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Come Here in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Come Here calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Come Here” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Come Here” title below...

  1. To Come / To Arrive

  2. Surely I come quickly

  3. Dream Come True / Enjoy Success

  4. Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea

  5. Strong bones come from hard knocks

  6. Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

  7. Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither

  8. Love Will Find A Way

  9. Heroic Spirit / Heroism

10. Unbreakable

11. The Ease of the Scholar

12. Money / Wealth

13. A Journey of 1000 Miles Begins with a Single Step

14. Wake Up to Reality

15. Hentai

16. Jesus

17. Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

18. The Geisha’s World

19. Ikiru / To Live

20. Bright and Promising Future

21. Eternal Life / Future Life

22. When Three People Gather,...

23. Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself

24. Sun Tzu - Art of War

25. Enlightened Warrior

26. When Three People Gather,...

27. Grace

28. Flower Open / Blooming Flower

29. Pursue Your Dreams

30. John 14:18

31. Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose

32. Flowers Fall / The End Comes

33. Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs

34. Infinity / Infinite / Unlimited / Unbounded

35. Kowtow - The deepest bow

36. Great Aspirations / Ambition

37. Better to be Happy than Rich

38. Good Good Study, Day Day Up

39. Sky / Ether / Void / Emptiness / Unreality

40. An Open Book Benefits Your Mind

41. A Traditional Warm Welcome

42. Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

43. In Wine there is Truth

44. Japanese Snapping Turtle / Chinese Soft Shell Turtle

45. Broken Mirror Rejoined

46. Better Late Than Never


To Come / To Arrive

China lái
Japan rai / takagi / kuru
To Come / To Arrive Vertical Wall Scroll

來 means to come or to arrive.

In Japanese, this can be the female given name Rai or the surnames Takagi or Kuru (and a few other rare names). Often written 来 instead of the original 來 in modern Japanese.

In the Buddhist context, this can mean the coming or refer to the future.

Surely I come quickly

Part of Revelation 22:20
China shì le wǒ bì kuài lái
Surely I come quickly Vertical Wall Scroll

This is an excerpt from Revelations 22:20. It says "Surely, I am coming quickly" or "Surely I come quickly" depending on which Bible translation you use.

The Chinese translation here comes from the Chinese Union Bible which has been around for almost 100 years and it the standard for Chinese Christians.

Dream Come True / Enjoy Success

China dé zhì
Dream Come True / Enjoy Success Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese word means to accomplish one's ambition, a dream come true, or to enjoy your success.

Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea

China qiān lǜ yī dé
Japan senryonoittoku
Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea Vertical Wall Scroll

千慮一得 means, "1000 tries, one success," or "[a] thousand tries [leads to] one success."

This proverb is a humble way to speak of your success, ideas, or accomplishments. As if you are a fool who just got lucky in inventing or creating something.

Translations for this proverb include:
Even without any notable ability on my part, I may still get it right sometimes by good luck.
Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea.

Strong bones come from hard knocks

China bù kē bù pèng gǔ tóu bù yìng
Strong bones come from hard knocks Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Without being knocked around a bit, [one's] bones won't become hard.

Figuratively, this means: One can't become strong without first being tempered by "hard knocks."

While true for everyone, this sounds like the "Iron Body" form of Kung Fu, where practitioners bodies are beaten (and often bone fractured) in order to become stronger.
For the rest of us, this is just about how we can be tempered and build character through the hardships in our lives.

This is not a common title for a wall scroll in China.

Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

Japan hana wa sa ki hana wa chi ru
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb is about the cycle of life, or how things come and go in life.

This can be used to suggest that youth, fortune, and life can come and go (everything is temporary).


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

China huā kāi huā luò
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall Vertical Wall Scroll

花開花落 is a complete proverb that lightly speaks of the cycle of life, or how things come and go in life. It is used as a metaphor to suggest that youth is a temporary state, which in time will pass.

This can also be used to suggest that fortunes can come and go (everything is temporary).

Note: There are two versions of this proverb which are very similar. The other uses a word that means wither instead of fall.

Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither

China huā kāi huā xiè
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither Vertical Wall Scroll

花開花謝 is a complete proverb that lightly speaks of the cycle of life, or how things come and go in life. It is used as a metaphor to suggest that youth is a temporary state, which in time will pass.

This can also be used to suggest that fortunes can come and go (everything is temporary).

Note: There are two versions of this proverb which are very similar. The other uses a word that means fall instead of wither.

Love Will Find A Way

China zhōng chéng juàn shǔ
Love Will Find A Way Vertical Wall Scroll

終成眷屬 is a Chinese proverb that translated roughly as, "Love will find a way to come together."

Love Will Find A Way

China yǒu qíng rén zhōng chéng juàn shǔ
Love Will Find A Way Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the long version of the Chinese proverb that translates as, "Where there are lovers, love will find a way (to come together)".

Heroic Spirit / Heroism

China háo qì
Heroic Spirit / Heroism Vertical Wall Scroll

豪氣 is heroic spirit or heroism in Chinese and old Korean Hanja.

This might come across as a bit arrogant to hang on your wall.

Unbreakable

Japan kowa re na i
Unbreakable Vertical Wall Scroll

壊れない means unbreakable in Japanese.

The first two characters mean to be broken; to break; to fall through; to come to nothing. But the last two characters create a negative meaning (like adding "un-" to "breakable").


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Indomitable Spirit

The Ease of the Scholar

Quote from Confucius
China mò ér zhì zhī xué ér bù yàn huǐ rén bù juàn hé yòu yú wǒ zāi
The Ease of the Scholar Vertical Wall Scroll

This quote from the Analects of Confucius translates as:

To quietly recite and memorize the classics,
to love learning without tiring of it,
never be bored with teaching,
How could these be difficult for me?

This is a suggestion that for a true scholar, all of these things come with ease.


This was written over 2500 years ago. The composition is in ancient Chinese grammar and phrasing. A modern Chinese person would need a background in Chinese literature to understand this without the aid of a reference.

Money / Wealth

China jīn qián
Japan kin sen
Money / Wealth Vertical Wall Scroll

金錢 / 金銭 means money, cash, currency or wealth in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Literally, it means "gold coins" but has come to be used to mean money in general, as well as the idea of wealth.


銭The second character of this word is written in a variant form in Japan. The more common version in Japan is shown to the right. Click on the Kanji to the right instead of the button above if you want this Japanese variant in your calligraphy.

A Journey of 1000 Miles Begins with a Single Step

China qiān lǐ zhī xíng shǐ yú zú xià
A Journey of 1000 Miles Begins with a Single Step Vertical Wall Scroll

千里之行始於足下 is a Chinese proverb that means, "a thousand mile journey begins with the first step."

This proverb figuratively means, "big accomplishments come from an accumulation of little achievements made one by one."

Wake Up to Reality

China xǐng wù
Japan shō go
Wake Up to Reality Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese word means, "to wake up to reality," "to come to oneself," "to realize," "to see the truth," or "to reflect and become aware." 省悟 is often used in the context of Buddhism.

In Japanese, this has the same meaning but is more often used as a given name, Seigo.

Hentai

Japan hen tai
Hentai Vertical Wall Scroll

変態 is a Japanese word that originally means transformation, metamorphosis, abnormality, or pervert.

In English, this has come to be the name for a genre of Japanese anime and manga pornography. However, in Japan, it remains a short word to describe any perverse or bizarre sexual desires or acts.

Jesus

Japan jiizasu
Jesus Vertical Wall Scroll

ジーザス is the name Jesus written in Katakana (phonetic Japanese).

ジーザス is a common version that approximates pronunciation in English. However, there are many variations for writing Jesus in Japanese, and it's hard to come up with an absolute answer (transliteration of names is more art than science).


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history
China jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country Vertical Wall Scroll

This proverb is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as "Serve the country with the utmost loyalty." More literally, it means, "[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country."

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means "serve the country faithfully" or "die for the country." Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean, "Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country."

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei

The Geisha’s World

China huā liǔ jiè
Japan karyuukai
The Geisha’s World Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally means "Flower Willow World/Kingdom."

In Japanese, this means "The Realm of the Geisha" or "World of the Geisha." I suppose there is a presumption that the Geisha are surrounded by flowers in their residence. In Chinese and Korean, this pretty much has colloquially come to mean "The Red Light District" or to refer to pimps, prostitutes, and johns as a group.

Ikiru / To Live

Japan ikiru
Ikiru / To Live Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese title means, to live, to exist, to make a living, to subsist, to come to life, or to be enlivened.

生きる is also the title of a 1952 Japanese movie that uses the translated English title of, "To Live."

Note: This term, when used in the context of baseball, and some Japanese games such as "go" can mean "safe."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Bright and Promising Future

Japan akarui mirai
Bright and Promising Future Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "Bright Future." It suggests a lot of possibility and potential awaits in your future. A great gift for a graduate.

The first part of this proverb literally means bright or light. The second part means future but can also be translated as, "the world to come."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Eternal Life / Future Life

China lái shì
Japan rai-se
Eternal Life / Future Life Vertical Wall Scroll

來世 can be used in many different ways.

It is often used to express the next life (life in heaven or wherever your soul is bound for). So it does have a religious overtone. However, it can also be used to express your life in the future - perhaps during your present lifetime.

It can also be translated as "the next world," "the next generation," "the time that is to come," "otherworld," or simply "posterity."


See Also:  Eternity | Rebirth | Reincarnation | Immortality

When Three People Gather,
Wisdom is Multiplied

Japan san nin yore ba monju no chie
When Three People Gather, / Wisdom is Multiplied Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally means, "when three people meet, wisdom is exchanged."

Some will suggest this means when three people come together, their wisdom is multiplied.

That wisdom part can also be translated as wit, sagacity, intelligence, or Buddhist Prajna (insight leading to enlightenment).

In the middle of this proverb is "monju," suggesting "transcendent wisdom." This is where the multiplication of wisdom idea comes from.


Note: This is very similar to the Chinese proverb, "When 3 people meet, one becomes a teacher."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself

China zhí bǐ zhí jī
Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself Vertical Wall Scroll

This proverb is from Sun Tzu's (Sunzi's) Art of War. It means that if you know and understand the enemy, you also know yourself. There is a secondary four characters that come after this in the Art of War (not included here) which suggest you cannot lose a battle when you follow this philosophy.

In a very literal and somewhat-boring way, this can also be translated as, "Estimate correctly one's strength as well as that of one's opponent."

Sun Tzu - Art of War

military strategy, tactics, and procedure
China sūn zǐ bīng fǎ
Japan son shi hyou hou
Sun Tzu - Art of War Vertical Wall Scroll

孫子兵法 is the full title of the most famous book of military proverbs about warfare.

The English title is "Sun Tzu's The Art of War."

The last two characters have come to be known in the west as "The Art of War" but a better translation would be, "military strategy and tactics," "military skills" or "army procedures."

Note: Sometimes the author's name is Romanized as "Sun Zi" or "Sunzi."

It's written the same in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja.


See Also:  Military | Warrior

Enlightened Warrior

China jué xǐng wǔ shì
Enlightened Warrior Vertical Wall Scroll

覺醒武士 is not a commonly used title in Chinese but sometimes used in Martial arts and military context to refer to a warrior who seems to always be fully aware, enlightened, knowledgeable, noble, and just.

The first two characters are a word that means: to awaken; to come to realize; awakened to the truth; the truth dawns upon one; scales fall from the eyes; to become aware.

The last two characters mean warrior but can also refer to a samurai, soldier, or fighter.

When Three People Gather,
One Becomes a Teacher

China sān rén xíng bì yǒu wǒ shī
When Three People Gather, / One Becomes a Teacher Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally means, "when three people meet, one becomes the teacher."

This famous Chinese philosophy suggests that when people come together, they can always learn from each other.

One person must be the teacher and others learn. And in turn, the others become the teachers of the knowledge they posses.

It is important to remember that we all have something to teach, and we all have something to learn as well.

Grace

China ēn
Japan on
Grace Vertical Wall Scroll

恩 is often translated as "kind act from above," as in "The Grace of God." This doesn't necessarily have to come from God. It could be a favor paid to you, or help that you received (or gave). Of course, you can decide for yourself whether the grace or favor given to you by a friend is actually a gift from God.

Other possible translations of this character:
Favor / favour, acts of kindness, merits, beneficial Influence, kindness, indebtedness, obligation, and benevolent influence.

Flower Open / Blooming Flower

China huā kāi
Flower Open / Blooming Flower Vertical Wall Scroll

These two characters literally mean "flower open."

花開 is also associated with Springtime, the beginning of something, or youth.

花開 is often followed by "flower falls" (closes and loses its petals) which means "Things come and go" or "Youth comes and goes."

If you like flowers and the Springtime, this is a great selection for you. However, if you want the companion "flower falls" (flower withers), we offer that as a companion wall scroll or all together as a four-character phrase.


See Also:  Flowers Fall

Pursue Your Dreams

China zhuī xún mèng xiǎng
Pursue Your Dreams Vertical Wall Scroll

追尋夢想 means "pursue your dreams," "follow your dreams," or "chase your dreams" in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "to pursue," "to track down," or "to search for."

The last two mean dreams. This version of dreams refers to those with an element of reality (not the dreams you have when you sleep but rather your aspirations or goals in life).

This title will tell everyone that you want to make your dreams come true.


See Also:  Pursuit of Happiness

John 14:18

China wǒ bù piě xià nǐ mén wéi gū ér wǒ bì dào nǐ mén zhè lǐ lái
John 14:18 Vertical Wall Scroll

我不撇下你們為孤兒我必到你們這裡來 is the translation of John 14:18 into Chinese.

This comes from the Chinese Union Bible which comes from a revised version of the King James. This Chinese Bible was originally translated and printed in 1919 (several revisions since then).

Because of the origin being the KJV, I'll say that in English, this would be, "I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you..."

In basic English, this would be, "I will not let you be without a friend: I am coming to you."

Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose

China zhí bǐ zhí jī bǎi zhàn bú dài
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose Vertical Wall Scroll

This is from Sun Tzu's (Sunzi's) Art of War. It means that if you know and understand the enemy, you also know yourself, and thus with this complete understanding, you cannot lose.

This proverb is often somewhat-directly translated as, "Know the enemy and know yourself, and you can fight a hundred battles without defeat."

It can also be translated as, "If you know both yourself and your enemy, you can come out of hundreds of battles without danger," or "Know your enemy, know yourself, and your victory will not be threatened."

Flowers Fall / The End Comes

China huā sà
Flowers Fall / The End Comes Vertical Wall Scroll

These two characters mean flower fall (closes and loses its petals). It suggests nearing the end of something. A time that some might call "The sunset of life." 花落 often follows "flower open" to talk of the cycle of life.

We offer this as a possible companion to a "flower open" scroll (to be placed side by side, or at either side of a doorway to say "things come and go" - a cool metaphor for a doorway). If placed in a doorway, it could be used as a suggestion to your guests that things bloom when they arrive through your door but wither when they leave (a great compliment).


See Also:  Flowers Bloom

Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs

Eiko-Seisui
Japan ei ko sei sui
Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb can be translated as, "flourish and wither, prosper and perish," "life is full of fortune and misfortune," or simply "vicissitudes of life."

This is about the rise and fall of human affairs or the ups and downs of life. Prosperity comes and goes, everything is fleeting and temporary but like waves, another swell of prosperity may come.

Here's how the Kanji break down in this proverb:

栄 = prosper; thrive; flourish; boom.
枯 = wither; die.
盛 = prosperous; flourishing; thriving; successful; energetic; vigorous; enthusiastic.
衰 = become weaker; decline; get weak; die down; subside; abate; fail.


榮 Notes: The original version of the first character looks like the image to the right. In modern Japan, they simplified that Kanji a bit into the version shown above. If you have a preference for which style is used for your calligraphy, please let me know when you place your order.

Apparently, with that original version of the first character, this is also used in Korean Hanja. However, I have not confirmed that it's used in the same way or is widely-known in Korean.

Infinity / Infinite / Unlimited / Unbounded

Japanese = Infinity / Chinese = No limits
China wú xiàn
Japan mu gen
Infinity / Infinite / Unlimited / Unbounded Vertical Wall Scroll

無限 is the Chinese and Japanese word meaning infinity, unlimited or unbounded.

無限 literally translates as "without limits" or "without [being] bound."

The first character means "never" or "not" or like a prefix "un-."

The second means "limited," "restricted," or "bound."

Please note that the Japanese definition leans more toward "infinity" and the Chinese is more about being "boundless" or "without limits."

In Korean, this means infinity, infinitude, or boundlessness. But in Korean, this term has many interpretations or contexts, so your intended meaning might come out a little vague or ambiguous.

Kowtow - The deepest bow

China kòu tóu
Japan koutou
Kowtow - The deepest bow Vertical Wall Scroll

叩頭 is the term that seems to be known worldwide as kowtow. In Japanese and Chinese, it simply means a deep bow, especially one so low that one's head touches the ground in submission. However, in western culture, it has sometimes come to mean "giving in" or "surrendering to someone else's will." Sometimes even said of a person who stoops to flattery at the expense of their own dignity.

I don't know if you would really want this on a wall scroll but enough people have searched for this term on our website, that I guess it was time to add it. It just feels strange to see such a word on a wall scroll, so please order with caution. 叩頭 is antiquated in both Japanese and Chinese. The act is seldom done anymore, and seen as an ancient ritual of sorts.

Great Aspirations / Ambition

China hóng hú zhī zhì
Great Aspirations / Ambition Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb implies that having great ambitions also means that others will not understand your great expectations and ideas.

Though the actual words come from a longer saying of Confucius which goes, "The little swallows living under the eaves wouldn't understand the lofty ambitions of a swan (who flies far and wide)."

This Confucius quote has led to this idiomatic expression in China that means "think big." What you'd really be saying is "The lofty ambitions of a swan."

Note that Chinese people sometimes refer to the little swallow, as one who does not "think big" but is, instead, stuck in a rut, or just leading a mundane life. Therefore, it's a compliment to be called a swan but not a good thing to be called a swallow.

Better to be Happy than Rich

China ān pín lè dào
Better to be Happy than Rich Vertical Wall Scroll

Even if you are poor, you should still feel satisfied in your life...

...Satisfaction, happiness, and the meaning of your life come from within yourself and not from money or riches of the world.

In Chinese, there are a lot of four-character proverbs which express some very old philosophies.
Though there are only four characters on this scroll, in Chinese the meanings often surpass the dictionary definition of each character.

In this case, you should not set your expectations too high for the amount to money or riches you wish to have. One who sets their expectations too high is almost always disappointed. Instead, you should cherish what you have, and seek to improve yourself from within, and not measure your personal worth by the size of your bank account.


See Also:  A Sly Rabbit Will Have Three Openings to Its Den

Good Good Study, Day Day Up

China hǎo hǎo xué xí tiān tiān xiàng shàng
Good Good Study, Day Day Up Vertical Wall Scroll

This is a famous proverb by Chairman Mao Zedong that sounds really strange when directly translated into English. I include it in our database of phrases to illustrate how different the construction and grammar can be between Chinese and English. The direct translation is "Good Good Study, Day Day Up." In Chinese, a repeated character/word can often serve to reinforce the idea (like saying "very" or suggesting "a lot of"). So "good good" really means "a lot of good." While "day day" can be better translated as "day in day out." The idea of "up" has a meaning in China of "rising above" or "improving."

After understanding all of this, we come up with a slightly better translation of "With lot of good study, day in day out, we raise above."

The more natural translation of this proverb would be something like, "study hard, and keep improving."

Sky / Ether / Void / Emptiness / Unreality

(Used in Japanese version of five elements)
China kōng
Japan kuu / kara / sora / ron
Sky / Ether / Void / Emptiness / Unreality Vertical Wall Scroll

This single character means empty, void, hollow, vacant, vacuum, blank, nonexistent, vacuity, voidness, emptiness, non-existence, immateriality, unreality, the false or illusory nature of all existence, being unreal.

In Buddhist context, this relates to the doctrine that all phenomena and the ego have no reality but are composed of a certain number of skandhas or elements, which disintegrate. The void, the sky, space. The universal, the absolute, complete abstraction without relativity. The doctrine further explains that all things are compounds, or unstable organisms, possessing no self-essence, i.e. are dependent, or caused, come into existence only to perish. The underlying reality, the principle of eternal relativity, or non-infinity, i.e. śūnya, permeates all phenomena making possible their evolution.

From Sanskrit and/or Pali, this is the translation to Chinese and Japanese of the title śūnya or śūnyatā.

In Japanese, when pronounced as "ron" (sounds like "roan") this can be a given name. It should be noted that this Kanji has about 5 different possible pronunciations in Japanese: kuu, kara, sora, ron, and uro. 空 is also an element in the Japanese version of the five elements.

An Open Book Benefits Your Mind

China kāi juàn yǒu yì
An Open Book Benefits Your Mind Vertical Wall Scroll

There are several ways to translate this ancient proverb. Translated literally and directly it says, "Open roll has/yields benefit."

To understand that, you must know a few things...

First, Chinese characters and language have deeper meanings that often are not spoken but are understood - especially with ancient text like this. Example: It's understood that the "benefit" referred to in this proverb is to the mind of the reader. Just the last character expresses that whole idea.

Second, Chinese proverbs are supposed to make you think, and leave a bit of mystery to figure out.

Third, for this proverb, it should be noted that roll = book. When this proverb came about (about two thousand years ago) books were really rolls of bamboo slips strung together. The first bound books like the ones we use today did not come about until about a thousand years after this proverb when they invented paper in China.

開卷有益 is a great gift for a bookworm who loves to read and increase their knowledge. Or for any friend that is or wants to be well-read.

Some other translations of this phrase:
Opening a book is profitable
The benefits of education.

A Traditional Warm Welcome

China huān yíng guāng lín
A Traditional Warm Welcome Vertical Wall Scroll

This would be the ultimate Chinese "welcome mat." Except it will be on your wall, and people will not step on it.

In a somewhat literal translation, you could say it means, "I feel happiness as I welcome you, as you have brought a shining light to this place with your arrival" or in a more simple way, "I am happy you've come as your presents really brightens up the place."

It has become common for this greeting to be announced by the staff upon the arrival of any customer in to a fancy store in China. You will also see these characters on the "welcome mats" in front of 4 and 5 star hotels in China.

Having this on a wall scroll is an extra nice touch. I have seen a few horizontal scrolls with this phrase on the wall behind the reception desk of better hotels, or near the front door of fine shops. At the most fancy department stores and restaurants in China, several greeters (almost always young women) will stand by the front door all wearing sashes with this phrase embroidered on them. As you walk in, they will bow and say "huan ying guang lin" to welcome you to the establishment.

Note: The first two and last two characters do make words in Korean Hanja but seldom used as a sentence like this in Korean.

Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

China shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the last line of a famous poem. It is perceived as a tribute or ode to your parent's or mother from a child or children that have left home.

The poem was written by Meng Jiao during the Tang Dynasty (about 1200 years ago). The Chinese title is "You Zi Yin" which means "The Traveler's Recite."

The last line as shown here speaks of the generous and warm spring sun light which gives the grass far beyond what the little grass can could ever give back (except perhaps by showing its lovely green leaves and flourishing). The metaphor is that the sun is your mother or parents, and you are the grass. Your parents raise you and give you all the love and care you need to prepare you for the world. A debt which you can never repay, nor is repayment expected.

The first part of the poem (not written in the characters to the left) suggests that the thread in a loving mother's hands is the shirt of her traveling offspring. Vigorously sewing while wishing them to come back sooner than they left.
...This part is really hard to translate into English that makes any sense but maybe you get the idea. We are talking about a poem that is so old that many Chinese people would have trouble reading it (as if it was the King James Version of Chinese).

In Wine there is Truth

China jiǔ hòu tǔ zhēn yán
In Wine there is Truth Vertical Wall Scroll

This is a nice Asian proverb if you know a vintner or wine seller - or wine lover - although the actual meaning might not be exactly what you think or hope.

The literal meaning is that someone drinking wine is more likely to let the truth slip out. It can also be translated as, "People speak their true feelings after drinking alcohol."

It's long-believed in many parts of Asia that one can not consciously hold up a facade of lies when getting drunk, and therefore the truth will come out with a few drinks.

I've had the experience where a Korean man would not trust me until I got drunk with him (I was trying to gain access to the black market in North Korea which is tough to do as an untrusted outsider) - so I think this idea is still well-practiced in many Asian countries.

后 VS 後

Please note that there are two common ways to write the second character of this phrase. The way it's written will be left up to the mood of the calligrapher, unless you let us know that you have a certain preference.


See Also:  Honesty | Truth

Japanese Snapping Turtle / Chinese Soft Shell Turtle

China biē
Japan suppon
Japanese Snapping Turtle / Chinese Soft Shell Turtle Vertical Wall Scroll

鼈 refers to a species of turtle.

Sinensis Turtle

鼈 is Trionyx Sinensis.

鼈 refers to different turtles in different languages. See individual language notes below:

Japanese: 鼈 means "snapping turtle" or "mud turtle." But rarely used as a single Kanji like this in Japanese.

Chinese: 鼈 means soft-shelled turtle. A specific species, Trionyx Sinensis which is native to Asia.
In China, this species is related to the "wang ba," a soft-shelled turtle sometimes known in English as a banjo turtle (due to its long neck, and general shape). Unfortunately, there is a word, "wang ba dan" which means the egg of this species of turtle. That term has come to mean "bastard" in Chinese (a turtle hatches from an abandoned egg, and does not know who his mother or father is). 鼈 is not a good selection for a wall scroll if your audience is Chinese.

In Korean, this character can be pronounced (though most Koreans would have to look it up in a dictionary). It has not been in common use in Korea for at least a few hundred years.

General notes: You may notice that the bottom half of this character is the same as some other turtle-related titles. That bottom half is actually an ancient character that means "toad." 黽 Though not see in this way today, most turtle-related characters hold the meaning of "a toad with a shell" in their ancient origin. That toad character is rarely used alone anymore but you can see what it looks like in the image to the right.

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
China pò jìng chóng yuán
Broken Mirror Rejoined Vertical Wall Scroll

A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:


You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon but as for you, I see not a trace.


The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb, 破鏡重圓, is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce) but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

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Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll


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Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Better Late Than Never Horizontal Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
To Come
To Arrive

rai / takagi / kurulái / lai2 / lai
Surely I come quickly是了我必快來
是了我必快来
shì le wǒ bì kuài lái
shi4 le wo3 bi4 kuai4 lai2
shi le wo bi kuai lai
shilewobikuailai
shih le wo pi k`uai lai
shihlewopikuailai
shih le wo pi kuai lai
Dream Come True
Enjoy Success
得誌
得志
dé zhì / de2 zhi4 / de zhi / dezhite chih / techih
Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea千慮一得
千虑一得
senryonoittokuqiān lǜ yī dé
qian1 lv4 yi1 de2
qian lv yi de
qianlvyide
ch`ien lü i te
chienlüite
chien lü i te
Strong bones come from hard knocks不磕不碰骨頭不硬
不磕不碰骨头不硬
bù kē bù pèng gǔ tóu bù yìng
bu4 ke1 bu4 peng4 gu3 tou2 bu4 ying4
bu ke bu peng gu tou bu ying
bukebupenggutoubuying
pu k`o pu p`eng ku t`ou pu ying
pukopupengkutoupuying
pu ko pu peng ku tou pu ying
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall花は咲き花は散るhana wa sa ki hana wa chi ru
hanawasakihanawachiru
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall花開花落
花开花落
huā kāi huā luò
hua1 kai1 hua1 luo4
hua kai hua luo
huakaihualuo
hua k`ai hua lo
huakaihualo
hua kai hua lo
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither花開花謝
花开花谢
huā kāi huā xiè
hua1 kai1 hua1 xie4
hua kai hua xie
huakaihuaxie
hua k`ai hua hsieh
huakaihuahsieh
hua kai hua hsieh
Love Will Find A Way終成眷屬
终成眷属
zhōng chéng juàn shǔ
zhong1 cheng2 juan4 shu3
zhong cheng juan shu
zhongchengjuanshu
chung ch`eng chüan shu
chungchengchüanshu
chung cheng chüan shu
Love Will Find A Way有情人終成眷屬
有情人终成眷属
yǒu qíng rén zhōng chéng juàn shǔ
you3 qing2 ren2 zhong1 cheng2 juan4 shu3
you qing ren zhong cheng juan shu
yu ch`ing jen chung ch`eng chüan shu
yu ching jen chung cheng chüan shu
Heroic Spirit
Heroism
豪氣
豪气
háo qì / hao2 qi4 / hao qi / haoqihao ch`i / haochi / hao chi
Unbreakable壊れないkowa re na i
kowarenai
The Ease of the Scholar默而識之學而不厭誨人不倦何有于我哉
默而识之学而不厌诲人不倦何有于我哉
mò ér zhì zhī xué ér bù yàn huǐ rén bù juàn hé yòu yú wǒ zāi
mo4 er2 zhi4 zhi1 xue2 er2 bu4 yan4 hui3 ren2 bu4 juan4 he2 you4 yu2 wo3 zai1
mo er zhi zhi xue er bu yan hui ren bu juan he you yu wo zai
mo erh chih chih hsüeh erh pu yen hui jen pu chüan ho yu yü wo tsai
Money
Wealth
金錢 / 金銭
金钱
kin sen / kinsenjīn qián / jin1 qian2 / jin qian / jinqianchin ch`ien / chinchien / chin chien
A Journey of 1000 Miles Begins with a Single Step千里之行始於足下
千里之行始于足下
qiān lǐ zhī xíng shǐ yú zú xià
qian1 li3 zhi1 xing2 shi3 yu2 zu2 xia4
qian li zhi xing shi yu zu xia
qianlizhixingshiyuzuxia
ch`ien li chih hsing shih yü tsu hsia
chien li chih hsing shih yü tsu hsia
Wake Up to Reality省悟shō go / shōgoxǐng wù / xing3 wu4 / xing wu / xingwuhsing wu / hsingwu
Hentai変態hen tai / hentai
Jesusジーザスjiizasu / jizasu
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country盡忠報國
尽忠报国
jìn zhōng bào guó
jin4 zhong1 bao4 guo2
jin zhong bao guo
jinzhongbaoguo
chin chung pao kuo
chinchungpaokuo
The Geisha’s World花柳界karyuukai / karyukaihuā liǔ jiè
hua1 liu3 jie4
hua liu jie
hualiujie
hua liu chieh
hualiuchieh
Ikiru
To Live
生きるikiru
Bright and Promising Future明るい未来akarui mirai
akaruimirai
Eternal Life
Future Life
來世
来世
rai-selái shì / lai2 shi4 / lai shi / laishilai shih / laishih
When Three People Gather, Wisdom is Multiplied三人寄れば文殊の知恵san nin yore ba monju no chie
sanninyorebamonjunochie
Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself知彼知己zhí bǐ zhí jī
zhi2 bi3 zhi2 ji1
zhi bi zhi ji
zhibizhiji
chih pi chih chi
chihpichihchi
Sun Tzu - Art of War孫子兵法
孙子兵法
son shi hyou hou
sonshihyouhou
son shi hyo ho
sonshihyoho
sūn zǐ bīng fǎ
sun1 zi3 bing1 fa3
sun zi bing fa
sunzibingfa
sun tzu ping fa
suntzupingfa
Enlightened Warrior覺醒武士
觉醒武士
jué xǐng wǔ shì
jue2 xing3 wu3 shi4
jue xing wu shi
juexingwushi
chüeh hsing wu shih
chüehhsingwushih
When Three People Gather, One Becomes a Teacher三人行必有我師
三人行必有我师
sān rén xíng bì yǒu wǒ shī
san1 ren2 xing2 bi4 you3 wo3 shi1
san ren xing bi you wo shi
sanrenxingbiyouwoshi
san jen hsing pi yu wo shih
sanjenhsingpiyuwoshih
Graceonēn / en1 / en
Flower Open
Blooming Flower
花開
花开
huā kāi / hua1 kai1 / hua kai / huakaihua k`ai / huakai / hua kai
Pursue Your Dreams追尋夢想
追寻梦想
zhuī xún mèng xiǎng
zhui1 xun2 meng4 xiang3
zhui xun meng xiang
zhuixunmengxiang
chui hsün meng hsiang
chuihsünmenghsiang
John 14:18我不撇下你們為孤兒我必到你們這里來
我不撇下你们为孤儿我必到你们这里来
wǒ bù piě xià nǐ mén wéi gū ér wǒ bì dào nǐ mén zhè lǐ lái
wo3 bu4 pie3 xia4 ni3 men2 wei2 gu1 er2 wo3 bi4 dao4 ni3 men2 zhe4 li3 lai2
wo bu pie xia ni men wei gu er wo bi dao ni men zhe li lai
wo pu p`ieh hsia ni men wei ku erh wo pi tao ni men che li lai
wo pu pieh hsia ni men wei ku erh wo pi tao ni men che li lai
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose知彼知己百戰不殆
知彼知己百战不殆
zhí bǐ zhí jī bǎi zhàn bú dài
zhi2 bi3 zhi2 ji1 bai3 zhan4 bu2 dai4
zhi bi zhi ji bai zhan bu dai
zhibizhijibaizhanbudai
chih pi chih chi pai chan pu tai
Flowers Fall
The End Comes
花落huā sà / hua1 luo4 / hua luo / hualuohua lo / hualo
Rise and Fall
Ups and Downs
栄枯盛衰 / 榮枯盛衰
荣枯盛衰
ei ko sei sui
eikoseisui
Infinity
Infinite
Unlimited
Unbounded
無限
无限
mu gen / mugenwú xiàn / wu2 xian4 / wu xian / wuxianwu hsien / wuhsien
Kowtow - The deepest bow叩頭
叩头
koutou / kotokòu tóu / kou4 tou2 / kou tou / koutouk`ou t`ou / koutou / kou tou
Great Aspirations
Ambition
鴻鵠之誌
鸿鹄之志
hóng hú zhī zhì
hong2 hu2 zhi1 zhi4
hong hu zhi zhi
honghuzhizhi
hung hu chih chih
hunghuchihchih
Better to be Happy than Rich安貧樂道
安贫乐道
ān pín lè dào
an1 pin2 le4 dao4
an pin le dao
anpinledao
an p`in le tao
anpinletao
an pin le tao
Good Good Study, Day Day Up好好學習天天向上
好好学习天天向上
hǎo hǎo xué xí tiān tiān xiàng shàng
hao3 hao3 xue2 xi2 tian1 tian1 xiang4 shang4
hao hao xue xi tian tian xiang shang
hao hao hsüeh hsi t`ien t`ien hsiang shang
hao hao hsüeh hsi tien tien hsiang shang
Sky
Ether
Void
Emptiness
Unreality
kuu / kara / sora / ron
ku / kara / sora / ron
ku/kara/sora/ron
kōng / kong1 / kongk`ung / kung
An Open Book Benefits Your Mind開卷有益
开卷有益
kāi juàn yǒu yì
kai1 juan4 you3 yi4
kai juan you yi
kaijuanyouyi
k`ai chüan yu i
kaichüanyui
kai chüan yu i
A Traditional Warm Welcome歡迎光臨
欢迎光临
huān yíng guāng lín
huan1 ying2 guang1 lin2
huan ying guang lin
huanyingguanglin
huan ying kuang lin
huanyingkuanglin
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents誰言寸草心報得三春暉
谁言寸草心报得三春晖
shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
shui2 yan2 cun4 cao3 xin1 bao4 de2 san1 chun1 hui1
shui yan cun cao xin bao de san chun hui
shui yen ts`un ts`ao hsin pao te san ch`un hui
shui yen tsun tsao hsin pao te san chun hui
In Wine there is Truth酒后吐真言 / 酒後吐真言
酒后吐真言
jiǔ hòu tǔ zhēn yán
jiu3 hou4 tu3 zhen1 yan2
jiu hou tu zhen yan
jiuhoutuzhenyan
chiu hou t`u chen yen
chiuhoutuchenyen
chiu hou tu chen yen
Japanese Snapping Turtle
Chinese Soft Shell Turtle
suppon / suponbiē / bie1 / biepieh
Broken Mirror Rejoined破鏡重圓
破镜重圆
pò jìng chóng yuán
po4 jing4 chong2 yuan2
po jing chong yuan
pojingchongyuan
p`o ching ch`ung yüan
pochingchungyüan
po ching chung yüan
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Come Here Kanji, Come Here Characters, Come Here in Mandarin Chinese, Come Here Characters, Come Here in Chinese Writing, Come Here in Japanese Writing, Come Here in Asian Writing, Come Here Ideograms, Chinese Come Here symbols, Come Here Hieroglyphics, Come Here Glyphs, Come Here in Chinese Letters, Come Here Hanzi, Come Here in Japanese Kanji, Come Here Pictograms, Come Here in the Chinese Written-Language, or Come Here in the Japanese Written-Language.

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