Calligraphy banner explained

Other Chinese or Japanese calligraphy issues that does not seem to fit any of the categories above.
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Godisintherain
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Calligraphy banner explained

Post by Godisintherain » Mar 12, 2012 10:17 pm

what are the different parts of the banner. i know that the general saying is in the center with the largest space. i know that the chinese stone seal is for. but what the top right corner what is the red character for, and left side of the banner above the seal what is that for.

also side note. how would go about getting pictures of the seal stamps and their meanings and or how would you translate my last name "Hawm" into a stone seal? I am korean btw.

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Gary
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Re: Calligraphy banner explained

Post by Gary » Mar 12, 2012 11:20 pm

I suppose you are talking about a wall scroll when you say "banner"...

The upper right red stamp is the artist's personal chop. It serves to keep the piece in balance. However, the secret is, the artist uses that stamp to tell the mounter the limit of where the artist wants the piece to be trimmed with mounted.

Above the red signature stamp on the left is the artist's written signature. Above that may be an inscription (often the place written and date, such as "Written in Beijing, Spring, 2012").

We carve signature stones if you're interested:
http://www.orientaloutpost.com/proddetail.php?prod=chop
Don't order until we figure out what you want on the chop (how many characters, etc).

If you want the Hanja version of your name, please type the Hangul here. I have an electronic Korean dictionary, and I can look it up for you.

-Gary.

Godisintherain
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Joined: Mar 12, 2012 10:06 pm

Re: Calligraphy banner explained

Post by Godisintherain » Mar 12, 2012 11:24 pm

oh i had always thought the bottom left hand red stamp was the artist's chop. also i dont know how type in my last in hangul with computer.

Godisintherain
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Re: Calligraphy banner explained

Post by Godisintherain » Mar 12, 2012 11:28 pm

nvm i figure something out

Godisintherain
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Re: Calligraphy banner explained

Post by Godisintherain » Mar 12, 2012 11:31 pm

함영준 full name hawm young joon
함 surname hawm

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Gary
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Re: Calligraphy banner explained

Post by Gary » Mar 12, 2012 11:43 pm

Well, both chops belong to the artist. Upper-right is the personal chop, lower left is the signature chop. That rule applies most of the time, but some artists have their own way.

Because there's multiple romanization standards for Korean, it's very hard to figure out or look up a Korean name based on the romanization (unless it's Lee, Kim, or Park).

-Gary.

Godisintherain
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Re: Calligraphy banner explained

Post by Godisintherain » Mar 12, 2012 11:45 pm

can they make chops using the hangul alphabet?

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Gary
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Re: Calligraphy banner explained

Post by Gary » Mar 12, 2012 11:46 pm

OK, that surname means "Altogether". Most often romanized as "Ham"...



咸
咸

-Gary.

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Gary
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Re: Calligraphy banner explained

Post by Gary » Mar 12, 2012 11:51 pm

Hangul only dates back to rather recent history. There is no seal script version. Chinese characters go back to before 221 B.C.

So, it's Korean Hanja (aka Chinese characters), or nothing as far as seal script goes.

-Gary,

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