Hand Painted
Ships from: USA

 This artwork is
100% hand-painted.

Typical Gallery Price: $130.00

Your Price: $58.88

Deer Enclosure
Flowing Cursive Poetry Wall Scroll

Deer Enclosure - Flowing Cursive Poetry Wall Scroll

Approximate Measurements

Artwork Panel: 31.6cm x 65.6cm  ≈  12½" x 25¾"

Silk/Brocade: 41cm x 125.5cm  ≈  16" x 49½"

Width at Wooden Knobs: 50cm  ≈  19¾"

Information about caring for your wall scroll

Deer in Brushwood
Deer Enclosure

By 王維 (Wang Wei) who lived 699–759 A.D.

Deer Enclosure - Flowing Cursive Poetry Wall Scroll close up view

Close up view of the artwork mounted to this silk brocade wall scroll

This is a famous poem written during the Tang Dynasty some 1200 years ago.

The characters, romanization, and very-literal translation of each character...

Kōngshān bùjiàn rén, dàn wén rén yǔ xiǎng。
Fǎn jǐng rù shēnlín, fù zhào qīngtái shàng。
[empty] [mountain] [not] [see] [person], [yet] [hear] [person] [voice] [sound]。
[reflect] [sunlight] [enter] [deep] [forest], [again] [shine] [green] [moss] [on]。

Some Translations...

In the empty mountain, one does not see people, yet one hears the sound of human voice.
Reflected sunlight enters a deep forest, and comes to shine on luscious, green moss.

Remote the mountains, where no one is seen, Though human voices resound.
At dusk, reflected sunlight enters the forest deep. Once again setting the green moss aglow.

Note: 青 [green] can be more than "green" in this context. It often refers to youth and vitality. The green moss can also represent the coming or return of youth.

About this poem...

This is perhaps the most famous poem by poet Wang Wei (相思 "One-Hearted" is a close second). More than a poet, Wang Wei was also a musician, artist, and statesman.

About the calligraphy style...

This style of calligraphy is a flowing caoshu. The word cao means "grass" and shu means "script" or "writing". In English, this is often translated as "cursive". In this style, each character flows into the next. Instead of distinct strokes as seen with more conventional characters, you'll see just one almost-continuous stroke. Because of the special cursive nature, many Chinese people probably can't read this poem without some hints or help.

About the artist...

Xu Xueqin

Calligraphy artist Xu Xue-Qin practicing his art

The artist's name is 許 學 勤 (Xu Xue-Qin) of Jia Shan, which is in Zhenjiang Province of Southern China. He currently works as a school teacher in Jia Shan. Along with teaching, writing calligraphy is his passion.

Xu Xue-Qin is far beyond a hobbyist calligrapher. His calligraphy has been awarded and certified for its quality (see certificate below from a nation-wide calligraphy competition, May 2010). His calligraphy was also chosen for the cover of a widely-read magazine, The World of Weiqi. His calligraphy is also featured in calligraphy textbooks. On weekends and evenings, he can be found teaching calligraphy at a local art school.

Note: I do have a bit of guanxi with this calligrapher which allows me to offer his work to you at a very special price. He happens to be my wife's uncle.

World of Weiqi

Xu Xue-Qin's work featured on the front cover
of The World of Weiqi magazine.

Xu Xueqin's certificate

About the artwork and wall scroll...

The artwork was painted on Chinese xuan paper (known incorrectly as "rice paper" in the west). This is a high-quality handmade paper which is based on mostly cotton pulp.

This artwork was taken to our workshop in Beijing where we mounted it as a nice two-toned silk brocade wall scroll. We use more xuan paper, silk brocade, brass hardware, wood, other paper products, and our specially-made solid-wood knobs to build our wall scrolls.

This item was listed or modified
Mar 3rd, 2018

Printer-Friendly Version

Gary's random little things about China:

Vehicular and Pedestrian Yielding Quotient

When crossing a street, or merely making your way down the road, there is a certain law of physics that comes into play: When two forces meet, one must yield.

Here is the general yielding scheme in China:

Cars yield to big buses and trucks.

Bicycles and cars mingle and narrowly avoid each other. When push comes to shove, the bicyclist knows he will lose the fight. But the car driver knows that the bicycle will scratch his car when he runs it over, and will only yield on that premise.

Cars will not yield to, but are required to avoid pedestrians. When you hit a pedestrian at low speed, it does very little damage, and unlike a bicycle, will almost never scratch your car. Therefore pedestrians are given a smaller margin.
Note: Regardless of green or red stop lights, it is against the law to come to a complete stop when making a right hand turn in China (no matter how many pedestrians are in the way). The rule is "honk and avoid, then continue on your way".

Motor scooters yield to no one, not even when they are being driven on a pedestrian-filled sidewalk. Motor scooters zip around like they have nothing to lose - this may be true, as smaller motor scooters require no license of any kind and are very cheap.

If you are driving on the wrong side of the road, or going the wrong way on a one-way street, you do not have to yield to anyone, no matter what kind of vehicle you are operating.

Cars will yield (not by choice) to pedestrians crossing the street in numbers greater than 10 (it is best in China to invite 9 of your friends for an outing if you plan to cross a lot of streets).

In lieu of yielding, drivers are required to honk at pedestrians. I swear to God, this is the law! It's a safety issue: If you are passing a pedestrian that is walking on the side of the road, you are required by law to honk at them to let them know you are there.
Note: All streets in Chinese cities, sound like a New York traffic jam 24 hours per day with all this "safety honking".

I have not been able to find a traffic law that states you must yield to ambulances. And in practice, very few drivers do.

When two large vehicles come face to face on a narrow roadway, and neither can pass, neither will yield. They will sit there, honking at each other for a while. After several cars are lined up behind them, they will decide that they should have yielded earlier, and start to back up. This is to the great dismay of all the cars behind them who will honk in unison. This could go on for an hour or more. It ends when a police officer arrives, tells both drivers what idiots they are, issues tickets to both of them, and then systematically makes the situation worse by insisting that all the smaller cars turn around (rather than back up) by making 162-point turns in the small roadway. Eventually, two of the cars will hit each other, for which both drivers will be cited and fined on the spot.

Typical Gallery Price: $130.00

Your Price: $58.88