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Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Train"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Practice / Train / Drill
  2. Education / Refinement
  3. Exercise
  4. Move On / Change Way of Thinking
  5. Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication
  6. Islam
  7. Skill Acquired Through Hard Training
  8. Shugyo
  9. Training / Practice / Cultivation
10. Ninjutsu / Ninjitsu
11. Self-Improvement
12. Shihan
13. Training / Drill
14. Black Belt
15. Moderation
16. Discipline
17. Pushing Hands / Tui Sau
18. Teach / Education
19. Tai Chi Ball
20. Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan
21. Discipline
22. Discipline / Training / Tempering Character
23. Warriors: Quality Over Quantity
24. Cry in the dojo - Laugh on the battlefield
25. Perseverance is the Key
26. The More We Sweat in Training,...
27. Five Reflections / Gosei
28. Wing Chun Fist Maxims

Practice / Train / Drill

China liàn
Japan ren
Practice / Train / Drill Wall Scroll

This Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word is the simplest way to say practice, train, drill, exercise, or to describe the effort taken to perfect one's skill.

Education / Refinement

China jiào yǎng
Japan kyou you
Education / Refinement Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese word means to train, to educate, to bring up, to nurture, education, culture, upbringing, early conditioning, cultivation, and/or refinement.


(for body or mind)
China duàn liàn
Exercise Wall Scroll

鍛煉 / 鍛鍊 means exercise in much the same way we use the word exercise in English. This can be exercising your body at the gym, or exercising your mind in studies. Most of the time, this refers to physical exercise.

This can also be translated as to temper, to toughen, to train, to drill, to forge, or simply discipline.

Move On / Change Way of Thinking

Japan norikaeru
Move On / Change Way of Thinking Wall Scroll

乗り換える is the Japanese way to say, "move on." This can also be translated as, "to change one's mind," "to change methods," "to change one's way of thinking." For instance, if you changed your love interest, or political ideology, you might describe the act of that change with this title.

Colloquially in Japan, this is also used to describe the act of transferring trains or to change from one bus or train to another.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication

(complete bodily devotion)
China xiàn shēn
Japan ken shin
Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication Wall Scroll

This word is used to describe being so devoted to something that you will make sacrifices for that goal/thing/person. You can also translate this word as any of the following:
Give one's life for...
Sacrifice one's life for...
To dedicate oneself to...
Commit ones energy to...
Devote to...
Giving your whole body to...

This can be a dedication to or for someone but more often is used in reference to a dedication or making sacrifices for your country, public service, or a cause. For instance, an Olympic athlete makes great sacrifices to train in his/her sport for their country and compatriots.

While the form shown to the upper-left is considered an ancient Japanese version, in modern Japan, they use the simplified version of the first Kanji (shown to the right). Click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version.

If you are looking for a more religious meaning of devotion, see Faith.

See Also:  Confidence | Dedication


(phonetic version)
China yī sī lán jiào
Islam Wall Scroll

This both means and sounds like "Islam" in Mandarin Chinese.

The first three characters sound like the word "Islam," and the last character means "religion" or "teaching." It's the most general term for "Islam" in China. The highest concentration of Muslims in China is Xinjiang (the vast region in northwest China that was called The East Turkistan Republic until 1949 and is sometimes called Chinese Turkistan, Uyghuristan). Here you will find Uygurs, Kazakhs, and Kyrgyz and others that are descendants of Turkmen (possibly mixed with Persians and Arabs). Many of their ancestors were traders who traveled the silk road to buy and sell spices, silk, and exchange other goods from the Orient and the Middle East.

I spent some time in Xinjiang and got to know this community. They are strong people who can endure much. They are friendly and love to have a good time. I was a stranger but treated by villagers (near China's border with Afghanistan) as if I was a good friend.
However, I have heard that it's best not to cross them, as in this land, the law is the blade, and everything is "eye for an eye." The Chinese government has little control in Xinjiang with almost no police officers except in the capital of Urumqi (so it's a 60-hour roundtrip train ride to seek the aid of law enforcement in most cases).

While few seem to be devout, there are at least small mosques in every village. And you will never see a man or woman outside without a head covering.

It should be noted that these people are all citizens of China, but they are officially of the Caucasian race. A visit to Xinjiang will change your idea what it means to be Chinese.

Skill Acquired Through Hard Training

China liàn gōng
Japan renkou
Skill Acquired Through Hard Training Wall Scroll

This martial arts term can mean to practice and attain working skills, feats of practice/practise, or skills acquired through hard training.
練功 is often used as a martial arts term but can apply to other skills (or professions).


China xiū xíng
Japan shu gyou
Shugyo Wall Scroll

修行 is shugyō or shugyou in Japanese. It refers to ascetic practices, training, practice, discipline, and study.

修行 is also a word in the original Chinese, where it refers more to religious studies and practices.

In Buddhist context, this represents caryā. In Buddhism, this refers to conduct; to observe and do; to end one's ways; to cultivate oneself in right practice; to be religious; to be pious.

Training / Practice / Cultivation

Japan ren ma
Training / Practice / Cultivation Wall Scroll

錬磨 is a Japanese word which means training, practice, practise, or cultivation.

Ninjutsu / Ninjitsu

China rěn shù
Japan ninjutsu
Ninjutsu / Ninjitsu Wall Scroll

忍術 is the "art of the ninja" in Japanese. Most Japanese people associate ninjas with some degree of romance and reverence to Japan's ancient past. But most will accept that the ninja is an idea or way of life whose time has passed. However, this has not stopped floods of movies about ninjas and dojos offering Ninjutsu training from keeping the idea of the ninja alive in modern times.

My modern Japanese dictionary defines this term as "assassination, stealth and combat techniques," or "fighting art of the ninja."

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. Because this is specifically a Japanese title, we only suggest our Japanese master calligrapher for this selection - and you will get the form shown to the right if you do that (please ignore the fact that some of the images you see during the following pages in the options process will be the Chinese/alternate form).


China xiū yǎng
Japan shuuyou / shuyo
Self-Improvement Wall Scroll

修養 means self-improvement in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Other translations for this word include: accomplishment; training; self-cultivation; (mental) training; self-discipline; cultivation; cultivating moral character.


China shī fàn
Japan shi han
Shihan Wall Scroll

Shihan is a Japanese term, often used in Japanese martial arts.

In typical Japanese language, it can refer to a teacher or instructor. However, in martial arts, it's often an honorific title for an expert or master instructor.

Example: In Aikido the title can refer to someone with the rank of 7th dan. But other schools us it to mean a master who has earned the right to award black belts.

This term is also used in Chinese, where it refers to teacher-training or the art of teaching by example. It's used within the proper name of certain types of universities in China.

Training / Drill

China xùn liàn
Japan kunren
Training / Drill Wall Scroll

If training or drill is important to you (especially for military drill and training), this might be just the thing for a drill master to hang behind his/her desk.

This term is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. It can also mean practice or exercise, depending on context.

Black Belt

China hēi dài
Black Belt Wall Scroll

Many will argue whether rank systems that include a "black belt" are used in pure Chinese martial arts systems. The argument goes that it's more a Japanese idea that's merged into the western versions of Chinese martial arts. However, in Wushu (often referred to as Kung Fu), it's said that all students started with white belts. Over the years of training, the white belt would get dirty, until finally appearing black with filth. Thus, more advanced students had darker belts.

If you want this title in Chinese, this would be the form.

带 Often, the second character is written like the image to the right. If you like this version, click on this character instead of the button above.


China jié zhì
Japan sessei
Moderation Wall Scroll

Moderation is creating a healthy balance in your life between work and play, rest and exercise. You don't overdo or get swept away by the things you like. You use your self-discipline to take charge of your life and your time.

This word can also be translated as sobriety, self-restraint, or temperance.

節制 is often used as part of the Seven Heavenly Virtues to represent sobriety and/or temperance.

See Also:  Prudence | Ethics | Humble | Humility


China jì lǜ
Discipline Wall Scroll

Discipline: There are a few different ways to define this word in English. This Asian word conveys the idea of extreme self-control and perhaps self-sacrifice, and obedience. This matches what I was taught as the meaning of "discipline" when I was in the Marine Corps. There is also an additional idea of maintaining order or being orderly in your tasks.

This idea would also fit an athlete training for the Olympics who gives up many pleasures to stay focused on their training.

See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Pushing Hands / Tui Sau

China tuī shǒu
Pushing Hands / Tui Sau Wall Scroll

推手 is the martial arts title "Pushing Hands."

推手 is the title for two-person training routines practiced in internal Chinese martial arts such as Baguazhang, Xingyiquan, Tai Chi Chuan (Taijiquan), Liuhebafa, Chuan Fa, and Yiquan.

The first character means "pushing."
The second character means "hand" (or "hands").

This term can be romanized as "Tui Sau," "Tui Sao," or from Mandarin, "Tui Shou."

If you are looking for this term, chances are, you already know the meaning within the context of Tai Chi and other martial arts.

Teach / Education

China jiào yù
Japan kyouiku
Teach / Education Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese word means to educate, to teach, education, and/or training.

Tai Chi Ball

China tài jí qiú
Japan tai kyoku kyuu
Tai Chi Ball Wall Scroll

太極球 is the title "Tai Chi Ball."

This may refer to any number of variations of exercise balls, some with yin-yang themes, others strictly for taichi/taiji or qigong exercises.

Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan

China tài jí quán
Japan tai kyoku ken
Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan Wall Scroll

太極拳 is the famous Taoist meditation and martial art exercise. The direct translation of these characters would be something like "grand ultimate fist" but that does not quite hit the mark for what this title really means.

An early-morning walk through any city in China near a park or open area will yield a view of Chinese people practicing this ancient technique.

The typical scene is an old man of no less than 80 years on this earth, with a wispy white beard and perhaps a sword in one hand. He makes slow moves that are impossibly smooth. He is steady-footed, and always in balance. For him, time is meaningless and proper form and technique is far more important than speed.

For the younger generation, faster moves may look impressive and seem smooth to the casual observer. But far more discipline and mental strength is needed to create perfectly smooth moves in virtual slow motion.

Note: There are two ways to Romanize these Chinese characters as seen in the title above. The pronunciation and actual characters are the same in Chinese. If you really used English sounds/words to pronounce this, it would be something like "tie jee chew-on" (just make the "chew-on" as one flowing syllable).


China duàn liàn
Japan tan ren
Discipline Wall Scroll

鍛練 / 鍛錬 is the Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja word that is used for discipline. This has a meaning like "forging or creating something from lots of training and practice." My Japanese dictionary translates this as, "tempering, forging, hardening, disciplining, training."

鍛練 / 鍛錬 is for Japanese and Korean only. In Chinese, these characters might be translated as (physical) "exercise."


The modern form of the second Japanese Kanji looks like the first image to the right. There's also an alternate modern form after that, and finally, an alternate traditional form. Because calligraphy is an art, the calligrapher could choose any of these possible forms. Let us know if you have a preference.

See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Discipline / Training / Tempering Character

China mó liàn
Discipline / Training / Tempering Character Wall Scroll

磨練 / 磨鍊 / 磨鍊 is a form of discipline which suggests training of the mind and character, aimed at producing self-control, obedience, etc.

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries even translates this as "tempering oneself" or turning yourself into hardened steel.

In old Korean Hanja, they use these characters in reverse order but with the same meaning. If you want the Korean version, please click this link instead of the button above: Korean version.

Warriors: Quality Over Quantity

China bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō
Warriors: Quality Over Quantity Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally means: [The value of] soldiers/warriors lies in [their] quality, not [just] in [their] quantity.

In simple terms, this says that in regard to warriors, quality is better than quantity.

Most tacticians will agree that this can aid in the factor known as "force multiplication." Having good troops, of high morale, excellent training, and good discipline is like having a force that is three times larger.

See Also:  兵在精

Cry in the dojo - Laugh on the battlefield

Japan doujou de naki senjou de warau
Cry in the dojo - Laugh on the battlefield Wall Scroll

道場で泣き戦場で笑う is a Japanese phrase that means, "Cry in the dojo, laugh on the battlefield."

You'll see this phrase in a lot of dojos as a kind of philosophical joke.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Perseverance is the Key

Skills cannot be perfected without perseverance in practice
China bú pà liàn bù chéng jiù pà xīn bù héng
Perseverance is the Key Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Do not worry about not being able to master [a skill]; What [one should] be concerned about is lack of perseverance.

Figuratively, this means: One's skills cannot be perfected without perseverance in practice.

For me, I've learned that you can only get so much from school or studying. You've really got to do "on-the-job training" to perfect your ability and skill.

For martial arts students: You can read about a kick in a book, or someone can tell you about a certain kick but until you practice the kick, there's no way you'll master it.

The More We Sweat in Training,
The Less We Bleed in Battle

China píng shí duō liú hàn zhàn shí shǎo liú xuè
The More We Sweat in Training, / The Less We Bleed in Battle Wall Scroll

There is more than one way to translate this ancient Chinese military proverb. Here are a few interpretations:

A drop of sweat spent in a drill is a drop of blood saved in war.

More practice will give one a better chance of success in real situation.

The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in battle.

I heard this many times when I was a U.S. Marine but I had no idea at the time that it was actually an old Chinese proverb.

Five Reflections / Gosei

Japan shi se i ni moto ru na ka ri shi ka? gen kou ni ha zu ru na ka ri shi ka? ki ryo ku ni ka ku ru na ka ri shi ka? do ryo ku ni u ra mi na ka ri shi ka? bu sho u ni wa ta ru na ka ri shi ka?
Five Reflections / Gosei Wall Scroll

These are the "Five Reflections" of Vice Admiral Hajime Matsushita of the Japanese Imperial Navy.

These days, the Five Reflections are recited or contemplated daily by Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force recruits in training. This long proverb is popularly translated into English this way:

Hast thou not gone against sincerity?
Hast thou not felt ashamed of thy words and deeds?
Hast thou not lacked vigor?
Hast thou not exerted all possible efforts?
Hast thou not become slothful?

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Wing Chun Fist Maxims

Wing Chun Kuen Kuit
Wing Chun Fist Maxims Wall Scroll

有手黐手無手問手來留區送甩手直沖怕打終歸打貪打終被打粘連迫攻絕不放鬆來力瀉力借力出擊步步追形點點朝午以形補手敗形不敗馬腰馬一致心意合一拳由心發動法無形活人練活死功夫 is the chant or poem of Wing Chun. I call it a "chant" because it was meant to be a somewhat rhythmic poem to help practitioners memorize many aspects of Wing Chun.

You will see this referred to as, "Wing Chun Kuem Kuit." This Cantonese romanization is popular in the west (and there is no official way to romanize Cantonese, so many variations exist). In Mandarin it would be, "Yong Chun Quan Jue." The last character (kuit or kyut from Cantonese, jue or chüeh from Mandarin) kind of means "secrets of the art." It's a short way to write 口訣, meaning "mnemonic chant" or "rhyme for remembering."

In the west (especially in the military), we often use acronyms to remember things. There's no initials to make acronyms in Chinese, so in ancient times, chants like this are used to remember vast amounts of information.

有手黐手無手問手來留區送甩手直沖怕打終歸打貪打終被打粘連迫攻絕不放鬆來力瀉力借力出擊步步追形點點朝午以形補手敗形不敗馬腰馬一致心意合一拳由心發動法無形活人練活死功夫 is the Chinese text:
1 有手黐手,無手問手
2 來留區送, 甩手直沖
3 怕打終歸打, 貪打終被打
4 粘連迫攻, 絕不放鬆
5 來力瀉力, 借力出擊
6 步步追形, 點點朝午
7 以形補手, 敗形不敗馬
8 腰馬一致, 心意合一
9 拳由心發, 動法無形
10 活人練活死功夫

I will presume you already know the meaning of the 10 maxims, so I will skip that to keep this calligraphy entry from getting too large.

Some think 练拳者必记 is the title but that just says, "Training fist people should remember:." Therefore, I've not included that in the calligraphy. However, you can put a note in the special instructions if you want it added.

Note: On a traditional calligraphy wall scroll, the characters will be written in vertical columns, starting from the right, and proceeding left.

Note: This is an except and variation from a huge 口訣. These 10 maxims are used extensively in Wing Chun training, and you'll find them all over the internet. Just know there is a much longer version out there, along with several variations and excepts like this one. If you know of, or want a different version, just contact me, and I will add it for you.

The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese

renliàn / lian4 / lian lien
kyou you / kyouyou / kyo yo / kyoyojiào yǎng
jiao4 yang3
jiao yang
chiao yang
Exercise 鍛煉 / 鍛鍊
duàn liàn
duan4 lian4
duan lian
tuan lien
Move On
Change Way of Thinking
ken shin / kenshinxiàn shēn
xian4 shen1
xian shen
hsien shen
Islam 伊斯蘭教
yī sī lán jiào
yi1 si1 lan2 jiao4
yi si lan jiao
i ssu lan chiao
Skill Acquired Through Hard Training 練功
renkou / renkoliàn gōng
lian4 gong1
lian gong
lien kung
Shugyo 修行shu gyou / shugyou / shu gyo / shugyoxiū xíng / xiu1 xing2 / xiu xing / xiuxing hsiu hsing / hsiuhsing
錬磨ren ma / renma
ninjutsurěn shù / ren3 shu4 / ren shu / renshu jen shu / jenshu
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Beautiful Princess
Flowers Bloom
God Loves You
Martial Arts
Never Give Up
Semper Fi
Tae Kwon Do
Wing Chun
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.

Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Train Kanji, Train Characters, Train in Mandarin Chinese, Train Characters, Train in Chinese Writing, Train in Japanese Writing, Train in Asian Writing, Train Ideograms, Chinese Train symbols, Train Hieroglyphics, Train Glyphs, Train in Chinese Letters, Train Hanzi, Train in Japanese Kanji, Train Pictograms, Train in the Chinese Written-Language, or Train in the Japanese Written-Language.