Asian Art Gallery

Adventures in Asian Art



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1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Together As One in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Together As One calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Together As One" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Together As One" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Love Binds Us Together
  2. The Karma/Fate/Destiny...
  3. One Day Seems Like 1000 Years
  4. No one knows a son better than the father
  5. When Three People Gather,...
  6. Devotion / Dedication / Attentive / Focused
  7. The Red String
  8. Spiritual Soul Mates
  9. Energy Sword Body in Concert
10. Wing Chun Fist Maxims
11. Push or Knock
12. Unity / United
13. Broken Mirror Rejoined
14. Double Happiness
15. Gung Ho
16. Do not fear the task,...
17. Christianity / Christian
18. Brotherly and Sisterly Love
19. Soul Mates
20. God is Always With You
21. Immovable Mind
22. Knight
23. Protector
24. Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude
25. Sangha
26. Serendipity / Happy Coincidence
27. Serendipity / Lucky Coincidence
28. Tea Fate
29. Tiger Rumor
30. Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial
31. Mama / Mother / Mommy
32. Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls


Love Binds Us Together

Japan ai ha subete o kanzen ni musubu obi de aru
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This Japanese phrase suggests that we (or a couple) are bound together by love.

I searched the web and found all of these English translation variations for this phrase:

Have love; The only way in which you may be completely joined together.

Love is the sash that perfectly binds us together.

Love is what binds us together

Love, which binds all things together in perfect unity.

This same Japanese phrase is used as part of Colossians 3:14 in at least one version of the Japanese Bible.

A few Biblical versions include:

...Charity, which is the bond of perfectness. (KJV)

...Love, which binds them all together in perfect unity. (NIV)

The Karma/Fate/Destiny
that Brings Lovers Together

China yīn yuán
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These two characters mean, "Destiny that brings lovers together". It can also be translated technically as, "Predestined matrimonial affinity" (wow, talk about taking the romance out of this word - that was from the Oxford C-E dictionary).

Basically, this is talking about the fate (or karma) that brings a husband and wife together. I would translate this as "Together by fate" or "Joined by destiny", but in the context of marriage. You could use this for non-married lovers, but the first character has a suggestion that this refers to those that are married.

One Day Seems Like 1000 Years

IchiJitsuSenShuu
Japan ichi jitsu sen shuu
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This Japanese proverb is really about missing someone. At least, it's usually used to express how hard it is to wait for someone's return, or to be away from someone.

Some will translate this as, "one day feels like a very long time", or "waiting for someone (something) is hard".
If we break down the Kanji one-by-one, we get:
一 = one / a
日 = day / sun (can also represent time, or a date)
千 = 1000 / a thousand
秋 = autumn / fall

Together, 千秋 can mean, "autumn comes thousand times" (or 1000 years). It can also be read as 1000 periods of time.
So, you can read this as, "1 day is like 1000 years", or "1 day is like 1000 years". Either way, it relays the idea of heartache as you wait for someone that you miss.

No one knows a son better than the father

China zhī zǐ mò ruò fù
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This can be translated as "No one knows a son better than his father".

This idiom is based on the idea that after spending many years together, family members know everything about each other. Better than anyone else, a father knows the qualities and shortcomings of his son.

If you are looking for something about "father and son", this is probably the best selection.

This is the original proverb (very old) but others have been composed about various combinations of mothers, sons, daughters, and fathers.

When Three People Gather,
One Becomes a Teacher

China sān rén xíng bì yǒu wǒ shī
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This literally means, "when three people meet, one becomes the teacher".

This famous Chinese philosophy suggests that when people come together, they can always learn from each other.

One person must be the teacher and others learn. And in turn, the others become the teachers of the knowledge they posses.

It is important to remember that we all have something to teach, and we all have something to learn as well.

Devotion / Dedication / Attentive / Focused

China zhuān xīn
Japan sen shin
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The first character means "for a particular person, occasion, or purpose", "focused on one single thing", "concentrated" and sometimes, "special".

The second character means "heart" or "mind" by itself.

Together, these two characters make a word that means, "paying attention with your heart". It's often translated as, "dedication", as in "be absorbed in" or "concentrate one's efforts". It's also used to mean, "with single mind", "whole-heartedly", "paying attention", "undivided attention", "concentration (-ed)", "engrossed", "devotionally (listening/watching)", and/or "attentive".

My favorite translation, which comes from the Oxford Advanced Chinese/English Dictionary is, "wholehearted devotion".

If it seems like the meaning of this word is quite open, you are correct. The context in which the word is used matters a lot. It can mean different things depending on how you use it. This makes it kind of nice as you can decide what this means to you (within some limits). This word is always positive in meaning, so even if a Chinese person reads it differently than you, it will still have a good meaning.


専In Japanese, they tend to use a variation of the second character which has one less stroke. If you want your calligraphy written this Japanese form, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above. Note: Japanese and Chinese people will recognize either form.


See Also...  Faith | Devotion

The Red String

Thread of Lover's Destiny / Fate
Japan akai ito
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This literally translates as, "the red string" in Japanese, but the real meaning is much deeper...

In Japanese culture, it's believed that fate, destiny, or karma joins lovers by an unseen string, tied around one little finger of each. This is how soul mates fine and are drawn to each other.

Spiritual Soul Mates

China jīng shén bàn lǚ
Japan sei shin han ryo
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This is title means "Spiritual Soul Mates". The first two characters mean "spiritual" or "soul". The second two characters mean "mates", "companions" or "partners".

This is more about the spiritual connection between partners rather than a "fate-brought-us-together" kind of soul mates.

Both halves of this title have meaning in Japanese, but I've not yet confirmed that this is a commonly-used title in Japan.

Energy Sword Body in Concert

Spirit, Sword & Body as One
Japan ki ken tai icchi
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This often gets translated as "Mind Sword Body", or "Spirit, Sword and Body as One". But I think these translations don't tell you enough about what this is really saying.

In this context, 気, which is the modern Japanese version of 氣, means spiritual and unseen energy or "life energy". In some cases, 気 can be translated as spirit, feeling, or nature. If defined as mind, it's more about invisible or intangible part of one's mind (or soul).

剣 is the Japanese version of 劍 meaning sword.

体 is the modern Japanese version of 體 meaning body.

The Kanji 一 means one, and in this case suggests "all in one". The Kanji 到 means to send, deliver, or convey. But together, 一到 suggests all these things in agreement, union cooperation, or in concert.

Wing Chun Fist Maxims (Part 1)

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A customer asked me to split these Wing Chun maxims into two parts, so he could order a couplet. It thought this was a good idea, so it's been added here.

Chinese text of part 1:
1 有手黐手,無手問手
2 來留區送, 甩手直沖
3 怕打終歸打, 貪打終被打
4 粘連迫攻, 絕不放鬆
5 來力瀉力, 借力出擊

A couplet is a set of two wall scrolls that start and finish one phrase or idea. Often, couplets are hung with the first wall scroll on the right side, and the second on the left side of a doorway or entrance. The order in Chinese is right-to-left, so that's why the first wall scroll goes on the right as you face the door.

Of course, couplets can also be hung together on a wall. Often they can be hung to flank an alter, or table with incense, or even flanking a larger central wall scroll. See an example here from the home of Confucius

Be sure to order both part 1 and 2 together. One without the other is like Eve without Adam.

Push or Knock

To weigh one's words
China fǎn fù tuī qiāo
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During the Tang Dynasty, a man named Jia Dao (born in the year 779), a well studied scholar and poet, went to the capital to take the imperial examination.

One day as he rides a donkey through the city streets, a poem begins to form in his mind. A portion of the poem comes into his head like this:

"The bird sits on the tree branch near a pond,
A monk approaches and knocks at the gate..."


At the same time, he wondered if the word "push" would be better than "knock" in his poem.

As he rides down the street, he imagines the monk pushing or knocking. Soon he finds himself making motions of pushing, and shaking a fist in a knocking motion as he debates which word to use. He is quite a sight as he makes his way down the street on his donkey with hands and fists flying about as the internal debate continues.

As he amuses people along the street, he becomes completely lost in his thoughts and does not see the mayor's procession coming in the opposite direction. Jia Bao is blocking the way for the procession to continue down the road, and the mayor's guards immediately decide to remove Jia Bao by force. Jia Bao, not realizing that he was in the way, apologizes, explains his poetic dilemma, and awaits his punishment for blocking the mayor's way.

The mayor, Han Yu, a scholar and author of prose himself, finds himself intrigued by Jia Dao's poem and problem. Han Yu gets off his horse, and addresses Jia Bao, stating, "I think knock is better". The relieved Jia Bao raises his head, and is invited by the mayor to join the procession, and are seen riding off together down the street exchanging their ideas and love of poetry.

In modern Chinese, this idiom is used when someone is trying to decide which word to use in their writing or when struggling to decide between two things when neither seems to have a downside.

Unity / United

Join Forces / Rally Together
China tuán jié
Japan dan ketsu
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There's not a perfect match to the English word "unity" in Chinese. But this word is pretty close. It speaks to the idea of joining forces, and working as one. It could even mean to rally together to achieve a goal, or defeat a common enemy.


団 There are several variations of these characters such as 团结, 団結, 團結, 糰結, etc. Modern Japanese will write it 団結. Just the first Kanji varies. Click on the image of that modern Japanese first Kanji to the right if you want this version instead of the traditional one.

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
China pò jìng chóng yuán
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A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:


You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon, but as for you, I see not a trace.


The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb in Chinese is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce), but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.

Double Happiness

(Happy wedding and marriage)
China
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This is a common gift for Chinese couples getting married or newly married couples.

As we say in the west, "Two heads are better than one" Well, in the east, two "happinesses" are certainly better than one.

Some will suggest this is a symbol of two happinesses coming together. Others see it as a multiplication of happiness because of the union or marriage.

This is not really a character that is pronounced very often - it's almost exclusively used in written form. However, if pressed, most Chinese people will pronounce this "shuang xi" (double happy) although literally there are two "xi" characters combined in this calligraphy (but nobody will say "xi xi").

Double Happiness Portrait Red If you select this character, I strongly suggest the festive bright red paper for your calligraphy. Part of my suggestion comes from the fact that red is a good luck color in China, and this will add to the sentiment that you wish to convey with this scroll to the happy couple.


See Also...  Happiness

Gung Ho

Working Together
China gōng hé
Japan guai
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This is one of those Asian words that is used more in English than it is in the original Chinese.

Gung Ho was originally used to speak of Carlson's Raiders, a group of "Gung Ho" U.S. Marines who went on an island-hopping campaign of death during WWII.

A movie called Gung Ho came out in the mid-1940s and was later re-released in the 1950s depicting the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, and brought this word to the mainstream.

It is still sometimes used today within the U.S. Marine Corps brotherhood to refer to a unit or group that works well together, or is otherwise efficient and motivated (has good moral).

In 1986, there was a movie called Gung Ho, about a Japanese company taking over an American automotive factory. They completely ignored the fact that this was a Chinese title.

It should be noted that this title actually means condition, state, manner, or health of something in Japanese.

Language and pronunciation notes:
Like many Asian words absorbed into common use in English, this one is drastically mispronounced. The official Romanization is "gong he", but that doesn't tell you enough. The vowel sound on the first character is like the English word "own", now just add the g-sounds to the beginning and end. The second character is misleading, as you might think it is like the English word "he". In reality, the vowel sound is more like the "u" in "up".

It should also be noted, that the current generation in China no longer uses, or recognizes this as a common word or slogan.


Note: This can be pronounced and is a word in Japanese, though seldom used. Japanese will use a variation of "具合" instead. But still, not common.

Do not fear the task,
cooperation will lead to success

Do not fear strong winds waves; just be sure to row in unison
China bù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
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This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Do not fear strong winds [and] high waves; what [one should] worry about whether or not you're rowing in unison.

Figuratively, this means: However difficult the task, the key to success lies in making collective efforts.

I like to translate this as, "Don't sweat the details, just get together and get it done".

Christianity / Christian

China jī dū jiào
Japan kirisutokyou
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This is the Chinese, Japanese and Korean word for "Christianity". Just as in English, this word is often used to mean "Protestant" but includes Catholics in the true definition.

It is the word used to refer to the whole "Christian religion" or "Christian Faith" and therefore it can be translated as "Christianity". However, used as an adjective in regards to a person, it would translate as "Christian". But more like saying "His religion is Christianity" rather than a noun form.

If you break it apart, the characters mean Base/Foundation Leading/Supervising Religion/Teaching. It makes more sense in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. The first two characters together are translated as "Christ". So you can also say this means "Christ's Religion" or "Christ's Teachings" when directly translated, or in reverse, "The Religion of Christ" or "The Teaching of Christ".

Notes: The last character has a slight difference in one stroke - however, in calligraphic form, this will not be apparent. This entry can easily be read by any Korean person who knows Hanja characters (Chinese characters used in Korean).


See Also...  Jesus Christ | God Of Abraham

Brotherly and Sisterly Love

China shǒu zú qíng
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This is the love between siblings. When you love, protect, care for, and have a deep bond that only brothers or sisters can.

The actual translation is "Hand and Foot" but it is said the relationship between brothers or sisters is like that of hands and feet. They belong together, and complete the body. Even though this says "hand and foot", it will always be read with the brotherly and sisterly love meaning in Chinese.

Note: During the past 20 years, the "One child policy" in China is slowly making this term obsolete.

Soul Mates

Japanese only
Japan tamashii no tomo
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This is one of a few ways to write "Soul Mates" in Japanese.

The first Kanji means soul, spirit, ghost, immortal soul, the mind, or conscious mind. From Sanskrit it's Vijñāna.

The middle character is a Japanese Hiragana connecting or possessive article that links the two ideas together.

The last Kanji means friends or friendship.

God is Always With You

God is With Me Always
China shàng dì yǔ nǐ cháng zài
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The direct translation of these Chinese characters is "God Together [with] You Always Exist".

Keep in mind that Chinese grammar is sometimes very different from English. This makes perfect sense in Chinese.

Note: The title for God is the first two characters - the other words in the direct translation represent one character each.

Immovable Mind

fudoshin
Japan fu dou shin
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The first two Kanji alone mean immobility, firmness, fixed, steadfastness, motionless, idle.

The last Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these three Kanji create a title that is defined as "immovable mind" within the context of Japanese martial arts. However, in Chinese it would mean "motionless heart" and in Korean Hanja, "wafting heart" or "floating heart".

This is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: An unshakable mind and an immovable spirit is the state of fudoshin. It is courage and stability displayed both mentally and physically. Rather than indicating rigid, inflexibility, fudoshin describes a condition that is not easily upset by internal thoughts or external forces. It is capable of receiving a strong attack while retaining composure and balance. It receives and yields lightly, grounds to the earth, and reflects aggression back to the source.

Other translations of this title include: imperturbability; steadfastness; keeping a cool head in an emergency; keeping one's calm (during a fight).


Knight

China qí shì
Japan ki shi
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The first character has the element of "horse" in it, and alone can mean "one who rides". Together, these characters can be translated as "riding soldier" or "horseman soldier", which of course can also be translated as "knight".


Can also be translated as "cavalier".


See Also...  Warrior | Horse

Protector

China bǎo hù zhě
Japan hogosha
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This is the universal word for protector in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The first character means to defend, to protect, to insure or guarantee, to maintain, hold or keep, or to guard.

The second character means to protect.

Together the first and second characters create a word that means to defend, to protect, or to safeguard.

The last character means person.

Add all three characters together, and you have a word that means "protector", one who will protect, guard, and keep you safe.

Some will also translate this word as guardian or patron.


Note: Not a common selection for a wall scroll in Asia.


See Also...  Guardian Angel

Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude

A Japanese martial arts title/concept
China xǐ xīn
Japan sen shin
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The first Kanji alone means to wash, to bathe, primness, cleanse or purify.

The second Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these two Kanji create a word that is defined as "purified spirit" or "enlightened attitude" within the context of Japanese martial arts.

This is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context it's often defined this way: A spirit that protects and harmonizes the universe. Senshin is a spirit of compassion that embraces and serves all humanity and whose function is to reconcile discord in the world. It holds all life to be sacred. It is the Buddha mind.

This title will only be familiar to Japanese who practice certain martial arts. Others may not recognize this word at all.

This word does not show up as a word in too many Chinese dictionaries, but it can be read and has the same meaning in Chinese.


先心 There is an issue with the first character. The original, and probably most correct version is shown above. However, many dojo documents and other sources have used a more simple first character. Arguments ensue about which version is correct. If you want to be correct in the Japanese language, use the "Select and Customize" button above. If you want to match the Kanji used by your dojo, click the Kanji shown to the right. There is a slightly different meaning with this first character which means before, ahead, previous, future, precedence.

Sangha

China sēng qié
Japan sougya
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In Buddhism, this term refers to a community of monks and/or nuns (one of the "Three Jewels"). In general terms, it can simply mean "all followers of the Buddha".

Notes: Though there are not vast numbers of Chinese Hindus, in the Hindu faith, this term means "community together".
The original Sanskrit word is also Romanized as samgha.
The first character means "monk". The second character means Buddha or Shakyamuni.
This is really a transliteration of the original Sanskrit, but it uses two very profound Chinese characters related to Buddhism.

Some may pronounce this as "seng qie" or "seng jia" in Mandarin (two possible pronunciations for second character). Note that "qie" would sound a bit like "chee-ah" using typical English pronunciation. Chinese Romanization is not actually designed to match English sounds.


僧僧Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this special Kanji form. However, it should also be noted that this is not a common term in Japanese (except by certain sects of Buddhism or perhaps devout Buddhists in Japan).

Serendipity / Happy Coincidence

Japanese only
Japan shiawa se na guu zen
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This is one of many ways to express serendipity in Japanese.

The first two characters mean happiness, good fortune, luck, or blessing.

In the middle is a Japanese Hiragana character that serves to connect these words/ideas together.

The last two Kanji mean incidentally, by chance, randomly, unexpectedly, suddenly, accident, fortuity, or by coincidence.

Serendipity / Lucky Coincidence

Japanese only
Japan kou un na guu zen
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This is one of many ways to express serendipity in Japanese.

The first two Kanji mean fortunate, lucky, fortune, or good luck.

In the middle is a Japanese Hiragana character that serves to connect these words/ideas together.

The last two Kanji mean incidentally, by chance, randomly, unexpectedly, suddenly, accident, fortuity, or by coincidence.

Tea Fate

China chá yuán
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This is a special title for the tea lover. This kind of means "tea fate", but it's more spiritual and hard to define. Perhaps the tea brought you in to drink it. Perhaps the tea will bring you and another tea-lover together. Perhaps you were already there, and the tea came to you. Perhaps it's the ah-ha moment you will have when drinking the tea.

I've been told not to explain this further, as it will either dilute or confuse the purposefully-ambiguous idea embedded in this enigma.

I happen to be the owner of a piece of calligraphy written by either the son or nephew of the last emperor of China, and this is the title he wrote. It was given to me at a Beijing tea house in 2001. This is where I learned to love tea after literally spending weeks tasting and studying everything I could about Chinese tea. I did not understand the significance of the authorship, or meaning of the title at all. Some 10 years later, I realized the gift was so profound and had such providence. Only now I realize the value of a gift that it is too late to give proper thanks for. It was also years later that I ended up in this business, and could have the artwork properly mounted as a wall scroll. It has been borrowed for many exhibitions and shows, and always amazes native Chinese and Taiwanese who read the signature. This piece of calligraphy which I once thought just a bit of ink on a thin and wrinkled piece of paper is now one of my most valued possessions. And by fate, it has taught me to be more thankful of seemingly simple gifts.

Tiger Rumor

China sān rén chéng hǔ
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These four characters together relay the meaning that can be expressed in English as, "When three people say there's a tiger running in the street, you believe it".

Of course, there is an ancient story behind this idiom...

This is actually a proverb that resulted from a conversation that occurred around 300 B.C.

The conversation was between the king of the Wei kingdom and one of the king's ministers named Pang Cong.

It was near the end of one of many wars, this time with the Zhao kingdom. Pang Cong was to be sent by the king to the Zhao kingdom with the king's son who was to be held hostage. It was common at the time for a king to make his son a hostage to secure stable peace between warring kingdoms.

Before minister Pang Cong departed, he asked his king, "If one person told you there was a tiger running in the street, would you believe it?".

"No", the king said.

The minister continued, "What if two people told you?"

The king replied, "Well, I would have my doubts, but I might believe it".

The minister continued, "So, what if three people told you that there is a tiger running in the streets?"

The king replied, "Yes, I would believe it, it must be true if three people say it".

The minister then reminded the king, "Your son and I are now traveling far away to live in the distant Zhao kingdom - much farther from your palace than the street. Rumors may fly about me in my absence, so I hope your majesty will weight such rumors appropriately".

The king replied, "I have every trust in you, do not worry"

While the minister was gone, the king's enemies gossiped about minister Pang Cong on many occasions. At first, the king thought nothing of these comments and rumors. But slowly as the rumors mounted, the king began to suspect ill of his minister.

Some time later when peace was well-established, the minister and prince were freed and returned to the kingdom of Wei. The king received his son, BUT DID NOT EVEN SUMMON MINISTER PANG CONG TO THE PALACE!

Hopefully this story will help you see how dangerous words can be when used to promote rumors, or create ill will. And perhaps will inspire you to not believe everything you hear.

There is also a secondary suggestion in this idiom that gossip is as ferocious as a tiger. Some Chinese people who don't know the ancient story above may believe that this scroll means that rumors are as vicious as three tigers.

Note: This proverb appears in my Korean dictionary, but is not well-known in Korea.

Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

China dà gōng wú sī
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This Chinese proverb comes from an old story from some time before 476 BC. About a man named Qi Huangyang, who was commissioned by the king to select the best person for a certain job in the Imperial Court.

Qi Huangyang selected his enemy for the job. The king was very confused by the selection, but Qi Huangyang explained that he was asked to find the best person for the job, not necessarily someone that he personally liked or had a friendship with.

Later, Confucius commented on how unselfish and impartial Qi Huangyang was by saying "Da Gong Wu Si" which if you look it up in a Chinese dictionary, is generally translated as "Unselfish" or "Just and Fair".

If you translate each character, you'd have something like,

"Big/Deep Justice Without Self".

Direct translations like this leave out a lot of what the Chinese characters really say. Use your imagination, and suddenly you realize that "without self" means "without thinking about yourself in the decision" - together, these two words mean "unselfish". The first two characters serve to really drive the point home that we are talking about a concept that is similar to "blind justice".

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries translates this simply as "just and fair". So that is the short and simple version.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly-used term.


See Also...  Selflessness | Work Unselfishly For The Common Good | Altruism

Mama / Mother / Mommy

China
knob
ribbon top
knob

This is the oral way that most Chinese people refer to their mothers. Often, they will put this together twice (two of the same character in a row) to create a word that sounds like "Mama". That's absolutely what little kids call their mothers in China. This Chinese "Mama" is the rough equivalent of "Mommy" in English. Beyond a certain age, Chinese will start to just say "Ma", which is like saying "Mom".

This entry is just here for a language lesson. This would make a strange wall scroll by Chinese standards. In Chinese, there are sometimes oral words that don't seem appropriate when written in calligraphy, and this is one of them. See our entry for "Loving Mother" for a better selection.


See Also...  Loving Mother | Family

Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls

China lún huí
Japan rin ne
knob
ribbon top
knob

This is a universal word in Japanese and Chinese that expresses the Buddhist idea of "reincarnation", "transmigration of souls" or "the eternal cycle of birth and death". In some context, this can also mean "karma".

The first character means wheel, ring, turn, circle, loop or rotate.
The second character can be thought of as a suffix meaning "-times". This second character can also refer to something that revolves, returns, goes back, or a counter for the number of occurrences of some event.
Together the sum supersedes the parts and it means reincarnation. But knowing the seeing the essence of each character may help you understand some of the meaning behind the word.

廻If you request this selection from our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect that the second Kanji will look like the one shown to the right. This is the more common way to write this in Japanese. It's an alternate form of this character in Chinese (so neither way is technically wrong in either language).


See Also...  Buddhism | Rebirth


Check dictionary for together as one


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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The scroll that I am holding in this picture is a "medium size"
4-character wall scroll.
As you can see, it is a great size to hang on your wall.
(We also offer custom wall scrolls in larger sizes)

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.




If your search is not successful, just post your request on our forum, and we'll be happy to do research or translation for any reasonable request.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

A Vast Sky Full of Stars
Abby
Achieve Inner Peace
Achievement
Adventure
Aikido
Aries
Autumn
Balance
Balanced Life
Bamboo
Beautiful
Beautiful Girl
Beautiful Princess
Beautiful Virtue
Beautiful Woman
Beauty
Best Love
Black
Black Eagle
Bless and Protect
Blossom
Brotherly Love
Buddha
Bushido
Capricorn
Cause and Effect
Cherry Blossom
Children
Cliff
Commitment
Community
Destiny
Diego
Double Happiness
Dragon
Dragon Tiger
Eight
Ellie
Enjoy Life
Ethan
Father
Flowers
Flying
Forever
Fortune
Free Will
Ghost
Goat
God is Always With You
God of Abraham
Goddess
Gold
Gold Fish
Good
Good Luck
Great
Great Ambitions
Guan Gong
Happiness
Harmony
Harvest
Horse
Humor
I Love Mother
I Need You
Jasmine Flower
Kodokan
Koi Fish
Light
Live for the Moment
Live for Today
Live Laugh Love
Longevity
Lotus
Lotus Sutra
Love
Love With All My Heart
Love You Forever
Luck
Lucky
Madison
Male
Marriage
Moon
Mountain
One Life One Chance
One True Love
People
Pine
Plum
Power
Pride
Reason
Respect
Revolution
Richard
Self-respect
Sheep
Simon
Sincerity and Devotion
Spirit of the Tiger
Star
Strength
Strength Vigor
The Saint
Tiger
Tigers
Tree
Twins
Unique
United
Vigor
Warrior
Water
White
Whore
Wing Chun Fist
Wisdom from Hard Knocks
Year of the Dragon
Yin Yang
Zachary
Zhong Kui

With so many searches, we had to upgrade to our own Linux server.
Of course, only one in 500 searches results in a purchase - Hey buy a wall scroll!!!



See: Our list of specifically Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls. And, check out Our list of specifically old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title
Characters 
Simplified
Traditional
Japanese Romaji
(Romanized Japanese)
Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Love Binds Us Together愛は全てを完全に結ぶ帯である
愛は全てを完全に結ぶ帯である
ai ha subete o kanzen ni musubu obi de aru
The Karma/Fate/Destiny / that Brings Lovers Together姻缘
姻緣
n/ayīn yuán
yin yuan
yin yüan
yin1 yuan2
yinyuan
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years一日千秋
一日千秋
ichi jitsu sen shuu
ichijitsusenshuu
ichi jitsu sen shu
n/a
No one knows a son better than the father知子莫若父
知子莫若父
n/azhī zǐ mò ruò fù
zhi zi mo ruo fu
chih tzu mo jo fu
zhi1 zi3 mo4 ruo4 fu4
zhizimoruofu
When Three People Gather, One Becomes a Teacher三人行必有我师
三人行必有我師
n/asān rén xíng bì yǒu wǒ shī
san ren xing bi you wo shi
san jen hsing pi yu wo shih
san1 ren2 xing2 bi4 you3 wo3 shi1
sanrenxingbiyouwoshi
Devotion / Dedication / Attentive / Focused专心
專心 / 専心 / 耑心
sen shin
senshin
zhuān xīn
zhuan xin
chuan hsin
zhuan1 xin1
zhuanxin
The Red String赤い糸
赤い糸
akai ito
akaiito
n/a
Spiritual Soul Mates精神伴侣
精神伴侶
sei shin han ryo
seishinhanryo
jīng shén bàn lǚ
jing shen ban lv
ching shen pan lü
jing1 shen2 ban4 lv3
jingshenbanlv
Energy Sword Body in Concert气剑体一致
気剣体一致 / 氣劍體一致
ki ken tai icchi
kikentaiicchi
ki ken tai ichi
n/a
Wing Chun Fist Maxims (Part 1)有手黐手无手问手来留区送甩手直冲怕打终归打贪打终被打粘连迫攻绝不放松来力泻力借力出击
有手黐手無手問手來留區送甩手直沖怕打終歸打貪打終被打粘連迫攻絕不放鬆來力瀉力借力出擊
n/an/a
Push or Knock反复推敲
反復推敲
n/afǎn fù tuī qiāo
fan fu tui qiao
fan fu t`ui ch`iao
fan3 fu4 tui1 qiao1
fanfutuiqiao
fanfutuichiao
fan fu tui chiao
Unity / United团结
團結 / 糰結
dan ketsu
danketsu
tuán jié
tuan jie
t`uan chieh
tuan2 jie2
tuanjie
tuanchieh
tuan chieh
Broken Mirror Rejoined破镜重圆
破鏡重圓
n/apò jìng chóng yuán
po jing chong yuan
p`o ching ch`ung yüan
po4 jing4 chong2 yuan2
pojingchongyuan
pochingchungyüan
po ching chung yüan
Double Happiness喜喜
n/a
xi
hsi
xi3
Gung Ho工合
工合
guaigōng hé
gong he
kung ho
gong1 he2
gonghe
Do not fear the task, cooperation will lead to success不怕风浪大就怕桨不齐
不怕風浪大就怕槳不齊
n/abù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
bu pa feng lang da jiu pa jiang bu qi
pu p`a feng lang ta chiu p`a chiang pu ch`i
bu4 pa4 feng1 lang4 da4 jiu4 pa4 jiang3 bu4 qi2
pu pa feng lang ta chiu pa chiang pu chi
Christianity / Christian基督教
基督教
kirisutokyou
kirisutokyo
jī dū jiào
ji du jiao
chi tu chiao
ji1 du1 jiao4
jidujiao
Brotherly and Sisterly Love手足情
手足情
n/ashǒu zú qíng
shou zu qing
shou tsu ch`ing
shou3 zu2 qing2
shouzuqing
shoutsuching
shou tsu ching
Soul Mates魂の友
魂の友
tamashii no tomo
tamashi no tomo
n/a
God is Always With You上帝与你常在
上帝與你常在
n/ashàng dì yǔ nǐ cháng zài
shang di yu ni chang zai
shang ti yü ni ch`ang tsai
shang4 di4 yu3 ni3 chang2 zai4
shangdiyunichangzai
shangtiyünichangtsai
shang ti yü ni chang tsai
Immovable Mind不動心
不動心
fu dou shin
fudoushin
fu do shin
n/a
Knight骑士
騎士
ki shi
kishi
qí shì
qi shi
ch`i shih
qi2 shi4
qishi
chishih
chi shih
Protector保护者
保護者
hogoshabǎo hù zhě
bao hu zhe
pao hu che
bao3 hu4 zhe3
baohuzhe
Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude先心
洗心
sen shin
senshin
xǐ xīn
xi xin
hsi hsin
xi3 xin1
xixin
Sangha僧伽
僧伽
sougya
sogya
sēng qié
seng qie
seng ch`ieh
seng1 qie2
sengqie
sengchieh
seng chieh
Serendipity / Happy Coincidence幸せな偶然
幸せな偶然
shiawa se na guu zen
shiawasenaguuzen
shiawa se na gu zen
n/a
Serendipity / Lucky Coincidence幸運な偶然
幸運な偶然
kou un na guu zen
kouunnaguuzen
ko un na gu zen
n/a
Tea Fate茶缘
茶緣
n/achá yuán
cha yuan
ch`a yüan
cha2 yuan2
chayuan
chayüan
cha yüan
Tiger Rumor三人成虎
三人成虎
n/asān rén chéng hǔ
san ren cheng hu
san jen ch`eng hu
san1 ren2 cheng2 hu3
sanrenchenghu
sanjenchenghu
san jen cheng hu
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial大公无私
大公無私
n/adà gōng wú sī
da gong wu si
ta kung wu ssu
da4 gong1 wu2 si1
dagongwusi
Mama / Mother / Mommy
n/a
ma
ma1
Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls轮回
輪回 / 輪廻
rin ne
rinne
lún huí
lun hui
lun2 hui2
lunhui

If you have not set up your computer to display Chinese, the characters in this table probably look like empty boxes or random text garbage.
This is why I spent hundreds of hours making images so that you could view the characters in the "together as one" listings above.
If you want your Windows computer to be able to display Chinese characters you can either head to your Regional and Language options in your Win XP control panel, select the [Languages] tab and click on [Install files for East Asian Languages]. This task will ask for your Win XP CD to complete in most cases. If you don't have your Windows XP CD, or are running Windows 98, you can also download/run the simplified Chinese font package installer from Microsoft which works independently with Win 98, ME, 2000, and XP. It's a 2.5MB download, so if you are on dial up, start the download and go make a sandwich.

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