Ships from: USA

Typical Gallery Price: $200.00

$87.88

SOLD

Category: Chinese Character & Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls

Bushido Code of the Samurai
Japanese Calligraphy Horizontal Wall Scroll


Bushido Code of the Samurai - Japanese Calligraphy Horizontal Wall Scroll

Approximate Measurements

Painting: 95.9cm x 31.7cm  ≈  37¾" x 12½"

Silk Border: 151.8cm x 41.3cm  ≈  59¾" x 16¼"

Information about how this Asian painting is mounted

道士武

Note: These Kanji are written horizontally from right-to-left in the ancient traditional way (opposite of English).

The Way of the Samurai

This is a special edition. This horizontal wall scroll must be hung carefully between two nails or hooks. Those nails or hooks must be placed perfectly so the scroll is taunt but not too tight as to tear it.
See our Bushido Way of the Samurai page for more custom Japanese calligraphy options related to Bushido concepts.

During the 9th and 12th centuries in Japan the warrior class were known as samurai, also called bushi (knights/warriors - bushi hence bushido).
They emerged from the provinces of Japan to become the ruling class until their decline and later total abolition in 1876 during the Meiji Era.

These warriors were men who lived by Bushido; it was their way of life. The samurai's loyalty to the emperor and his overlord or daimyo were unsurpassed. They were trustworthy and honest. They lived frugal lives with no interest in riches and material things, but rather in honor and pride. They were men of true valor. Samurai had no fear of death. They would enter any battle no matter the odds. To die in battle would only bring honor to one's family and one's lord.

The actual code was passed on verbally to each generation of samurai, but over time, seven chief virtues emerged, and became the written form of Bushido.

Of course, credit is generally given that a Chinese man (known in the west as "Confucius") is the father of these values in China. Therefore, you'll find these concepts belong not only to the Japanese samurai, but have spread throughout Asia. Variations of these soldierly and moral values can be seen in China, Korea, Vietnam, and elsewhere.


Japanese Master Calligrapher Michiko Imai Signature

Authentic Japanese Calligraphy by Japanese Master Calligrapher Michiko Imai

Japanese Master Calligrapher Michiko Imai

Japanese Master Calligrapher Michiko Imai.
Shown here crafting her artwork which follows
a 1600-year Japanese tradition.

????? (Imai, Michiko) was born and raised in Nara, Japan. She began her studies of Calligraphy at the age of four at Baikou Calligraphy School. When Michiko was 25 years old, she received a membership to the Tenshin Kai (calligraphy society) and her life as a calligrapher began. Michiko progressed to the next level, becoming a member of the Cho-ko Guild which is the most prestigious calligraphy society in Japan. During her apprenticeship, she taught calligraphy and studied the art of Japanese silk scroll making (hyougu) at Mizuno Hyougu-ten.

Bushido Japanese Kanji calligraphy wall scroll

A sample of her work:
Bushido - Kaisho style

In 1998, Master Calligrapher Michiko Imai was awarded the highest rank in Japanese Calligraphy of Shihan. She currently holds a guild licence for teaching both calligraphy and instructing teachers to teach calligraphy.

Michiko Imai is among the few to have won multiple best of category awards in national competitions (Japan). Her work has been displayed at the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, Osaka Municipal Museum Of Art, Nara City Museum Of Art and Kyoto Municipal Museum Of Art.

In Addition to being a calligrapher, she is also an "artisan artist" (Hyougushi). Ms. Imai now resides half of the year in Japan and the other in Boston.

It should be noted that Master Imai signs her artwork with the "art name" of 美嶂 (Beautiful Cliff/Mountain). So this is what you will see just before the red signature stamp on her calligraphy pieces.


Japanese calligraphy painting combo

Kana Sosho
painting combination.

Japanese Kana calligraphy

Kana style Japanese calligraphy

Japanese love calligraphy

Single-Kanji
Love
calligraphy
in Kai-Gyosho
style.


Completely handmade, yet affordable...

If you've shopped much for Japanese calligraphy, you know that it generally starts from $200 and up. In fact, I can show you a catalog full of Japanese calligraphy priced at $2000 and up (someone sent it to me, thinking that I'd like to blow $12,000 on a wall scroll).

So how can we offer authentic Japanese calligraphy for such a low price? The short answer is that I work with people who are more interested in the art than getting rich. Master Michiko Imai has given us a very special opportunity to offer her artwork at a price that most people can afford.
The second part of the equation is the fact that we are building all of our own wall scrolls by hand in our workshop in Beijing.


All of this means you get high-quality artwork with no "middle man markup".

Japanese Master Calligrapher Michiko Imai
Japanese Master Calligrapher Michiko Imai
Japanese Master Calligrapher Michiko Imai gives a Japanese calligraphy class

Master Imai, holding a Japanese calligraphy class in Boston.

This item was listed or modified
Sep 15th, 2012

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Gary's random little things about China:

Vehicular and Pedestrian Yielding Quotient

When crossing a street, or merely making your way down the road, there is a certain law of physics that comes into play: When two forces meet, one must yield.

Here is the general yielding scheme in China:

Cars yield to big buses and trucks.

Bicycles and cars mingle and narrowly avoid each other. When push comes to shove, the bicyclist knows he will lose the fight. But the car driver knows that the bicycle will scratch his car when he runs it over, and will only yield on that premise.

Cars will not yield to, but are required to avoid pedestrians. When you hit a pedestrian at low speed, it does very little damage, and unlike a bicycle, will almost never scratch your car. Therefore pedestrians are given a smaller margin.
Note: Regardless of green or red stop lights, it is against the law to come to a complete stop when making a right hand turn in China (no matter how many pedestrians are in the way). The rule is "honk and avoid, then continue on your way".

Motor scooters yield to no one, not even when they are being driven on a pedestrian-filled sidewalk. Motor scooters zip around like they have nothing to lose - this may be true, as smaller motor scooters require no license of any kind and are very cheap.

If you are driving on the wrong side of the road, or going the wrong way on a one-way street, you do not have to yield to anyone, no matter what kind of vehicle you are operating.

Cars will yield (not by choice) to pedestrians crossing the street in numbers greater than 10 (it is best in China to invite 9 of your friends for an outing if you plan to cross a lot of streets).

In lieu of yielding, drivers are required to honk at pedestrians. I swear to God, this is the law! It's a safety issue: If you are passing a pedestrian that is walking on the side of the road, you are required by law to honk at them to let them know you are there.
Note: All streets in Chinese cities, sound like a New York traffic jam 24 hours per day with all this "safety honking".

I have not been able to find a traffic law that states you must yield to ambulances. And in practice, very few drivers do.

When two large vehicles come face to face on a narrow roadway, and neither can pass, neither will yield. They will sit there, honking at each other for a while. After several cars are lined up behind them, they will decide that they should have yielded earlier, and start to back up. This is to the great dismay of all the cars behind them who will honk in unison. This could go on for an hour or more. It ends when a police officer arrives, tells both drivers what idiots they are, issues tickets to both of them, and then systematically makes the situation worse by insisting that all the smaller cars turn around (rather than back up) by making 162-point turns in the small roadway. Eventually, two of the cars will hit each other, for which both drivers will be cited and fined on the spot.

Typical Gallery Price: $200.00

$87.88

SOLD

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