Not what you want?

Try other similar-meaning words, fewer words, or just one word.

Enter your email below, and get an automatic notice when results for Korean Martial Arts are added or updated...

 
  

Korean Martial Arts in old Korean Hanja...

Buy a Korean Martial Arts calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Korean Martial Arts” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Korean Martial Arts” title below...

See also: Martial Arts Words and Phrases | Selections of just old Korean Hanja Calligraphy


  1. Shotokan Aikido

  2. Martial Arts

  3. Martial Arts / Wu Shu

  4. Martial Arts Master

  5. Martial Arts / Budo

  6. Korean CKD Virtues

  7. Jing Mo / Jing Wu

  8. Control of Power

  9. Kata

10. Heart of Judo

11. Kyuki-Do

12. Southern Praying Mantis

13. Shotokan

14. Shotokan Karate-Do

15. Chung Do Kwan

16. Speed Control

17. Self-Restraint / Self-Control

18. Heijoshin / Presence of Mind

19. Haidong Gumdo

20. Fatherly Master / Sifu / Shi Fu / Shifu

21. Patience / Perseverance / To Endure / Tolerant

22. Five Elements Tai Chi Fist

23. Immovable Mind

24. Taekwondo

25. Indomitable Spirit

26. Tang Soo Do / Tang Hand Way

27. Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister

28. No Mind / Mushin


Shotokan Aikido

sōng tāo guǎn hé qì dào
shou tou kan ai ki dou
Shotokan Aikido Scroll

This is the title for Shotokan Aikido in Japanese.

Note: Chinese and Korean pronunciations of these characters are included above, however, this title would only be understood in Chinese or Korean by someone who practices or is familiar with Shotokan Aikido. Please consider this title to be "Japanese only".


See Also:  Martial Arts | Hapkido

Martial Arts

wǔ yì
Martial Arts Scroll

武藝 is a Korean Hanja title that means, "martial arts" or "military skill".

武藝 is also a word in Chinese but used more often in the context of Korean martial arts.

From Korean, this is romanized as either "mu ye" or "moo ye". If you want to order this in modern Korean Hangul, just click the Hangul in the pronunciation box next to the Korean flag above.

Martial Arts / Wu Shu

wǔ shù
bujutsu
Martial Arts / Wu Shu Scroll

武術 is the very Chinese way to express "Martial Arts". Some even use this word to directly describe Kung Fu. But this is a label that fits all disciplines from Karate to Kung Fu to Taekwondo.

Note: This also means Martial Arts with the same appearance in old Korean Hanja characters and is pronounced "musul" or "musur" in Korean.

While this is best if your audience is Chinese or Korean, this also means "martial arts" in Japanese.

Martial Arts Master

wǔ yún zhě
bugeisha
Martial Arts Master Scroll

武芸者 is the Japanese Kanji title for "Martial Arts Master". It suggests that you have reached at least the level of black belt, and are probably to the level where you are ready to become an instructor.

Please consider carefully where you stand before ordering this phrase on a wall scroll. If you are not a master, this will make you look a bit foolish.

If you want to get this as a gift for your master at the dojo. Try to discreetly make sure this term is used in your school. Different schools and styles of Japanese martial arts use different terms. You may notice in the Romaji and the characters, this has the same characters as "geisha" which means "person skilled in arts" (what a geisha girl really is). The title here has the character for "martial", "warrior", and/or "military" in front of it. Therefore the literal translation is "martial art person".

These Kanji are valid Chinese characters and Korean Hanja but this title does not really make sense in Chinese and not often used in Korean, though a Chinese or Korean would be able to guess the meaning by looking at the first and last characters.

Martial Arts / Budo

Way of the Warrior
wǔ dào
bu dou
Martial Arts / Budo Scroll

武道 is the very common Japanese way to say "Martial Arts".

武道 is used mostly in Japanese dojos but is also understood in Chinese and Korean.

Some will use this title to mean chivalry (the conduct of a knight) or military art. The way this word is understood would depend on the context in which it is used.

The first character means "force" or "warlike" or "essence of a warrior".

The second character means "method", "path", and "the way". It is the same character used to describe/mean the philosophy of Taoism / Daoism.

Some will also translate this as, "The Way of the Warrior", especially in the context of Korean martial arts.

Korean CKD Virtues

qiān xùn zhèng zhí wēn róu rěn nài kè jǐ bù qū
Korean CKD Virtues Scroll

These are the virtues used by Choi Kwang Do Martial Arts.

EnglishHanjaHangulPronunciation
1. Humility (Humble / Modesty)謙遜겸손gyeom son
2. Honesty (Integrity)正直정직jeong jig
3. Gentleness溫柔온유on yu
4. Perseverance (To Endure)忍耐인내in nae
5. Self-Control (Self-Restraint)克己극기geug gi
6. Unbreakable Spirit (Unyielding / Unbending)不屈불굴bur gur

The characters shown here are the ancient Korean Hanja form of writing. If you wish for a Korean Hangul form of these tenets, we can arrange that with our Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping (click on the Hangul next to the South Korean flag above to order this in Hangul).

Jing Mo / Jing Wu

jīng wǔ
jing mo
Jing Mo / Jing Wu Scroll

This two-character title is used for a certain type of martial arts. You can translate this roughly as "Excellent Marital Arts" or "Excellence in Martial Arts". You will notice that the second character is "wu" as in wushu (martial arts) and wushi (warrior).

More information can be found at the Jing Mo website. You should probably only order this if you are a member of this association.

Note that "jing mo" is the Cantonese pronunciation of these characters. In Mandarin, they are "jing wu".
Also used in Korean but only by those involved with martial arts who can also read Korean Hanja (a small percentage of the population).

Control of Power

Him Cho Chung
lì cào zhèng
Control of Power Scroll

力操正 is a Korean martial arts title meaning, "Power Control".

It's most often cited as one of the 8 key concepts from Tang Soo Do.

This can be pronounced in Chinese but will only be recognized by those familiar with martial arts terms.

xíng
kata
Kata Scroll

型 is often used in Japanese martial arts to mean a certain set of movements and techniques.

The meaning in other context (and in Chinese or Korean) can be model, type, style, pattern, mold, mould, template, or form.

One Japanese dictionary defines it as, "standard form of a movement, posture, etc. in martial arts, sport, etc".

Heart of Judo

róu
yawara
Heart of Judo Scroll

This 柔 Kanji literally means flexible, pliable, gentle, or yielding.

柔 is also the first Kanji of the Japanese martial arts titles of Judo and Jujutsu (Jujitsu). In those cases, it's pronounced "ju" in Japanese. However, alone, the classic pronunciation is "yawara". Some translate this Kanji (in the context of martial arts) as "The Heart of Judo".

Please note that this just means pliable, gentle, and yielding in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. They do know what Judo and Jujitsu are but if this character is seen alone in China or Korea, people generally will not think of the martial arts context.

Kyuki-Do

Korean Martial Art
jī qì dào
Kyuki-Do Scroll

擊氣道 is the title of the Kyuki-Do form of Korean martial arts.

In Korean Hangul, it's 격기도.

While "Kyuki-Do" is the most common romanized form of this title, the official Korean romanization is actually "Gyeog Gi Do" or "Gyeoggi-Do".>

The first character means to hit, strike, attack, rout, or break.
The second means "life energy" or "atmosphere".
The last means "the way" or "method".

FYI: The last two characters are the same as the last two in the titles Hapkido and Aikido.

I have included Mandarin Chinese pronunciation above, however, this term would only be known by Chinese people familiar with this style of martial arts. Consider this to be a Korean-only title.

Southern Praying Mantis

nán pài táng láng
Southern Praying Mantis Scroll

This can be translated literally as "Southern School Praying Mantis" or "Southern Style Praying Mantis".

Despite its name, the Southern Praying Mantis style of Chinese martial arts is unrelated to the Northern Praying Mantis style. Southern Praying Mantis is instead related most closely to fellow Hakka styles such as Dragon and more distantly to the Fujian family of styles that includes Fujian White Crane, Five Ancestors, and Wing Chun.

This style of martial arts focuses more on fighting skills rather than aesthetics.

Of course, you already knew that if you were looking for this term.

Note: This title can be pronounced and does have meaning in Korean but only to Koreans familiar with Chinese martial arts.

Shotokan

sōng tāo guǎn
shou tou kan
Shotokan Scroll

These Kanji characters make up the title for Shotokan.

This should be considered a Japanese-only title. It does make sense and is pronounceable in Chinese and Korean but only as a title for a building (perhaps a martial arts hall) surrounded by pine trees. Also, the first two characters were simplified in both Japanese and Chinese. The third character was simplified in Chinese but not Japanese.

Upon request, we can offer the fully traditional Chinese version but be sure you know what you are asking for.

Note: This would be understood in Chinese and Korean Hanja by a person from those cultures who is familiar with martial arts and various schools of Japanese karate.

Shotokan Karate-Do

sōng tāo guǎn kōng shǒu dào
shou tou kan kara te dou
Shotokan Karate-Do Scroll

These Japanese Kanji make up the title for Shotokan Karate.

This should be considered a Japanese-only title. It does make sense and is pronounceable in Chinese and Korean but only as a title for a building (perhaps a martial arts hall) surrounded by pine trees - followed by the characters for "The empty hand method" (kong shou dao / Karate-do). Also, the first two characters were simplified in both Japanese and Chinese. The third character was simplified in Chinese but not Japanese.

Upon request, we can offer the fully traditional Chinese version but be sure you know what you are asking for.

Note: This would be understood in Chinese and Korean Hanja by a person from those cultures who is familiar with martial arts and various schools of Japanese karate.

Chung Do Kwan

Chung Do Kwan Scroll

靑濤館 is the Korean martial arts style, Chung Do Kwan, meaning, "Blue Wave School".

If you want this in modern Korean Hangul characters, click on the Hangul next to the Korean flag above instead of the button above.

Also Romanized as "Cheong Do Gwan" or "Ch'ŏng Do Kwan".

Speed Control

Wan Geub
huǎn jí
kankyuu
Speed Control Scroll

緩急 is often used as a Korean martial arts term, "speed control". It's also one of the 8 key concepts of Tang Soo Do.

In other context, this can mean: priority; pace; tempo; slow and fast.

Self-Restraint / Self-Control

kè jǐ
kokki
Self-Restraint / Self-Control Scroll

克己 / 剋己 can be translated as "self-denial", "self-abnegation", "self-restraint", "self-discipline", "self-mastery" or selflessness.

As a tenet of Korean taekwondo, and other martial arts, this is often used with the title "self-control".

Heijoshin / Presence of Mind

píng cháng xīn
hei jou shin
Heijoshin / Presence of Mind Scroll

平常心 is the title Heijoshin, as associated with Kendo and Aikido schools of Japanese martial arts.

平常心 is also a word in Japanese which can be translated as "one's self-possession" or "presence of mind".

In Chinese and Korean, this means "simplicity heart", "composure", "calmness", or a "sense of orderliness". In Chinese and Korean, this implies that you enjoy what you have, keep your heart in balance, and have no over-blown ambitions.

Haidong Gumdo

hǎi dǒng jiàn dào
Haidong Gumdo Scroll

海東劍道 is the Korean martial arts style that means Eastern Sea Sword Way.

The character meanings break down this way:
海 = Sea
東 = East/Eastern
劍 = Sword
道 = Way/Path/Style/Method

This can sometimes be romanized as "Hae Dong Kum Do", "Haidong Kendo", "Hae Dong Geom Do", "Haedong Geomdo", or "Haedong Kumdo".

If you want this written in modern Korean Hangul (해동검도) instead of Hanja (Chinese), click on the Hangul characters next to the Korean flag above, instead of the regular button.

Fatherly Master / Sifu / Shi Fu / Shifu

Martial Arts Teacher
shī fù
si fu
shi fu
Fatherly Master / Sifu / Shi Fu / Shifu Scroll

師父 means master in Chinese (occasionally used in Korean Hanja and Japanese as well). In the context of Martial Arts, this is the master and teacher who instructs students.

The second character by itself means father. Thus, you get the "Fatherly Master" translation. There's an old Chinese saying that goes something like, "One who is your teacher for one day, is your father for life".

Language notes: I've often seen this romanized as "sifu", this is actually the Cantonese romanization. In Mandarin Chinese, it's "shifu". The pronunciation in Mandarin is actually like "sure foo" (using typical English pronunciation). There's an "R-sound" in there, which is not obvious from the romanization. Many martial arts studios incorrectly pronounce this like "she foo" (which is actually the Japanese pronunciation). In Cantonese, it sounds like "Sea foo" (almost like "sea food", minus the "d" on the end).

師父 is kind of a weird selection for a calligraphy wall scroll, this entry is more for educational purposes. But you are welcome to buy it if you feel it's appropriate for your circumstances.

Patience / Perseverance / To Endure / Tolerant

rěn nài
nin tai
Patience / Perseverance / To Endure / Tolerant Scroll

Patience is quiet hope and trust that things will turn out right. You wait without complaining. You are tolerant and accepting of difficulties and mistakes. You picture the end in the beginning and persevere to meet your goals.

忍耐 can also mean "to endure", "restrain oneself", "forbearance", and in some context it can mean "perseverance" or "endurance".

忍耐 is also used as a tenet of Taekwondo, Tang Soo Do, and other Korean martial arts where it's titled "Endurance" and romanized as "In Neh".


忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it’s just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).


See Also:  Peace | Harmony | Perseverance

Five Elements Tai Chi Fist

wǔ xíng tài jí quán
go gyou tai kyoku ken
Five Elements Tai Chi Fist Scroll

五行太極拳 is a certain school or style of Tai Chi (Taiji).

The characters literally mean "Five Elements Tai Chi Fist".

Notes:
In Taiwan, it would be Romanized as "Wu Hsing Tai Chi Chuan" - see the standard Mandarin method above in the gray box (used in mainland China and the official Romanization used by the Library of Congress).

The last three characters are sometimes translated as "Grand Ultimate Fist", so the whole thing can be "Five Elements Grand Ultimate Fist" if you wish.

I have not confirmed the use of this title in Korean but if it is used, it's probably only by martial arts enthusiasts. The pronunciation is correct as shown above for Korean.

Immovable Mind

fudoshin
fu dou shin
Immovable Mind Scroll

不動心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet.

Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: An unshakable mind and an immovable spirit is the state of fudoshin. It is courage and stability displayed both mentally and physically. Rather than indicating rigidity and inflexibility, fudoshin describes a condition that is not easily upset by internal thoughts or external forces. It is capable of receiving a strong attack while retaining composure and balance. It receives and yields lightly, grounds to the earth, and reflects aggression back to the source.

Other translations of this title include imperturbability, steadfastness, keeping a cool head in an emergency, or keeping one's calm (during a fight).

The first two Kanji alone mean immobility, firmness, fixed, steadfastness, motionless, idle.

The last Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these three Kanji create a title that is defined as "immovable mind" within the context of Japanese martial arts. However, in Chinese it would mean "motionless heart" and in Korean Hanja, "wafting heart" or "floating heart".

Taekwondo

tái quán dào
te kon do
Taekwondo Scroll

跆拳道 is one of the most widespread types of martial arts in the world as well as being an Olympic sport. Taekwondo was born in Korea with influences of Chinese and Japanese styles, combined with traditional Korean combat skills. Some will define it as the "Korean art of empty-handed self-defense".

In the simplest translation, the first character means "kick", the second character can mean either "fist" or "punching" the third means "way" or "method". Altogether, you could say this is "Kick Punch Method". When heard or read in various Asian languages, all will automatically think of this famous Korean martial art. It is written the same in Japanese Kanji, Chinese, and Korean Hanja characters - so the appearance of the characters are rather universal. However, you should note that there is another way to write this in modern Korean Hangul characters which looks like the image to the right. Taekwondo Hangul Characters

We suggest the original Korean Hanja (Chinese characters) for a wall scroll but if you really need the Hangul version, you must use master calligrapher Xing An-Ping: Order Taekwondo in Korean Hangul

Note: Taekwondo is sometimes Romanized as Tae-Kwondo, Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-do, Taegwondo, Tae Gweon Do, Tai Kwon Do, Taikwondo, Taekwando, Tae Kwan Do and in Chinese Taiquandao, Tai Quan Dao, Taichuando, or Tai Chuan Tao.

Indomitable Spirit

Korean Only
bǎi shé bù qū
Indomitable Spirit Scroll

This Korean proverb means "indomitable spirit", at least, that is the way it is commonly translated in martial arts circles (Taekwondo, Hapkido, etc.).

The literal translation is "[one] hundred [times] broken [still] don't succumb".
Or more naturally translated, "Even if attacked/beaten one hundred times, still be undaunted/indomitable".

Notes:
Some will say this is one long word rather than a proverb.
百折不屈 is also a proverb/word in Chinese though rarely used in modern times.

Tang Soo Do / Tang Hand Way

táng shǒu dào
kara te do
Tang Soo Do / Tang Hand Way Scroll

唐手道 is the alternate title for Karate-do.

This title uses a character, 唐, which represents the Tang Dynasty of China. Thus, this is often translated as the "Tang Hand Way" or incorrectly, "Tang Fist Way".
I have also seen some call it "China Hand Way".
Many in Korea refer to and romanize these characters as as "Tang Soo Do" (당수도) where these characters refer to a kind of Korean style of Karate.

There is not a lot of information on this title but some believe that a simplified form of Kung Fu that started in China, and ended up very popular in Japan used this title initially. It was later changed in Japan to a different Karate title which means "Empty Hand" (as in, without weapons).

Note: When used in Korean, this is pronounced 당수도. This title is often romanized as "Tang Soo Do", "Tangsudo", "Dang Su Do", or "Dangsudo". The last two romanizations on that list are the official Korean government romanization, though martial arts schools tend to use other non-standard versions.

Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister

xiān shēng
sen sei
Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister Scroll

If you've taken even a single karate class in your life, you know this term. 先生 is sensei, which is associated in the west with a master or instructor of karate, aikido, judo, and other Japanese martial arts.

In reality, this is a term of respect for almost any professional or skilled person (doctor, lawyer, teacher, etc). In some cases, it is used for musicians and artists who have achieved a certain level of fame, skill, or accomplishment.

It should be noted that this is also a courtesy title in Chinese but more like calling someone "mister" or "gentleman". It doesn't really have the "master" or "teacher" meaning in Chinese - see our Chinese "Master / Sifu / Shi Fu" entry if your audience is Chinese.

In Korean Hanja, this means teacher, instructor, schoolmaster, or schoolmistress.

This entry is more for educational purposes. 先生 is kind of a strange thing to put on a wall scroll. It's a title that is used more orally to show respect, rather than something written in calligraphy. If you feel that it is appropriate in your circumstances, we are very willing to create a piece of sensei Japanese calligraphy artwork for you.

No Mind / Mushin

wú xīn
mu shin
No Mind / Mushin Scroll

In Japanese, this word means innocent, or one with no knowledge of good and evil. It literally means "without mind".

無心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: "No mind, a mind without ego. A mind like a mirror which reflects and dos not judge". The original term was "mushin no shin", meaning, "mind of no mind". It is a state of mind without fear, anger, or anxiety. Mushin is often described by the phrase, "mizu no kokoro", which means, "mind like water". The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects it's surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

This has a good meaning in conjunction with Chan / Zen Buddhism in Japan. However, out of that context, it means mindlessness or absent-minded. To non-Buddhists in China, this is associated with doing something without thinking.
In Korean, this usually means indifference.

Use caution and know your audience before ordering this selection.


More info: Wikipedia: Mushin




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...

Gallery Price: $144.00

Your Price: $79.88

Gallery Price: $144.00

Your Price: $79.88

Gallery Price: $144.00

Your Price: $79.88

Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $98.88

Gallery Price: $150.00

Your Price: $88.88

Gallery Price: $150.00

Your Price: $88.88

Gallery Price: $150.00

Your Price: $88.88

Gallery Price: $70.00

Your Price: $38.88

Gallery Price: $88.00

Your Price: $48.88

Gallery Price: $88.00

Your Price: $48.88

Gallery Price: $88.00

Your Price: $48.88


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Shotokan Aikido鬆濤館合氣道 (Old Japanese/Chinese)
松涛館合気道 (Modern Japanese)
shou tou kan ai ki dou
shoutoukanaikidou
sho to kan ai ki do
shotokanaikido
sōng tāo guǎn hé qì dào
song1 tao1 guan3 he2 qi4 dao4
song tao guan he qi dao
songtaoguanheqidao
sung t`ao kuan ho ch`i tao
sungtaokuanhochitao
sung tao kuan ho chi tao
Martial Arts武藝
武艺
wǔ yì / wu3 yi4 / wu yi / wuyiwu i / wui
Martial Arts
Wu Shu
武術
武术
bujutsuwǔ shù / wu3 shu4 / wu shu / wushu
Martial Arts Master武芸者bugeishawǔ yún zhě
wu3 yun2 zhe3
wu yun zhe
wuyunzhe
wu yün che
wuyünche
Martial Arts
Budo
武道bu dou / budou / bu do / budowǔ dào / wu3 dao4 / wu dao / wudaowu tao / wutao
Korean CKD Virtues謙遜正直溫柔忍耐克己不屈
谦逊正直温柔忍耐克己不屈
qiān xùn zhèng zhí wēn róu rěn nài kè jǐ bù qū
qian1 xun4 zheng4 zhi2 wen1 rou2 ren3 nai4 ke4 ji3 bu4 qu1
qian xun zheng zhi wen rou ren nai ke ji bu qu
ch`ien hsün cheng chih wen jou jen nai k`o chi pu ch`ü
chien hsün cheng chih wen jou jen nai ko chi pu chü
Jing Mo
Jing Wu
精武jīng wǔ / jing1 wu3 / jing wu / jingwuching wu / chingwu
Control of Power力操正lì cào zhèng
li4 cao4 zheng4
li cao zheng
licaozheng
li ts`ao cheng
litsaocheng
li tsao cheng
Katakataxíng / xing2 / xinghsing
Heart of Judoyawararóu / rou2 / roujou
Kyuki-Do擊氣道
击气道
jī qì dào
ji1 qi4 dao4
ji qi dao
jiqidao
chi ch`i tao
chichitao
chi chi tao
Southern Praying Mantis南派螳螂nán pài táng láng
nan2 pai4 tang2 lang2
nan pai tang lang
nanpaitanglang
nan p`ai t`ang lang
nanpaitanglang
nan pai tang lang
Shotokan鬆濤館
松涛館
shou tou kan
shoutoukan
sho to kan
shotokan
sōng tāo guǎn
song1 tao1 guan3
song tao guan
songtaoguan
sung t`ao kuan
sungtaokuan
sung tao kuan
Shotokan Karate-Do鬆濤館空手道
松涛館空手道
shou tou kan kara te dou
shoutoukankaratedou
sho to kan kara te do
shotokankaratedo
sōng tāo guǎn kōng shǒu dào
song1 tao1 guan3 kong1 shou3 dao4
song tao guan kong shou dao
songtaoguankongshoudao
sung t`ao kuan k`ung shou tao
sungtaokuankungshoutao
sung tao kuan kung shou tao
Chung Do Kwan靑濤館
Speed Control緩急
缓急
kankyuu / kankyuhuǎn jí / huan3 ji2 / huan ji / huanjihuan chi / huanchi
Self-Restraint
Self-Control
克己 / 剋己
克己
kokki / kokikè jǐ / ke4 ji3 / ke ji / kejik`o chi / kochi / ko chi
Heijoshin
Presence of Mind
平常心hei jou shin
heijoushin
hei jo shin
heijoshin
píng cháng xīn
ping2 chang2 xin1
ping chang xin
pingchangxin
p`ing ch`ang hsin
pingchanghsin
ping chang hsin
Haidong Gumdo海東劍道
海东剑道
hǎi dǒng jiàn dào
hai3 dong3 jian4 dao4
hai dong jian dao
haidongjiandao
hai tung chien tao
haitungchientao
Fatherly Master
Sifu
Shi Fu
Shifu
師父
师父
shi fu / shifushī fù / shi1 fu4 / shi fu / shifushih fu / shihfu
Patience
Perseverance
To Endure
Tolerant
忍耐nin tai / nintairěn nài / ren3 nai4 / ren nai / rennaijen nai / jennai
Five Elements Tai Chi Fist五行太極拳
五行太极拳
go gyou tai kyoku ken
gogyoutaikyokuken
go gyo tai kyoku ken
gogyotaikyokuken
wǔ xíng tài jí quán
wu3 xing2 tai4 ji2 quan2
wu xing tai ji quan
wuxingtaijiquan
wu hsing t`ai chi ch`üan
wuhsingtaichichüan
wu hsing tai chi chüan
Immovable Mind不動心fu dou shin
fudoushin
fu do shin
fudoshin
Taekwondo跆拳道te kon do / tekondotái quán dào
tai2 quan2 dao4
tai quan dao
taiquandao
t`ai ch`üan tao
taichüantao
tai chüan tao
Indomitable Spirit百折不屈bǎi shé bù qū
bai3 she2 bu4 qu1
bai she bu qu
baishebuqu
pai she pu ch`ü
paishepuchü
pai she pu chü
Tang Soo Do
Tang Hand Way
唐手道kara te do / karatedotáng shǒu dào
tang2 shou3 dao4
tang shou dao
tangshoudao
t`ang shou tao
tangshoutao
tang shou tao
Sensei
Master
Teacher
Mister
先生sen sei / senseixiān shēng
xian1 sheng1
xian sheng
xiansheng
hsien sheng
hsiensheng
No Mind
Mushin
無心
无心
mu shin / mushinwú xīn / wu2 xin1 / wu xin / wuxinwu hsin / wuhsin
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


No Mind / Mushin Scroll
No Mind / Mushin Scroll
No Mind / Mushin Scroll
No Mind / Mushin Scroll


And formats...

No Mind / Mushin Vertical Portrait
No Mind / Mushin Horizontal Wall Scroll
No Mind / Mushin Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Korean Martial Arts in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Abundance and ProsperityAbundant HealthAikidoAmaterasuAngelAngeliqueBeautyBettyBig BrotherBirdBirthdayBlessingsBodhidharmaBrotherhoodBryceCharityChaseDaoismDouble HappinessExtremeFear No EvilFearlessFierceFireFire DragonForever LoveForgivenessFortitudeFortuneFrancescaGoldGold DragonGood FortuneGood HealthGreatGreat AmbitionsHafsaHappy BirthdayHealthHopeHorseImaginationIndestructibleJudoJuggernautKathrynLoversMarriageMindMulanOvercomePainPeaceful WarriorPhilipPineProsperityRenaRichieScarlettScholarSerenityStrengthSupermanTaoistThorToleranceTrust No ManUnitedVampireWarriorWeddingYin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Korean Martial Arts Kanji, Korean Martial Arts Characters, Korean Martial Arts in Mandarin Chinese, Korean Martial Arts Characters, Korean Martial Arts in Chinese Writing, Korean Martial Arts in Japanese Writing, Korean Martial Arts in Asian Writing, Korean Martial Arts Ideograms, Chinese Korean Martial Arts symbols, Korean Martial Arts Hieroglyphics, Korean Martial Arts Glyphs, Korean Martial Arts in Chinese Letters, Korean Martial Arts Hanzi, Korean Martial Arts in Japanese Kanji, Korean Martial Arts Pictograms, Korean Martial Arts in the Chinese Written-Language, or Korean Martial Arts in the Japanese Written-Language.

1 people have searched for Korean Martial Arts in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Korean Martial Arts was last searched for by someone else on Sep 11th, 2020