Calligraphy for Wing Tsun terms

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sunmtn
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Calligraphy for Wing Tsun terms

Post by sunmtn » Apr 3, 2013 11:23 am

Hello Gary,
I am thinking about getting some small scrolls or portraits done on pure white rice paper of some terms for Wing Tsun forms.

Siu-Nim-Tau (means Little Idea Form)

Chum-Kiu (Arm Seeking Form)

Biu-Tze (Thrusting-fingers form)

These terms come right out of my instructor's book "Wing Tsun Kuen."

I have included the Chinese characters, also out of his book.

I would like to see how they would look vertically.

I assume it would have to be done by Xing An-Ping

Thanks,
Keith Sonnenberg
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Biu_Tze_scan_page_2.jpg
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Chum_Kiu_scan_page_2.jpg
Chum_Kiu_scan_page_2.jpg (53.95 KiB) Viewed 26950 times
Siu_Nim_Tau_scan_page_2.jpg
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Gary
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Re: Calligraphy for Wing Tsun terms

Post by Gary » Apr 5, 2013 12:14 pm

Here's those titles. I used Mandarin Pinyin Romanization for the titles of each one...
標
指
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/options. ... 25351&95=1

尋
橋
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/options. ... 27211&95=1

小
念
頭
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/options. ... 38957&95=1

Keep in mind that the mock-up is just an estimation or idea of what the characters will look like when the calligrapher writes them. I used fonts for that, and tried to match the style to the calligrapher as much as possible (Asking a calligrapher to write 21,386 characters x 9 styles was not a reasonable option). Xing An-Ping's "Personal Lishu" and "Caoshu" will be quite different from the mock-up rendering.

Cheers,
-Gary.

sunmtn
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Posts: 63
Joined: Nov 8, 2009 9:12 pm

Re: Calligraphy for Wing Tsun terms

Post by sunmtn » Apr 10, 2013 9:33 am

Gary,
OK, I would like to order one vertical portrait of Chum Kiu (Arm seeking Form), extra small, plain mocha brocade, plain white paper, regular script, no inscription. According to your system, it costs $56.88.
I would also like one just like the above description, but saying Biu Tze (Thrusting Fingers Form).

Thank you!

Keith Sonnenberg

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Gary
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Re: Calligraphy for Wing Tsun terms

Post by Gary » Apr 10, 2013 5:10 pm

The first link is for the Biu-Tze that you presented. I labeled it in Hanyu-Pinyin as "Biao Zhi".

The second link will help you customize and order "Chum-Kiu" which I labeled "Xun Qiao".

I have to use proper Mandarin Hanyu Pinyin or English for those titles, otherwise, somebody in my little workshop will get confused.

Example: The "Tze" from Biu-Tze is "zhi" in Mandarin, but while pronounced the same, it's romanized as "chih" from Taiwanese Mandarin. In Cantonese (which doesn't have a standard romanization scheme) it can be "zi".
It's 지 ("ji" or "ci") in Korean. It can be shi, sashi, yubi, sasu, oyobi, or oyubi in Japanese. In Vietnamese, it's chỉ.

Definition: finger, toe; point, indicate, point to, indicate, put into, play (chess), measure (ruler).

Keeping track of this is a pain. But the mainland-based Mandarin Hanyu-Pinyin is the standard that I, and the U.S. Library of Congress use for romanization. Oddly, I could not find anybody using "tze" as a romanization for this character (outside of a few Martial arts websites in the USA). Just curious, what was the believed language origin of that romanization/pronunciation?

No matter how you romanize, they are the same characters. So no worries there.

-Gary.

sunmtn
Advanced Member
Posts: 63
Joined: Nov 8, 2009 9:12 pm

Re: Calligraphy for Wing Tsun terms

Post by sunmtn » Apr 10, 2013 5:40 pm

Gary wrote:The first link is for the Biu-Tze that you presented. I labeled it in Hanyu-Pinyin as "Biao Zhi".

The second link will help you customize and order "Chum-Kiu" which I labeled "Xun Qiao".

I have to use proper Mandarin Hanyu Pinyin or English for those titles, otherwise, somebody in my little workshop will get confused.

Example: The "Tze" from Biu-Tze is "zhi" in Mandarin, but while pronounced the same, it's romanized as "chih" from Taiwanese Mandarin. In Cantonese (which doesn't have a standard romanization scheme) it can be "zi".
It's 지 ("ji" or "ci") in Korean. It can be shi, sashi, yubi, sasu, oyobi, or oyubi in Japanese. In Vietnamese, it's chỉ.

Definition: finger, toe; point, indicate, point to, indicate, put into, play (chess), measure (ruler).

Keeping track of this is a pain. But the mainland-based Mandarin Hanyu-Pinyin is the standard that I, and the U.S. Library of Congress use for romanization. Oddly, I could not find anybody using "tze" as a romanization for this character (outside of a few Martial arts websites in the USA). Just curious, what was the believed language origin of that romanization/pronunciation?

No matter how you romanize, they are the same characters. So no worries there.

-Gary.
Gary,
I do not know where the tze comes from. My former 'wing chun' teacher spelled it Bil Gee. Perhaps someplace in Europe since Grandmaster Leung Ting traveled in Europe and still does, teaching.
Thank you!

Keith Sonnenberg

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