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To Live for Today in Chinese / Japanese...

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Start your custom "To Live for Today" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "To Live for Today" title below...

  1. Live In The Moment / Live In The Now

  2. Live For The Day

  3. Live Without Regret

  4. Carpe Diem / Seize the Day

  5. Live For The Day / Seize The Day

  6. No Regrets

  7. Heaven / Sky

  8. A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

  9. Better Late Than Never


Live In The Moment / Live In The Now

China xiàn shì
Japan gen sei
Live In The Moment / Live In The Now Vertical Wall Scroll

現世 is a very short way to write "live in the moment" or "live in the now" in Japanese.

This short word is open to interpretation. It's used in Japanese Buddhism to mean "the current epoch" or "the current age" (the current age is but a brief moment in the greater scope of existence). When used in that context, this is pronounced "utsushiyo" or "ustusiyo" in Japanese. Otherwise, it's pronounced "gensei" in Japanese.

Other translation possibilities include:

Live for now
Earthly world
This world
This life
Earthly life
Present life
Present generation
Present incarnation
Current age
This existence
This (momentary) reality


Note: This is also a word in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. While the meaning is more or less the same, this is not recommended for a wall scroll if your audience is Chinese or Korean. This selection is best if your audience is Japanese.

Live For The Day

China huó zài jīn tiān
Live For The Day Vertical Wall Scroll

活在今天 is not really an eastern concept, so it does not translate into a phrase that seems natural on a wall scroll. However, if this is your philosophy, the characters shown here do capture your idea of living for today or living in the moment. 活在今天 literally say "Live in today" and they are grammatically correct in Chinese.


Note: This kind of makes sense in Korean Hanja but the grammar is Chinese, so it's not that natural in Korean.

Live Without Regret

Japan jinsei kui nashi
Live Without Regret Vertical Wall Scroll

This is how to say "live without regrets" in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Live for Today

Live Without Regret

China shēng ér wú huǐ
Live Without Regret Vertical Wall Scroll

生而無悔 is how to say "live without regrets" in Mandarin Chinese.


Note: There is some debate about whether this makes sense in Japanese. It would be read, "nama ji mu ke," and be understood in Japanese. But, a Japanese person will probably think it's Chinese (not Japanese).


See Also:  Live for Today

Carpe Diem / Seize the Day

China bǎ wò jīn rì
Carpe Diem / Seize the Day Vertical Wall Scroll

把握今日 is the closest and most natural way to express this proverb in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "to seize" but can also be translated as "take control of."

The last two characters mean "today."

Live For The Day / Seize The Day

Japan ima wo i ki ru
Live For The Day / Seize The Day Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese phrase can be translated as "live for the day," "live for the moment," "seize the day," or "make the most of the present." You can think of this as the Japanese version of "Carpe Diem."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

No Regrets

China wú huǐ
Japan mu ke
No Regrets Vertical Wall Scroll

無悔 is how to say "no regrets" in Mandarin Chinese. This also makes sense in Japanese though not the most common way to express "no regrets" in Japanese.


See Also:  Live for Today

No Regrets

Japan kou kai na shi
No Regrets Vertical Wall Scroll

後悔無し is how to say "no regrets" in Japanese.


See Also:  Live for Today

Heaven / Sky

China tiān
Japan ten
Heaven / Sky Vertical Wall Scroll

天 means "heaven" or "sky" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The context determines if you are talking about heaven or the sky above (often they are the same concept).

When combined with other characters, words like "today" and "tomorrow" are created. While sometimes the character for "sun" is used to mean "day," often "sky" represents "day" in Asian languages.
Example: 今天 (this sky) = "today," 明天 (next sky) = "tomorrow" in modern Chinese and Japanese.

In Chinese culture, regardless of which religion, it's almost always assumed that God (and any other deities) live up above in the sky. The concept of God living in the sky is likely the reason heaven is associated with this character.
The equation goes something like this: God's domain is the sky, thus, the sky is heaven.


Note: As a single character, this is a little ambiguous, so you might want to choose our Kingdom of Heaven selection instead.


See Also:  Heaven | God | Today | Sun

A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

-or- The crafty rabbit has three different entrances to its lair
China jiǎo tù sān kū
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den Vertical Wall Scroll

This speaks to the cunning character of a sly rabbit. Such a rabbit will not have just one hole but rather a few entrances and exits from his liar.

About 2,250 years ago a very rich man told his assistant to go and buy something wonderful that he did not yet posses. He was a man that already had everything, so the assistant went to a local village that owed a great deal of money to the rich man. The assistant told the village elders that all debts were forgiven. All the villagers rejoiced and praised the rich man's name. The assistant returned to the rich man and told him he had purchased "benevolence" for him. The rich man was mildly amused but perhaps a bit confused by the action.

Some time later, the rich man fell from the favor of the Emperor, and was wiped out without a penny to his name. One day he was walking aimlessly and stumbled into the village in which the debts had been forgiven. The villagers recognized the man and welcomed him with open arms, clothed, fed, and gave him a place to live.

Without trying, the man had become like the sly and cunning rabbit. When his exit was blocked, he had another hole to emerge from - and was reborn. This story and idiom comes from a book titled "The Amendment" - it's unclear whether this man actually existed or not. But the book did propel this idiom into common use in China.

Still today this idiom about the rabbit is used in China when suggesting "backup plans" alternate methods, and anyone with a good escape plan.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

Search for To Live for Today in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Live In The Moment
Live In The Now
現世
现世
gen sei / genseixiàn shì / xian4 shi4 / xian shi / xianshihsien shih / hsienshih
Live For The Day活在今天huó zài jīn tiān
huo2 zai4 jin1 tian1
huo zai jin tian
huozaijintian
huo tsai chin t`ien
huotsaichintien
huo tsai chin tien
Live Without Regret人生悔い無しjinsei kui nashi
jinseikuinashi
Live Without Regret生而無悔
生而无悔
shēng ér wú huǐ
sheng1 er2 wu2 hui3
sheng er wu hui
shengerwuhui
sheng erh wu hui
shengerhwuhui
Carpe Diem
Seize the Day
把握今日bǎ wò jīn rì
ba3 wo4 jin1 ri4
ba wo jin ri
bawojinri
pa wo chin jih
pawochinjih
Live For The Day
Seize The Day
今を生きるima wo i ki ru
imawoikiru
No Regrets無悔
无悔
mu ke / mukewú huǐ / wu2 hui3 / wu hui / wuhui
No Regrets後悔無しkou kai na shi
koukainashi
ko kai na shi
kokainashi
Heaven
Sky
tentiān / tian1 / tiant`ien / tien
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den狡兔三窟jiǎo tù sān kū
jiao3 tu4 san1 ku1
jiao tu san ku
jiaotusanku
chiao t`u san k`u
chiaotusanku
chiao tu san ku
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Balance
Be True to Yourself
Believe
Benevolence
Bible
Blood
Bull
Bushido Code
Chicken
Commitment
Courageous
Determination
Dragon and Phoenix
Endurance
Endure
Energy
Enso
Family
Fate
Fearless
Fiddle
Fire
Four Noble Truths
Healthy
Heart of a Lion
Heaven Blesses the Diligent
Honesty
Humble
I Love You
I Love You Forever and Always
Integrity
Light Dark
Lion
Love
Love Always
Loyalty
Never Give Up
Overcome
Pain
Passion
Patience
Peace and Harmony
Perserverance
Phoenix and Dragon
Princess
Prosperity
Protector
Rebel
Resolve
Responsibility
Safety and Well Being of Family
Samurai
Scorpio Zodiac Sign
Shotokan
Soul
Strength
Survive
Tae Kwon Do
Truth
Wave
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Wing Chun
Wolf

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When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
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Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as To Live for Today Kanji, To Live for Today Characters, To Live for Today in Mandarin Chinese, To Live for Today Characters, To Live for Today in Chinese Writing, To Live for Today in Japanese Writing, To Live for Today in Asian Writing, To Live for Today Ideograms, Chinese To Live for Today symbols, To Live for Today Hieroglyphics, To Live for Today Glyphs, To Live for Today in Chinese Letters, To Live for Today Hanzi, To Live for Today in Japanese Kanji, To Live for Today Pictograms, To Live for Today in the Chinese Written-Language, or To Live for Today in the Japanese Written-Language.