Hand Painted
Ships from: USA

 This artwork is
100% hand-painted.

Typical Gallery Price: $180.00

Your Price: $79.88


Category: Chinese Character & Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls

Awesome Power
Chinese Calligraphy Wall Scroll


Awesome Power - Chinese Calligraphy Wall Scroll
125.8cm
49½"
50.3cm
19¾"

Approximate Measurements

Painting: 31.9cm x 65.3cm  ≈  12½" x 25¾"

Silk Scroll: 41.3cm x 125.8cm  ≈  16¼" x 49½"

Width at Wooden Knobs: 50.3cm  ≈  19¾"

Information about caring for your new Wall Scroll
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雄
風

Great Leader / Awesome Force / Powerful Wind

Awesome Power - Chinese Calligraphy Wall Scroll close up view

Close up view of the calligraphy artwork mounted to this silk brocade wall scroll

The Chinese characters written on this scroll say "Xiong Feng". Separately, these characters mean "strong" and "wind". But together they create a title that means, "powerful" or "awesome" (especially in regards to a leader).

This wall scroll suggests that you are a leader of great physical and mental strength. This title is often bestowed upon the tiger in China. This is because the tiger is seen as the king of the animal world, full of awesome strength and majesty.


Written by Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping in a "personal caoshu" (chaos cursive) style using Chinese ink on handmade tan xuan paper with gold flakes. The artwork was then mounted to a handmade silk brocade wall scroll at our workshop in Beijing.


Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping is a famous calligrapher in Beijing. He's been published and interviewed in magazines numerous times. In Beijing, a city known for its high level of scholarship and calligraphy, Xing An-Ping is rated in the top 200 living masters of calligraphy.

Some random facts about Master Xing:

Master Xing is not only an expert in nine different Chinese scripts, but also can write any of more than 40,000 characters in the Chinese and Japanese lexicons, including alternate forms, without reference to any books. This is very rare, as most calligraphers must consult special reference books to find rare and alternate forms of many characters. Most literate Chinese people of this generation can only read 5000 characters, and perhaps write 3000 of them without reference.

His belief is that art is more important than politics. Therefore, his is more than willing to write Japanese words and phrases. This is rare for a Chinese calligrapher, as most still hold strong distaste for Japan due to the atrocities in Nanking (Nanjing) before and during WWII.

He believes that all religions should be respected. While he sees himself as a Buddhist, and meditates before writing all of this calligraphy, he carefully creates Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and other religious calligraphy artwork upon request of customers in China and around the world.

Unlike many or most Chinese men, Master Xing does not smoke or drink. He eats mostly vegetables and not too much meat (Yes, contrary to popular belief, many Buddhists do eat meat - in moderation). His healthy lifestyle is probably why he is in his mid-50's, but looks like he is 40.

He speaks in sophisticated Chinese - they way you expect a doctor or professor to speak. My Chinese is at about the level of a 3rd-grader, so he has to "dumb down" his Chinese when he and I have a conversation.

Master Calligrapher Xing Anping and I at his studio in Beijing

Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping and I
visit at his studio in the
Haidian District of Beijing.


A summary of when we met and shared philosophies...

When I met Master Xing, in early 2005, I had already looked through the studios of almost 100 top-rated calligraphers, in search of the one I wanted to work with (a process that took two years). I liked the quality and styles I saw in his studio, and we sat down to talk. I told him of my plan to bring very personal and customized Chinese calligraphy to the masses. We talked about catalogs of high-level calligraphy that sells for $2000-$5000 for a single wall scroll. This is fine for a collector of Asian calligraphy, but it puts it out of reach of the common people. I told him that my plan was to offer a beautiful product at an affordable price, while at the same time, educating people about calligraphy and Chinese culture.
He agreed to lower his price in favor of these ideas:
1. His artwork being displayed in over 60 countries around the world.
2. His part in providing education and knowledge about this special art.
3. The fact that I was going to potentially keep him busy with lots of interesting projects.

The final philosophy is, "The legacy of this artwork far outweighs the money received for creating it".

I also found a kindred spirit with Master Xing in the fact that he cares as much about quality as I do. I've always been picky about quality, and thus spent years searching for the best scroll maker in all of China. When I found him, I helped him set up the best mounting workshop ever. We even imported special saws from Sweden, had huge custom glass-top tables made, and recently bought the largest and best artwork press that they make.
Before Master Xing would work with me, he sent me away with a piece of his raw calligraphy to have mounted as a scroll at our workshop. Master Xing had his own favorite mounter, and knowing the quality issues (or lack there of), he wanted to make sure his artwork was going to be mounted using the best materials and craftsmanship. When I brought the scroll back a few days later, he said, "Wow, this is better than mine". He now gets his own artwork for domestic sale at his studio, mounted at our workshop.

Xing Anping writes his craft in his studio

The master calligrapher creates his craft using
traditional and classic materials.

Watching the master do his work

In the past few years, I have become very serious
in my appreciation of Asian calligraphy.
Just watching the way a good calligrapher gracefully
moves and pauses his brush can be mesmerizing.

This item was listed or modified
Feb 15th, 2014

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Gary's random little things about China:

More traffic tidbits:

Parking your car on the sidewalk is legal in most places in China. I am talking fully on the sidewalk, and fully blocking the sidewalk, so that nobody can walk there at all. After all, there is a perfectly good roadway for pedestrians and cars to share just past the edge of the sidewalk - right?
In many urban areas, there is a sidewalk parking attendant who will ensure that you park in such a way that no one can use the sidewalk at all. They will also charge a fee of 2 Yuan (26 cents) for up to a full day of sidewalk parking privileges.

The green light means "go". The Yellow light means "20 more cars should enter the intersection". The red light means "5 more cars enter the intersection and become a nuisense to pedestrians trying to cross the street".
Actually, the green light means "Try to go, but you'll probably have to wait for the yellow or red light before you get your chance".

If you get in a car accident, it's best to argue briefly with the other driver, and then both drive away. When the police get involved, everyone gets fined, and someone might lose their license. The fines are generally higher than what it will cost to fix your car, so hanging around to exchange insurance information is rare in minor fender-benders.
If your car is too damaged to drive away, you are screwed. The police own and operate all of the tow trucks in most Chinese cities. You will be fined, charged for towing, charged an impound fee, and may lose your license.

On long stretches of highway, police checkpoints are occasionally set up. They may be stopping drivers and summarily fining them for wearing sunglasses or talking on a mobile phone while driving. However, in the next stretch of highway, another police checkpoint may be issuing fines for driving without sunglasses.

Under certain circumstances, and if you are really unlucky, drivers who get in injury accidents while drunk may be executed. If you are caught drinking and driving just once, you will be fined, and will probably lose your drivers license for the rest of your life.
Thus, drunk driving has become very rare in China.

Typical Gallery Price: $180.00

Your Price: $79.88


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