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Mandarin Mandarin Chinese information.
Wade Giles Old Wade-Giles romanization used only in Taiwan.
Japanese Japanese information.
Buddhist definition. Note: May not apply to all sects.
 Definition may be different outside of Buddhism.

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If shown, 2nd row of characters is Simplified Chinese.

Characters Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition


see styles
Mandarin dòng / dong4
Taiwan tung
Japanese dou / do / どう
Chinese (of something) to move; to set in movement; to displace; to touch; to make use of; to stir (emotions); to alter; abbr. for 動詞|动词[dong4 ci2], verb
Japanese motion; change; confusion; (female given name) Yurugi
Move, stir, motion, mutable; movement arises from the nature of wind which is the cause of motion.

see styles
Mandarin de / de
Taiwan te
Japanese chi / ち    ji / じ
Chinese earth; ground; field; place; land; CL:片[pian4]; -ly; structural particle: used before a verb or adjective, linking it to preceding modifying adverbial adjunct
Japanese (n,n-suf) (1) earth; ground; land; soil; (2) place; (3) territory; (4) (See 天地無用) bottom (of a package, book, etc.); (5) (See 五大・1,土・ど・2) earth (one of the five elements); (1) (abbreviation) ground; land; earth; soil; (2) the region in question; the local area; (3) skin; (4) texture; fabric; material; weave; (5) base; background; (6) one's true nature; (7) narrative (i.e. descriptive part of a story); (8) real life; actuality; (9) (in the game of go) captured territory; (10) (See 地謡) noh chorus; (11) (in Japanese dance) accompaniment music; (12) (in Japanese music) basic phrase (usu. repetitive); (13) base part (of multiple shamisens); (surname) Hamadzi; (surname) Chitoku; (surname) Chizaki; (surname) Chi; (surname) Shouchi; (surname) Koochi
pṛthivī, 鉢里體尾 the earth, ground; bhūmi, 歩弭 the earth, place, situation; talima, 託史麽 (or 託吏麽) ground, site; explained by 土地 earth, ground; 能生 capable of producing; 所依 that on which things rely. It is also the spiritual rank, position, or character attained by a Bodhisattva as a result of 住 remaining and developing in a given state in order to attain this 地 rank; v. 十住; 住位 and 十地.


see styles
Mandarin/ qi4
Taiwan ch`i / chi
Japanese ki / き
Chinese gas; air; smell; weather; to make angry; to annoy; to get angry; vital energy; qi
Japanese (out-dated kanji) (1) spirit; mind; heart; (2) nature; disposition; (3) motivation; intention; (4) mood; feelings; (5) ambience; atmosphere; mood
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

see styles
Mandarin kōng / kong1
Taiwan k`ung / kung
Japanese kuu / ku / くう    kara / から
Chinese to empty; vacant; unoccupied; space; leisure; free time; empty; air; sky; in vain
Japanese (1) empty air; sky; (2) {Buddh} shunyata; emptiness; the lack of an immutable intrinsic nature within any phenomenon; (3) (abbreviation) (See 空軍) air force; (noun or adjectival noun) (4) fruitlessness; meaninglessness; (5) (See 五大・1) void (one of the five elements); (can be adjective with の) (6) {math} empty (e.g. set); (noun - becomes adjective with の) emptiness; vacuum; blank; (female given name) Ron; (personal name) Hiroshi; (female given name) Hikari; (female given name) Haruka; (female given name) Noa; (surname) Sorasaki; (female given name) Sora; (female given name) Sukai; (female given name) Shieru; (personal name) Kuukai; (surname, female given name) Kuu; (female given name) Kanata; (female given name) Kasumi; (female given name) Urue; (surname, female given name) Aki; (female given name) Aoi
śūnya, empty, void, hollow, vacant, nonexistent. śūnyatā, 舜若多, vacuity, voidness, emptiness, non-existence, immateriality, perhaps spirituality, unreality, the false or illusory nature of all existence, the seeming 假 being unreal. The doctrine that all phenomena and the ego have no reality, but are composed of a certain number of skandhas or elements, which disintegrate. The void, the sky, space. The universal, the absolute, complete abstraction without relativity. There are classifications into 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 11, 13, 16, and 18 categories. The doctrine is that all things are compounds, or unstable organisms, possessing no self-essence, i.e. are dependent, or caused, come into existence only to perish. The underlying reality, the principle of eternal relativity, or non-infinity, i.e. śūnya, permeates all phenomena making possible their evolution. From this doctrine the Yogācārya school developed the idea of the permanent reality, which is Essence of Mind, the unknowable noumenon behind all phenomena, the entity void of ideas and phenomena, neither matter nor mind, but the root of both.

see styles
Mandarin shēn / shen1
Taiwan shen
Japanese mi / み
Chinese body; life; oneself; personally; one's morality and conduct; the main part of a structure or body; pregnant; classifier for sets of clothes: suit, twinset; Kangxi radical 158
Japanese (1) body; (2) oneself; (3) one's place; one's position; (4) main part; meat (as opposed to bone, skin, etc.); wood (as opposed to bark); blade (as opposed to its handle); container (as opposed to its lid); (surname) Misaki
kāya; tanu; deha. The body; the self.; Two forms of body; there are numerous pairs, e. g. (1) (a) 分段身 The varied forms of the karmic or ordinary mortal body, or being; (b) 變易身 the transformable, or spiritual body. (2) (a) 生身 The earthly body of the Buddha; (b) 化身 hinirmāṇakāya, which may take any form at will. (3) (a) 生身 his earthly body; (b) 法身 his moral and mental nature—a Hīnayāna definition, but Mahāyāna takes his earthly nirmāṇakāya as the 生身 and his dharmakāya or that and his saṃbhogakāya as 法身. (4) 眞應二身 The dharmakāya and nirmāṇakāya. (5) (a) 實相身 The absolute truth, or light, of the Buddha, i. e. the dharmakāya; (b) 爲物身 the functioning or temporal body. (6) (a) 眞身 the dharmakāya and saṃbhogakāya; (b) 化身 the nirmāṇakāya. (7) (a) 常身 his permanent or eternal body; (b) 無常身 his temporal body. (8) (a) 實身 and 化身 idem 二色身.

see styles
Mandarin qīng / qing1
Taiwan ch`ing / ching
Japanese haru / はる    seigai / segai / せいがい    sei / se / せい    jou / jo / じょう    shou / sho / しょう    aoyanagi / あおやなぎ    aoyagi / あおやぎ    aomine / あおみね    aozaki / あおざき    aosaki / あおさき    aogi / あおぎ    aoi / あおい    ao / あお    aeyagi / あえやぎ
Chinese nature's color; green or blue; greenish black; youth; young (of people); abbr. for 青海[Qing1 hai3], Qinghai Province
Japanese (n,adj-no,adj-na) (1) blue; (2) green; (3) (abbreviation) green light; (4) black (horse coat color); (prefix) (5) immature; unripe; young; (female given name) Haru; (given name) Seigai; (surname, female given name) Sei; (female given name) Jou; (given name) Shou; (surname) Aoyanagi; (surname) Aoyagi; (personal name) Aomine; (surname) Aozaki; (surname) Aosaki; (surname) Aogi; (surname, female given name) Aoi; (surname, female given name) Ao; (surname) Aeyagi

三諦


三谛

see styles
Mandarin sān dì / san1 di4
Taiwan san ti
Japanese santai;sandai / さんたい;さんだい
Japanese {Buddh} (in Tendai) threefold truth (all things are void; all things are temporary; all things are in the middle state between these two)
The three dogmas. The "middle" school of Tiantai says 卽空, 卽假. 卽中 i.e. 就是空, 假, 中; (a) by 空śūnya is meant that things causally produced are intheir essential nature unreal (or immaterial) 實空無; (b) 假, though thingsare unreal in their essential nature their derived forms are real; (c) 中;but both are one, being of the one 如 reality. These three dogmas arefounded on a verse of Nāgārjuna's— 因緣所生法, 我說卽是空 亦爲是假名, 亦是中道義 "All causally produced phenomena, I say, areunreal, Are but a passing name, and indicate the 'mean'." There are otherexplanations— the 圓教 interprets the 空 and 假 as 中; the 別教 makes 中 independent. 空 is the all, i.e. the totality of all things, and is spokenof as the 眞 or 實 true, or real; 假 is the differentiation of all thingsand is spoken of as 俗 common, i.e. things as commonly named; 中 is theconnecting idea which makes a unity of both, e.g. "all are but parts of onestupendous whole." The 中 makes all and the all into one whole, unifying thewhole and its parts. 空 may be taken as the immaterial, the undifferentiatedall, the sum of existences, by some as the tathāgatagarbha 如來藏; 假as theunreal, or impermanent, the material or transient form, the temporal thatcan be named, the relative or discrete; 中 as the unifier, which places eachin the other and all in all. The "shallower" 山外 school associated 空 and 中 with the noumenal universe as opposed to the phenomenal and illusoryexistence represented by 假. The "profounder" 山内 school teaches that allthree are aspects of the same; threefold truth

人性

see styles
Mandarin rén xìng / ren2 xing4
Taiwan jen hsing
Japanese jinsei / jinse / じんせい
Chinese human nature; humanity; human; the totality of human attributes
Japanese human nature; instinct; humanity; humanism

人情

see styles
Mandarin rén qíng / ren2 qing2
Taiwan jen ch`ing / jen ching
Japanese ninjou / ninjo / にんじょう
Chinese human emotions; social relationship; friendship; favor; a good turn
Japanese (1) humanity; empathy; kindness; sympathy; (2) human nature; common sense; customs and manners
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

化身

see styles
Mandarin huà shēn / hua4 shen1
Taiwan hua shen
Japanese keshin / けしん
Chinese incarnation; reincarnation; embodiment (of abstract idea); personification
Japanese (n,vs,adj-no) {Buddh} incarnation; impersonation; personification; avatar
nirmāṇakāya, 應身, 應化身; 變化身 The third characteristic or power of the trikāya 三身, a Buddha's metamorphosic body, which has power to assume any shape to propagate the Truth. Some interpret the term as connoting pan-Buddha, that all nature in its infinite variety is the phenomenal 佛身 Buddha-body. A narrower interpretation is his appearance in human form expressed by 應身, while 化身 is used for his manifold other forms of appearances.

參悟


参悟

see styles
Mandarin cān wù / can1 wu4
Taiwan ts`an wu / tsan wu
Chinese to comprehend (the nature of things etc); to achieve enlightenment

天地

see styles
Mandarin tiān dì / tian1 di4
Taiwan t`ien ti / tien ti
Japanese tenchi(p);ametsuchi / てんち(P);あめつち
Chinese heaven and earth; world; scope; field of activity
Japanese (1) heaven and earth; the universe; nature; top and bottom; realm; sphere; world; (2) (てんち only) top and bottom; (3) (あめつち only) gods of heaven and earth; (surname) Amachi
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

天恩

see styles
Japanese tenon / てんおん
Japanese blessings of heaven; favour of emperor; favor of emperor; divination's luckiest day; blessings of nature

天恵

see styles
Japanese tenkei / tenke / てんけい
Japanese Heaven's blessing; gift of nature; natural resources; (given name) Tenkei; (female given name) Amae

真如

see styles
Mandarin zhēn rú / zhen1 ru2
Taiwan chen ju
Japanese shinnyo / しんにょ
Chinese Tathata
Japanese {Buddh} tathata (the ultimate nature of all things); (female given name) Mayuki; (surname) Majo; (surname, female given name) Shinnyo

神明

see styles
Mandarin shén míng / shen2 ming2
Taiwan shen ming
Japanese shinmei / shinme / しんめい    shinmyou / shinmyo / しんみょう
Chinese deities; gods
Japanese (1) deity; god; (2) (See 天照大神) Amaterasu (as an enshrined deity); {Buddh} spirits of heaven and earth; (surname) Jinmei; (surname, given name) Jinmyou; (place-name, surname) Shinmei; (surname) Shinmyou
The spirits of heaven and earth, the gods; also the intelligent or spiritual nature; intelligence

空無


空无

see styles
Mandarin kōng wú / kong1 wu2
Taiwan k`ung wu / kung wu
Japanese kūmu
Unreality, or immateriality, of things, which is defined as nothing existing of independent or self-contained nature; emptiness

自然

see styles
Mandarin ran  / ran2 
Taiwan ran 
Japanese shizen / しぜん
Chinese nature; natural; naturally
Japanese (1) nature; (noun or adjectival noun) (2) natural; spontaneous; (adv,adv-to) (3) naturally; spontaneously; (female given name) Minori; (female given name) Mizuki; (female given name) Neito; (given name) Jinen; (surname, given name) Shizen; (female given name) Kokoro
svayaṃbhū, also 自爾; 法爾 self-existing, the self-existent; Brahmā, Viṣṇu, and others; in Chinese it is 'self-so', so of itself, natural, of course, spontaneous. It also means uncaused existence, certain sects of heretics 自然外道 denying Buddhist cause and effect and holding that things happen spontaneously.

菩薩


菩萨

see styles
Mandarin pú sà / pu2 sa4
Taiwan p`u sa / pu sa
Japanese bosatsu(p);bosachi(ok) / ぼさつ(P);ぼさち(ok)
Chinese Bodhisattva (Buddhism)
Japanese (n,n-suf) (1) {Buddh} bodhisattva; one who has reached enlightenment but vows to save all beings before becoming a buddha; (2) High Monk (title bestowed by the imperial court); (3) (See 本地垂迹説) title bestowed to Shinto kami in manifestation theory; (surname) Mizoro
bodhisattva, cf. 菩提薩埵. While the idea is not foreign to Hīnayāna, its extension of meaning is one of the chief marks of Mahāyāna. 'The Bodhisattva is indeed the characteristic feature of the Mahāyāna.' Keith. According to Mahāyāna the Hinayanists, i.e. the śrāvaka and pratyekabuddha, seek their own salvation, while the bodhisattva's aim is the salvation of others and of all. The earlier intp. of bodhisattva was 大道心衆生 all beings with mind for the truth; later it became 大覺有情 conscious beings of or for the great intelligence, or enlightenment. It is also intp. in terms of leadership, heroism, etc. In general it is a Mahayanist seeking Buddhahood, but seeking it altruistically; whether monk or layman, he seeks enlightenment to enlighten others, and he will sacrifice himself to save others; he is devoid of egoism and devoted to helping others. All conscious beings having the Buddha-nature are natural bodhisattvas, but require to undergo development. The mahāsattva is sufficiently advanced to become a Buddha and enter nirvāṇa, but according to his vow he remains in the realm of incarnation to save all conscious beings. A monk should enter on the arduous course of discipline which leads to Bodhisattvahood and Buddhahood.

見性


见性

see styles
Mandarin jiàn xìng / jian4 xing4
Taiwan chien hsing
Japanese kenshou / kensho / けんしょう
Japanese self-awareness; consciousness of one's own character
To behold the Buddha-nature within oneself, a common saying of the Chan (Zen) or Intuitive School; to see the (buddha-)nature

開覺


开觉

see styles
Mandarin kāi jué / kai1 jue2
Taiwan k`ai chüeh / kai chüeh
Japanese kaikaku
To arouse, awaken; to allow the original Buddha-nature to open and enlighten the mind; to awaken

魂魄

see styles
Mandarin hún pò / hun2 po4
Taiwan hun p`o / hun po
Japanese konpaku / こんぱく
Chinese soul
Japanese soul; spirit; ghost
Animus and anima; the spiritual nature or mind, and the animal soul; the two are defined as mind and body or mental and physical, the invisible soul inhabiting the visible body, the former being celestial, the latter terrestrial.

大自然

see styles
Mandarin dà zì rán / da4 zi4 ran2
Taiwan ta tzu jan
Japanese daishizen / だいしぜん
Chinese nature (the natural world)
Japanese nature; Mother Nature

精神性

see styles
Mandarin jīng shén xìng / jing1 shen2 xing4
Taiwan ching shen hsing
Japanese seishinsei / seshinse / せいしんせい
Chinese spirituality; mental; nervous; psychogenic
Japanese spirituality; spiritual nature

天人合一

see styles
Mandarin tiān rén hé yī / tian1 ren2 he2 yi1
Taiwan t`ien jen ho i / tien jen ho i
Chinese oneness of heaven and humanity; the theory that man is an integral part of nature

物の哀れ

see styles
Japanese mononoaware / もののあわれ    mononoahare / もののあはれ
Japanese (out-dated or obsolete kana usage) (exp,n) (kana only) mono no aware; appreciation of the fleeting nature of beauty; pathos of things; strong aesthetic sense

花鳥風月

see styles
Japanese kachoufuugetsu / kachofugetsu / かちょうふうげつ
Japanese (1) (yoji) (See 花鳥諷詠) beauties of nature; the traditional themes of natural beauty in Japanese aesthetics; (2) artistic pursuits involving nature themes

see styles
Mandarin xìng / xing4
Taiwan hsing
Japanese sei / se / せい    shou / sho / しょう
Chinese nature; character; property; quality; attribute; sexuality; sex; gender; suffix forming adjective from verb; suffix forming noun from adjective, corresponding to -ness or -ity; essence; CL:個|个[ge4]
Japanese (1) nature (of a person); (2) sex; (3) gender; (suffix) (4) (indicating quality or condition) -ty; -ity; -ness; -cy; (n,n-suf) (1) nature (of a person or thing); (2) {Buddh} that which does not change according to external influences; (surname) Shou
svabhāva, prakṛti, pradhāna. The nature intp. as embodied, causative, unchanging; also as independent or self-dependent; fundamental nature behind the manifestation or expression. Also, the Buddha-nature immanent in all beings, the Buddha heart or mind.

see styles
Mandarin/ su4
Taiwan su
Japanese so / そ    su / す
Chinese raw silk; white; plain, unadorned; vegetarian (food); essence; nature; element; constituent; usually; always; ever
Japanese (adj-na,n,adj-no) (1) plain, white silk; (2) {math} (See 互いに素) prime; (adj-no,n) (1) plain; unadorned; undecorated; unadulterated; au naturel; (prefix) (2) (derogatory term) (before a noun) mere; poor; (3) (before an adjective) exceedingly; (given name) Motoi; (female given name) Moto; (personal name) Hajime; (female given name) Tada; (surname) So; (female given name) Sunao; (personal name) Suzu; (surname) Suzaki; (surname) Susaki
Original colour or state; plain, white; heretofore, usual; translit. su.; To keep to vegetarian diet; vegetarian; simple


see styles
Mandarin zhì / zhi4
Taiwan chih
Japanese tachi / たち    shitsu / しつ    shichi / しち
Chinese character; nature; quality; plain; to pawn; pledge; hostage; to question; Taiwan pr. [zhi2]
Japanese quality; nature (of person); (n,n-suf) quality; (See 質に入れる・しちにいれる) collateral; pledge; pawned article; (given name) Tadashi
Substance, matter; to substantiate, to confront; substantial honest, sound; translit. ci, ce; disposition

天性

see styles
Mandarin tiān xìng / tian1 xing4
Taiwan t`ien hsing / tien hsing
Japanese tensei / tense / てんせい
Chinese nature; innate tendency
Japanese (n-adv,n-t) nature; natural constitution; innate disposition

天生

see styles
Mandarin tiān shēng / tian1 sheng1
Taiwan t`ien sheng / tien sheng
Japanese tensei / tense / てんせい
Chinese nature; disposition; innate; natural
Japanese naturally occurring; nature; disposition; vocation; calling; (given name) Tensei; (female given name) Ten'i; (place-name, surname) Amou

心性

see styles
Mandarin xīn xìng / xin1 xing4
Taiwan hsin hsing
Japanese shinsei / shinse / しんせい
Chinese one's nature; temperament
Japanese mind; disposition; nature
Immutable mind-corpus, or mind-nature, the self-existing fundamental pure mind, the all, the Tathāgata-garbha, or 如來藏心; 自性淸淨心; also described in the 起信論 Awakening of Faith as immortal 不生不滅. Another definition identifies 心 with 性 saying 性卽是心, 心卽是佛 the nature is the mind, and mind is Buddha; another, that mind and nature are the same when 悟 awake and understanding, but differ when 迷 in illusion; and further, in reply to the statement that the Buddha-nature is eternal but the mind not eternal, it is said, the nature is like water, the mind like ice, illusion turns nature to mental ice form, awakening melts it back to its proper nature.

性情

see styles
Mandarin xìng qíng / xing4 qing2
Taiwan hsing ch`ing / hsing ching
Japanese seijou / sejo / せいじょう
Chinese nature; temperament
Japanese nature; disposition

性格

see styles
Mandarin xìng gé / xing4 ge2
Taiwan hsing ko
Japanese seikaku / sekaku / せいかく
Chinese nature; disposition; temperament; character; CL:個|个[ge4]
Japanese character; personality; disposition; nature

性質


性质

see styles
Mandarin xìng zhì / xing4 zhi4
Taiwan hsing chih
Japanese seishitsu / seshitsu / せいしつ
Chinese nature; characteristic; CL:個|个[ge4]
Japanese nature; property; disposition

本性

see styles
Mandarin běn xìng / ben3 xing4
Taiwan pen hsing
Japanese honshou(p);honsei / honsho(p);honse / ほんしょう(P);ほんせい
Chinese natural instincts; nature; inherent quality
Japanese true character; real nature
The spirit one possesses by nature; hence, the Buddha-nature; the Buddha-nature within; one's own nature; original nature

本質


本质

see styles
Mandarin běn zhì / ben3 zhi4
Taiwan pen chih
Japanese honshitsu / ほんしつ
Chinese essence; nature; innate character; intrinsic quality
Japanese (noun - becomes adjective with の) essence; true nature; substance; reality
Original substance, the substance itself; any real object of the senses; the raw appearance

真性

see styles
Mandarin zhēn xìng / zhen1 xing4
Taiwan chen hsing
Japanese shinsei / shinse / しんせい
Chinese real; the nature of something
Japanese (1) inborn nature; (can be adjective with の) (2) genuine; intrinsic; essential

造化

see styles
Mandarin zào huà / zao4 hua4
Taiwan tsao hua
Japanese zouka / zoka / ぞうか
Chinese good luck; Nature (as the mother of all things)
Japanese creation; nature; the Universe
To create; to make and transform.

自然界

see styles
Mandarin zì rán jiè / zi4 ran2 jie4
Taiwan tzu jan chieh
Japanese shizenkai / しぜんかい
Chinese nature; the natural world
Japanese nature; the natural world; realm of nature

see styles
Mandarin pǐn / pin3
Taiwan p`in / pin
Japanese hon / ほん    hin / ひん
Chinese article; commodity; product; goods; kind; grade; rank; character; disposition; nature; temperament; variety; to taste something; to sample; to criticize; to comment; to judge; to size up
Japanese (1) court rank; (suffix) (2) {Buddh} (sometimes pronounced ぼん, ぽん as a suffix) (See 九品・1) level; grade; (3) {Buddh} chapter; section; volume; (1) elegance; grace; refinement; class; dignity; (suffix) (2) article; item; (suf,ctr) (3) (sometimes pronounced ぴん) counter for items (of food, etc.); counter for dishes or courses (at a restaurant); (surname) Shina
varga, 跋渠 class, series, rank, character; a chapter of a sutra; type


see styles
Mandarin chén / chen2
Taiwan ch`en / chen
Japanese chiri / ちり    jin / じん
Chinese dust; dirt; earth
Japanese dust; dirt; (1) {Buddh} defilement; impurity; affliction; (2) object (perceived with the mind or the senses); (numeric) (3) one billionth
guṇa, in Sanskrit inter alia means 'a secondary element', 'a quality', 'an attribute of the five elements', e.g. 'ether has śabda or sound for its guṇa and the ear for its organ'. In Chinese it means 'dust, small particles; molecules, atoms, exhalations'. It may be intp. as an atom, or matter, which is considered as defilement; or as an active, conditioned principle in nature, minute, subtle, and generally speaking defiling to pure mind; worldly, earthly, the world. The six guṇas or sensation-data are those of sight, sound, smell, taste, touch, and thought; object

see styles
Mandarin/ ru2
Taiwan ju
Japanese nyo / にょ
Chinese as; as if; such as
Japanese {Buddh} (See 真如) tathata (the ultimate nature of all things); (female given name) Yuki; (male given name) Hitoshi; (female given name) Naho
tathā 多陀; 但他 (or 怛他), so, thus, in such manner, like, as. It is used in the sense of the absolute, the 空 śūnya, which is 諸佛之實相 the reality of all Buddhas; hence 如 ru is 賃相 the undifferentiated whole of things, the ultimate reality; it is 諸法之性 the nature of all things, hence it connotes 法性 faxing which is 眞實之際極 the ultimate of reality, or the absolute, and therefore connotes 實際 ultimate reality. The ultimate nature of all things being 如 ru, the one undivided same, it also connotes 理 li, the principle or theory behind all things, and this 理 li universal law, being the 眞實 truth or ultimate reality; 如 ru is termed 眞如 bhūtatathatā, the real so, or suchness, or reality, the ultimate or the all, i. e. the 一如 yiru. In regard to 如 ju as 理 li the Prajñā-pāramitā puṇḍarīka makes it the 中 zhong, neither matter nor nothingness. It is also used in the ordinary sense of so, like, as (cf yathā).


see styles
Mandarin/ yi2
Taiwan i
Chinese ancient wine vessel; ancient sacrificial vessel; Yi ethnic group; normal nature of man; laws and rules

see styles
Mandarin bǐng / bing3
Taiwan ping
Japanese tsuka / つか    gara / がら    e / え
Chinese handle or shaft (of an axe etc); (of a flower, leaf or fruit) stem; something that affords an advantage to an opponent; classifier for knives or blades
Japanese hilt (of a sword); haft (of a dagger); handgrip; (n,n-suf) (1) pattern; design; (2) body build; figure; physique; (n,n-suf) (3) essential qualities; character; nature; (suffix noun) (4) appropriate to; fitting of; suitable for; (1) handle; grip; (2) stalk (of a mushroom, leaf, etc.); (personal name) Fukumasu; (surname) Tsuka; (surname) Karasaki
A handle; authority, power.

see styles
Mandarin gēn / gen1
Taiwan ken
Japanese ne / ね    kon / こん
Chinese root; basis; classifier for long slender objects, e.g. cigarettes, guitar strings; CL:條|条[tiao2]; radical (chemistry)
Japanese (1) root (of a plant); (2) root (of a tooth, hair, etc.); center (of a pimple, etc.); (3) root root (of all evil, etc.); source; origin; cause; basis; (4) one's true nature; (5) (fishing) reef; (1) stick-to-itiveness; perseverance; persistence; (2) (See 基・き・1) radical (esp. one that tends to ionize easily); (3) {math} root; (4) {Buddh} indriya (faculty of the body having a specific function, i.e. the sensory organs); (personal name) Nemawari; (personal name) Nemawashi; (personal name) Nene; (surname) Nezaki; (surname) Nesaki; (place-name) Ne; (surname) Konzaki; (surname) Kon; (surname) Kotakane
mūla, a root, basis, origin; but when meaning an organ of sense, indriyam, a 'power', 'faculty of sense, sense, organ of sense'. M.W. A root, or source; that which is capable of producing or growing, as the eye is able to produce knowledge, as faith is able to bring forth good works, as human nature is able to produce good or evil karma. v. 五根 and 二十二根.

see styles
Mandarin/ qi4
Taiwan ch`i / chi
Japanese ge / げ    ke / け    gi / ぎ
Chinese Japanese variant of 氣|气
Japanese (suffix) (kana only) seeming; giving the appearance of; giving one the feeling of; (n,n-suf) (1) sign; indication; trace; touch; feeling; (prefix noun) (2) somehow; for some reason; seeming to be; (suffix) -like nature; -like disposition; -ish temperament; (personal name) Taiki

see styles
Mandarin zhū / zhu1
Taiwan chu
Japanese megumi / めぐみ    tamami / たまみ    tamaki / たまき    tama / たま    arata / あらた
Chinese bead; pearl; CL:粒[li4],顆|颗[ke1]
Japanese (1) ball; sphere; globe; orb; (2) bead (of sweat, dew, etc.); drop; droplet; (3) ball (in sports); (4) pile (of noodles, etc.); (5) bullet; (6) bulb (i.e. a light bulb); (7) lens (of glasses, etc.); (8) bead (of an abacus); (9) (slang) (abbreviation) ball (i.e. a testicle); (10) gem; jewel (esp. spherical; sometimes used figuratively); pearl; (11) female entertainer (e.g. a geisha); (12) (derogatory term) person (when commenting on their nature); character; (13) item, funds or person used as part of a plot; (n,n-suf) (14) egg; (suffix noun) (15) coin; (16) precious; beautiful; excellent; (female given name) Megumi; (female given name) Tamami; (female given name) Tamaki; (female given name) Tama; (female given name) Arata
mani. A pearl; a bead; synonym for buddha-truth.

see styles
Mandarin yòng / yong4
Taiwan yung
Japanese you / yo / よう
Chinese to use; to employ; to have to; to eat or drink; expense or outlay; usefulness; hence; therefore
Japanese (n,n-suf) (1) task; business; (2) use; duty; service; (3) (See 用を足す) call of nature; excretion; (place-name) You; (surname) Mochii; (surname) Mochi; (personal name) Takara
To use, to employ; use, function.

see styles
Mandarin jiè / jie4
Taiwan chieh
Japanese kai / かい
Chinese boundary; scope; extent; circles; group; kingdom (taxonomy)
Japanese (1) {biol} kingdom; (2) {geol} erathem (rock layer corresponding to the era in which it was deposited); (3) partition of land; (suffix) (4) the world of (some category); (place-name, surname) Sakai; (personal name) Kai
dhātu. 馱都 Whatever is differentiated; a boundary, limit, region; that which is contained or limited, e. g. the nature of a thing; provenance; a species, class, variety; the underlying principle; the root or underlying principles of a discourse; realm

see styles
Mandarin/ pi2
Taiwan p`i / pi
Japanese kawa / かわ
Chinese leather; skin; fur; CL:張|张[zhang1]; pico- (one trillionth); naughty; surname Pi
Japanese (1) (See 革) skin; hide; pelt; fur; (2) rind; peel; husk; bark; (3) shell; sheath; wrapping; (4) (See 化けの皮・ばけのかわ,欲の皮が突っ張る・よくのかわがつっぱる) mask (hiding one's true nature); seeming; (personal name) Hi
皮革 Leather, skin, hide.

穿

see styles
Mandarin chuān / chuan1
Taiwan ch`uan / chuan
Japanese haku / はく
Chinese to wear; to put on; to dress; to bore through; to pierce; to perforate; to penetrate; to pass through; to thread
Japanese (female given name) Haku
To bore, pierce; to thread; to don, put on. To bore a well and gradually discover water, likened to the gradual discovery of the Buddha-nature.

see styles
Mandarin zhě / zhe3
Taiwan che
Japanese mono(p);mon / もの(P);もん    sha / しゃ
Chinese (after a verb or adjective) one who (is) ...; (after a noun) person involved in ...; -er; -ist; (used after a number or 後|后[hou4] or 前[qian2] to refer to something mentioned previously); (used after a term, to mark a pause before defining the term); (old) (used at the end of a command); (old) this
Japanese (rarely used without a qualifier) person; (n,suf) someone of that nature; someone doing that work
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition


see styles
Mandarin yùn / yun4
Taiwan yün
Japanese osamu / おさむ
Chinese to accumulate; to hold in store; to contain; to gather together; to collect; depth; inner strength; profundity
Japanese (given name) Osamu
skandha, v. 塞; older tr. 陰, intp. as that which covers or conceals, implying that physical and mental forms obstruct realization of the truth; while the tr. 蘊, implying an accumulation or heap, is a nearer connotation to skandha, which, originally meaning the shoulder, becomes stem, branch, combination, the objects of sense, the elements of being or mundane consciousness. The term is intp. as the five physical and mental constituents, which combine to form the intelligent 性 or nature; rūpa, the first of the five, is considered as physical, the remaining four as mental; v. 五蘊. The skandhas refer only to the phenomenal, not to the 無爲 non-phenomenal.


see styles
Mandarin yīn / yin1
Taiwan yin
Japanese hoto / ほと    in / いん
Chinese overcast (weather); cloudy; shady; Yin (the negative principle of Yin and Yang); negative (electric.); feminine; moon; implicit; hidden; genitalia; surname Yin
Japanese (archaism) female private parts; female genitals; (1) (ant: 陽・1) yin (i.e. the negative); (2) (See 陰に) unseen location (i.e. somewhere private); (surname) Kage
Shade, dark, the shades, the negative as opposed to the positive principle, female, the moon, back, secret. In Buddhism it is the phenomenal, as obscuring the true nature of things; also the aggregation of phenomenal things resulting in births and deaths, hence it is used as a translation like 蘊 q.v. for skandha, the 五陰 being the five skandhas or aggregates.

一地

see styles
Mandarin yī de / yi1 de
Taiwan i te
Japanese ichiji / いちぢ    ichichi / いちち
Japanese (personal name) Ichidzi; (surname) Ichichi
The one ground; the same ground; the Buddha-nature of all living beings i.e. as all the plants grow out of the one ground, so all good character and works grow from the one Buddha-nature; single ground

一如

see styles
Mandarin yī rú / yi1 ru2
Taiwan i ju
Japanese ichinyo / いちにょ
Chinese to be just like
Japanese oneness; (personal name) Kazuyuki
The one ru, i.e. the bhūtatathatā, or absolute, as the norm and essence of life. The 眞如 true suchness, or true character, or reality; the 法性 nature of things or beings. The whole of things as they are, or seem; a cosmos; a species; things of the same order. Name of a celebrated monk, Yiru. V. 一眞; 一實; oneness

一寶


一宝

see styles
Mandarin yī bǎo / yi1 bao3
Taiwan i pao
Japanese ippou / ippo / いっぽう
Japanese (surname) Ippou
The one precious thing, the spirit, or intelligent nature; the intelligent mind (behind all things); singular treasure

一性

see styles
Mandarin yī xìng / yi1 xing4
Taiwan i hsing
Japanese issei
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

一體


一体

see styles
Mandarin yī tǐ / yi1 ti3
Taiwan i t`i / i ti
Japanese ittai
Chinese an integral whole; all concerned; everybody
Though externally differing, in nature the same; the fundamental unity of the universe. 天地與我同根, 萬物與我一體 Heaven, earth, and myself have the same root; all things are one corpus with me.

万象

see styles
Japanese banshou / bansho / ばんしょう Japanese all creation; all nature; all the universe; (given name) Banshou

三力

see styles
Mandarin sān lì / san1 li4
Taiwan san li
Japanese sanriki
The three powers, of which there are various groups: (1) (a) personal power; (6) tathāgata-power; (c) power of the Buddha-nature within. (2) (a) power of a wise eye to see the Buddha-medicine (for evil); (b) of diagnosis of the ailment; (c) of suiting and applying the medicine to the disease. (3) (a) the power of Buddha; (b) of samādhi; (c) of personal achievement or merit.

三因

see styles
Mandarin sān yīn / san1 yin1
Taiwan san yin
Japanese sanin / さんいん
Japanese {Buddh} (See 三因仏性) three causes of Buddha nature; (place-name) Miyori
The six "causes" of the Abhidharma Kośa 倶舍論 as reduced to three in the Satyasiddhi śāstra 成實論, i.e. 生因 producing cause, as good or evil deeds cause good or evil karma; 習因 habit cause, e.g. lust breeding lust; 依因 dependent or hypostatic cause, e.g. the six organs 六根 and their objects 六境 causing the cognitions 六識; three causes

三大

see styles
Mandarin sān dà / san1 da4
Taiwan san ta
Japanese sandai / さんだい
Japanese (prefix) (See 三大疾病) the big three ...; (surname) Miou
The three great characteristics of the 眞如 in the 起信論 Awakening of Faith: (1) 體大 The greatness of the bhūtatathatā in its essence or substance; it is 衆生心之體性 the embodied nature of the mind of all the living, universal, immortal, immutable, eternal; (2) 相大 the greatness of its attributes or manifestations, perfect in wisdom and mercy, and every achievement; (3) 用大 the greatness of its functions and operations within and without, perfectly transforming all the living to good works and good karma now and hereafter. There are other groups, e.g. 體, 宗, and 用; three kinds of greatness

三密

see styles
Mandarin sān mì / san1 mi4
Taiwan san mi
Japanese sanmitsu / さんみつ
Japanese {Buddh} three mysteries (Buddha's body, speech and mind)
The three mystic things: the body, mouth (i.e. voice), and mind of the Tathāgata, which are universal, all things being this mystic body, all sound this mystic voice, and all thought this mystic mind. All creatures in body, voice, and mind are only individualized parts of the Tathāgata, but illusion hides their Tathāgata nature from them. The esoterics seek to realize their Tathāgata nature by physical signs and postures, by voicing of 眞言 dhāraṇī and by meditations, so that 入我我入 He may enter me and I Him, which is the perfection of siddhi 悉地; v. 大日經疏 1. 菩提心論; three mysteries

三性

see styles
Mandarin sān xìng / san1 xing4
Taiwan san hsing
Japanese sanshō
The three types of character 善, 惡, 無記 good, bad and undefinable, or neutral; v. 唯識論 5. Also, 徧依圓三性 the three aspects of the nature of a thing— partial, as when a rope is mistaken for a snake; only partly reliable, i.e. incomplete inference, as when it is considered as mere hemp; all around, or perfect, when content, form, etc., are all considered.

三斷


三断

see styles
Mandarin sān duàn / san1 duan4
Taiwan san tuan
Japanese sandan
The three cuttings off or excisions (of 惑 beguiling delusions, or perplexities). (1) (a) 見所斷 to cut off delusions of view, of which Hīnayāna has eighty-eight kinds; (b) 修所斷in practice, eighty-one kinds; (c) 非所斷nothing left to cut off, perfect. v. 倶舍論 2. (2) (a) 自性斷 to cut off the nature or root (of delusion); (b) 緣縛斷 to cut off the external bonds, or objective causes (of delusions); (c) 不生斷 (delusion) no longer arising, therefore nothing produced to cut off. The third stage in both groups is that of an arhat; three eliminations

三業


三业

see styles
Mandarin sān yè / san1 ye4
Taiwan san yeh
Japanese sangou / sango / さんごう    sangyou / sangyo / さんぎょう
Japanese {Buddh} (See 身口意) three activities (action, speech and thought); the three entertainment district enterprises: eating houses, geisha houses, meeting places for assignations, etc.
trividha-dvāra. The three conditions, inheritances, or karma, of which there are several groups. (1) Deed, word, thought, 身, 口, 意. (2) (a) Present-1ife happy karma; (6) present-life unhappy karma; (c) 不動 karma of an imperturbable nature. (3) (a) Good; (b) evil; (c) neutral karma. (4) (a) 漏業 Karma of ordinary rebirth; (6) 無漏業 karma of Hīnayāna nirvana; (c) 非漏非無漏 karma of neither, independent of both, Mahāyāna nirvana. (5) (a) Present deeds and their consequences in this life; (b) present deeds and their next life consequences; (c) present deeds and consequences after the next life, There are other groups of three; three activities

三身

see styles
Mandarin sān shēn / san1 shen1
Taiwan san shen
Japanese sanjin;sanshin / さんじん;さんしん
Japanese {Buddh} trikaya (three bodies of the Buddha); (surname) Sanmi
trikāya. 三寶身 The threefold body or nature of a Buddha, i.e. the 法, 報, and 化身, or dharmakāya, sambhogakāya, and nirmāṇakāya. The three are defined as 自性, 受用, and 變化, the Buddha-body per se, or in its essential nature; his body of bliss, which he "receives" for his own "use" and enjoyment; and his body of transformation, by which he can appear in any form; i.e. spiritual, or essential; glorified; revealed. While the doctrine of the trikāya is a Mahāyāna concept, it partly results from the Hīnayāna idealization of the earthly Buddha with his thirty-two signs, eighty physical marks, clairvoyance, clairaudience, holiness, purity, wisdom, pity, etc. Mahāyāna, however, proceeded to conceive of Buddha as the Universal, the All, with infinity of forms, yet above all our concepts of unity or diversity. To every Buddha Mahāyāna attributed a three-fold body: that of essential Buddha; that of joy or enjoyment of the fruits of his past saving labours; that of power to transform himself at will to any shape for omnipresent salvation of those who need him. The trinity finds different methods of expression, e.g. Vairocana is entitled 法身, the embodiment of the Law, shining everywhere, enlightening all; Locana is 報身; c.f. 三賓, the embodiment of purity and bliss; Śākyamuni is 化身 or Buddha revealed. In the esoteric sect they are 法 Vairocana, 報 Amitābha, and 化 Śākyamuni. The 三賓 are also 法 dharma, 報 saṅgha, 化 buddha. Nevertheless, the three are considered as a trinity, the three being essentially one, each in the other. (1) 法身 Dharmakāya in its earliest conception was that of the body of the dharma, or truth, as preached by Śākyamuni; later it became his mind or soul in contrast with his material body. In Mādhyamika, the dharmakāya was the only reality, i.e. the void, or the immateria1, the ground of all phenomena; in other words, the 眞如 the tathāgatagarbha, the bhūtatathatā. According to the Huayan (Kegon) School it is the 理or noumenon, while the other two are氣or phenomenal aspects. "For the Vijñānavāda... the body of the law as highest reality is the void intelligence, whose infection (saṃkleҫa) results in the process of birth and death, whilst its purification brings about Nirvāṇa, or its restoration to its primitive transparence" (Keith). The "body of the law is the true reality of everything". Nevertheless, in Mahāyāna every Buddha has his own 法身; e.g. in the dharmakāya aspect we have the designation Amitābha, who in his saṃbhogakāya aspect is styled Amitāyus. (2) 報身Sambhogakāya, a Buddha's reward body, or body of enjoyment of the merits he attained as a bodhisattva; in other words, a Buddha in glory in his heaven. This is the form of Buddha as an object of worship. It is defined in two aspects, (a) 自受用身 for his own bliss, and (b) 他受用身 for the sake of others, revealing himself in his glory to bodhisattvas, enlightening and inspiring them. By wisdom a Buddha's dharmakāya is attained, by bodhisattva-merits his saṃbhogakāya. Not only has every Buddha all the three bodies or aspects, but as all men are of the same essence, or nature, as Buddhas, they are therefore potential Buddhas and are in and of the trikāya. Moreover, trikāya is not divided, for a Buddha in his 化身 is still one with his 法身 and 報身, all three bodies being co-existent. (3) 化身; 應身; 應化身 nirmāṇakāya, a Buddha's transformation, or miraculous body, in which he appears at will and in any form outside his heaven, e.g. as Śākyamuni among men; three bodies [of the Buddha]

下轉


下转

see styles
Mandarin xià zhuǎn / xia4 zhuan3
Taiwan hsia chuan
Japanese geten
The downward turn, in transmigration. Primal ignorance or unenlightenment 無明acting against the primal, true, or Buddha-nature causes transmigration. The opposite is上轉 when the good prevails over the evil. 下轉is sometimes used for 下化 to save those below.

不二

see styles
Mandarin bù èr / bu4 er4
Taiwan pu erh
Japanese funi / ふに    fuji / ふじ
Japanese {Buddh} advaitam (non-duality); (1) being two sides of the same coin; being the same (while appearing different); (2) (See 不一・1) Very sincerely yours; (adj-no,n) (3) (archaism) (orig. meaning) peerless; unparalleled; unparallelled; (surname, female given name) Fuji
advaya. No second, non-duality, the one and undivided, the unity of all things, the one reality、 the universal Buddha-nature. There are numerous combinations, e. g. 善惡不二 good and evil are not a dualism: nor are 有 and 空 the material and immaterial, nor are 迷 and 悟 delusion and awareness— all these are of the one Buddha-nature.

世情

see styles
Mandarin shì qíng / shi4 qing2
Taiwan shih ch`ing / shih ching
Japanese sejou / sejo / せじょう
Chinese worldly affairs; the ways of the world
Japanese the ways of the world; human nature

二因

see styles
Mandarin èr yīn / er4 yin1
Taiwan erh yin
Japanese niin / nin / にいん
Japanese {Buddh} two causes
Two causes, of which there are various definitions: (1) 生因 The producing cause (of all good things); and 了因 the revealing or illuminating cause i.e. knowledge, or wisdom. (2) 能生因 The 8th 識 q. v.: the cause that is able to produce all sense and perceptions, also all good and evil; and 方便因 the environmental or adaptive cause, which aids the 8th 識, as water or earth does the seed, etc. (3) 習因 or 同類因 Practice or habit as cause e. g. desire causing desire; and 報因 or 果熟因 the rewarding cause, or fruit-ripening cause, e. g. pleasure or pain caused by good or evil deeds. (4) 正因 Correct or direct cause i.e. the Buddha-nature of all beings; and 緣因 the contributory cause, or enlightenment (see 了因 above) which evolves the 正因 or Buddha-nature by good works. (5) 近因 Immediate or direct cause and 遠因 distant or indirect cause or causes.

二土

see styles
Mandarin èr tǔ / er4 tu3
Taiwan erh t`u / erh tu
Japanese nido
There are three groups: 性土 and 相土 : the former is the ubiquitous, unadulterated or innocent 法性之理 dharma-name, or essence of things; the latter is the form-nature, or formal existence of the dharma, pure or impure according to the mind and action of the living. The 淨土 and 穢土 are Pure-land or Paradise; and impure land, e.g. the present world. In the Pure-land there are also 報土 , the land in which a Buddha himself dwells and 化土 in which all beings are transformed. There are other definitions, e. g. the former is Buddha's Paradise, the latter the world in which he dwells and which he is transforming, e. g. this Sahā-world; two grounds

二如

see styles
Mandarin èr rú / er4 ru2
Taiwan erh ju
Japanese ninyo
There are various definitions of the two aspects of the 眞如 bhūtatathatā. (1) (a) 不變眞如 The changeless essence or substance, e.g. the sea; (b) 隨緣眞如 its conditioned or ever-changing forms, as in the phenomenal world, e.g. the waves. (2) (a) 離言眞如 The inexpressible absolute, only mentally conceivable; (6) 依言眞如 aspects of it expressible in words, its ideal reflex. (3) (a) 空眞如 The absolute as the void, e.g. as space, the sky, a clear mirror; (b) 不空眞如 the absolute in manifestation, or phenomenal, e. g. images in the mirror: the womb of the universe in which are all potentialities. (4) (a) 在纏眞如The Buddha-nature in bonds, i.e. all beings in suffering; (b) 出纏真如the Buddha-nature set free by the manifestation of the Buddha and bodhisattvas. (5) (a) 有垢眞如The Buddha-nature defiled, as in unenlightened man, etc., e.g. the water-lily with its roots in the mud; (b) 無垢眞如 the pure Buddha-nature, purifed or bright as the full moon. (6) 安立 and 非安立眞如 similar to the first definition given above; thusness in two aspects

二性

see styles
Mandarin èr xìng / er4 xing4
Taiwan erh hsing
Japanese nishō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

二我

see styles
Mandarin èr wǒ / er4 wo3
Taiwan erh wo
Japanese niga
(二我見) The two erroneous views of individualism: (a) 人我見 The erroneous view that there is an independent human personality or soul, and (b) 法我見 the like view that anything exists with an independent nature.

二空

see styles
Mandarin èr kōng / er4 kong1
Taiwan erh k`ung / erh kung
Japanese nikū
The two voids, unrealities, or immaterialities; v. 空. There are several antitheses: (1) (a) 人空; 我空 The non-reality of the atman, the soul, the person; (6) 法空 the non-reality of things. (2) (a) 性空 The Tiantai division that nothing has a nature of its own; (b) 相空 therefore its form is unreal, i.e. forms are temporary names. (3) (a) 但空 Tiantai says the 藏 and 通 know only the 空; (b) 不但空 the 別 and 圓 have 空, 假, and 中 q.v. (4) (a) 如實空 The division of the 起信論 that the 眞如 is devoid of all impurity; (b) 如實不空 and full of all merit, or achievement; two kinds of emptiness

二觀


二观

see styles
Mandarin èr guān / er4 guan1
Taiwan erh kuan
Japanese nikan
The two universal bases of meditation: 事觀 the external forms, or the phenomenal, and 理觀 the real or underlying nature, i. e. practice and theory; two kinds of meditation

五因

see styles
Mandarin wǔ yīn / wu3 yin1
Taiwan wu yin
Japanese goin
The five causes, v. 倶舍論 7. i. e. (1) 生因 producing cause; (2) 依因supporting cause; (3) 立因 upholding or establishing cause; (4) 持因 maintaining cause; (5) 養因 nourishing or strengthening cause. These all refer to the four elements, earth, water, fire, wind, for they are the causers or producers and maintainers of the infinite forms of nature. Another list from the Nirvana-Sutra 21 is (1) 生因 cause of rebirth, i. e. previous delusion; (2) 和合因 intermingling cause, i. e. good with good, bad with bad, neutral with neutral; (3) 住因 cause of abiding in the present condition, i. e. the self in its attachments; (4) 增長因 causes of development, e. g. food, clothing, etc.; (5) 遠因 remoter cause, the parental seed.

五塵


五尘

see styles
Mandarin wǔ chén / wu3 chen2
Taiwan wu ch`en / wu chen
Japanese gojin
The objects of the five senses, which being dusty or earthly things can taint the true nature; idem 五境; objects of the five sense organs

五教

see styles
Mandarin wǔ jiào / wu3 jiao4
Taiwan wu chiao
Japanese gokyō
The five division of Buddhism according to the Huayan School, of which there are two That of 杜順 Dushun down to 賢首 Xianshou is (1) 小乘教 Hīnayāna which interprets nirvana as annihilation; (2) 大乘始教 the primary stage of Mahāyāna, with two sections the 相始教 and 空 始教 or realistic and idealistic, (3) 大乘終教 Mahāyāna in its final stage, teaching the 眞如 and universal Buddhahood; (4) 頓教 the immediate, direct, or intuitive school, e. g. by right concentration of thought, or faith, apart from 'works'; (5) 圓教 the complete or perfect teaching of the Huayan, combining all the rest into one all-embracing vehicle. The five are now differentiated into 十宗 ten schools. The other division, by 圭峯 Guifeng of the same school, is (1) 人天教 rebirth as human beings for those who keep the five commandments and as devas those who keep the 十善 as 相始教 above; (4) 大乘破相教 as 空始教 above; and (5) 一乘顯性教 the one vehicle which reveals the universal Buddha-nature; it includes (3), (4), and (5) of the first group. See also 五時教; five teachings

五智

see styles
Mandarin wǔ zhì / wu3 zhi4
Taiwan wu chih
Japanese gochi / ごち
Japanese (place-name, surname) Gochi
The five kinds of wisdom of the 眞言宗 Shingon School. Of the six elements 六大 earth, water, fire, air (or wind), ether (or space) 曇空, and consciousness (or mind 識 ), the first five form the phenomenal world, or Garbhadhātu, the womb of all things 胎藏界, the sixth is the conscious, or perceptive, or wisdom world, the Vajradhātu 金剛界, sometimes called the Diamond realm. The two realms are not originally apart, but one, and there is no consciousness without the other five elements. The sixth element, vijñāna, is further subdivided into five called the 五智 Five Wisdoms: (1) 法界體性智 dharmadhātu-prakṛti-jñāna, derived from the amala-vijñāna, or pure 識; it is the wisdom of the embodied nature of the dharmadhātu, defined as the six elements, and is associated with Vairocana 大日, in the centre, who abides in this samādhi; it also corresponds to the ether 空 element. (2) 大圓鏡智 adarśana-jñāna, the great round mirror wisdom, derived from the ālaya-vijñāna, reflecting all things; corresponds to earth, and is associated with Akṣobhya and the east. (3) 平等性智 samatā-jñāna, derived from mano-vijñāna, wisdom in regard to all things equally and universally; corresponds to fire, and is associated with Ratnasaṃbhava and the south. (4) 妙觀察智 pratyavekṣaṇa-jñāna, derived from 意識, wisdom of profound insight, or discrimination, for exposition and doubt-destruction; corresponds to water, and is associated with Amitābha and the west. (5) 成所作智 kṛtyānuṣṭhāna-jñāna, derived from the five senses, the wisdom of perfecting the double work of self-welfare and the welfare of others; corresponds to air 風 and is associated with Amoghasiddhi and the north. These five Dhyāni-Buddhas are the 五智如來. The five kinds of wisdom are the four belonging to every Buddha, of the exoteric cult, to which the esoteric cult adds the first, pure, all-refecting, universal, all-discerning, and all-perfecting.

五法

see styles
Mandarin wǔ fǎ / wu3 fa3
Taiwan wu fa
Japanese gohō
pañcadharma. The five laws or categories, of which four groups are as follows: I. 相名五法 The five categories of form and name: (1) 相 appearances, or phenomena; (2) 名 their names; (3) 分別 sometimes called 妄想 ordinary mental discrimination of them— (1) and (2) are objective, (3) subjective; (4) 正智 corrective wisdom, which corrects the deficiencies and errors of the last: (5) 如如 the 眞如 Bhutatathata or absolute wisdom, reached through the 如理智 understanding of the law of the absolute, or ultimate truth. II. 事理五法 The five categories into which things and their principles are divided: (1) 心法 mind; (2) 心所法 mental conditions or activities; (3) 色法 the actual states or categories as conceived; (4) 不相應法 hypothetic categories, 唯識 has twenty-four, the Abhidharma fourteen; (5) 無爲法 the state of rest, or the inactive principle pervading all things; the first four are the 事 and the last the 理. III. 理智五法 cf. 五智; the five categories of essential wisdom: (1) 眞如 the absolute; (2) 大圓鏡智 wisdom as the great perfect mirror reflecting all things; (3) 平等性智 wisdom of the equal Buddha nature of all beings; (4) 妙觀察智 wisdom of mystic insight into all things and removal of ignorance and doubt; (5) 成所作智 wisdom perfect in action and bringing blessing to self and others. IV. 提婆五法 The five obnoxious rules of Devadatta: not to take milk in any form, nor meat, nor salt; to wear unshaped garments, and to live apart. Another set is: to wear cast-off rags, beg food, have only one set meal a day, dwell in the open, and abstain from all kinds of flesh, milk, etc.

五蘊


五蕴

see styles
Mandarin wǔ yùn / wu3 yun4
Taiwan wu yün
Japanese goun / gon / ごうん
Chinese the Five Aggregates (from Sanskrit "skandha") (Buddhism)
Japanese {Buddh} the five skandhas (the five aggregates: matter, sensation, perception, mental formations and consciousness)
The five skandhas, pañca-skandha: also 五陰; 五衆; 五塞犍陀 The five cumulations, substances, or aggregates, i. e. the components of an intelligent being, specially a human being: (1) 色 rūpa, form, matter, the physical form related to the five organs of sense; (2) 受 vedana, reception, sensation, feeling, the functioning of the mind or senses in connection with affairs and things; (3) 想 saṃjñā, conception, or discerning; the functioning of mind in distinguishing; (4) 行 saṃskāra, the functioning of mind in its processes regarding like and dislike, good and evil, etc.; (5) 識 vijñāna, mental faculty in regard to perception and cognition, discriminative of affairs and things. The first is said to be physical, the other four mental qualities; (2), (3), and (4) are associated with mental functioning, and therefore with 心所; (5) is associated with the faculty or nature of the mind 心王 manas. Eitel gives— form, perception, consciousness, action, knowledge. See also Keith's Buddhist Philosophy, 85-91; five aggregates

五障

see styles
Mandarin wǔ zhàng / wu3 zhang4
Taiwan wu chang
Japanese goshō
The five hindrances, or obstacles; also 五礙; 五雲. I. Of women, i. e. inability to become Brahma-kings, Indras, Māra-kings, Caikravarti-kings, or Buddhas. II. The hindrances to the five 五力 powers, i. e. (self-) deception a bar to faith, as sloth is to zeal, anger to remembrance, hatred to meditaton, and discontent to wisdom. III. The hindrances of (1) the passion-nature, e. g. original sin; (2) of karma caused in previous lives; (3) the affairs of life; (4) no friendly or competent preceptor; (5) partial knowledge.

人心

see styles
Mandarin rén xīn / ren2 xin1
Taiwan jen hsin
Japanese jinshin(p);hitogokoro / じんしん(P);ひとごころ
Chinese popular feeling; the will of the people
Japanese human nature; human heart; human spirit; kindness; sympathy; (given name) Jinshin
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

人本

see styles
Mandarin rén běn / ren2 ben3
Taiwan jen pen
Japanese ninhon
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

人空

see styles
Mandarin rén kōng / ren2 kong1
Taiwan jen k`ung / jen kung
Japanese ningū
Man is only a temporary combination formed by the five skandhas and the twelve nidānas, being the product of previous causes, and without a real self or permanent soul. Hīnayāna is said to end these causes and consequent reincarnation by discipline in subjection of the passions and entry into nirvana by the emptying of the self. Mahāyāna fills the "void" with the Absolute, declaring that when man has emptied himself of the ego he realizes his nature to be that of the absolute, bhūtatathatā; v. 二空; emptiness of person

仏性

see styles
Japanese hotokeshou / hotokesho / ほとけしょう    busshou / bussho / ぶっしょう Japanese mercifulness; compassion; {Buddh} Buddha-nature; (surname) Butsushou; (personal name) Busshou

体質

see styles
Japanese taishitsu / たいしつ Japanese (noun - becomes adjective with の) (1) constitution (physical); genetic make-up; predisposition (to disease); (2) structure (e.g. of an organization); innate characteristics; make-up; nature; culture

佛子

see styles
Mandarin fú zi / fu2 zi
Taiwan fu tzu
Japanese busshi / ぶっし
Japanese (surname) Busshi
Son of Buddha; a bodhisattva; a believer in Buddhism, for every believer is becoming Buddha; a term also applied to all beings, because all are of Buddha-nature. There is a division of three kinds: 外子 external sons, who have not yet believed; 度子 secondary sons, Hīnayānists; 眞子 true sons, Mahāyānists; children of the Buddha

佛性

see styles
Mandarin fú xìng / fu2 xing4
Taiwan fu hsing
Japanese butsushou / butsusho / ぶつしょう
Chinese Buddha nature
Japanese (surname) Butsushou
buddhatā. The Buddha-nature, i.e. gnosis, enlightenment; potential bodhi remains in every gati, i.e. all have the capacity for enlightenment; for the Buddha-nature remains in all as wheat-nature remains in all wheat. This nature takes two forms: 理 noumenal, in the absolute sense, unproduced and immortal, and 行 phenomenal, in action. While every one possesses the Buddha-nature, it requires to be cultivated in order to produce its ripe fruit.

依圓


依圆

see styles
Mandarin yī yuán / yi1 yuan2
Taiwan i yüan
Japanese een
Dependent and perfect, i. e. the dependent or conditioned nature, and the perfect nature of the unconditioned bhūtatathatā.

便意

see styles
Japanese beni / べんい Japanese call of nature; bowel movement

信忍

see styles
Mandarin xìn rěn / xin4 ren3
Taiwan hsin jen
Japanese shinnin
Faith-patience, faith-endurance: (1) To abide patiently in the faith and repeat the name of Amitābha. (2) To believe in the Truth and attain the nature of patient faith. (3) According to Tiantai the 別教 meaning is the unperturbed faith of the Bodhisattva (that all dharma is unreal); cognitive faith

修性

see styles
Mandarin xiū xìng / xiu1 xing4
Taiwan hsiu hsing
Japanese shushō
To cultivate the nature; the natural proclivities; cultivation and nature

修惡


修恶

see styles
Mandarin xiū è / xiu1 e4
Taiwan hsiu o
Japanese shuaku
To cultivate evil; cultivated evil in contrast with evil by nature.

催す

see styles
Japanese moyoosu / もよおす Japanese (transitive verb) (1) to hold (a meeting); to give (a dinner); to show signs of; (2) to feel (sensation, emotion, call of nature, etc.)

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This page contains 100 results for "nature" in Chinese and/or Japanese.



Information about this dictionary:

Apparently, we were the first ones who were crazy enough to think that western people might want a combined Chinese, Japanese, and Buddhist dictionary.

A lot of westerners can't tell the difference between Chinese and Japanese - and there is a reason for that. Chinese characters and even whole words were borrowed by Japan from the Chinese language in the 5th century. Much of the time, if a word or character is used in both languages, it will have the same or a similar meaning. However, this is not always true. Language evolves, and meanings independently change in each language.

Example: The Chinese character 湯 for soup (hot water) has come to mean bath (hot water) in Japanese. They have the same root meaning of "hot water", but a 湯屋 sign on a bathhouse in Japan would lead a Chinese person to think it was a "soup house" or a place to get a bowl of soup. See this: Soup or Bath

This dictionary uses the EDICT and CC-CEDICT dictionary files.
EDICT data is the property of the Electronic Dictionary Research and Development Group, and is used in conformance with the Group's license.

Chinese Buddhist terms come from Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist Terms by William Edward Soothill and Lewis Hodous. This is commonly referred to as "Soothill's'". It was first published in 1937 (and is now off copyright so we can use it here). Some of these definitions may be misleading, incomplete, or dated, but 95% of it is good information. Every professor who teaches Buddhism or Eastern Religion has a copy of this on their bookshelf. We incorporated these 16,850 entries into our dictionary database ourselves (it was lot of work).



Combined, these cover 355,969 Japanese, Chinese, and Buddhist characters, words, idioms, and short phrases.

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