Free Chinese & Japanese Online Dictionary

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Key:

Mandarin Mandarin Chinese information.
Wade Giles Old Wade-Giles romanization used only in Taiwan.
Japanese Japanese information.
Buddhist definition. Note: May not apply to all sects.
 Definition may be different outside of Buddhism.

There are 22 total results for your infinity search.

If shown, 2nd row of characters is Simplified Chinese.

Characters Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition

see styles
Mandarin kōng / kong1
Taiwan k`ung / kung
Japanese kuu / ku / くう    kara / から
Chinese to empty; vacant; unoccupied; space; leisure; free time; empty; air; sky; in vain
Japanese (1) empty air; sky; (2) {Buddh} shunyata; emptiness; the lack of an immutable intrinsic nature within any phenomenon; (3) (abbreviation) (See 空軍) air force; (noun or adjectival noun) (4) fruitlessness; meaninglessness; (5) (See 五大・1) void (one of the five elements); (can be adjective with の) (6) {math} empty (e.g. set); (noun - becomes adjective with の) emptiness; vacuum; blank; (female given name) Ron; (personal name) Hiroshi; (female given name) Hikari; (female given name) Haruka; (female given name) Noa; (surname) Sorasaki; (female given name) Sora; (female given name) Sukai; (female given name) Shieru; (personal name) Kuukai; (surname, female given name) Kuu; (female given name) Kanata; (female given name) Kasumi; (female given name) Urue; (surname, female given name) Aki; (female given name) Aoi
śūnya, empty, void, hollow, vacant, nonexistent. śūnyatā, 舜若多, vacuity, voidness, emptiness, non-existence, immateriality, perhaps spirituality, unreality, the false or illusory nature of all existence, the seeming 假 being unreal. The doctrine that all phenomena and the ego have no reality, but are composed of a certain number of skandhas or elements, which disintegrate. The void, the sky, space. The universal, the absolute, complete abstraction without relativity. There are classifications into 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 11, 13, 16, and 18 categories. The doctrine is that all things are compounds, or unstable organisms, possessing no self-essence, i.e. are dependent, or caused, come into existence only to perish. The underlying reality, the principle of eternal relativity, or non-infinity, i.e. śūnya, permeates all phenomena making possible their evolution. From this doctrine the Yogācārya school developed the idea of the permanent reality, which is Essence of Mind, the unknowable noumenon behind all phenomena, the entity void of ideas and phenomena, neither matter nor mind, but the root of both.

無限


无限

see styles
Mandarin wú xiàn / wu2 xian4
Taiwan wu hsien
Japanese mugen / むげん
Chinese unlimited; unbounded
Japanese (1) infinity; infinitude; eternity; (adj-no,adj-na) (2) infinite; limitless; (given name) Mugen
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

see styles
Mandarin miǎo / miao3
Taiwan miao
Chinese a flood; infinity

三身

see styles
Mandarin sān shēn / san1 shen1
Taiwan san shen
Japanese sanjin;sanshin / さんじん;さんしん
Japanese {Buddh} trikaya (three bodies of the Buddha); (surname) Sanmi
trikāya. 三寶身 The threefold body or nature of a Buddha, i.e. the 法, 報, and 化身, or dharmakāya, sambhogakāya, and nirmāṇakāya. The three are defined as 自性, 受用, and 變化, the Buddha-body per se, or in its essential nature; his body of bliss, which he "receives" for his own "use" and enjoyment; and his body of transformation, by which he can appear in any form; i.e. spiritual, or essential; glorified; revealed. While the doctrine of the trikāya is a Mahāyāna concept, it partly results from the Hīnayāna idealization of the earthly Buddha with his thirty-two signs, eighty physical marks, clairvoyance, clairaudience, holiness, purity, wisdom, pity, etc. Mahāyāna, however, proceeded to conceive of Buddha as the Universal, the All, with infinity of forms, yet above all our concepts of unity or diversity. To every Buddha Mahāyāna attributed a three-fold body: that of essential Buddha; that of joy or enjoyment of the fruits of his past saving labours; that of power to transform himself at will to any shape for omnipresent salvation of those who need him. The trinity finds different methods of expression, e.g. Vairocana is entitled 法身, the embodiment of the Law, shining everywhere, enlightening all; Locana is 報身; c.f. 三賓, the embodiment of purity and bliss; Śākyamuni is 化身 or Buddha revealed. In the esoteric sect they are 法 Vairocana, 報 Amitābha, and 化 Śākyamuni. The 三賓 are also 法 dharma, 報 saṅgha, 化 buddha. Nevertheless, the three are considered as a trinity, the three being essentially one, each in the other. (1) 法身 Dharmakāya in its earliest conception was that of the body of the dharma, or truth, as preached by Śākyamuni; later it became his mind or soul in contrast with his material body. In Mādhyamika, the dharmakāya was the only reality, i.e. the void, or the immateria1, the ground of all phenomena; in other words, the 眞如 the tathāgatagarbha, the bhūtatathatā. According to the Huayan (Kegon) School it is the 理or noumenon, while the other two are氣or phenomenal aspects. "For the Vijñānavāda... the body of the law as highest reality is the void intelligence, whose infection (saṃkleҫa) results in the process of birth and death, whilst its purification brings about Nirvāṇa, or its restoration to its primitive transparence" (Keith). The "body of the law is the true reality of everything". Nevertheless, in Mahāyāna every Buddha has his own 法身; e.g. in the dharmakāya aspect we have the designation Amitābha, who in his saṃbhogakāya aspect is styled Amitāyus. (2) 報身Sambhogakāya, a Buddha's reward body, or body of enjoyment of the merits he attained as a bodhisattva; in other words, a Buddha in glory in his heaven. This is the form of Buddha as an object of worship. It is defined in two aspects, (a) 自受用身 for his own bliss, and (b) 他受用身 for the sake of others, revealing himself in his glory to bodhisattvas, enlightening and inspiring them. By wisdom a Buddha's dharmakāya is attained, by bodhisattva-merits his saṃbhogakāya. Not only has every Buddha all the three bodies or aspects, but as all men are of the same essence, or nature, as Buddhas, they are therefore potential Buddhas and are in and of the trikāya. Moreover, trikāya is not divided, for a Buddha in his 化身 is still one with his 法身 and 報身, all three bodies being co-existent. (3) 化身; 應身; 應化身 nirmāṇakāya, a Buddha's transformation, or miraculous body, in which he appears at will and in any form outside his heaven, e.g. as Śākyamuni among men; three bodies [of the Buddha]

四喩

see styles
Mandarin sì yù / si4 yu4
Taiwan ssu yü
Japanese shiyu
The four metaphors (of infinity, etc. ): 山斤 the weight of all the mountains in pounds; 海 the drops in the ocean; 地塵 the atoms of dust in the earth; 空 界 the extent of space.

八解脫


八解脱

see styles
Mandarin bā jiě tuō / ba1 jie3 tuo1
Taiwan pa chieh t`o / pa chieh to
Japanese hachi gedatsu
aṣṭa-vimokṣa, mokṣa, vimukti, mukti. Liberation, deliverance, freedom, emancipation, escape, release―in eight forms; also 八背捨 and cf. 解脫 and 八勝處. The eight are stages of mental concentration: (1) 内有色想觀外色解脱 Liberation, when subjective desire arises, by examination of the object, or of all things and realization of their filthiness. (2) 内無色想觀外色解脫 Liberation, when no subjective desire arises, by still meditating as above. These two are deliverance by meditation on impurity, the next on purity. (3) 淨身作證具足住解脫 Liberation by concentration on the pure to the realization of a permanent state of freedom from all desire. The above three "correspond to the four Dhyānas". (Eitel.) (4) 空無邊處解脫 Liberation in realization of the infinity of space, or the immaterial. (5) 識無邊處解脫 Liberation in realization of infinite knowledge. (6) 無所有處解脫Liberation in realization of nothingness, or nowhereness. (7) 非想非非想處解脫 Liberation in the state of mind where there is neither thought nor absence of thought. These four arise out of abstract meditation in regard to desire and form, and are associated with the 四空天. (8) 滅受 想定解脫 Liberation by means of a state of mind in which there is final extinction, nirvāṇa, of both sensation, vedanā, and consciousness, saṁjñā; eight kinds of liberation

無量義


无量义

see styles
Mandarin wú liàng yì / wu2 liang4 yi4
Taiwan wu liang i
Japanese muryō gi
Infinite meaning, or the meaning of infinity; the meaning of the all, or all things; immeasurable meanings

無限大

see styles
Japanese mugendai / むげんだい Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) infinity

空處定


空处定

see styles
Mandarin kōng chù dìng / kong1 chu4 ding4
Taiwan k`ung ch`u ting / kung chu ting
Japanese kūsho jō
(or 空無邊處定) The dhyāna, or meditation connected with the above, in which all thought of form is suppressed; sphere of the infinity of space

限無し

see styles
Japanese kirinashi / きりなし Japanese (irregular okurigana usage) (1) boundlessness; endlessness; infinity; (2) incessantness; continuousness

無窮遠點

see styles
Mandarin wú qióng yuǎn diǎn / wu2 qiong2 yuan3 dian3
Taiwan wu ch`iung yüan tien / wu chiung yüan tien
Chinese point at infinity (math.); infinitely distant point

無量空處


无量空处

see styles
Mandarin wú liáng kōng chù / wu2 liang2 kong1 chu4
Taiwan wu liang k`ung ch`u / wu liang kung chu
Japanese muryō kūsho
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

無限遠点

see styles
Japanese mugenenten / むげんえんてん Japanese {comp} infinity

生佛一如

see styles
Mandarin shēng fú yī rú / sheng1 fu2 yi1 ru2
Taiwan sheng fu i ju
Japanese shōbutsu ichinyo
生佛一體; 生佛不二; 凡聖一如 The living and the Buddha are one, i. e. all are the one undivided whole, or absolute; they are all of the same substance: all are Buddha, and of the same 法身 dharmakāya, or spiritual nature; all are of the same 空 infinity; sentient beings and buddha are of the same essence

空無邊處


空无边处

see styles
Mandarin kōng wú biān chù / kong1 wu2 bian1 chu4
Taiwan k`ung wu pien ch`u / kung wu pien chu
Japanese kū muhen sho
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

限り無し

see styles
Japanese kirinashi / きりなし Japanese (1) boundlessness; endlessness; infinity; (2) incessantness; continuousness

空無邊處定


空无边处定

see styles
Mandarin kōng wú biān chù dìng / kong1 wu2 bian1 chu4 ding4
Taiwan k`ung wu pien ch`u ting / kung wu pien chu ting
Japanese kū muhen sho jō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

無量義處三昧


无量义处三昧

see styles
Mandarin wú liàng yì chù sān mèi / wu2 liang4 yi4 chu4 san1 mei4
Taiwan wu liang i ch`u san mei / wu liang i chu san mei
Japanese muryō gisho zanmai
The anantanirdeśapratiṣṭhāna samādhi, into which the Buddha is represented as entering before preaching the doctrine of infinity as given in the Lotus Sūtra; meditation on the infinite meanings of reality

インフィニティ

see styles
Japanese infiniti / インフィニティ Japanese infinity

インフィニティー

see styles
Japanese infinitii / infiniti / インフィニティー Japanese infinity

限り無し;限無し(io)

see styles
Japanese kirinashi / きりなし Japanese (1) (usu. used adverbially as 限り無しに) boundlessness; endlessness; infinity; (2) incessantness; continuousness

インフィニティ;インフィニティー

see styles
Japanese infiniti;infinitii / infiniti;infiniti / インフィニティ;インフィニティー Japanese infinity
This page contains 22 results for "infinity" in Chinese and/or Japanese.



Information about this dictionary:

Apparently, we were the first ones who were crazy enough to think that western people might want a combined Chinese, Japanese, and Buddhist dictionary.

A lot of westerners can't tell the difference between Chinese and Japanese - and there is a reason for that. Chinese characters and even whole words were borrowed by Japan from the Chinese language in the 5th century. Much of the time, if a word or character is used in both languages, it will have the same or a similar meaning. However, this is not always true. Language evolves, and meanings independently change in each language.

Example: The Chinese character 湯 for soup (hot water) has come to mean bath (hot water) in Japanese. They have the same root meaning of "hot water", but a 湯屋 sign on a bathhouse in Japan would lead a Chinese person to think it was a "soup house" or a place to get a bowl of soup. See this: Soup or Bath

This dictionary uses the EDICT and CC-CEDICT dictionary files.
EDICT data is the property of the Electronic Dictionary Research and Development Group, and is used in conformance with the Group's license.

Chinese Buddhist terms come from Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist Terms by William Edward Soothill and Lewis Hodous. This is commonly referred to as "Soothill's'". It was first published in 1937 (and is now off copyright so we can use it here). Some of these definitions may be misleading, incomplete, or dated, but 95% of it is good information. Every professor who teaches Buddhism or Eastern Religion has a copy of this on their bookshelf. We incorporated these 16,850 entries into our dictionary database ourselves (it was lot of work).



Combined, these cover 355,969 Japanese, Chinese, and Buddhist characters, words, idioms, and short phrases.

Just because a word appears here does not mean it is appropriate for a tattoo, your business name, etc. Please consult a professional before doing anything stupid with this data.

We do offer Chinese and Japanese Tattoo Services. We'll also be happy to help you translate something for other purposes.

No warranty as to the correctness, potential vulgarity, or clarity is expressed or implied. We did not write any of these definitions (though we occasionally act as a contributor/editor to the CC-CEDICT project). You are using this dictionary for free, and you get what you pay for.

The following titles are just to help people who are searching for an Asian dictionary to find this page.

Japanese Kanji Dictionary

Free Asian Dictionary

Chinese Kanji Dictionary

Chinese Words Dictionary

Chinese Language Dictionary

Japanese Chinese Dictionary