Custom Chinese "I Miss You" Symbols - Calligraphy Wall Scrolls

We have many options to create artwork with "I Miss You" characters on a wall scroll or portrait.

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. I Miss You
  2. Miss You Forever
  3. Missing / Yearning
  4. One Day Seems Like 1000 Years
  5. Alone / A Lone Person
  6. Alone with only your shadow for company
  7. Broken Mirror Rejoined
  8. Desire / Longing / Craving
  9. Filial Piety
10. Kindheartedness / Benevolence...
11. Lonely
12. Longing for Lover
13. Better Late Than Never


I Miss You

China wǒ xiǎng nǐ
I Miss You Wall Scroll

我想你 is the Chinese way to say "I miss you." It is said in the same word order in both English and Chinese.

Miss You Forever

China yǒng yuǎn xiǎng niàn nǐ
Miss You Forever Wall Scroll

永遠想念你 is how to write "missing you forever" in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "forever" or "eternally."
The third and forth characters mean "missing" or "longing for."
The last character means "you."

This might suggest that you are missing someone whom you will never see again (depending on how you read it, or in what context it is used).

Missing / Yearning

I miss you
Japan koishi garu
Missing / Yearning Wall Scroll

戀しがる is the most common Japanese verb for missing someone or yearning for someone (it could also be missing a place).

戀しがる is the shortest way to say, "I miss you" or "I yearn for you" in Japanese.

Breaking down the characters:
恋し (koishi) yearned for; longed for; missed (acts as an adjective in Japanese).
がる (garu) to feel, behavior (this represents emotion, and turns the whole word into a verb in Japanese).


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

One Day Seems Like 1000 Years

Japan ichi jitsu sen shuu
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb is really about missing someone.

一日千秋 is often used to express how hard it is to wait for someone's return, or to be away from someone.

Some will translate this as, "one day feels like a very long time," or "waiting for someone (something) is hard."

If we break down this Ichijitsusenshuu Kanji one-by-one, we get:
一 = one / a
日 = day / sun (can also represent time, or a date)
千 = 1000 / a thousand
秋 = autumn / fall

Together, 千秋 can mean, "autumn comes thousand times" (or 1000 years). It can also be read as 1000 periods of time.
So, you can read this as, "1 day is like 1000 years," or "1 day is like 1000 years." Either way, it relays the idea of heartache as you wait for someone that you miss.

Alone / A Lone Person

China dú zì yì rén
Alone / A Lone Person Wall Scroll

獨自一人 means "alone" in the context of a person by himself/herself.

Alone / A Lone Person

Japan dokuji
Alone / A Lone Person Wall Scroll

This Japanese word means "alone" in the context of a person by himself/herself. This can be translated as individual; solo; on one's own; by oneself.

Alone with only your shadow for company

China qióng qióng jié lì xíng yǐng xiāng diào
Alone with only your shadow for company Wall Scroll

This proverb is about the state of being as alone as you possibly can be. It can be translated as, "Alone with only your shadow for comfort/company."

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
China pò jìng chóng yuán
Broken Mirror Rejoined Wall Scroll

A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:


You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon but as for you, I see not a trace.


The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb in Chinese is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce) but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.

Desire / Longing / Craving

China
Japan yoku
Desire / Longing / Craving Wall Scroll

This character means desire, longing, appetite, wish, covetousness, greed, passion, desire, avarice, and craving.

This word is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja.

The context in which this character is used, determines whether the meaning is good or bad. As a single character on a wall scroll, you get to decide what the definition is to you (hopefully more toward desire than greed).


Japanese DesirePlease note that Japanese use a simplified version of this character - it also happens to be the same simplification used in mainland China. Click on the character to the right if you want the Japanese/Simplified version of desire.

Filial Piety

China xiào
Japan kou
Filial Piety Wall Scroll

This character represents filial piety. Some will define this in more common English as "respect for your parents and ancestors."

孝 is a subject deeply emphasized by the ancient philosophy and teachings of Confucius.

Some have included this in the list for the Bushido, although generally not considered part of the 7 core virtues of the warrior.

Note: This character is not the best of meanings when seen along as a single character. Some will read the single character form to mean "missing my dead ancestors." However, when written at part of Confucian tenets, or in the two-character word that means filial piety, the meaning is better or read differently (context is important for this character).

We suggest one of our other two-character filial piety entries instead of this one.


See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Filial Piety | Confucius

Kindheartedness / Benevolence
Humanity

China rén dé
Japan jintoku
Kindheartedness / Benevolence / Humanity Wall Scroll

These two characters create a word that can be translated as love, kindheartedness, benevolence and humanity.

The first character means benevolence by itself.
The second character means virtue or morality.

Japanese note: The second Kanji of this word has been slightly simplified (one tiny horizontal stroke removed). It is still readable for Japanese but if you select our Japanese calligrapher, expect that stroke to be missing on your wall scroll.

Lonely

China gū dú
Japan ko doku
Lonely Wall Scroll

孤獨 means lonely, solitude, loneliness, and lonesome.
In some context, it can mean reclusive, isolation, single or solo.

孤獨 is a Japanese word but not a good selection for a wall scroll.
In Chinese, this will relay a rather sad feeling to anyone who reads this calligraphy on your wall.


独The version shown to the left is the Traditional Chinese and ancient Japanese version. In modern Japan and China they often use a different more simplified version of the second character (as shown to the right). If you want this Japanese/Simplified version, please click on the character shown to the right instead of the button above.

Longing for Lover

China sī liàn
Longing for Lover Wall Scroll

思戀 is a term used for when you miss a lover. It suggests that you are separated (not by choice) and have longing for each other. It's a strong feeling of missing your lover.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King’s court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King’s ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin’s words.
Seeing the King’s displeasure with him and the King’s fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it’s never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
I Miss You 我想你wǒ xiǎng nǐ
wo3 xiang3 ni3
wo xiang ni
woxiangni
wo hsiang ni
wohsiangni
Miss You Forever 永遠想念你
永远想念你
yǒng yuǎn xiǎng niàn nǐ
yong3 yuan3 xiang3 nian4 ni3
yong yuan xiang nian ni
yongyuanxiangnianni
yung yüan hsiang nien ni
yungyüanhsiangnienni
Missing
Yearning
戀しがる
恋しがる
koishi garu
koishigaru
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years 一日千秋ichi jitsu sen shuu
ichijitsusenshuu
ichi jitsu sen shu
ichijitsusenshu
Alone
A Lone Person
獨自一人
独自一人
dú zì yì rén
du2 zi4 yi4 ren2
du zi yi ren
duziyiren
tu tzu i jen
tutzuijen
Alone
A Lone Person
獨自
独自
dokuji
Alone with only your shadow for company 煢煢孑立形影相吊
茕茕孑立形影相吊
qióng qióng jié lì xíng yǐng xiāng diào
qiong2 qiong2 jie2 li4 xing2 ying3 xiang1 diao4
qiong qiong jie li xing ying xiang diao
ch`iung ch`iung chieh li hsing ying hsiang tiao
chiung chiung chieh li hsing ying hsiang tiao
Broken Mirror Rejoined 破鏡重圓
破镜重圆
pò jìng chóng yuán
po4 jing4 chong2 yuan2
po jing chong yuan
pojingchongyuan
p`o ching ch`ung yüan
pochingchungyüan
po ching chung yüan
Desire
Longing
Craving

yokuyù / yu4 / yu
Filial Piety kou / koxiào / xiao4 / xiao hsiao
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.