Not what you want?

Try other similar-meaning words, fewer words, or just one word.

Enter your email below, and get an automatic notice when results for Go for It are added or updated...

 
  

Go for It in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Go for It calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Go for It” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Go for It” title below...


  1. Release / Let Go

  2. The Game of Weiqi / Weichi / Go

  3. Forgive and Forget

  4. Let It Be

  5. Let It Be / Be Relieved

  6. Once in a Lifetime

  7. Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

  8. Chess

  9. Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

10. Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither

11. Tranquility Yields Transcendence

12. Overcome / Surpass / Rise Above

13. Sleep / Rest / Repose

14. Industrious / Hard Working

15. Chess

16. Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice

17. Angel

18. Husband and Wife

19. Spare No Effort

20. Antiwar / Anti-War

21. Flying / Flight / Rising Upward

22. Responsibility

23. This Too Shall Pass

24. The key to immortality is first living a life worth remembering

25. One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet

26. Ikiru / To Live

27. Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment

28. Beyond / Exceed / Surpass

29. Camellia

30. Courtesy / Politeness

31. Life Goes On

32. Bond

33. Put out a burning wood cart with a cup of water

34. Shodan

35. Boxing

36. Overcome: Regardless of the Rain and Wind

37. Flower Open / Blooming Flower

38. Sworn Friend / Ally

39. Read

40. Roku-Dan / 6th Degree Black Belt

41. Live Free or Die

42. Roar of the Lioness

43. Trust No One / Trust No Man

44. Through the Ups and Downs of Life

45. Regardless of the Weather, We Overcome Troubles Together

46. Flowers Fall / The End Comes

47. Better to Travel 10,000 Miles than Read 10,000 Books

48. Great Ambitions

49. Love and Respect

50. Smooth Sailing

51. No Worries

52. Flying Tigers AVG

53. Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity

54. Diligent Study Proverb

55. A Bright Future

56. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33

57. A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

58. Qi Gong / Chi Kung

59. Double Happiness Guest Book


Release / Let Go

fàng
hana / pang
Release / Let Go Scroll

放 means to release, to free, to let go, to let out, to set off (fireworks).

In Japanese, this can also be a place called Hanashi

放 is also used in the context of Buddhism.

In Buddhism, this can represent the release of desire, materialism, suffering, or mortality.

The Game of Weiqi / Weichi / Go

wéi qí
The Game of Weiqi / Weichi / Go Scroll

圍棋 is the Chinese title for the ancient game of strategy known as Weiqi or Wei Chi in Chinese, and Go in Japanese.


碁 Note: In Japanese, this game is known by a different single Kanji as seen to the right. If you want this Japanese "Go" character, click the Kanji to the right instead of the button above.

Forgive and Forget

lüè jì yuán qíng
Forgive and Forget Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "to overlook past faults", or "forgive and forget".

It's more literally, "Abridge or make small the scars from your past emotions". Basically, you should let it go.

The character breakdown:
略 (lüè) abbreviation; omission; abridge.
跡 (jī) ruins; scar; traces.
原 (yuán) former.
情 (qíng) feeling; emotion.

Let It Be

suàn le
Let It Be Scroll

This Chinese word means, "let it be", "let it pass", "let it go", or "forget about it".

Let It Be / Be Relieved

mayu o hira ku
Let It Be / Be Relieved Scroll

眉を開く is a Japanese proverb and expression that means, "to feel relieved", "to forget about one's troubles", or "to settle into peace of mind".

The literal words suggest relaxing your eyebrows or face. Allow worry or concern to go away, and just be content "letting it be".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Once in a Lifetime

yī qī yī huì
ichigoichie
Once in a Lifetime Scroll

This Japanese title can be translated as "for this time only", "chance meeting", "one meeting, one opportunity", "never again", or "one chance in a lifetime".

The characters literally mean "one time one meeting" - of course, the Kanji characters have meaning far beyond a direct translation like this.

Some might use this proverb to talk of an opportunity that presents itself just once in your life. It could also be the single chance-meeting with your true soul mate. Basically an expression for any event that might happen once in a lifetime.


This is primarily a Japanese title, however, there is also a Traditional Chinese (and old Korean) version of this proverb. Just the last character is different.
會The traditional form was used in Japan before WWII and in Korea prior to 1900. This title is somewhat known in China.

If you want the older traditional form, just click on the character to the right.

Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

hana wa sa ki hana wa chi ru
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall Scroll

This Japanese proverb is about the cycle of life, or how things come and go in life.

This can be used to suggest that youth, fortune, and life can come and go (everything is temporary).


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

go
Chess Scroll

棋 is the most simple or generic way to write "chess" in Asia.

棋 is parts of other more specific words for board games of strategy such as the western version of chess, Chinese chess, Weiqi, or Go.

In Japanese, this single character is pronounced "Go" and often refers to the game known in the west as "Go" (not just the 5-in-a-row version but also the complicated encirclement game of strategy known in China as Weiqi).

In Chinese, this can be more ambiguous as to which game of chess you speak.

If you like any version of chess, or games of intense strategy, this can be the character to hang on your wall in your game room.

Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

huā kāi huā luò
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall Scroll

花開花落 is a complete proverb that lightly speaks of the cycle of life, or how things come and go in life.

花開花落 is used as a metaphor to suggest that youth is a temporary state, which in time will pass.

This can also be used to suggest that fortunes can come and go (everything is temporary).

Note: There are two versions of this proverb which are very similar. The other uses a word that means wither instead of fall.

Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither

huā kāi huā xiè
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither Scroll

花開花謝 is a complete proverb that lightly speaks of the cycle of life, or how things come and go in life.

花開花謝 is used as a metaphor to suggest that youth is a temporary state, which in time will pass.

This can also be used to suggest that fortunes can come and go (everything is temporary).

Note: There are two versions of this proverb which are very similar. The other uses a word that means fall instead of wither.

Tranquility Yields Transcendence

níng jìng zhì yuǎn
Tranquility Yields Transcendence Scroll

寧靜致遠 is an ancient Chinese idiom which means "tranquility yields transcendence".

This suggests pursuing a quiet life of profound study.

The first two characters mean tranquility. The last two characters mean "go far" which suggests achieving much in your life or expanding beyond normal limits. The direct translation would read something like, "[With] tranquility [in your life, you'll] go far".

Compare this to the English idiom: Still waters run deep.

Overcome / Surpass / Rise Above

chāo yuè
chou etsu
Overcome / Surpass / Rise Above Scroll

In Chinese, Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja, this means overcome, surpass, transcendence, excel, to exceed, go beyond, to rise above, or to transcend.

Sleep / Rest / Repose

ān xī
an soku
Sleep / Rest / Repose Scroll

安息 means to rest, to go to sleep, to rest peacefully, or in repose, in Chinese characters, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Industrious / Hard Working

ài gǎng jìng yè
Industrious / Hard Working Scroll

Used to refer to someone who puts forth maximum effort and achieves much.

We might call this kind of person a "go-getter" in English.


See Also:  Dedication | Tenacious | Devotion

xī yáng qí
Chess Scroll

西洋棋 is the Chinese title for the game of Chess (western style as opposed to Chinese Chess, Weiqi, or Japanese Go).

seiyoushougi
Chess Scroll

西洋将棋 is the Japanese title for the game of Chess (western style as opposed to Chinese Chess, Weiqi, or Japanese Go).

Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice

nìng quē wú làn
Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice Scroll

This Chinese proverb can be translated as, "Better to have nothing (than substandard choice)".

It basically suggests that one should prefer to go without something rather than accept a shoddy option.


See Also:  A Deliberate Inaction is Better Than a Blind Action

Angel

(Name Version 1)
ān qí ér
Angel Scroll

安琪兒 is the most common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Angel.

It is supposed to sound like Angel but to be honest, this one misses the mark.

I would go with the meaning of Angel if I were you.

Husband and Wife

fū fù
fuu fu
Husband and Wife Scroll

These are the Chinese characters, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji for, "Husband and Wife". 夫婦 can also be translated as a married couple, spouses, couple, or pair.

夫婦 is not a common selection for a calligraphy wall scroll in Asia but if it has special meaning for you, go for it.

Spare No Effort

bù yí yú lì
Spare No Effort Scroll

This is a Chinese proverb that can be translated many ways. Here's some of them: go to any lengths; with all one's might; spare no pain; do one's utmost.

If you feel hard work and holding nothing back is your philosophy, then this is the phrase for you.

Antiwar / Anti-War

fǎn zhàn
han sen
Antiwar / Anti-War Scroll

反戰 means antiwar, as in what a pacifist believes in.

China doesn't tend to go to war very often, and Japan has embraced a pacifist ideology, so it's rare to need this word. However, this is the kind of word that war protesters would write on their signs.


戦There is a modern Japanese version of the second character which has become the standard in Japan after WWII. If you want your calligraphy written in the modern Japanese form, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above. Note: Most Japanese and all Chinese people will recognize the form shown in the upper left.

Flying / Flight / Rising Upward

fēi yáng
hi you
Flying / Flight / Rising Upward Scroll

飛揚 means flight, flying, or to rise upwards in Chinese and Japanese Kanji.

飛揚 is not the most common title for a wall scroll but if you have a personal reason, or this idea is important to you, then go for it.

This can also be the personal name "Hiyou" in Japanese.

Responsibility

zé rèn
sekinin
Responsibility Scroll

責任 is the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word for "responsibility".

責任 can also refer to someone who is willing to take the blame when things go wrong (instead of making excuses or passing the blame to someone else). While this is a noble idea, I think it is getting more rare these days in both eastern and western cultures.


Also associated with the idea of "duty."

This Too Shall Pass

yī qiè dōu jiāng guò qù
This Too Shall Pass Scroll

This phrase means, "this too shall pass" in Chinese.

This should be a reminder on your wall that no matter how bad things get, difficulties in life are transient and will go away in time.

This is not the only way to express this idea, as there is also 这一切都会过去 and 一切都会过去.
The version we are using here is more traditional-sounding.

The key to immortality is first living a life worth remembering

huò dé yǒng shēng de yào shí shì xiān yào huó dé jīng cǎi
The key to immortality is first living a life worth remembering Scroll

獲得永生的鑰匙是先要活得精彩 is a famous quote from Bruce Lee.

However, when quoted, he was speaking in English. So this is a translation of his English quote into Chinese. Since Bruce spoke both Chinese and English, his quotes sometimes go both ways.

One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet

cháng zài hé biān zǒu nǎ néng bù shī xié
One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet Scroll

This is an old Chinese proverb that is sometimes compared to the English saying "Shit Happens".

It's a reflection that there are risks in life, and you should not be surprised when things don't go your way.

A secondary translation might be, "When walking by a river, often one cannot avoid wet shoes".

Ikiru / To Live

ikiru
Ikiru / To Live Scroll

This Japanese title means, to live, to exist, to make a living, to subsist, to come to life, or to be enlivened.

生きる is also the title of a 1952 Japanese movie that uses the translated English title of, "To Live".

Note: This term, when used in the context of baseball, and some Japanese games such as "go" can mean "safe".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment

Samudaya
jí dì
jittai
Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment Scroll

At the core of suffering is often the concept of desire or attachment.

This can be carnal desire, monetary desire, or the attachment you have to something that you are unwilling to part with (such as a fancy car). 集諦 is a simplification of the second noble truth which is really and exploration into the root causes of suffering - it's deeper than I can go in a few sentences.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Chinese, Japanese and Korean people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Beyond / Exceed / Surpass

yu
Beyond / Exceed / Surpass Scroll

逾 means: to exceed; to go beyond; to transcend; to cross over; to jump over.

You'll see this character used in Buddhism (same meaning).

Technically, this single character is a Japanese word but seldom-used as a single Kanji in modern Japanese.

Camellia

kameria
Camellia Scroll

カメリア is the name Camellia in Japanese.

This sounds like Camellia, but does not mean the camellia plant or leaf.

Instead of these characters, you may want to go with the name of the plant. Of course, camellia also means tea, as varieties of camellia plants provide the leaves for many kinds of Chinese and Japanese teas.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Courtesy / Politeness

lǐ mào
Courtesy / Politeness Scroll

禮貌 is a Chinese and old Korean word that means courtesy or politeness.

Courtesy is being polite and having good manners. When you speak and act courteously, you give others a feeling of being valued and respected. Greet people pleasantly. Bring courtesy home. Your family needs it most of all. Courtesy helps life to go smoothly.


If you put the words "fēi cháng bù" in front of this, it is like adding "very much not." it’s a great insult in China, as nobody wants to be called "extremely discourteous" or "very much impolite."


See Also:  Kindness | Respect

Life Goes On

jin sei ha tsudu ku
Life Goes On Scroll

人生は続く is a Japanese phrase that expresses, "Life Goes On".

The first two characters mean "life" (literally "human life").
The third character is a particle which connects the ideas in this phrase.
The last two characters mean "to continue", "to last", "to go on", "to occur again and again".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

bàn
kizuna
Bond Scroll

This Kanji represents a bond, as in the bond between mother and daughter, father and son, family ties, or a family bond.

絆 is the kind of character that says, no matter what happens (difficult times), we have this bond that cannot be broken.

If you go to the Japanese dictionary, the definition is: bonds (between people); (emotional) ties; relationship; connection; link; tether; fetters.



Read this before ordering...
This Kanji is best if your audience is Japanese. While this is also a Chinese character, it has a completely different meaning in Chinese (it means to hinder or stumble in Chinese). it’s a very rare character in Korean Hanja but does mean bond in Korean (used in Korean words for certain kinds of glue and sticking plaster).

Put out a burning wood cart with a cup of water

An utterly inadequate measure
bēi shuǐ chē xīn
Put out a burning wood cart with a cup of water Scroll

杯水車薪 is a warning against a futile effort.

This proverb literally refers to one who is "trying to put out a burning cart of wood with a cup of water", or "throw a cup of water on a cartload of wood". The lesson to be learned is about using the right measure or tool for the job, and not to waste your effort if you are inadequately equipped for the task at hand - in other words the postscript should be "go get a bucket or a fire hose".

Shodan

sho dan
Shodan Scroll

This Japanese Kanji word literally means, "beginning degree". 初段 is the lowest black belt rank in Japanese martial arts and the game of Go.

The first Kanji means first, new, or beginning in Japanese.

Other ways to translate this title include, "lowest grade" or "first grade".

Boxing

quán jī
Boxing Scroll

拳擊 is the term used in Chinese to refer to the original Olympic sport of combat and fighting.

If you like to strap on your boxing gloves and go a few rounds, or are just a fan of boxing, this could make a nice wall scroll for you.

Note that Japanese use the same first character (which means fist) but a different Kanji for the second. Please see our Japanese boxing entry for that version.

Overcome: Regardless of the Rain and Wind

fēng yǔ wú zǔ
Overcome: Regardless of the Rain and Wind Scroll

This proverb is often translated as, "Go ahead as planned regardless of the weather" or, "[Overcome] despite the rain and wind".

This Chinese proverb suggests that you are willing (or should be willing) to overcome any adversity, and accomplish your task at hand.

There is a second/optional part to this phrase which suggests that you should do this together with someone (see our other 8-character version if you want the full phrase).

Flower Open / Blooming Flower

huā kāi
Flower Open / Blooming Flower Scroll

These two characters literally mean "flower open".

花開 is also associated with Springtime, the beginning of something, or youth.

花開 is often followed by "flower falls" (closes and loses its petals) which means "Things come and go" or "Youth comes and goes".

If you like flowers and the Springtime, this is a great selection for you. However, if you want the companion "flower falls" (flower withers), we offer that as a companion wall scroll or all together as a four-character phrase.


See Also:  Flowers Fall

Sworn Friend / Ally

méng yǒu
meiyuu
Sworn Friend / Ally Scroll

盟友 means a sworn friend or ally. If you stand on the same side of an issue with someone, and perhaps fight for the same cause together, this is the term you would use to describe such a partner.

There may not be a personal relationship, as this term is also used to describe whole countries that make a coalition, or fight against a common enemy.

This would be most appropriate if you are a high-level military officer, giving this wall scroll to an officer of another country as you join forces together, and go to war.

yuè
Read Scroll

This Chinese character means to read. It can also refer to observing (the world, and learning from it), or gaining life experiences. 閱 is a good character to relay the idea of being "well read", which can include reading books, studying, and learning through experience.

The dictionary definition also includes: to inspect; to review; to peruse; to go through; to experience.

Technically, this is also a Japanese Kanji but it only used by some Japanese Buddhists (most of the population will not recognize it).

In both Chinese and Japanese Buddhism, this means: Examine, inspect, look over.

Roku-Dan / 6th Degree Black Belt

roku dan
Roku-Dan / 6th Degree Black Belt Scroll

六段 is the Japanese title for the 6th Degree or 6th Level.

This applies mostly to martial arts and earning the title of a 6th-degree black belt.

The first character is simply the number 6.
The second character is "dan" which is often translated at "degree" in the context of Japanese martial arts. 六段 actually means grade, rank, level. When a number is in front like this, it refers to a senior rank in martial arts or games of strategy such as go, shogi, chess, etc.

Live Free or Die

Give me liberty or give me death
bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
Live Free or Die Scroll

不自由毋寧死 means, "Give me liberty or give me death", in Chinese.

This is also the best way to say, "Live free or die".

The characters break down this way:
不 = Not; none; without.
自由 = Freedom; liberty; freewill; self-determination.
毋寧 = Rather; would rather; rather be.
死 = Dead; death.

This will go nicely next to your, "Don't tread on me", flag. This phrase is known well enough in China that it's listed in a few dictionaries. Though I doubt you will find too many Chinese citizens willing to yell this on the steps of the capital in Beijing.


See Also:  Death Before Dishonor

Roar of the Lioness

hé dōng shī hǒu
Roar of the Lioness Scroll

河東獅吼 is actually a proverb and joke about the plight and fear of a hen-pecked husband.

In more ancient times it was used to describe a wife who would berate her husband or go into jealous rages. However, this phrase currently brings about ideas of a husband that cowers in fear and cringes when his wife screams (or roars) at him.

Please only purchase this as a good-natured joke. If your wife or husband does not have a good sense of humor, it's probably not a good idea to hang this on your wall just to irritate your mate.

Trust No One / Trust No Man

wú fǎ xìn rèn
Trust No One / Trust No Man Scroll

無法信任 is the kind of thing you expect to hear in a spy movie.

"Trust no one, 007!"

The first two characters express the idea of "no way" or "cannot".

The last two characters mean "trust".

The characters must go in this order due to Chinese grammar issues and in order to sound natural.

Note: 無法信任 is not an ancient Chinese phrase by any means. It's just that we received a lot of requests for this phrase.

無法信任 is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man", though technically no gender is specified.

Through the Ups and Downs of Life

tóng gān gòng kǔ
Through the Ups and Downs of Life Scroll

This Chinese proverb talks of "shared delights and common hardships".

This can be translated and understood a few different ways, including:
To share life's joys and sorrows.
For better or for worse.
Through joys and sorrows of life.
Through all life ups and downs.
To go through thick and thin.
To stick together through thick and thin.
To share joys and sorrows of life.
To share pleasures and pains.
To partake in each other's joys and sorrows.
To take "for better or for worse".

Regardless of the Weather, We Overcome Troubles Together

fēng yǔ wú zǔ tóng zhōu gòng jì
Regardless of the Weather, We Overcome Troubles Together Scroll

The first four characters are often translated as, "Go ahead as planned regardless of the weather" or, "[Overcome] despite the rain and wind". The last four characters can mean, "Stick together" but literally means "Take the same boat [together]".

This Chinese proverb suggests that you are willing (or should be willing) to overcome any adversity, and accomplish your task at hand. The second part (last four characters) is sometimes left off but this second part strongly suggests that you should overcome that adversity together.

Flowers Fall / The End Comes

huā sà
Flowers Fall / The End Comes Scroll

These two characters mean flower fall (closes and loses its petals).

It suggests nearing the end of something. A time that some might call "The sunset of life". 花落 often follows "flower open" to talk of the cycle of life.

We offer this as a possible companion to a "flower open" scroll (to be placed side by side, or at either side of a doorway to say "things come and go" - a cool metaphor for a doorway). If placed in a doorway, it could be used as a suggestion to your guests that things bloom when they arrive through your door but wither when they leave (a great compliment).


See Also:  Flowers Bloom

Better to Travel 10,000 Miles than Read 10,000 Books

xíng wàn lǐ lù shèng dú wàn juǎn shū
Better to Travel 10,000 Miles than Read 10,000 Books Scroll

This translates a few ways:
To travel ten-thousand miles beats reading ten-thousand books.
Better to travel ten thousand li than to read ten thousand books. (a "li" is an ancient Chinese mile)
Travelling thousands of miles is better than reading thousands of books.

No matter how you slice it, this Chinese proverb is claiming that experience is more profound and meaningful than what you can get from a book. Go do it! Don't just read about it.

Great Ambitions

Brave the wind and the waves
chéng fēng pò làng
Great Ambitions Scroll

乘風破浪 is a Chinese proverb that represents having great ambitions.

The British might say "to plough through". Another way to understand it is, "surmount all difficulties and forge ahead courageously".

This can also be translated as, "braving the wind and waves", "to brave the wind and the billows", "to ride the wind and crest the waves", or "to be ambitious and unafraid".

Literally it reads: "ride (like a chariot) [the] wind [and] break/cleave/cut [the] waves", or "ride [the] wind [and] slash [through the] waves".

乘風破浪 is a great proverb to encourage yourself or someone else not to be afraid of problems or troubles, and when you have a dream just go for it.

There is an alternate version, 長風破浪, but 乘風破浪 is far more common.

Love and Respect

Love and respect each other
xiāng jìng xiāng ài
Love and Respect Scroll

相敬相愛 is an old Chinese proverb that suggests love and respect go together and are to be exchanged between people (especially couples).

The first two characters mean, "exchanging respect" or "mutual respect".

The last two characters create a word that means, "to love each other" or "mutual love".

You'll notice that the first and third characters are the same. So you can read this literally as something like "Exchange respect, exchange love" or "Mutual respect, mutual love". In English, we'd probably just say, "Mutual love and respect". Grammar differs in every language - So while the literal translation might sound a bit awkward in English, this phrase is very natural in Chinese.

Smooth Sailing

yī fán fēng shùn
Smooth Sailing Scroll

一帆風順 is just what you think it means. It suggests that you are on a trouble-free voyage through life, or literally on a sailing ship or sail boat. It is often used in China as a wish for good luck on a voyage or as you set out on a new quest or career in your life. Some may use this in lieu of "bon voyage".

The literal meaning is roughly, "Once you raise your sail, you will get the wind you need, and it will take you where you want to go". Another way to translate it is "Your sail and the wind follow your will".

一帆風順 is a great gift for a mariner, sailor, adventurer, or someone starting a new career.

Note: Can be understood in Korean Hanja but rarely used.


See Also:  Bon Voyage | Adventure | Travel

No Worries

fàng xīn
houshin
No Worries Scroll

My Australian friends always say "No worries mate". It's caught on with me, though I drop the "mate" part since it confuses my fellow Americans.

If you would like to express the idea of "no worries" this is the best and most natural way to say it in Chinese.

The characters you see to the left can be translated as "put your mind at rest" or "to be at ease". You could literally translate "no worries" but it doesn't "flow" like this simple Chinese version.

For your info, the first character means to release, to free, to let go, to relax, or to rest. The second character means your heart or your mind.

Note that in Japanese and Korean, this holds the similar meaning of "peace of mind" but can also mean absentmindedness or carelessness depending on context.

Flying Tigers AVG

fēi hǔ duì
Flying Tigers AVG Scroll

飛虎隊 is the full Chinese title of the "Flying Tigers Group".

These were the American pilots that volunteered to go to China and fight the Japanese prior to the entry of the USA into World War Two. These fighter pilots were so esteemed in China, that fallen American pilots could always find refuge in villages, and safe passage and escape to areas of China that were not occupied by Japan at that time. Chinese villagers helped such fallen pilots with full knowledge that when the Japanese occupation forces found out, all the men, women, and children in the village would be massacred by Japanese troops (there are more than a few known cases of such massacres).

The Flying Tigers successfully kept supply lines to the Chinese resistance open, and divided Japanese forces at a crucial time while America prepared to officially join WWII.

A wall scroll like this honors the men who risked or gave their lives as noble volunteers, and is a reminder of the best moment in the history of Sino-American relations.

These three characters literally mean "flying tiger(s) group/team/squad".


Note: Hanging these characters on your wall will not make you any friends with Japanese people who are aware or this history (most Japanese have no idea, as Japan’s involvement in WWII has all but been erased from school textbooks in Japan).

Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity

Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself
jǐ suǒ bú yù wù shī yú rén
Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity Scroll

Some may think of this as a "Christian trait" but actually it transcends many religions.

This Chinese teaching dates back to about 2,500 years ago in China. Confucius had always taught the belief in being benevolent (ren) but this idea was hard to grasp for some of his students, as benevolence could be kind-heartedness, or an essence of humanity itself.

When answering Zhong Gong's question as to what "ren" actually meant, Confucius said:

"When you go out, you should behave as if you were in the presence of a distinguished guest, when people do favors for you, act as if a great sacrifice was made for you. Whatever you wouldn't like done to you, do not do that thing to others. Don't complain at work or at home".

Hearing this, Zhong Gong said humbly, "Although I am not clever, I will do what you say".

From this encounter, the Chinese version of the "Golden Rule" or "Ethic of Reciprocity" came to be.
The characters you see above express, "Do not do to others whatever you do not want done to yourself".


See Also:  Confucius Teachings | Benevolence

Diligent Study Proverb

Drill a hole in the wall to get light to read by.
záo bì tōu guāng
Diligent Study Proverb Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "Bore a hole on the wall to make use of the neighbor's light to study".

鑿壁偷光 is a nice gift for a very studious person.

Kuang Heng was born during the Western Han period. He was very fond of reading ever since he was young. However, he could not go to school since his family was poor, and he had to borrow books from people to learn.

In order to borrow these books he normally did chores for people who had them. When he became older, he had to work in the field from sunrise to sunset since his family's financial situation did not get any better. Thus, he tried to study at night but he had no lamp.

One day, he noticed that there was light from the neighbor's house coming through a crack in the wall. This made him very happy, so he dug a larger hole from the crack and read in the light that shone through. This diligent study eventually made him an accomplished person.

A Bright Future

Incredible 10,000-Mile Flight of the Peng
péng chéng wàn lǐ
A Bright Future Scroll

鵬程萬里 is an ancient Chinese proverb used in modern times to wish someone a long and successful career.

It's really about the 10,000 Flight of the Peng (Peng, also known as Roc is a mythical fish that can turn into a bird and take flight).

Zhuangzi

庄子 - Zhuangzi

Breaking down each character:
1. Peng or Roc (a kind of bird).
2. Journey (in this case, a flight).
3. 10,000 (Ten Thousand).
4. Li is a unit of distance often referred to as a "Chinese Mile", though the real distance is about half a kilometer.

Direct Translation: "Peng's Journey [of] 10,000 Li".
Literal meaning: "The 10,000-Li Flying Range Of The Roc".
Perceived meaning: "To have a bright future" or "To go far".

This proverb/idiom comes from the book of Zhuangzi. It tells the tale of a huge fish which could turn into a gigantic bird. This bird was called "peng" and was many miles long. This legendary size allowed the Peng to fly from the Northern Sea to the Southern Sea in a single bound.

Wishing someone "a Peng's Journey of 10,000 Li", will imply that they will be able to travel far without stopping, and will have great success, a long career, and a prosperous future.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33

zhī rén zhě zhī yě zì zhī zhě míng yě shèng rén zhě yǒu lì yě zì shèng zhě qiáng yě zhī zú zhě fù yě qiáng xíng zhě yǒu zhì yě bù zhī qí suǒ zhě jiǔ yě sǐ ér bù wáng zhě shòu yě
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33 Scroll

This is referred to as passage or chapter 33 of the Dao De Jing (often Romanized as "Tao Te Ching").

These are the words of the philosopher Laozi (Lao Tzu).

The following is one translation of this passage:
To know others is wisdom;
To know oneself is acuity/intelligence.
To conquer others is power,
To conquer oneself is strength.
To know contentment is to have wealth.
To act resolutely is to have purpose.
To stay one's ground is to be enduring.
To die and yet not be forgotten is to be long-lived.
Another translation:
To understand others is to be knowledgeable;
To understand yourself is to be wise.
To conquer others is to have strength;
To conquer yourself is to be strong.
To know when you have enough is to be rich.
To go forward with strength is to have ambition.
To not lose your place is to be long lasting.
To die but not be forgotten -- that's true long life.
A third translation of the second half:
He who is content is rich;
He who acts with persistence has will;
He who does not lose his roots will endure;
He who dies physically but preserves the Dao
will enjoy a long after-life.


Notes:

During our research, the Chinese characters shown here are probably the most accurate to the original text of Laozi. These were taken for the most part from the Mawangdui 1973 and Guodan 1993 manuscripts which pre-date other Daodejing texts by about 1000 years.

Grammar was a little different in Laozi’s time. So you should consider this to be the ancient Chinese version. Some have modernized this passage by adding, removing, or swapping articles and changing the grammar (we felt the oldest and most original version would be more desirable). You may find other versions printed in books or online - sometimes these modern texts are simply used to explain to Chinese people what the original text really means.

This language issue can be compared in English by thinking how the King James (known as the Authorized version in Great Britain) Bible from 1611 was written, and comparing it to modern English. Now imagine that the Daodejing was probably written around 403 BCE (2000 years before the King James Version of the Bible). To a Chinese person, the original Daodejing reads like text that is 3 times more detached compared to Shakespeare’s English is to our modern-day speech.

Extended notes:

While on this Biblical text comparison, it should be noted, that just like the Bible, all the original texts of the Daodejing were lost or destroyed long ago. Just as with the scripture used to create the Bible, various manuscripts exist, many with variations or copyist errors. Just as the earliest New Testament scripture (incomplete) is from 170 years after Christ, the earliest Daodejing manuscript (incomplete) is from 100-200 years after the death of Laozi.

The reason that the originals were lost probably has a lot to do with the first Qin Emperor. Upon taking power and unifying China, he ordered the burning and destruction of all books (scrolls/rolls) except those pertaining to Chinese medicine and a few other subjects. The surviving Daodejing manuscripts were either hidden on purpose or simply forgotten about. Some were not unearthed until as late as 1993.

We compared a lot of research by various archeologists and historians before deciding on this as the most accurate and correct version. But one must allow that it may not be perfect, or the actual and original as from the hand of Laozi himself.

A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

-or- The crafty rabbit has three different entrances to its lair
jiǎo tù sān kū
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den Scroll

This speaks to the cunning character of a sly rabbit. Such a rabbit will not have just one hole but rather a few entrances and exits from his liar.

About 2,250 years ago a very rich man told his assistant to go and buy something wonderful that he did not yet posses. He was a man that already had everything, so the assistant went to a local village that owed a great deal of money to the rich man. The assistant told the village elders that all debts were forgiven. All the villagers rejoiced and praised the rich man's name. The assistant returned to the rich man and told him he had purchased "benevolence" for him. The rich man was mildly amused but perhaps a bit confused by the action.

Some time later, the rich man fell from the favor of the Emperor, and was wiped out without a penny to his name. One day he was walking aimlessly and stumbled into the village in which the debts had been forgiven. The villagers recognized the man and welcomed him with open arms, clothed, fed, and gave him a place to live.

Without trying, the man had become like the sly and cunning rabbit. When his exit was blocked, he had another hole to emerge from - and was reborn. This story and idiom comes from a book titled "The Amendment" - it's unclear whether this man actually existed or not. But the book did propel this idiom into common use in China.

Still today this idiom about the rabbit is used in China when suggesting "backup plans" alternate methods, and anyone with a good escape plan.

Qi Gong / Chi Kung

qì gōng
kikou
Qi Gong / Chi Kung Scroll

Qigong is the title of a technique that is somewhere between a medical practice, meditation, and in some cases a religion. The definition is blurred depending on which school of Qigong you are following. In some cases, it is even incorporated with martial arts.

Some people (even Chinese people) mix this title with Tai Chi (Tai Qi) exercises.

Lately in China, people will claim to practice Tai Chi rather than Qigong because the Qigong title was recently used as a cover for an illegal pseudo-religious movement in China with the initials F.G. or F.D. (I can not write those names here for fear of our website being banned in China).

You can learn those names and more here: Further info about Qigong

If you are wondering about why I wrote "Qi Gong" and "Chi Kung" as the title of this calligraphy entry, I should teach you a little about the various ways in which Chinese can be Romanized. One form writes this as "Chi Kung" or "Chikung" (Taiwan). In the mainland and elsewhere, it is Romanized as "Qi Gong" or "Qigong". The actual pronunciation is the same in Taiwan, mainland, and Singapore Mandarin. Neither Romanization is exactly like English. If you want to know how to say this with English rules, it would be something like "Chee Gong" (but the "gong" has a vowel sound like the "O" in "go").

Romanization is a really confusing topic and has caused many Chinese words to be mispronounced in the west. One example is "Kung Pao Chicken" which should actually be more like "Gong Bao" with the "O" sounding like "oh" for both characters. Neither system of Romanization in Taiwan or the Mainland is perfect in my opinion and lead to many misunderstandings.

Double Happiness Guest Book

Customize a special Asian guest book for your wedding
Double Happiness Guest Book Scroll

Start customizing a "Double Happiness Guest Book Wall Scroll" Here!

The paper panel length can be whatever you choose from 68cm to 135cm (27" to 53").

If you don't mention what paper length you want in the special instructions tab (on the next page), we'll make it about 100cm (40").

How many signatures fit

The medium size scroll with a 33cm x 100cm (13" x 40") paper panel can usually handle up to 89 signatures. That breaks down to 37 signatures per empty square and 15 signatures around the 囍 character. If you switch to a 135cm paper panel, add another 37 potential signatures.

We can splice two 135cm papers together, but that would be a crazy-long scroll. These are only estimates, your mileage may vary.


With silk panels this will yield a wall scroll about 155cm (61") long. That's enough for up to 89 signatures. Of course, that depends on if your guests just sign a brief salutation and name, or more verbose good wishes. Customer feedback is that 126 people can sign the 135cm long paper on a medium-sized scroll. If we go bigger than that, there will be a minor paper seam and an extra charge. Email me with your specifications if you need something special.

Most customers pick the festive red paper with gold flecks and white or ivory silk. Red is a good luck color in Chinese culture, thus the most popular choice. But, you can do any color combination that you want.

There is a long history of Chinese-character-use outside of mainland China. This Double Happiness character is also seen at weddings in Korea, Vietnam, Hong Kong, Taiwan, as well as Chinese communities in Thailand, Indonesia, and elsewhere. While Japan borrowed Chinese characters into their language, you won't see 囍 as often at Japanese weddings.




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...

Gallery Price: $60.00

Your Price: $33.88

Gallery Price: $60.00

Your Price: $33.88

Gallery Price: $60.00

Your Price: $33.88


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Release
Let Go
hana / pangfàng / fang4 / fang
The Game of Weiqi
Weichi
Go
圍棋
围棋
wéi qí / wei2 qi2 / wei qi / weiqiwei ch`i / weichi / wei chi
Forgive and Forget略跡原情
略迹原情
lüè jì yuán qíng
lve4 ji4 yuan2 qing2
lve ji yuan qing
lvejiyuanqing
chi yüan ch`ing
chiyüanching
chi yüan ching
Let It Be算了suàn le / suan4 le5 / suan le / suanle
Let It Be
Be Relieved
眉を開くmayu o hira ku
mayuohiraku
Once in a Lifetime一期一會
一期一会
ichigoichieyī qī yī huì
yi1 qi1 yi1 hui4
yi qi yi hui
yiqiyihui
i ch`i i hui
ichiihui
i chi i hui
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall花は咲き花は散るhana wa sa ki hana wa chi ru
hanawasakihanawachiru
Chessgoqí / qi2 / qich`i / chi
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall花開花落
花开花落
huā kāi huā luò
hua1 kai1 hua1 luo4
hua kai hua luo
huakaihualuo
hua k`ai hua lo
huakaihualo
hua kai hua lo
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither花開花謝
花开花谢
huā kāi huā xiè
hua1 kai1 hua1 xie4
hua kai hua xie
huakaihuaxie
hua k`ai hua hsieh
huakaihuahsieh
hua kai hua hsieh
Tranquility Yields Transcendence寧靜致遠
宁静致远
níng jìng zhì yuǎn
ning2 jing4 zhi4 yuan3
ning jing zhi yuan
ningjingzhiyuan
ning ching chih yüan
ningchingchihyüan
Overcome
Surpass
Rise Above
超越chou etsu / chouetsu / cho etsu / choetsuchāo yuè / chao1 yue4 / chao yue / chaoyuech`ao yüeh / chaoyüeh / chao yüeh
Sleep
Rest
Repose
安息an soku / ansokuān xī / an1 xi1 / an xi / anxian hsi / anhsi
Industrious
Hard Working
愛崗敬業
爱岗敬业
ài gǎng jìng yè
ai4 gang3 jing4 ye4
ai gang jing ye
aigangjingye
ai kang ching yeh
aikangchingyeh
Chess西洋棋xī yáng qí
xi1 yang2 qi2
xi yang qi
xiyangqi
hsi yang ch`i
hsiyangchi
hsi yang chi
Chess西洋将棋seiyoushougi
seiyoshogi
Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice寧缺毋濫
宁缺毋滥
nìng quē wú làn
ning4 que1 wu2 lan4
ning que wu lan
ningquewulan
ning ch`üeh wu lan
ningchüehwulan
ning chüeh wu lan
Angel安琪兒
安琪儿
ān qí ér
an1 qi2 er2
an qi er
anqier
an ch`i erh
anchierh
an chi erh
Husband and Wife夫婦fuu fu / fuufu / fu fu / fufufū fù / fu1 fu4 / fu fu / fufu
Spare No Effort不遺餘力 / 不遺余力
不遗余力
bù yí yú lì
bu4 yi2 yu2 li4
bu yi yu li
buyiyuli
pu i yü li
puiyüli
Antiwar
Anti-War
反戰
反战 / 反戦
han sen / hansenfǎn zhàn / fan3 zhan4 / fan zhan / fanzhanfan chan / fanchan
Flying
Flight
Rising Upward
飛揚
飞扬
hi you / hiyou / hi yo / hiyofēi yáng / fei1 yang2 / fei yang / feiyang
Responsibility責任
责任
sekininzé rèn / ze2 ren4 / ze ren / zerentse jen / tsejen
This Too Shall Pass一切都將過去
一切都将过去
yī qiè dōu jiāng guò qù
yi1 qie4 dou1 jiang1 guo4 qu4
yi qie dou jiang guo qu
yiqiedoujiangguoqu
i ch`ieh tou chiang kuo ch`ü
ichiehtouchiangkuochü
i chieh tou chiang kuo chü
The key to immortality is first living a life worth remembering獲得永生的鑰匙是先要活得精彩
获得永生的钥匙是先要活得精彩
huò dé yǒng shēng de yào shí shì xiān yào huó dé jīng cǎi
huo4 de2 yong3 sheng1 de yao4 shi2 shi4 xian1 yao4 huo2 de2 jing1 cai3
huo de yong sheng de yao shi shi xian yao huo de jing cai
huo te yung sheng te yao shih shih hsien yao huo te ching ts`ai
huo te yung sheng te yao shih shih hsien yao huo te ching tsai
One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet常在河邊走哪能不濕鞋
常在河边走哪能不湿鞋
cháng zài hé biān zǒu nǎ néng bù shī xié
chang2 zai4 he2 bian1 zou3 na3 neng2 bu4 shi1 xie2
chang zai he bian zou na neng bu shi xie
ch`ang tsai ho pien tsou na neng pu shih hsieh
chang tsai ho pien tsou na neng pu shih hsieh
Ikiru
To Live
生きるikiru
Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment集諦
集谛
jittaijí dì / ji2 di4 / ji di / jidichi ti / chiti
Beyond
Exceed
Surpass
yuyú / yu2 / yu
Camelliaカメリアkameria
Courtesy
Politeness
禮貌
礼貌
lǐ mào / li3 mao4 / li mao / limao
Life Goes On人生は続くjin sei ha tsudu ku
jinseihatsuduku
Bond
kizunabàn / ban4 / banpan
Put out a burning wood cart with a cup of water杯水車薪
杯水车薪
bēi shuǐ chē xīn
bei1 shui3 che1 xin1
bei shui che xin
beishuichexin
pei shui ch`e hsin
peishuichehsin
pei shui che hsin
Shodan初段sho dan / shodan
Boxing拳擊
拳击
quán jī / quan2 ji1 / quan ji / quanjich`üan chi / chüanchi / chüan chi
Overcome: Regardless of the Rain and Wind風雨無阻
风雨无阻
fēng yǔ wú zǔ
feng1 yu3 wu2 zu3
feng yu wu zu
fengyuwuzu
feng yü wu tsu
fengyüwutsu
Flower Open
Blooming Flower
花開
花开
huā kāi / hua1 kai1 / hua kai / huakaihua k`ai / huakai / hua kai
Sworn Friend
Ally
盟友meiyuu / meiyuméng yǒu / meng2 you3 / meng you / mengyoumeng yu / mengyu
Read
yuè / yue4 / yueyüeh
Roku-Dan
6th Degree Black Belt
六段roku dan / rokudan
Live Free or Die不自由毋寧死
不自由毋宁死
bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
bu2 zi4 you2 wu2 ning4 si3
bu zi you wu ning si
buziyouwuningsi
pu tzu yu wu ning ssu
putzuyuwuningssu
Roar of the Lioness河東獅吼
河东狮吼
hé dōng shī hǒu
he2 dong1 shi1 hou3
he dong shi hou
hedongshihou
ho tung shih hou
hotungshihhou
Trust No One
Trust No Man
無法信任
无法信任
wú fǎ xìn rèn
wu2 fa3 xin4 ren4
wu fa xin ren
wufaxinren
wu fa hsin jen
wufahsinjen
Through the Ups and Downs of Life同甘共苦tóng gān gòng kǔ
tong2 gan1 gong4 ku3
tong gan gong ku
tonggangongku
t`ung kan kung k`u
tungkankungku
tung kan kung ku
Regardless of the Weather, We Overcome Troubles Together風雨無阻同舟共濟
风雨无阻同舟共济
fēng yǔ wú zǔ tóng zhōu gòng jì
feng1 yu3 wu2 zu3 tong2 zhou1 gong4 ji4
feng yu wu zu tong zhou gong ji
fengyuwuzutongzhougongji
feng yü wu tsu t`ung chou kung chi
feng yü wu tsu tung chou kung chi
Flowers Fall
The End Comes
花落huā sà / hua1 luo4 / hua luo / hualuohua lo / hualo
Better to Travel 10,000 Miles than Read 10,000 Books行萬里路勝讀萬捲書
行万里路胜读万卷书
xíng wàn lǐ lù shèng dú wàn juǎn shū
xing2 wan4 li3 lu4 sheng4 du2 wan4 juan3 shu1
xing wan li lu sheng du wan juan shu
hsing wan li lu sheng tu wan chüan shu
Great Ambitions乘風破浪
乘风破浪
chéng fēng pò làng
cheng2 feng1 po4 lang4
cheng feng po lang
chengfengpolang
ch`eng feng p`o lang
chengfengpolang
cheng feng po lang
Love and Respect相敬相愛
相亲相爱
xiāng jìng xiāng ài
xiang1 jing4 xiang1 ai4
xiang jing xiang ai
xiangjingxiangai
hsiang ching hsiang ai
hsiangchinghsiangai
Smooth Sailing一帆風順
一帆风顺
yī fán fēng shùn
yi1 fan2 feng1 shun4
yi fan feng shun
yifanfengshun
i fan feng shun
ifanfengshun
No Worries放心houshin / hoshinfàng xīn / fang4 xin1 / fang xin / fangxinfang hsin / fanghsin
Flying Tigers AVG飛虎隊
飞虎队
fēi hǔ duì
fei1 hu3 dui4
fei hu dui
feihudui
fei hu tui
feihutui
Confucius: Golden Rule
Ethic of Reciprocity
己所不欲勿施於人
己所不欲勿施于人
jǐ suǒ bú yù wù shī yú rén
ji3 suo3 bu2 yu4, wu4 shi1 yu2 ren2
ji suo bu yu, wu shi yu ren
jisuobuyu,wushiyuren
chi so pu yü, wu shih yü jen
chisopuyü,wushihyüjen
Diligent Study Proverb鑿壁偷光
凿壁偷光
záo bì tōu guāng
zao2 bi4 tou1 guang1
zao bi tou guang
zaobitouguang
tsao pi t`ou kuang
tsaopitoukuang
tsao pi tou kuang
A Bright Future鵬程萬里
鹏程万里
péng chéng wàn lǐ
peng2 cheng2 wan4 li3
peng cheng wan li
pengchengwanli
p`eng ch`eng wan li
pengchengwanli
peng cheng wan li
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33
知人者知也自知者明也勝人者有力也自勝者強也知足者富也強行者有志也不失其所者久也死而不亡者壽也
知人者知也自知者明也胜人者有力也自胜者强也知足者富也强行者有志也不失其所者久也死而不亡者寿也
zhī rén zhě zhī yě zì zhī zhě míng yě shèng rén zhě yǒu lì yě zì shèng zhě qiáng yě zhī zú zhě fù yě qiáng xíng zhě yǒu zhì yě bù zhī qí suǒ zhě jiǔ yě sǐ ér bù wáng zhě shòu yě
zhi1 ren2 zhe3 zhi1 ye3 zi4 zhi1 zhe3 ming2 ye3 sheng4 ren2 zhe3 you3 li4 ye3 zi4 sheng4 zhe3 qiang2 ye3 zhi1 zu2 zhe3 fu4 ye3 qiang2 xing2 zhe3 you3 zhi4 ye3 bu4 zhi1 qi2 suo3 zhe3 jiu3 ye3 si3 er2 bu4 wang2 zhe3 shou4 ye3
zhi ren zhe zhi ye zi zhi zhe ming ye sheng ren zhe you li ye zi sheng zhe qiang ye zhi zu zhe fu ye qiang xing zhe you zhi ye bu zhi qi suo zhe jiu ye si er bu wang zhe shou ye
chih jen che chih yeh tzu chih che ming yeh sheng jen che yu li yeh tzu sheng che ch`iang yeh chih tsu che fu yeh ch`iang hsing che yu chih yeh pu chih ch`i so che chiu yeh ssu erh pu wang che shou yeh
chih jen che chih yeh tzu chih che ming yeh sheng jen che yu li yeh tzu sheng che chiang yeh chih tsu che fu yeh chiang hsing che yu chih yeh pu chih chi so che chiu yeh ssu erh pu wang che shou yeh
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den狡兔三窟jiǎo tù sān kū
jiao3 tu4 san1 ku1
jiao tu san ku
jiaotusanku
chiao t`u san k`u
chiaotusanku
chiao tu san ku
Qi Gong
Chi Kung
氣功
气功
kikou / kikoqì gōng / qi4 gong1 / qi gong / qigongch`i kung / chikung / chi kung
Double Happiness Guest Book
喜喜
xǐ / xi3 / xihsi
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Double Happiness Guest Book Scroll
Double Happiness Guest Book Scroll
Double Happiness Guest Book Scroll
Double Happiness Guest Book Scroll


And formats...

Double Happiness Guest Book Vertical Portrait
Double Happiness Guest Book Horizontal Wall Scroll
Double Happiness Guest Book Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Go for It in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Abundance and ProsperityAbundant HealthAikidoAmaterasuAngelAngeliqueBeautyBettyBig BrotherBirdBirthdayBlessingsBodhidharmaBrotherhoodBryceCharityChaseDaoismDouble HappinessExtremeFear No EvilFearlessFierceFireFire DragonForever LoveForgivenessFortitudeFortuneFrancescaGoldGold DragonGood FortuneGood HealthGreatGreat AmbitionsHafsaHappy BirthdayHealthHopeHorseImaginationIndestructibleJudoJuggernautKathrynLoversMarriageMindMulanOvercomePainPeaceful WarriorPhilipPineProsperityRenaRichieScarlettScholarSerenityStrengthSupermanTaoistThorToleranceTrust No ManUnitedVampireWarriorWeddingYin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Go for It Kanji, Go for It Characters, Go for It in Mandarin Chinese, Go for It Characters, Go for It in Chinese Writing, Go for It in Japanese Writing, Go for It in Asian Writing, Go for It Ideograms, Chinese Go for It symbols, Go for It Hieroglyphics, Go for It Glyphs, Go for It in Chinese Letters, Go for It Hanzi, Go for It in Japanese Kanji, Go for It Pictograms, Go for It in the Chinese Written-Language, or Go for It in the Japanese Written-Language.

0 people have searched for Go for It in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Go for It was last searched for by someone else on Aug 26th, 2020