Meaning of the characters

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baotica
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Meaning of the characters

Post by baotica » May 22, 2009 3:41 am

can someone tell me what this two characters mean, and if the meaning is bad, could one add some characters that would change the bad meaning to a good one.Oh, and what would be the style of writing.

Thanks for answering.


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Gary
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Post by Gary » May 22, 2009 10:38 am

This appears to be:




Sometimes it's written this way (like yours)...




Yours is "Chaos Cursive Style" or "Grass Script", known as Caoshu in Chinese or Sosho in Japanese.

Your characters are absolutely Japanese because the second character is a morphed form of the original Chinese, which is only used in modern Japan.

Yours looks a bit like this:



Although your first character looks a bit more like this Xingshu/Gyosho version:


Since the second character is specifically Japanese, I will forgo the Mandarin Chinese definitions. Trust me, you don't want to know.

In Japanese, when pronounced as "warugi" this means: ill will, malice, evil intent, ill feeling, distrust, mauvaise intention.

It can also be pronounced as "akki", the meaning is "nasty-smelling air" or "noxious gas". This can be the fumes from feces or the smell of a rotting dead body. It's jokingly used to mean "fart gas" in Japanese, but it's like saying "your farts smell like a rotting corpse".

I hope you don't already have this as a tattoo. Clearly you should not get this inked on your body if you haven't already. There is nothing you can add to this word to make a better meaning.

Where did you get this word by the way?

Cheers,
-Gary.

baotica
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Post by baotica » May 22, 2009 1:57 pm

I know that first character means "aku" in Japanese, and the second character meaning is ki or chinese chi (life energy).What I mean I know the first character, but second character leaves doubt.

How you come up with your thesis of bad smelling corpses is beyond me.

And you always can balance one meaning with other, like, good and evil, light and dark, love and hate, and so on.You must show one to see the other.

The question is what to ink to balance the word aku.What it should say is akurei (evil spirit), rei being spirit, but second character is not spirit, it is probably ki (seen alike characters on the web, litle x is tale tell part of the sign), so now the meaning of the characters combined is probably nothing, but they still have meaning, just each for himself.

So is it possible to add some characters to left or right of the sign aku, so it says something like, good and bad, or have meaning like light and darkness, or right and wrong.

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Gary
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Post by Gary » May 23, 2009 5:23 pm

There is no thesis, this is not an argument in a debate.

For clarification, this can mean the smell of a rotting corpse (not the actual rotting corpse itself).

There is no mistake, as beyond my personal knowledge (that knowledge coming from living in a Japanese household for 3 years while studying Japanese in college, and living various Chinese households for the past 7 years, while studying Chinese in college), I checked several different Japanese and Chinese dictionaries and reference books for you. I spent nearly an hour ensuring that I was giving you correct information.

This means "evil intent" or "putrid/stinky gas".

Nobody will read these characters separately. They are one word now.

It's like the English word "cowcatcher" (the thing on a front of an old steam-engine train). Nobody will take these words apart in their mind and think "bovine creature" and "guy who receives the ball behind home plate in baseball". When combined, the new word is different and has a solid definition.

Here are some of the most common words that include the first character that you presented (all of these are Japanese with English equivalents shown to the right of the Kanji/Hiragana text)...

悪 evil, wickedness
悪い bad, poor, inferior, grave
悪意 ill will, spite, evil intention
悪化; あっ化 (suffer) deterioration, growing worse, aggravation, degeneration, corruption
悪事 evil deed, crime, wickedness, crime
悪質 bad quality, malignancy, vicious, malignant
悪者 bad fellow, rascal, ruffian, scoundrel, misérable
悪循環 vicious circle
悪女 wicked or ugly woman, femme fatale
悪人 bad man, villain
悪魔 devil, demon, fiend, Satan, evil spirit, Satan
悪夢 nightmare, bad dream
悪用 abuse, misuse, perversion
憎い; 悪い hateful, abominable, poor-looking, detestable
憎む; 悪む to hate, to detest
悪口 abuse, insult, slander, evil speaking
難い; 悪い difficult, hard
悪巫山戯; 悪ふざけ prank, practical joke, horseplay, mischievous trick
悪さ badness, mean mischief
悪玉 bad character, bad person, villain, baddie
悪習 bad habit, vice
悪臭 stink, bad odor, bad odour, stench
悪条件 unfavorable conditions, unfavourable conditions
悪性 malignancy, virulence, malignant (cancer), pernicious (anemia, anaemia)
悪政 misgovernment
悪戦苦闘 hard fighting, hard struggle, fighting against heavy odds
悪態 abusive language
悪天候 bad weather
悪党 scoundrel, rascal, villain
悪童 bad boy

Unlike the "ki" Kanji, there are not really any pleasant words that can be constructed with this "aku" Kanji. Note: can be pronounced a variety of ways, including "aku", "waru", "niku", etc.

You really need to rethink your tattoo. This is not a good character. It's almost worse in the original Chinese (this Japanese word that you presented was borrowed directly from Chinese in or about the 5th century A.D.). Please abandon this word, and do not get it inked on your body. It will be shocking or repulsive to any Japanese or Chinese person who reads it. You would be the subject of laughter and ridicule when a waitress or waiter sees this in a Chinese restaurant or Sushi bar.

I really want to know who suggested that this was a good idea or gave you the image of these Kanji. This is the exact kind of thing that I have been fighting against for years. I hate to see gaijin / weiguoren (non-Asians or foreigners) make fools of themselves with bad Asian character tattoos. Most of the time, these come from errant flashers at tattoo parlors, but others seem to be giving out bad info, just to make fools of white/black/non-Asian people.

-Gary.
Last edited by Gary on May 23, 2009 9:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Gary » May 23, 2009 9:18 pm

Here's a link to virtually every Japanese word that contains that character:
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/dictiona ... AA&t=chars

I don't like to give out links to our dictionary, as it is not finished and has bugs (I only meant it to be for internal use for my translators to use). But it's useful, as it is the only dictionary that I know of which will allow you to look up every word that contains a certain character.

If you want to see the Chinese options, look here:
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/dictiona ... A1&t=chars

However, in Chinese, the second character of your selection looks like this:

...which is the traditional/ancient Japanese form.

-Gary.

baotica
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Post by baotica » May 28, 2009 12:01 am

you are correct, but damage is done, and belive you me, better is to have some prank tatood on you that says bad smell, than evil spirit.But none the less, I think I will sue the particular tattoo parlor, because I choose the letters from their books, and second character was translated as spirit, not ki.
The particular parlor is very popular in my city and this is not very professional, I know that they didn't do it on purpose, but you can't have japanese characters translated wrong in your tattoo book, and that's that.But than again 9 years have passed and I haven't exactly a bill for my tattoo so I'll have to think on taking them to court.

I will not remove it because, in my country if you see an asian, it's a rare thing, it's almost like seeing bigfoot or something alike.And no one else, and I mean no one I encountered knows the meaning of the characters, or any other japanese/chinese characters.

And it realy started to bother me that I have tattooed evil spirit or evil intent on my body,as I've said, better to have a prank tattooed that 99.95% of people in europe don't understand, than evil intent.Maybe in the future I will laser out the aku sign, but for now I don't care, as long as it tattoo doesn't pronounce evil spirit or evil intention.


And for the end, you said that this signs together could have two meanings, first being evil intent and second putrid gas.Which meaning would be taken first when asian people would see it, evil intent or putrid gas ? on your link there is only noxios gas or putrid gas and evil ki (what could be evil ki?) stated for these two characters combined, evil intent is not linked to these signs combined, evil intent has another sign attached to aku,sign that is not ki.


Thank you for taking time to explaining the true meaning of the characters, and their combined meaning.

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Gary
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Post by Gary » May 28, 2009 12:29 pm

When a Japanese person sees this, it could go either way. Since this is a single word without any context to suggest which meaning, it's really hard to say. If there was a good meaning, they would tend to "see" that meaning. In this case, there is not really an upside.

If I had this tattoo on my body, here is what I would do:
Try to make the upper character into some kind of design (make it not look like a character anymore). The bottom character (ki) does not have a bad meaning alone.
Maybe you could make a design that goes all the way around the "ki".

That character actually comes from the idea of steam rising from a pot of boiling rice. When you look at the Chinese form, you may want to note that the part that looks kind of like an asterisk "*" is also the character for rice when seen alone.

The steam from the rice was thought to be the essence or even the escaping spirit of the rice.

This character came to mean both "gas" or "air" and "spirit" or "energy".

Context is important in deciding which meaning will be read. However, as a tattoo, the default meaning would be "spirit" or "energy". This is the same "chi" ("ki" in Japanese, "chi" or "qi" in Chinese) that Kung Fu masters believe they are channeling when they bend iron with their fingertips or do something else amazing.



As for this tattoo parlor:
Perhaps they have many characters in their flashers with English meanings associated with each character. The problem is, often the English meanings are incorrect. Also, you can put two innocent characters together, and create a terrible or nonsense word with the combination.

In your case, I don't see why they would offer the first character for any reason. Alone it is terrible, and combined with virtually any other character, it is terrible.

Feel free to print out my comments and highlight the important parts when you go to have a talk with the tattoo parlor.

I've gone to several tattoo parlors, and found errors in the flashers that featured Chinese or Japanese characters. When I point out the errors, and ask if they want a correction, I have been told, "No, they are correct, we paid money for these, they are right and you don't know what you are talking about".

On a day that I was feeling really cocky, I had this exchange at that point:
I exclaimed terrible insults at the tattoo artist in Chinese and Japanese. Then asked (in English) why he was not punching me in the face after what I just said I had done to his mother in Chinese, and the uncomplimentary comparison I made between his intellect and a horse in Japanese.

He didn't get it.

I had to explain that if you can't understand the language written on the flashers, how can you certify the correctness?

I was told to F-off and kicked out soon after.

I started this forum in hopes of saving some people from these tattoo parlors soon after that exchange.

-Gary.

baotica
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Post by baotica » May 28, 2009 9:43 pm

don't know if I can reink the aku sign to something else, I mean, it's pretty big (3x4cm) and on the tip of my shoulder, and I don't know if it's safe to ink the skin where ink is already there, I mean from medical standpoint.I'll have to ask in the parlor.

and it's as you say, in the parlor you have characters that are either wrongly translated, or pople often choose just one character from one expression, and other from another expression and bad result happens just like in my case.

and this aku sign is a tough customer, my plan was to add one character above it, and add one character below ki, creating two words and then separate those two expressions by some kind of a line, but there is just one expression in japanese that I could find on your link that has aku sign after it self (to avoid evil), and I don't like it, so It'll have to be the laser, or i will have to reink the aku in to something else.

thanks for your time.

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Post by Gary » May 31, 2009 9:25 pm

There is one semi-silly thing you could do. Add the character for "not" above these characters. Thus it becomes, "Not [the maker of] stink", or "not [the one who] stinks". You can also replace "stink" with "evil intent" in the above phrases.

This will be silly - I mean it's a silly thing to have tattooed on your body. But it will take the shock factor or the icky factor out of what you have now.

Good luck!
-Gary.

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Post by Yankee » Aug 2, 2009 2:22 pm

I realize this is a little late because this is a thread from May, but I just saw it and thought I might offer a suggestion for you to consider.

I'm just brainstorming here, Gary, but what do you think about possibly turning this tattoo into a statement of exhortation against or avoidance of 悪気?

For example, you could possibly add a few characters after the original two to make it read like a precept from a martial arts dōjōkun.

This could be one example: 悪気を戒める事 [WARUGI (W)O IMASHIMERU KOTO]
Or, this might work as well: 悪気を避ける事 [WARUGI (W)O SAKERU KOTO]

The former would translate as something like "admonish against malice/ill will/evil intent" or "exhort malice/ill will/evil intent."

The latter would be along the lines of "shun malice/ill will/evil intent" or "avoid malice/ill will/evil intent."

As mentioned earlier, it helps that these are specifically Japanese in nature because Japanese syntax would lend itself more readily to the possibility of using this method as a solution than would Chinese syntax.

Just a thought... :-)

Scott

Bionpen
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Meaning of the name

Post by Bionpen » Feb 3, 2012 9:18 am

The meaning of the name is fairy. Sorry i have answered in English because i cannot write in Japanese language. I think my answer is right.

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Gary
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Post by Gary » Feb 3, 2012 10:43 am

If you are referring to Aku as a name, it's not fairy. It would be closer to "demon" if you tried to make it into a being or spirit.

-Gary.

PS: Had to remove your link. It seemed a bit "spammy" here.

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