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Hand Painted
Ships from: USA

 This artwork is
100% hand-painted.

Typical Gallery Price: $210.00

Your Price: $92.88


MuShin
Without Mind
Kanji Wall Scroll


MuShin - Without Mind - Kanji Wall Scroll
MuShin - Without Mind - Kanji Wall Scroll
128cm
50¼"
50.6cm
20"

Approximate Measurements

Artwork Panel: 32.6cm x 66.4cm  ≈  12¾" x 26"

Silk/Brocade: 41.6cm x 128cm  ≈  16¼" x 50¼"

Width at Wooden Knobs: 50.6cm  ≈  20"

Information about caring for your wall scroll
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無心

Mushin

Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scroll

MuShin - Without Mind - Kanji Wall Scroll close up view

Close up view of the artwork mounted to this silk brocade wall scroll

In Japanese, this word means innocent, or one with no knowledge of good and evil. It literally means "without mind".

This is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: "No mind, a mind without ego. A mind like a mirror which reflects and dos not judge." The original term was "mushin no shin", meaning, "mind of no mind." It is a state of mind without fear, anger, or anxiety. Mushin is often described by the phrase, "mizu no kokoro", which means, "mind like water". The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects it’s surroundings when calm, but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

More info: Wikipedia: Mushin

This has a good meaning in conjunction with Chan / Zen Buddhism in Japan. However, out of that context, it means mindlessness or absent-minded. To non-Buddhists in China, this is associated with doing something without thinking.
In Korean, this usually means indifference.

Use caution and know your audience before ordering this wall scroll. Obviously, this is best if you are using the Japanese meaning in the context of martial arts of Buddhism.


About the calligrapher:

Caobin 2017

I met Cao Bin years ago, and long before his fame. At that time, his wife was running a small house cleaning business. One day she was tidying up my mother-in-law's home in Beijing and overheard that I am in the business of selling Chinese calligraphy and artwork. She asked if I'd like to meet her husband who was a pretty good calligrapher as she described him with modesty.

The next evening, I visited his modest studio and saw some really nice calligraphy and great black ink bamboo paintings that he'd just finished. After a lot of tea drinking and chatting, I asked if I could commission a few pieces.

Through the years, I would occasionally buy a few more pieces, not realizing how famous he had become. I might pop by his studio, only to hear from his wife that he was down in Anhui receiving an award for his calligraphy (calligraphy competitions are comparable to the fervor that sports championships have in the rest of the world). It finally dawned on me that this man I had known for about 7 years was a premier calligrapher for whom books had been published featuring his work, and the recipient of numerous awards.

The best part is that I have guanxi (a word that kind of means "special relationship" in Chinese), he gives me better prices than anyone else. This really fits well with my philosophy to offer high quality Asian artwork that everyone can afford.

Ponytail Cao Bin

When I first met him, Cao Bin had a shaved head like a Buddhist monk. Years later, he has traded in that look for the ponytail that is expected of the eccentric Chinese artist

Frenzy of people watching Cao Bin

A frenzy of people watch Cao Bin create his calligraphy during a special event

Caobin in Studio

Cao Bin at his studio

Calligraphy Studio of Cao Bin

Full view of Cao Bin's calligraphy studio


More about the artwork:

This is painted on xuan paper (often incorrectly called "rice paper"). The raw artwork was then taken to my workshop in east Beijing where the master mounter built it into a handmade wall scroll.

This item was listed or modified
Jun 26th, 2018

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Gary's random little things about China:

Crossing the Street: Human Frogger in China

If you are from my generation, you may remember the video game called "Frogger". It involved crossing a busy road while narrowly dodging cars and truck, often both in front of and behind you at the same time.

Well you can play real live Frogger every time you cross the street in China. It is perfectly normal to cross a four or six-lane road, one lane at a time. You stand motionless on the white, dashed line between lanes as cars and trucks whiz by you on both sides with only inches to spare. When the next lane is clear, you advance (there is no retreat in this game, that could get you killed, since drivers in China would never expect that).

If you did this in America, drivers would come to a screeching halt and think you were crazy (they might even tell you so, using colorful words and hand gestures). It is simply a different culture, or rather a different way of doing things in modern Chinese culture.

Typical Gallery Price: $210.00

Your Price: $92.88