I havent found a sentence, could you help me ?

If you have searched my Chinese and Japanese Calligraphy Dictionary, and did not find the word or title that you were looking for, we'll be happy to add it for you. Just tell us the word or title you want, and what it means to you.
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Leo
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I havent found a sentence, could you help me ?

Post by Leo » Jun 28, 2013 2:59 am

Hi there, I have found on the internet an interesting Japanese proverb but it was written in normal characters as bellow:
盛年重ねて来らず

I would love to have a look at this sentence written in "chaotic cursive script " (grass script) because it appeals more to me.

I also would like to know if this proverb is known in Chinese language. Or even if there is some Chinese proverb with similar meaning.

Thanks for your help.

Looking forward to hearing from you.

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Gary
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Re: I havent found a sentence, could you help me ?

Post by Gary » Jun 29, 2013 12:19 am

No worries, I've set it up so you can order this proverb here:
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/options. ... 2425+12378

You can select the chaos cursive style under the "Style" tab after you select the calligrapher.

Cheers,
-Gary.

Leo
Posts: 4
Joined: Jun 28, 2013 2:48 am

Re: I havent found a sentence, could you help me ?

Post by Leo » Jun 29, 2013 7:09 am

Hi Gary !

Thanks for your quick reply ! I found awesome in chaotic style !

I just would like you to double check this sentence meaning for me please, as I am not sure regarding the reliability of the web site I found it. Besides, I have no Japanese parents or friends capable of reading it.

Could you let me know its meaning please ? It is also known in Chinese? is there any Chinese proverb with a similar meaning ?

盛年重ねて来らず

thanks a lot Gary!

Looking forward to hearing from you!

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Gary
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Re: I havent found a sentence, could you help me ?

Post by Gary » Jun 29, 2013 6:07 pm

This can be:
Jou nen omone te kora zu
OR
Seinen kasane te kitara zu

盛年 seinen prime of life
重ね kasane to pile up; to put something on another; to heap up; to add; to repeat
て particle
来ら kitara (1) to come; to arrive; to be due to (2) next (e.g. "next April"); forthcoming; coming
ず zu

I really don't know this Japanese phrase. The translation would be something like, "the prime of your life does not come twice". The intended meaning: You're only young once.

-Gary.

Leo
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Joined: Jun 28, 2013 2:48 am

Re: I havent found a sentence, could you help me ?

Post by Leo » Jun 30, 2013 6:59 am

Hi Gary !
Thanks a lot for your explanation, it is exactly what i had seen!

As you told me you dont really know this proverb, would you suggest any other with a similar meaning but more well known?

I intend to say like " you only live once " but i found out that japanese dont usually say that! Therefore i was looking for a proverb with a similar meaning!

Thanks Gary!

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Yankee
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Re: I havent found a sentence, could you help me ?

Post by Yankee » Jul 1, 2013 12:31 pm

As Gary mentioned, seinen means 'prime of life'. Kasaneru (inflected here as kasanete in order to link this verb to the rest of the sentence) means 'to accumulate', 'to pile up', 'to heap up'.

Kitarazu is more complicated. This is an inflected form of the verb kuru. Kuru is a verb that means 'to come'; however, it's inflected here with a couple of suffixes. One suffix places the verb in a sort of conditional/subjunctive/abstract type of sense (comparable to saying if/when [something] comes). The other suffix negates it. So, kitarazu refers to a potential future arrival of something that never actually happens.

So, if you wanted a literal explanation of this phrase, it's kind of like saying that there never comes a time when our prime of life is accumulated in abundance, i.e., it's always a fleeting stage of life.

Jim Breen's dictionary lists the equivalent English counterpart as "Time and tide wait for no man." I've also seen it rendered as "You're only young once" (as Gary mentioned). Both of these would be valid translations of the spirit of this proverb.

I hope that helps.

Scott

Leo
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Joined: Jun 28, 2013 2:48 am

Re: I havent found a sentence, could you help me ?

Post by Leo » Jul 1, 2013 4:45 pm

Thanks a lot Scott ! It really helped!

Have you heard abiut this proverb before?

As Gary told me he doesnt really know this sentence, i am a kind of unsure if it does exist !

Would you suggest any more well know proverb with the meaning i said before??

Thanks everyone!

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Yankee
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Re: I havent found a sentence, could you help me ?

Post by Yankee » Jul 1, 2013 5:14 pm

In all honesty, I hadn't heard it before you brought up the topic; however, in researching it for you, it's very evident that it is a well established Japanese proverb. Furthermore, I'm not a native Japanese speaker, so the fact that I hadn't heard it before doesn't necessarily mean a great deal. :-)

As I mentioned, Jim Breen's dictionary lists it in exactly the format that you presented it, so that's a very good indication that it's legitimately understood in that format.

The only thing that's in question is how common its use is. A Google search gets just shy of half a million hits, so that's a good sign.

Given that it is definitely historically established and acknowledged in a respected database of Japanese kanji, if I were you, I wouldn't worry about its somehow seeming foolish. That aspect is not an issue. It may or may not be incredibly common, but I really think that part is irrelevant given the other. The point is that it is a legitimate proverb in its proper literary format.

As far as other expressions go, here are a few yojijukugo (four-character idiomatic compounds) that might appeal to you, but I don't know if they're what you're looking for or not. That's up to you. :-)

人生朝露
[jinsei chōro]
'Man's life vanishes like a dew'; 'A person's life is as fleeting as a morning dew'

一期一会
[ichigo ichie]
'once-in-a-lifetime experience [opportunity, encounter]'; 'experience that will never come again'

一生一度
[isshō ichido]
'once in one's life'; 'once in a lifetime'


Scott

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