All custom calligraphy items are made-to-order in our little Beijing artwork-mounting workshop.

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1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Together"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Love Binds Us Together
  2. Together Forever
  3. Together Forever in Love
  4. Together Forever
  5. Live Together and Help Each Other
  6. Growing Old Together
  7. Work Together with One Mind
  8. Solidarity / Working Together as One
  9. Working Together as One / Cooperation
10. Work Together with One Heart
11. Regardless of the Weather,...
12. The Karma/Fate/Destiny...
13. The Red String
14. Merge / Unify
15. The Mysterious Bond Between People
16. Unity / United / Solidarity / Cooperation
17. Gung Ho
18. Broken Mirror Rejoined

Love Binds Us Together

Japan ai ha subete o kanzen ni musubu obi de aru
Love Binds Us Together Wall Scroll

This Japanese phrase suggests that we (or a couple) are bound together by love.

I searched the web and found all of these English translation variations for this phrase:

Have love; The only way in which you may be completely joined together.

Love is the sash that perfectly binds us together.

Love is what binds us together

Love, which binds all things together in perfect unity.

This same Japanese phrase is used as part of Colossians 3:14 in at least one version of the Japanese Bible.

A few Biblical versions include:

...Charity, which is the bond of perfectness. (KJV)

...Love, which binds them all together in perfect unity. (NIV)

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Together Forever

Japan zutto issho
Together Forever Wall Scroll

ずっと一緒 is "together forever" in Japanese.

The first three characters mean "continuously," "throughout," "all along," "the whole time," or "all the way."

The last two Kanji mean "together."

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Together Forever in Love

China yǒng yuǎn ài zài yī qǐ
Together Forever in Love Wall Scroll

永遠愛在一起 is "together forever in love" in Chinese.

It's a nice phrase if you're a couple who plans to stay together and make your love last as long as you live.

Together Forever

China yǒng yuǎn zài yī qǐ
Together Forever Wall Scroll

永遠在一起 is "together forever" in Chinese.

永遠在一起 is a great idea for couples making a commitment of a lifetime.

Together Forever

Japan eien ni issho ni
Together Forever Wall Scroll

This Japanese phrase means, "together forever," or in the actual character order it's actually, "forever together" (more natural word order in Japanese).

The first two characters mean forever, eternally, or always. After a particle of speech, the last three characters mean together, or "with at the same time."

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Live Together and Help Each Other

Japan kyou son kyou ei
Live Together and Help Each Other Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "live together and help each other," "existing together, thriving together," or "co-existence and co-prosperity."

Growing Old Together

China xié lǎo
Japan kairou
Growing Old Together Wall Scroll

This Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word means to grow old together, or growing old together.

This will be a nice wall scroll to hang in your home if your plan is to grow old with your mate.

Work Together with One Mind

Japan ichi mi dou shin
Work Together with One Mind Wall Scroll

一味同心 is a Japanese phrase that refers to people working together with one mind.

Solidarity / Working Together as One

Japan icchidanketsu
Solidarity / Working Together as One Wall Scroll

This Japanese phrase means solidarity, or "banding together and working as one for a common cause."

Working Together as One / Cooperation

China tóng xīn xié lì
Working Together as One / Cooperation Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "to work with a common purpose," "to make concerted efforts," "to pull together," or "to work as one."

Work Together with One Heart

China qí xīn xié lì
Work Together with One Heart Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb mean, "to work with a common purpose," "to make concerted efforts," "to pull together," or "to work as one (or as if with one heart)".

Regardless of the Weather,
We Overcome Troubles Together

China fēng yǔ wú zǔ tóng zhōu gòng jì
Regardless of the Weather, / We Overcome Troubles Together Wall Scroll

The first four characters are often translated as, "Go ahead as planned regardless of the weather" or, "[Overcome] despite the rain and wind." The last four characters can mean, "Stick together" but literally means "Take the same boat [together]."

This Chinese proverb suggests that you are willing (or should be willing) to overcome any adversity, and accomplish your task at hand. The second part (last four characters) is sometimes left off but this second part strongly suggests that you should overcome that adversity together.

The Karma/Fate/Destiny
that Brings Lovers Together

China yīn yuán
The Karma/Fate/Destiny / that Brings Lovers Together Wall Scroll

These two characters mean, "Destiny that brings lovers together." It can also be translated technically as, "Predestined matrimonial affinity" (wow, talk about taking the romance out of this word - that was from the Oxford C-E dictionary).

Basically, this is talking about the fate (or karma) that brings a husband and wife together. I would translate this as "Together by fate" or "Joined by destiny" but in the context of marriage. You could use this for non-married lovers but the first character has a suggestion that this refers to those that are married.

The Red String

Thread of Lover's Destiny / Fate
Japan akai ito
The Red String Wall Scroll

This literally translates as, "the red string" in Japanese but the real meaning is much deeper...

In Japanese culture, it's believed that fate, destiny, or karma joins lovers by an unseen string, tied around one little finger of each. 赤い糸 is how soul mates fine and are drawn to each other.

Merge / Unify

China dǎ chéng yī piàn
Japan tajou ippen
Merge / Unify Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese proverb means, "to merge," "to integrate," "to become as one," "to unify together," "to knock all into one," or "to bring things together or into order."

The Mysterious Bond Between People

The invisible force that brings people together forever
China yuán
Japan en
The Mysterious Bond Between People Wall Scroll

緣 / 縁 is a complicated single character. It can mean a lot of different things depending on how you read it.

In Japanese, it can mean fate; destiny; a mysterious force that binds two people together; a relationship between two people; bond; link; connection; family ties; affinity; opportunity; chance (to meet someone and start a relationship). It can also mean "someone to rely on," relative, reminder, memento, or the female given name, Yori.

It's basically the same in Chinese, where it's defined as cause, reason, karma, fate, or predestined affinity.

In Buddhist context, it's Pratyaya. 緣 / 縁 is the concept of indirect conditions, as opposed to direct causes. It's when something happens (meeting someone) by circumstance, or a contributing environment. Instead of a direct cause or act, it is a conditioning cause without direct input or action by the involved people.

Occasionally, this character is used in a facetious way to say hem, seam, or edge of clothing. In this case, it's the seam that brings or holds the clothing together.

縁Note: Japanese will tend to use the variant of this Kanji shown to the right. If you want this version (and are ordering this from the Japanese master calligrapher), click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above.

Unity / United / Solidarity / Cooperation

Join Forces / Rally Together
China tuán jié
Japan dan ketsu
Unity / United / Solidarity / Cooperation Wall Scroll

團結 / 糰結 means to join forces, unity, united, union, combination, cooperation or solidarity.

Regarding solidarity, this was part of the Chinese title used for the Solidarity Workers Union in Poland. In some circumstances, this can mean "hold a rally."

While there's not a perfect match to the English word "unity" in Chinese, this word is pretty close. It contains the idea of joining forces, and working as one. It could even mean to rally together to achieve a goal, or defeat a common enemy.

団 There are several variations of these characters such as 团结, 団結, 團結, 糰結, etc. Modern Japanese will write it 団結. Just the first Kanji varies. Click on the image of that modern Japanese first Kanji to the right if you want this version instead of the traditional one.

Gung Ho

Working Together
China gōng hé
Japan guai
Gung Ho Wall Scroll

工合 is one of those Asian words that is used more in English than it is in the original Chinese.

Gung Ho was originally used to speak of Carlson's Raiders, a group of "Gung Ho" U.S. Marines who went on an island-hopping campaign of death during WWII.

A movie called Gung Ho came out in the mid-1940s and was later re-released in the 1950s depicting the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, and brought this word to the mainstream.

It is still sometimes used today within the U.S. Marine Corps brotherhood to refer to a unit or group that works well together, or is otherwise efficient and motivated (has good moral).

In 1986, there was a movie called Gung Ho, about a Japanese company taking over an American automotive factory. They completely ignored the fact that this was a Chinese title.

It should be noted that this title actually means a condition, state, manner, or health of something in Japanese.

Language and pronunciation notes:
Like many Asian words absorbed into common use in English, this one is drastically mispronounced. The official Romanization is "gong he" but that doesn't tell you enough. The vowel sound on the first character is like the English word "own," now just add the g-sounds to the beginning and end. The second character is misleading, as you might think it is like the English word "he." In reality, the vowel sound is more like the "u" in "up."

It should also be noted, that the current generation in China no longer uses, or recognizes this as a common word or slogan.

Note: This can be pronounced and is a word in Japanese, though seldom used. Japanese will use a variation of "具合" instead. But still, not common.

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
China pò jìng chóng yuán
Broken Mirror Rejoined Wall Scroll

A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:

You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon but as for you, I see not a trace.

The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb in Chinese is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce) but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.

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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Love Binds Us Together 愛は全てを完全に結ぶ帯であるai ha subete o kanzen ni musubu obi de aru
Together Forever ずっと一緒zutto issho
zutto isho
Together Forever in Love 永遠愛在一起
yǒng yuǎn ài zài yī qǐ
yong3 yuan3 ai4 zai4 yi1 qi3
yong yuan ai zai yi qi
yung yüan ai tsai i ch`i
yung yüan ai tsai i chi
Together Forever 永遠在一起
yǒng yuǎn zài yī qǐ
yong3 yuan3 zai4 yi1 qi3
yong yuan zai yi qi
yung yüan tsai i ch`i
yung yüan tsai i chi
Together Forever 永遠に一緒にeien ni issho ni
eien ni isho ni
Live Together and Help Each Other 共存共栄kyou son kyou ei
kyo son kyo ei
Growing Old Together 偕老kairou / kairoxié lǎo / xie2 lao3 / xie lao / xielao hsieh lao / hsiehlao
Work Together with One Mind 一味同心ichi mi dou shin
ichi mi do shin
Working Together as One
Working Together as One
tóng xīn xié lì
tong2 xin1 xie2 li4
tong xin xie li
t`ung hsin hsieh li
tung hsin hsieh li
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.

Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Together Kanji, Together Characters, Together in Mandarin Chinese, Together Characters, Together in Chinese Writing, Together in Japanese Writing, Together in Asian Writing, Together Ideograms, Chinese Together symbols, Together Hieroglyphics, Together Glyphs, Together in Chinese Letters, Together Hanzi, Together in Japanese Kanji, Together Pictograms, Together in the Chinese Written-Language, or Together in the Japanese Written-Language.