Not what you want?

Try other similar-meaning words, fewer words, or just one word.

  

Do Nothing in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Do Nothing calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Do Nothing” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Do Nothing” title below...


  1. To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

  2. Nothing is Impossible

  3. Nothing / Nothingness

  4. Nothing is Impossible

  5. The Destination is Nothing Without the Journey

  6. Nothing is Impossible with Persistence

  7. Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice

  8. Fear No Man / Fear Nothing

  9. Where There is a Will, There is a Way

10. A Deliberate Inaction is Better than a Blind Action

11. How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger?

12. Preparation Yields No Regrets

13. Perfection

14. Bee

15. Shoganai

16. August

17. Unbreakable

18. Spare No Effort

19. Nothingness

20. Shikataganai

21. Garden / Orchard / Park

22. Failure in Not an Option

23. Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries

24. Maintain An Army For 1000 Days, Use It For An Hour

25. Contentment

26. No Trouble / Freedom from Problems

27. Commitment

28. No Fear

29. Choose Life

30. Strong / Powerful / Force

31. Banzai / Wansui

32. Banzai

33. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81

34. Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / AZN Pryde

35. Tiger Rumor


To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

Where there is a will, there is a way
yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible Scroll

This old Chinese proverb has been translated many different ways into English. As you read the translations below, keep in mind that in Chinese, heart=mind.

Nothing is impossible to a willing heart.
Nothing is impossible to a willing mind.
Nothing is difficult to a willing heart.
Where there is a will, there is a way.
Nothing in the world is impossible if you set your mind to do it.
A willful man will have his way.
If you wish it, you will do it.
A determined heart can accomplish anything.
All things are possible to a strong mind.


Nothing is Impossible

méi yǒu shén bù kě néng
Nothing is Impossible Scroll

This Chinese phrase means, "Nothing is impossible".

Nothing / Nothingness

mu
Nothing / Nothingness Scroll

無 is the simple way to express "nothing".

However, this single character leaves a bit of mystery as to what you might really mean if you hang it as a wall scroll. I'm not saying that's a bad thing; as you can decide what it means to you, and you won't be wrong if you stay within the general context.

More info: 無 is usually used as a suffix or prefix for Chinese and Japanese words (also old Korean). It can be compared to "un-" or "-less" in English. It can also mean "not to have", no, none, not, "to lack", or nothingness.

Nothing is Impossible

nan mo fukanou janai
Nothing is Impossible Scroll

何も不可能じゃない is a Japanese phrase that means, "nothing is impossible".

何も不可能じゃない is just one of a few ways to express this idea. This one is probably the most common but other valid versions include these:
何も不可能でない
何事も不可能ではない

Some shorter versions that just mean "not impossible" include these:
不不可能
不可能はない

Another common phrase that roughly means, "No such thing as impossible" looks like this: 不可能なことはない

Some others include these...
Impossible things are possessed not by me: 無理なことなんてない
Where there's a will, there's a way: 精神一到何事か成らざらん

If you want any of these other versions for your wall scroll, just contact me and I'll set it up for you.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

The Destination is Nothing Without the Journey

bù jīng lǚ tú bù chéng mù dì
The Destination is Nothing Without the Journey Scroll

不經旅途不成目的 is the English proverb, "The destination is nothing without the journey", translated into Chinese.

Nothing is Impossible with Persistence

yí shān
isan
Nothing is Impossible with Persistence Scroll

移山 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for, "to remove mountains", or "to move a mountain".

Figuratively, this means you can accomplish the impossible by sheer persistence.

移山 is the short form of a proverb about a man who had much persistence, and was able to move a whole mountain (a bucket of soil at a time).

Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice

nìng quē wú làn
Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice Scroll

This Chinese proverb can be translated as, "Better to have nothing (than substandard choice)".

It basically suggests that one should prefer to go without something rather than accept a shoddy option.


See Also:  A Deliberate Inaction is Better Than a Blind Action

Fear No Man / Fear Nothing

wú suǒ wèi jù
Fear No Man / Fear Nothing Scroll

This literally means "fear nothing" but it's the closest thing in Chinese to the phrase "fear no man" which many of you have requested.

This would also be the way to say "fear nobody" and can also be translated simply as "undaunted".

Where There is a Will, There is a Way

yū gōng yí shān
Where There is a Will, There is a Way Scroll

愚公移山 is the Chinese proverb (also somewhat known in Japan and Korea) for, "the silly old man moves a mountain".

Figuratively, this means, "where there's a will, there's a way".

Based on a fable of Lord Yu (愚公). He moved the soil of the mountain in front of his house. After years of effort, he finally moved the entire mountain.

The moral of the story: Anything can be accomplished if one works at it ceaselessly.


The Japanese version of this is 愚公山を移す (gu kou yama wo utsu su). But better to get the Chinese version, since this is originally a Chinese proverb.


See Also:  Nothing is Impossible

A Deliberate Inaction is Better than a Blind Action

yí dòng bù rú yí jìng
A Deliberate Inaction is Better than a Blind Action Scroll

Sometimes this is translated by others as "Look before you leap" but the more accurate and direct translation is the one I used in the title.

While somewhat military in its origin, this proverb can apply to any situation where a decision needs to be made, but perhaps there are still some "unknowns".

This phrase suggests that in our "action based" world, sometimes the "smarter move" is "no move at all".


See Also:  Better to Choose Nothing Rather Than Make a Poor Choice

How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger?

Nothing ventured, nothing gained
koketsu ni haira zun ba tora ko o e zu
How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger? Scroll

This is the Japanese version of an ancient Chinese proverb. This is a reminder that you must take risks if you want reward.

This is similar to the English proverb, "Nothing ventured, nothing gained".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger?

Nothing ventured, nothing gained
bú rù hǔ xué yān dé hǔ zǐ
How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger? Scroll

While perhaps no longer politically correct, this Chinese proverb is a reminder that you must take risks if you want reward.

This is similar to the English proverb, "Nothing ventured, nothing gained".

The literal word order of the Chinese is, "If (you) don't enter the tiger's lair/cave, how can (you) get/obtain tiger cubs?".

Preparation Yields No Regrets

sona e a re ba ure i na shi
Preparation Yields No Regrets Scroll

This proverb means, "When you are well-prepared, you have nothing regret" in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

wán bèi
kan bi
Perfection Scroll

完備 is a word that means perfection in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

It can also be defined as: faultless; complete; completion; perfect; to leave nothing to be desired.


There are other words that have a perfection meaning in various contexts. Buddhism has many kinds of perfection (also understood to be transcendence). If you need a different kind of perfection, please contact me.

Bee Scroll

碧 is a common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Bee.

This has nothing to do with the insect bee. The meaning of the character is actually "fresh and green".

bii
Bee Scroll

ビー is the name Bee in Japanese.

This has nothing to do with the insect bee.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Shoganai

Accepting Your Fate
shouganai / shiyouganai
Shoganai Scroll

仕様が無い is a Japanese phrase that means, "it can't be helped", "it is inevitable", "nothing can be done".

Some will see this as a negative (just give up), and others will see it as a suggestion to avoid futile effort.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

ào gǔ sī té
August Scroll

奧古斯特 is a common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name August.

This sounds like "August" but has nothing to do with the month of August in Chinese.

kowa re na i
Unbreakable Scroll

壊れない means unbreakable in Japanese.

The first two characters mean to be broken; to break; to fall through; to come to nothing. But the last two characters create a negative meaning (like adding "un-" to "breakable").


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Indomitable Spirit

Spare No Effort

bù yí yú lì
Spare No Effort Scroll

This is a Chinese proverb that can be translated many ways. Here's some of them: go to any lengths; with all one's might; spare no pain; do one's utmost.

If you feel hard work and holding nothing back is your philosophy, then this is the phrase for you.

kōng wú
kuu mu
Nothingness Scroll

空無 is "nothingness" in a Buddhist context.

The first character means empty but can also mean air or sky (air and sky have no form).

The second character means have not, no, none, not or to lack.

Together these characters reinforce each other into a word that means "absolute nothingness".

I know this is a term used in Buddhism but I have not yet figured out the context in which it is used. I suppose it can be the fact that Buddhists believe that the world in a non-real illusion, or perhaps it's about visualizing yourself as "nothing" and therefore leaving behind your desire and worldliness.
Buddhist concepts and titles often have this element of ambiguity or rather "mystery". Therefore, such ideas can have different meanings to different people, and that's okay. If you don't get it right in this lifetime, as there will be plenty more lifetimes to master it (whatever "it" is, and if "it" really exists at all).

Soothill defines this as "Unreality, or immateriality, of things, which is defined as nothing existing of independent or self-contained nature".

shikataganai
Shikataganai Scroll

Shikataganai is a Japanese phrase meaning, "it cannot be helped", or "nothing can be done about it".

Other translations include: It can't be helped; it's inevitable; it's no use.

This phrase is sometimes used in Japan to refer to when (Japanese) people as a whole must endure things that are beyond their control.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Garden / Orchard / Park

yuán
sono
Garden / Orchard / Park Scroll

園 is a single character that means garden in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This can also mean orchard or park.

園 is not a common single character for a wall scroll but nothing is wrong with it. A lot of customers asked for a single character for garden, so I've provided what I think is the best option here.

Failure in Not an Option

shī bài bìng fēi yì zhǒng xuǎn zé
Failure in Not an Option Scroll

This is probably the best way to say, "Failure is not an option", in Chinese.

Just don't forget that some ancient Chinese proverbs suggest that failure is a learning opportunity that leads to success or innovation. So don't plan to fail but failure is only a waste if nothing is learned from the failure.


See Also:  Failure is a Stepping Stone to Success | Failure is the Mother of Success

Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries

yǒu bèi wú huàn
Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries Scroll

This really means, "When you are well-prepared, you have nothing to fear".

Noting that the third character means "no" or "without" and modifies the last... The last character can mean misfortune, troubles, worries, or fears. It could even be stretched to mean sickness. Therefore you can translate this proverb a few ways. I've also seen it translated as "Preparedness forestalls calamities".

有備無患 is comparable to the English idiom, "Better safe than sorry" but does not directly/literally mean this.

Maintain An Army For 1000 Days, Use It For An Hour

yǎng bīng qiān rì, yàng bīng yì shí
Maintain An Army For 1000 Days, Use It For An Hour Scroll

Nothing could be more true. When I was in the Marine Corps, we trained for years for combat that often lasts only hours.

This Chinese proverb also reminds me of a common phrase used in the military to describe combat: "Weeks of total boredom, punctuated with five minutes of shear terror".

This may have some roots in Sun Tzu's The Art of War. Though I can not find this passage in his writings.

On the subject of the Art of War, if you have a favorite passage, we can create a custom calligraphy scroll with that phrase.

zhī zú
chisoku
Contentment Scroll

知足 means content with one's situation, or to know contentment (hence happiness).

From Zen Buddhist context, Chisoku or 知足 (knowing what’s enough) means to always know and be satisfied with one’s lot.

Human pain and suffering is born of greed, and that greed arises because we do not know what’s enough.

The Chinese philosopher, Menzi (372-289 BCE) said, “to nourish the mind, there is nothing better than to make the desires few”. This relays the idea that the best method to cultivate the mind is to have little desire.

No Trouble / Freedom from Problems

wú shì
buji
No Trouble / Freedom from Problems Scroll

無事 is a Zen Buddhist term meaning no problem and no trouble.

無事 is the Zen state of perfect freedom from troubles and leaving secular affairs behind.

Sometimes this is used to describe the state of satori and complete tranquility of mind.

Written as 無事に with an extra Hiragana on the end, this becomes an adverb to describe something in the condition of safety, peace, quietness, and without troubles.

無事 (Buji) can also be a given name in Japan.

This has more meaning in the Japanese Zen Buddhist community than in China or Korea, where it can mean "be free" or "nothing to do or worry about".

chéng nuò
shoudaku
Commitment Scroll

承諾 embodies the idea commitment, but also means to make a big effort or undertaking a great task.

Commitment is caring deeply about something or someone. It is deciding carefully what you want to do, and then giving it 100%, holding nothing back. You give your all to a friendship, a task, or something you believe in. You finish what you start. You keep your promises.

In Chinese, this word directly means to undertake something or to make a promise to do something.

Outside of the commitment idea, this particular word can also mean approval, acceptance, consent, assent, acquiescence, or agreement depending on context (especially in Japanese and Korean). Therefore, this word is probably best if your audience is Chinese.


See Also:  Partnership | Hard Work | Dedication

No Fear

(2 characters)
wú wèi
mui
No Fear Scroll

This literally means "No Fear". But perhaps not the most natural Chinese phrase (see our other "No Fear" phrase for a more complete thought). However, this two-character version of "No Fear" seems to be a very popular way to translate this into Chinese, when we checked Chinese Google.

Note: This also means "No Fear" in Japanese and Korean but this character pair is not often used in Japan or Korea.

This term appears in various Chinese dictionaries with definitions like "without fear", intrepidity, fearless, dauntless, and bold.

In Buddhist context, this is a word derived from abhaya meaning: Fearless, dauntless, secure, nothing and nobody to fear. Also from vīra meaning: courageous, bold.


See Also:  Never Give Up | No Worries | Undaunted | Bravery | Courage | Fear No Man

xuǎn zé shēng huó
Choose Life Scroll

選擇生活 can mean to choose life instead of death (or suicide) or to choose to live life to the fullest.

I think of it as the key phrase used by Renton (Ewan McGregor) in the movie Trainspotting. While Chinese people will not think of Trainspotting when they see this phrase, for me, it will always be what comes near the end of this colorful rant:

Choose life. Choose a job. Choose a career. Choose a family. Choose a fucking big television, Choose washing machines, cars, compact disc players, and electrical tin can openers. Choose good health, low cholesterol, and dental insurance. Choose fixed-interest mortgage repayments. Choose a starter home. Choose your friends. Choose leisure wear and matching luggage. Choose a three piece suite on hire purchase in a range of fucking fabrics. Choose DIY and wondering who the fuck you are on a Sunday morning. Choose sitting on that couch watching mind-numbing spirit-crushing game shows, stuffing fucking junk food into your mouth. Choose rotting away at the end of it all, pissing your last in a miserable home, nothing more than an embarrassment to the selfish, fucked-up brats you have spawned to replace yourself. Choose your future. Choose life.

Strong / Powerful / Force

qiáng
kyou
Strong / Powerful / Force Scroll

This "strong" character means strength, force, powerful, better, stubborn, and stiff (yes, all of this in one character). This "strong" has less to do with physical strength and more to do with having a winning attitude, or just having the ability to win at something.

Note that most of the time, this character is pronounced "qiang" but when used with the meaning of stubborn, unyielding, or stiff, it is pronounced "jiang" in Chinese.

Also, sometimes "qiang" is used in modern Chinese to describe people that do crazy things (Example: Bicycling from Beijing to Tibet alone). I sometimes can be found outside my Beijing apartment wearing nothing but shorts and a tee-shirt while eating an ice cream during a snow storm, just to hear my neighbors call me "qiang". Maybe they mean "strong" but perhaps they are using the new meaning of "crazy strong".

Also a Korean Hanja with same meaning but mostly used in compound words.

強 is used in Japanese (though normally in compound words). In Japanese, it has the same meaning but in some context can mean "a little more than..". or "a little over [some amount]". Most Japanese would read this as tough, strength, stiff, hard, inflexible, obstinate, or stubborn.

Banzai / Wansui

Old Japanese / Traditional Chinese & Korean
wàn suì
banzai / manzai
Banzai / Wansui Scroll

萬歲 is the traditional Chinese, Korean Hanja, and ancient Japanese way to write banzai.

In modern times, the first character was simplified in Japan and China. So you might want to select the other entry for more universal readability.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray". The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years". It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. 萬歲 is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

Other translations include: Cheers! (not the drinking kind), hurrah!, long live [name]!, congratulations!

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other.

Banzai

Modern Japanese Version
wàn suì
banzai
Banzai Scroll

万歲 is the modern Japanese way to write banzai.

We've made two almost identical entries for this word, with just a variation on the first character. In the last century, 萬 was simplified to 万 in Japan and China. The new generation will expect it to be written as 万 but the old generation can still read the more traditional 萬 form. You must make your own determination as to what version is best for you. If your audience is mostly Japanese, I suggest 万歲.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray". The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years". It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. 万歲 is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Other translations: hurrah, long life, congratulations, cheers, live long.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81 Scroll

信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善聖人無積既以為人己癒有既以予人矣已癒多故天之道利而不害聖人之道為而不爭 is the Mawangdui version of Daodejing chapter 81.

It can be translated this way:
Credible words are not eloquent;
Eloquent words are not credible.

The wise are not erudite;
The erudite are not wise.

The adept are not all-around;
The all-around are not adept.
The sages do not accumulate things.
Yet the more they have done for others,
The more they have gained themselves;
The more they have given to others,
The more they have gotten themselves.

Thus, the way of tian (heaven) is to benefit without harming;
The way of sages is to do without contending.
Another translation:
Sincere words are not showy;
showy words are not sincere.
Those who know are not "widely learned";
those "widely learned" do not know.
The good do not have a lot;
Those with a lot are not good.
The Sage accumulates nothing.
Having used what he had for others,
he has even more.
Having given what he had to others,
what he has is even greater.
Therefore, the Way of Heaven is to benefit and not cause any harm,
The Way of Man is to act on behalf of others and not to compete with them.
And a third translation:
True words aren't charming,
charming words aren't true.
Good people aren't contentious,
contentious people aren't good.
People who know aren't learned,
learned people don't know.
Wise souls don't hoard;
the more they do for others the more they have,
the more they give the richer they are.
The Way of heaven provides without destroying.
Doing without outdoing
is the Way of the wise.

Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / AZN Pryde

dōng fāng zì zūn
dung fong chi juen
tou hou zi son
Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / AZN Pryde Scroll

東方自尊 is the most universal way to write "Asian Pride".

We worked on this one for a long time. The effort involved both Chinese and Japanese translators and lengthy discussions. If you have been searching for this term, there is a reason that it's hard to find the way to write "Asian Pride" in Chinese and Japanese - it's because of the inherent difficulties in figuring out a universal combination of characters that can be read in all languages that use forms of Chinese characters.

This final solution that you see to the left creates a reasonable title in Chinese, and an exotic (perhaps unusual) title in Japanese (This could be read as "Eastern Self-Respect" in Japanese").
Although not as natural, it does have the same meaning in Korean Hanja and the older-generation of Vietnamese people will be able to read it too.

The first two characters literally mean "Oriental" and the second two mean "pride", "self-esteem", or "self-respect" (we chose the most non-arrogant way to say "pride"). If you have "Asian Pride" (sometimes spelled Asian Pryde) these are the characters for you.

Note: For those of you that wonder, there is nothing technically wrong with the word "Oriental". It is a correct word, and any bad meanings were created by so-called "Asian Americans" and Caucasians in the United States. To say "Asian" would not completely correct to the intended meaning, since that would include people from Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, India, and portions of Russia.

For further proof, if you were of East Asian ancestry and born in England, you would be known as a "British Oriental" (The "Oriental stigma" is basically an American creation and, therefore, applies mostly to the American English language - where they get a bit overzealous with political correctness).

Further, since the Chinese and Japanese word for Oriental is not English, it can not be construed having ill-meaning. One trip to China or Japan, and you will find many things titled with these two characters such as malls, buildings, and business names. These places also use "Oriental" as their English title (much as we do, since our Chinese business name starts with these same two characters).

In short, the first two character have the meaning that Americans attach to "Asian" but is more technically correct.

sān rén chéng hǔ
Tiger Rumor Scroll

These four characters together relay the meaning that can be expressed in English as, "When three people say there's a tiger running in the street, you believe it".

Of course, there is an ancient story behind this idiom...

三人成虎 is actually a proverb that resulted from a conversation that occurred around 300 B.C.

The conversation was between the king of the Wei kingdom and one of the king's ministers named Pang Cong.

It was near the end of one of many wars, this time with the Zhao kingdom. Pang Cong was to be sent by the king to the Zhao kingdom with the king's son who was to be held hostage. It was common at the time for a king to make his son a hostage to secure stable peace between warring kingdoms.

Before minister Pang Cong departed, he asked his king, "If one person told you there was a tiger running in the street, would you believe it?".

"No", the king said.

The minister continued, "What if two people told you?"

The king replied, "Well, I would have my doubts but I might believe it".

The minister continued, "So, what if three people told you that there is a tiger running in the streets?"

The king replied, "Yes, I would believe it, it must be true if three people say it".

The minister then reminded the king, "Your son and I are now traveling far away to live in the distant Zhao kingdom - much farther from your palace than the street. Rumors may fly about me in my absence, so I hope your majesty will weight such rumors appropriately".

The king replied, "I have every trust in you, do not worry"

While the minister was gone, the king's enemies gossiped about minister Pang Cong on many occasions. At first, the king thought nothing of these comments and rumors. But slowly as the rumors mounted, the king began to suspect ill of his minister.

Some time later when peace was well-established, the minister and prince were freed and returned to the kingdom of Wei. The king received his son, BUT DID NOT EVEN SUMMON MINISTER PANG CONG TO THE PALACE!

Hopefully this story will help you see how dangerous words can be when used to promote rumors, or create ill will. And perhaps will inspire you to not believe everything you hear.

There is also a secondary suggestion in this idiom that gossip is as ferocious as a tiger. Some Chinese people who don't know the ancient story above may believe that this scroll means that rumors are as vicious as three tigers.

Note: This proverb appears in my Korean dictionary but is not well-known in Korea.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible有志者事竟成 / 有誌者事竟成
有志者事竟成
yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
you3 zhi4 zhe3 shi4 jing4 cheng2
you zhi zhe shi jing cheng
youzhizheshijingcheng
yu chih che shih ching ch`eng
yuchihcheshihchingcheng
yu chih che shih ching cheng
Nothing is Impossible沒有甚麼不可能
没有什么不可能
méi yǒu shén bù kě néng
mei2 you3 shen2 me5 bu4 ke3 neng2
mei you shen me bu ke neng
meiyoushenmebukeneng
mei yu shen me pu k`o neng
meiyushenmepukoneng
mei yu shen me pu ko neng
Nothing
Nothingness

muwú / wu2 / wu
Nothing is Impossible何も不可能じゃないnan mo fukanou janai
nanmofukanoujanai
nan mo fukano janai
nanmofukanojanai
The Destination is Nothing Without the Journey不經旅途不成目的
不经旅途不成目的
bù jīng lǚ tú bù chéng mù dì
bu4 jing1 lu:3 tu2 bu4 cheng2 mu4 di4
bu jing lu: tu bu cheng mu di
bujinglu:tubuchengmudi
pu ching lü t`u pu ch`eng mu ti
puchinglütupuchengmuti
pu ching lü tu pu cheng mu ti
Nothing is Impossible with Persistence移山isanyí shān / yi2 shan1 / yi shan / yishani shan / ishan
Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice寧缺毋濫
宁缺毋滥
nìng quē wú làn
ning4 que1 wu2 lan4
ning que wu lan
ningquewulan
ning ch`üeh wu lan
ningchüehwulan
ning chüeh wu lan
Fear No Man
Fear Nothing
無所畏懼
无所畏惧
wú suǒ wèi jù
wu2 suo3 wei4 ju4
wu suo wei ju
wusuoweiju
wu so wei chü
wusoweichü
Where There is a Will, There is a Way愚公移山yū gōng yí shān
yu1 gong1 yi2 shan1
yu gong yi shan
yugongyishan
yü kung i shan
yükungishan
A Deliberate Inaction is Better than a Blind Action一動不如一靜
一动不如一静
yí dòng bù rú yí jìng
yi2 dong4 bu4 ru2 yi2 jing4
yi dong bu ru yi jing
yidongburuyijing
i tung pu ju i ching
itungpujuiching
How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger?虎穴に入らずんば虎子を得ずkoketsu ni haira zun ba tora ko o e zu
How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger?不入虎穴焉得虎子bú rù hǔ xué yān dé hǔ zǐ
bu2 ru4 hu3 xue2 yan1 de2 hu3 zi3
bu ru hu xue yan de hu zi
buruhuxueyandehuzi
pu ju hu hsüeh yen te hu tzu
pujuhuhsüehyentehutzu
Preparation Yields No Regrets備え有れば憂い無しsona e a re ba ure i na shi
sonaearebaureinashi
Perfection完備
完备
kan bi / kanbiwán bèi / wan2 bei4 / wan bei / wanbeiwan pei / wanpei
Beebì / bi4 / bipi
Beeビーbii / bi
Shoganai仕様が無いshouganai / shiyouganai
shoganai / shiyoganai
shoganai / shiyoganai
August奧古斯特
奥古斯特
ào gǔ sī té
ao4 gu3 si1 te2
ao gu si te
aogusite
ao ku ssu t`e
aokussute
ao ku ssu te
Unbreakable壊れないkowa re na i
kowarenai
Spare No Effort不遺餘力 / 不遺余力
不遗余力
bù yí yú lì
bu4 yi2 yu2 li4
bu yi yu li
buyiyuli
pu i yü li
puiyüli
Nothingness空無
空无
kuu mu / kuumu / ku mu / kumukōng wú / kong1 wu2 / kong wu / kongwuk`ung wu / kungwu / kung wu
Shikataganai仕方が無いshikataganai
Garden
Orchard
Park

sonoyuán / yuan2 / yuanyüan
Failure in Not an Option失敗並非一種選擇
失败并非一种选择
shī bài bìng fēi yì zhǒng xuǎn zé
shi1 bai4 bing4 fei1 yi4 zhong3 xuan3 ze2
shi bai bing fei yi zhong xuan ze
shih pai ping fei i chung hsüan tse
Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries有備無患
有备无患
yǒu bèi wú huàn
you3 bei4 wu2 huan4
you bei wu huan
youbeiwuhuan
yu pei wu huan
yupeiwuhuan
Maintain An Army For 1000 Days, Use It For An Hour養兵千日用兵一時
养兵千日用兵一时
yǎng bīng qiān rì, yàng bīng yì shí
yang3 bing1 qian1 ri4 yang4 bing1 yi4 shi2
yang bing qian ri yang bing yi shi
yang ping ch`ien jih yang ping i shih
yang ping chien jih yang ping i shih
Contentment知足chisokuzhī zú / zhi1 zu2 / zhi zu / zhizuchih tsu / chihtsu
No Trouble
Freedom from Problems
無事
无事
bujiwú shì / wu2 shi4 / wu shi / wushiwu shih / wushih
Commitment承諾
承诺
shoudaku / shodakuchéng nuò
cheng2 nuo4
cheng nuo
chengnuo
ch`eng no
chengno
cheng no
No Fear無畏
无畏
muiwú wèi / wu2 wei4 / wu wei / wuwei
Choose Life選擇生活
选择生活
xuǎn zé shēng huó
xuan3 ze2 sheng1 huo2
xuan ze sheng huo
xuanzeshenghuo
hsüan tse sheng huo
hsüantseshenghuo
Strong
Powerful
Force

kyou / kyoqiáng / qiang2 / qiangch`iang / chiang
Banzai
Wansui
萬歲
万岁
banzai / manzaiwàn suì / wan4 sui4 / wan sui / wansui
Banzai万歲 / 萬歲
万岁
banzaiwàn suì / wan4 sui4 / wan sui / wansui
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善聖人無積既以為人己癒有既以予人矣已癒多故天之道利而不害聖人之道為而不爭
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善圣人无积既以为人己愈有既以予人矣已愈多故天之道利而不害圣人之道为而不争
Asian Pride
Oriental Pride
AZN Pryde
東方自尊
东方自尊
tou hou zi son
touhouzison
to ho zi son
tohozison
dōng fāng zì zūn
dong1 fang1 zi4 zun1
dong fang zi zun
dongfangzizun
tung fang tzu tsun
tungfangtzutsun
Tiger Rumor三人成虎sān rén chéng hǔ
san1 ren2 cheng2 hu3
san ren cheng hu
sanrenchenghu
san jen ch`eng hu
sanjenchenghu
san jen cheng hu
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Tiger Rumor Scroll
Tiger Rumor Scroll
Tiger Rumor Scroll
Tiger Rumor Scroll


And formats...

Tiger Rumor Vertical Portrait
Tiger Rumor Horizontal Wall Scroll
Tiger Rumor Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Do Nothing in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

47 Ronin7 VirtuesA Journey of a Thousand MilesA Moment of Time is as Precious as GoldAaliyahAbbeyAbbyAbelAbundance and ProsperityAbundance ProsperousAcceptanceAcupunctureAdnanAdventureAftabAguilarAhmedAidanAikidoAikoAileeAileenAinsleyAiramAishaAishuAjayAkariAkiyamaAkumaAkushuAlanaAlessandraAlexisAlfieAliaAlinaAliveAliyahAllegraAllenAlmightyAlways and ForeverAlways FaithfulAmanAmanteAmazing GraceAmberAmbitionAmeliaAmirAmitAnahiAnandAnarchyAnastasiaAndreiAngelAngeliaAngelicaAngeloAnilAnkitAnkitaAnnalynAnneAnnieAntonAnyaAquinoArabellaArchangelArcherArchieAreebAriaAriesArigatoArisaArissaArjayArjunArloArmaanArmanArmandoArnelArt of WarArunAryanAshwiniAsuraAvengerAyakaAyanAzuraBaguaBaiyaBajutsuBalanced LifeBambooBartekBe True to YourselfBe Water My FriendBeautiful SpiritBeauty of NatureBertBest Friends ForeverBetelgeuseBethBetsyBhavyaBiancaBibleBird ScrollBlack RavenBlacksmithBlessed by GodBlessed by HeavenBlessingBlessingsBlood BrotherBobbyBodhiBodhidharmaBodhisattvaBody and MindBojutsuBoutainaBowmanBoxingBrandonBrave the WavesBrave the Wind and the WavesBraydenBreannaBreatheBriannaBright FutureBrittneyBrodyBrokenBroken SoulBrotherhoodBrotherly LoveBrysonBuddhaBullBurenBushidoBushido CodeButsuCaesarCafeCallieCalmCalm MindCancer Zodiac Symbol SignCapricornCaraCarinaCarlaCarmaCaroCarolynCarpe Diem Seize the DayCassandraCastroCecilCedricCelineChadoChaeChampChantalChaosCharissaChazCheersChelseaChen SurnameCherieCherry Blossom ProverbChi EnergyChiemiChinaChloeChoy Li FutChristianityChristineCiaraCindyClairvoyanceClareClarisseClarityCliftonClintCoco

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Do Nothing Kanji, Do Nothing Characters, Do Nothing in Mandarin Chinese, Do Nothing Characters, Do Nothing in Chinese Writing, Do Nothing in Japanese Writing, Do Nothing in Asian Writing, Do Nothing Ideograms, Chinese Do Nothing symbols, Do Nothing Hieroglyphics, Do Nothing Glyphs, Do Nothing in Chinese Letters, Do Nothing Hanzi, Do Nothing in Japanese Kanji, Do Nothing Pictograms, Do Nothing in the Chinese Written-Language, or Do Nothing in the Japanese Written-Language.

5 people have searched for Do Nothing in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Do Nothing was last searched for by someone else on Oct 10th, 2021