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Category: South Chinese Folk Art Paintings & Batiks

Ethnic Tribal Women Colorful Batik Wall Hanging Art


Ethnic Tribal Women Colorful Batik Wall Hanging Art
90cm
35½"
68cm
26¾"

Approximate Measurements

68cm x 90cm  ≈  26¾" x 35½"


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Tribal Ethnic Women Batik Wall Hanging Art

This colorful handmade batik features two beautiful women of southern China. They walk together carrying heavy bundles of supplies, balanced on their shoulders.

This is a more colorful form of batik which involves multiple dye colors and steps. There is a loomed cloth sleeve at the top where you can put a stick or small bamboo shaft (not included).


The story of how I came to find this batik art:

I find myself in the Province of Guizhou returning from exploring some small ethnic minority villages in the mountains near Kaili, my search for batik art continues. The village women could make the most wonderful ethnic clothing, but I can not find a creator of batiks. I find a bus to Kaili full of villagers, chickens, cargo, with other livestock in cages on the roof of the bus. I arrive in Kaili and find a bus to Guiyang realizing that is has been weeks of travel since I last bought a piece of art. From Guiyang I head to Anshun which is known for batik art. After 8 hours of buses and waiting for buses, I am strangely relieved to put on my heavy backpack again.

Batik Lady

One of the ladies that creates these wonderful batiks.

I spend the next day walking and hitching rides around the city, but while I find batiks in lots of little markets, I can't find the source... ...I want to know who makes these, I want to meet them and talk to them. The locals tell me that the batiks are made in the villages outside of town, but they won't say or don't know exactly where. I tell a man I am trying to find batik makers and he yells at the driver of a departing mini-bus to stop and tells me to get on the bus. The door of the bus closes before I can ask him where I am actually going.

The bus zips along a rough road for about two hours when it finally stops and everyone gets off. This was probably a minority village at some time in history, but now it is a small bustling town. I ask about batiks to some of the people on the street who seem to know very little about the bounty of which I seek. Suddenly a 3-wheel motorcycle taxi driver tugs on my arm after overhearing my conversation. "You need to go to Stone Village, I can take you", he says in a local dialect which seems to be related to Mandarin so I can understand him (just barely).

We drive that noisy motor-taxi for over an hour through some of the roughest dirt roads that I have ever seen in China. I thought we were going to tip over many times, but somehow we arrive at Stone Village. They rarely see foreigners in this remote village, and a flood of children come out to greet me each one shouting one of the only English words they know which is "Hello!".



The best way to get around Southern China

The best way to get around Southern China

I am quickly invited into several homes which double as workshops for the various handcrafts. After taking a good look at what is available, I stumble into a stone house to be greeted by a few ladies who seem to run the place. It is all here, from the hand loom to make the cloth, to the big pot of blue dye. I looked on the wall where they hang their prizes.

My eyes feast on the beautiful work. Some of the pieces are suitable for framing, others are tablecloth batiks, wall-hangings, and even batik dresses. This is what I've spent the last two weeks looking for. I finally found it! I'm so happy to see these colorful creations that I simply ask, "Would it be alright if I buy everything?". They gasp and gladly say yes. I load up all of the batik cloths into the moto-taxi after buying everything except the dresses. I return to Anshun after nightfall and prepare for my departure the next morning to Kunming and then on to Tibet in search of other treasures...

More about batik folk art:

Batik is a traditional Chinese folk art which combines painting and dyeing. It is created by dipping a special knife into melted wax and painting that wax on pieces of white cloth. The wax stays embedded in the cloth and often cracks after it cools. The cloth is then dyed and the dyes seep into the cracks and make fine lines. When the wax is boiled away, beautiful patterns appear on the cloth.

The history of batik can be traced back to the Western Han Dynasty (206 BC - 24 AD). It has been handed down from generation to generation among the ethnic people in Guizhou, a province in Southwest China.

Nobody knows how batik was invented, but a folk tale about a "batik girl" tells us something about it. The story goes that long ago, there was a girl living in a village called Anshun, in what is now Guizhou Province. She was fond of dyeing white cloth blue and purple. One day, while she was working, a bee happened to alight on her cloth and left a little wax.  After dying the cloth she found there was a white dot left which looked very pretty. Her finding led to the use of wax in dyeing and the birth of batik art

This item was listed or modified
Mar 11th, 2014

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Gary's random little things about China:

Vehicular and Pedestrian Yielding Quotient

When crossing a street, or merely making your way down the road, there is a certain law of physics that comes into play: When two forces meet, one must yield.

Here is the general yielding scheme in China:

Cars yield to big buses and trucks.

Bicycles and cars mingle and narrowly avoid each other. When push comes to shove, the bicyclist knows he will lose the fight. But the car driver knows that the bicycle will scratch his car when he runs it over, and will only yield on that premise.

Cars will not yield to, but are required to avoid pedestrians. When you hit a pedestrian at low speed, it does very little damage, and unlike a bicycle, will almost never scratch your car. Therefore pedestrians are given a smaller margin.
Note: Regardless of green or red stop lights, it is against the law to come to a complete stop when making a right hand turn in China (no matter how many pedestrians are in the way). The rule is "honk and avoid, then continue on your way".

Motor scooters yield to no one, not even when they are being driven on a pedestrian-filled sidewalk. Motor scooters zip around like they have nothing to lose - this may be true, as smaller motor scooters require no license of any kind and are very cheap.

If you are driving on the wrong side of the road, or going the wrong way on a one-way street, you do not have to yield to anyone, no matter what kind of vehicle you are operating.

Cars will yield (not by choice) to pedestrians crossing the street in numbers greater than 10 (it is best in China to invite 9 of your friends for an outing if you plan to cross a lot of streets).

In lieu of yielding, drivers are required to honk at pedestrians. I swear to God, this is the law! It's a safety issue: If you are passing a pedestrian that is walking on the side of the road, you are required by law to honk at them to let them know you are there.
Note: All streets in Chinese cities, sound like a New York traffic jam 24 hours per day with all this "safety honking".

I have not been able to find a traffic law that states you must yield to ambulances. And in practice, very few drivers do.

When two large vehicles come face to face on a narrow roadway, and neither can pass, neither will yield. They will sit there, honking at each other for a while. After several cars are lined up behind them, they will decide that they should have yielded earlier, and start to back up. This is to the great dismay of all the cars behind them who will honk in unison. This could go on for an hour or more. It ends when a police officer arrives, tells both drivers what idiots they are, issues tickets to both of them, and then systematically makes the situation worse by insisting that all the smaller cars turn around (rather than back up) by making 162-point turns in the small roadway. Eventually, two of the cars will hit each other, for which both drivers will be cited and fined on the spot.

Typical Gallery Price: $65.00

Your Price: $28.88