would this be ok as a tatto?

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hopper
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would this be ok as a tatto?

Post by hopper » Jan 19, 2014 1:19 am

i want to get "jupiter king" as a tattoo in kanji but would that translate well in kanji?
its a title i gave myself and my friends started calling me that as a joke so it kinda became a thing.
but would it make sense as a kanji tattoo would the kanji just be jibberish?
ive done my reaerch and the kanji for it would be 木星王 is that right?

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Gary
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Re: would this be ok as a tatto?

Post by Gary » Jan 19, 2014 11:36 pm

Actually, for proper Chinese grammar, you need to add a character, and make it:
木星之王

It's like adding "of" in a way. Like "King of Jupiter" (only in opposite word order in Chinese etc).

If you want tattoo templates, you can get this in over 100 styles for just $25 here:
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/chinese- ... ervice.php

Cheers,
-Gary.

hopper
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Joined: Jan 19, 2014 1:15 am

Re: would this be ok as a tatto?

Post by hopper » Jan 20, 2014 5:23 pm

Gary wrote:Actually, for proper Chinese grammar, you need to add a character, and make it:
木星之王

It's like adding "of" in a way. Like "King of Jupiter" (only in opposite word order in Chinese etc).

If you want tattoo templates, you can get this in over 100 styles for just $25 here:
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/chinese- ... ervice.php

Cheers,
-Gary.

i didnt know japanese and chinese both used kanji.. so i would have to put it as king of jupiter? is there any way i could get away with it just being jupiter king?

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Gary
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Re: would this be ok as a tatto?

Post by Gary » Jan 20, 2014 8:33 pm

You just need a connecting article to link these two ideas.

As far as Kanji, they were Chinese first. The current Chinese character lexicon traces origins to the first standardization in 221 BC.

In the 5th century, Japan had no standard written language, so they borrowed Chinese characters by meaning (and in many cases, they borrowed pronunciation as well, when a word did not yet exist in Japanese). At the time, and even to this day, the constructs of Chinese language has great influence on Japanese.

The work "Kanji" is the romanization for a Japanese word that literally means, "Chinese characters".

There is a parallel story in Korea where they used Hanja (the Korean word for Chinese characters) as the standard written form until about 100 years ago.

-Gary.

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