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The Good Life in Chinese / Japanese...

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Start your custom "The Good Life" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "The Good Life" title below...

  1. The Good Life / Beautiful Life
  2. Life is Good / Life is Beautiful
  3. Life is Good
  4. Beautiful Life / Life in Perfect Harmony
  5. Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance
  6. Work Unselfishly for the Common Good
  7. Longevity / Long Life Wishes
  8. Choose Life
  9. Longevity / Long Life Wishes
10. Soul Mates
11. Live Laugh Love
12. Vitality
13. Destiny / Fate
14. Death with Dignity
15. 100 Years of Happy Marriage
16. Courtesy / Politeness
17. Rabbit / Hare
18. Best Love / Most Sincere Love
19. Smooth Sailing
20. Kindness / Caring
21. Faithful / Honorable...
22. Karma
23. Best Friends
24. Read
25. You must endure a harsh winter...
26. You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes
27. Great Aspirations / Ambition
28. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks
29. The Whole Room Rocks With Laughter

The Good Life / Beautiful Life

China měi hǎo de shēng huó
The Good Life / Beautiful Life

In Chinese, this means "Beautiful Life," or "The Good Life."

Life is Good / Life is Beautiful

Japan jinsei wa subarashii
Life is Good / Life is Beautiful

This means "life is good," "life is great," or "life is beautiful" in Japanese.

The first two characters mean "life" (as in your or a human lifespan).

The third character kind of means "is."

The last five characters are a long adjective that means wonderful, splendid, and/or magnificent. In the context of life it reads more like good or beautiful.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Life is Good / Life is Beautiful

China shēng huó měi hǎo
Life is Good / Life is Beautiful

生活美好 means "life is good" in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "life" or "living."

The last two characters mean "good" or "beautiful."

Life is Good

China rén shēng liáng hǎo
Japan jin sei ryou kou
Life is Good

人生良好 means "life is good" in Japanese.

The first two characters mean "life" (as in your or a human lifespan).

The last two characters mean "good."

This also makes sense in Chinese but it reads more like, "life is all right."

Life is Good

China shēng huó shì měi hǎo de
Life is Good

This is "Life is Good" in Mandarin Chinese.

Beautiful Life / Life in Perfect Harmony

China hé měi
Japan wa mi
Beautiful Life / Life in Perfect Harmony

These two characters create a word that means, "harmonious" or, "in perfect harmony." The deeper meaning or more natural translation would be something like, "beautiful life."

The first character means peace and harmony.

The second character means beautiful. But in this case, when combined with the first character, beautiful refers to being satisfied with what you have in your life. This can be having good relations, good feelings, comfort, and having enough (with no feeling of wanting).


Note: In Japanese, this is often used as the name "Wami." This title is probably more appropriate if your audience is Chinese.

Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance

China nián nián yǒu yú
Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance

年年有餘 is a common proverb or wish of prosperity you'll hear around the time of Chinese New Years.

Directly translated character by character it means, "Year Year Have Surplus." A more natural English translation including the deeper meaning would be "Every Year may you Have Abundance in your life."

On a side note, this phrase often goes with a gift of something related to fish. 年年有餘 is because the last character "yu" which means surplus or abundance has exactly the same pronunciation in Mandarin as the word for "fish."

年年有餘 is also one of the most common titles for traditional paintings that feature koi fish.

In China, this phrase might make an odd wall scroll - a customer asked especially for this common phrase which is why it appears here. See my other abundance-related words if you want a wall scroll that will seem more comfortable in Chinese culture.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Prosperity | Good Fortune

Work Unselfishly for the Common Good

China kè jǐ fèng gōng
Work Unselfishly for the Common Good

This can also mean: "Place Strict Standards on Oneself in Public Service."
This Chinese proverb is often used to express how one should act as a government official. Most of us wish our public officials would hold themselves to higher standards. I wish I could send this scroll, along with the meaning to every member of Congress, and the President (or if I was from the UK, all the members of Parliament, and the PM)

The story behind this ancient Chinese idiom:
A man named Cai Zun was born in China a little over 2000 years ago. In 24 AD, he joined an uprising led by Liu Xiu who later became the emperor of the Eastern Han Dynasty.

Later, the new emperor put Cai Zun in charge of the military court. Cai Zun exercised his power in strict accordance with military law, regardless of the offender's rank or background. He even ordered the execution of one of the emperor's close servants after the servant committed a serious crime.

Cai Zun led a simple life but put great demands on himself to do all things in an honorable way. The emperor rewarded him for his honest character and honorable nature by promoting him to the rank of General and granting him the title of Marquis.

Whenever Cai Zun would receive an award, he would give credit to his men and share the reward with them.
Cai Zun was always praised by historians who found many examples of his selfless acts that served the public interest.
Sometime, long ago in history, people began to refer to Cai Zun as "ke ji feng gong."


See Also:  Unselfish | Selflessness | Altruism

Longevity / Long Life Wishes

Japan nan zan no jyu
Longevity / Long Life Wishes

南山之壽 is a wish for long life for someone. The first part of this Japanese phrase is, "Nan Zan," which literally means "south mountain." This mountain is one of good wishes, good fortune, and prosperity. The title is often used as a salutation of good wishes.

The third Kanji is just a connector, and the last Kanji means long life or longevity.

I guess you could translate this phrase as "May your life be as long as Nan Zan is tall."

Choose Life

China xuǎn zé shēng huó
Choose Life

選擇生活 can mean to choose life instead of death (or suicide) or to choose to live life to the fullest.

I think of it as the key phrase used by Renton (Ewan McGregor) in the movie Trainspotting. While Chinese people will not think of Trainspotting when they see this phrase, for me, it will always be what comes near the end of this colorful rant:

Choose life. Choose a job. Choose a career. Choose a family. Choose a fucking big television, Choose washing machines, cars, compact disc players, and electrical tin can openers. Choose good health, low cholesterol, and dental insurance. Choose fixed-interest mortgage repayments. Choose a starter home. Choose your friends. Choose leisure wear and matching luggage. Choose a three piece suite on hire purchase in a range of fucking fabrics. Choose DIY and wondering who the fuck you are on a Sunday morning. Choose sitting on that couch watching mind-numbing spirit-crushing game shows, stuffing fucking junk food into your mouth. Choose rotting away at the end of it all, pissing your last in a miserable home, nothing more than an embarrassment to the selfish, fucked-up brats you have spawned to replace yourself. Choose your future. Choose life.

Longevity / Long Life Wishes

A wish for a long and prosperous life
China fú rú dōng hǎi shòu bǐ nán shān
Longevity / Long Life Wishes

This is a phrase that means "May you have good fortune as great as the eastern oceans, and may your life last as long as the southern mountains."

In ancient Chinese mythology, the eastern oceans and southern mountains are where God resides (basically it is the same as saying "heaven"). So it's like saying, "May your good fortune and life be as vast as the heavens."

There is also a longer, 14-character version of this phrase. Also, this can be cut into two scrolls (with half the phrase on each side - great for hanging on either side of a doorway). Just let me know if you'd like a special version (there is an additional cost).

Soul Mates

China líng hún bàn lǚ
Japan reikon hanryo
Soul Mates

靈魂伴侶 is the literal translation of "Soul Mates."

靈魂伴侶 is kind of the western way to express "soul mates" but translated into Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.
The first two characters mean "soul" or "spirit."
The second two characters mean "mate," "companion" or "partner."

Although not the most common title, these characters have good meaning and will be received well in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. It's a universal title!

Live Laugh Love

China xiào ài shēng huó
Live Laugh Love

In English, the word order shown in the title is the most natural or popular. In Chinese, the natural order is a little different:

The first character means laugh (sometimes means smile).

The second character means love.

The last two characters mean "live" as in "to be alive" or "pursue life."

Please note: 笑愛生活 is not a normal phrase, in that it does not have a subject, verb, and object. It is a word list. Word lists are not common in Asian languages/grammar (at least not as normal as they are in English). We only added this entry because so many people requested it.

We put the characters in the order shown above, as it almost makes a single word with the meaning, "A life of laughter and love." It's a made-up word but it sounds good in Chinese.


We removed the Japanese pronunciation guide from this entry, as the professional Japanese translator deemed it "near nonsense" from a Japanese perspective. Choose this only if your audience is Chinese and you want the fewest-possible characters to express this idea.

In Korean, this would be 소애생활 or "so ae saeng hwar" but I have not confirmed that this makes sense in Korean.

Vitality

China shēng mìng lì
Japan seimeiryoku
Vitality

生命力 can mean "vitality" or "libido." The first two characters mean "life" or "life force." The last character is a common word that means "strength." So together you get the meaning "life strength" which is the essence of vitality. Some will also translate this word as "good health."


See Also:  Life Force | Health

Destiny / Fate

China mìng
Japan inochi / mei
Destiny / Fate

命 is often translated as "destiny."

Sometimes this character is simply translated as "life" but more in terms of one's lot in life. In certain context, this can mean command or decree (generally from a king or emperor). Of course, such a decree are part of fate and lead you to fulfill your destiny.

In Chinese, this word leans toward the fate or destiny definition.
In Korean, it is usually read simply as "life."
In Japanese, it can mean all definitions shown above, depending on context.


See Also:  Good Fortune

Death with Dignity

Japan son gen shi
Death with Dignity

This was added at the request of a customer. 尊厳死 is not a good choice for a wall scroll unless you have a very specific and personal reason.

尊厳死 means "death with dignity" or "natural death" (as opposed to extending one's life unnaturally with life support).

100 Years of Happy Marriage

China bǎi nián hǎo hé
100 Years of Happy Marriage

百年好合 is a wish or greeting, often heard at Chinese weddings, for a couple to have 100 good years together.

Some will translate this more naturally into English as: "May you live a long and happy life together."

The character breakdown:
百 = 100
年 = Years
好 = Good (Happy)
合 = Together

Courtesy / Politeness

China lǐ mào
Courtesy / Politeness

Courtesy is being polite and having good manners. When you speak and act courteously, you give others a feeling of being valued and respected. Greet people pleasantly. Bring courtesy home. Your family needs it most of all. Courtesy helps life to go smoothly.


If you put the words "fēi cháng bù" in front of this, it is like adding "very much not." It's a great insult in China, as nobody wants to be called "extremely discourteous" or "very much impolite."


See Also:  Kindness | Respect

Rabbit / Hare

Year of the Rabbit / Zodiac Sign
China
Japan usagi
Rabbit / Hare

兔 is the character for rabbit or hare in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the rabbit, you . . .


Are gentle and full of sympathy.
Love to help others.
Enjoy a quiet life.
Are a good worker.
Are however, a bit of a pushover.


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Best Love / Most Sincere Love

China zhì ài
Best Love / Most Sincere Love

至愛 can mean the best love or most sincere love of your life. This could be a romantic love such as the love you have for your spouse or a boyfriend / girlfriend. It can also apply to the extreme love you have for your children or a parent, and maybe a really good friend.


See Also:  I Love You

Best Love / Most Sincere Love

Japan moai
Best Love / Most Sincere Love

This Japanese word means the best love, beloved, or most sincere love of your life. This could be a romantic love such as the love you have for your spouse or a boyfriend / girlfriend. It can also apply to the extreme love you have for your children or a parent, and maybe a really good friend.

Smooth Sailing

China yī fán fēng shùn
Smooth Sailing

一帆風順 is just what you think it means. It suggests that you are on a trouble-free voyage through life, or literally on a sailing ship or sail boat. It is often used in China as a wish for good luck on a voyage or as you set out on a new quest or career in your life. Some may use this in lieu of "bon voyage."

The literal meaning is roughly, "Once you raise your sail, you will get the wind you need, and it will take you where you want to go." Another way to translate it is "Your sail and the wind follow your will."

一帆風順 is a great gift for a mariner, sailor, adventurer, or someone starting a new career.

Note: Can be understood in Korean Hanja but rarely used.


See Also:  Bon Voyage | Adventure | Travel

Kindness / Caring

China qīn qiè
Japan shin setsu
Kindness / Caring

Kindness is showing you care, doing some good to make life better for others. Be thoughtful about people's needs. Show love and compassion to someone who is sad or needs your help. When you are tempted to be cruel, to criticize or tease, decide to be kind instead.

This Chinese / Japanese / Korean word can also mean affectionate, cordial, warmly, or close (emotionally).


See Also:  Love | Caring | Benevolence

Faithful / Honorable
Trustworthy / Fidelity / Loyalty

China xìn yì
Japan shingi
Faithful / Honorable / Trustworthy / Fidelity / Loyalty

信義 is a word that is often used to describe a person with an honest and loyal reputation. To put it simply, this applies to somebody you can trust (with your life).

In Chinese, this is often defined as good faith, honor, trust, and justice.
In Korean, this word means fidelity, truthfulness, or faithfulness.
In Japanese: faith, fidelity and loyalty. It's also a Japanese male given name when pronounced "Nobuyoshi."

Karma (of your past lives)

China sù yè
Japan shukugou
Karma (of your past lives)

宿業 is the Buddhist concept of Past Karma. To put it simply, it's the sum of all the good and bad from all previous lives (and perhaps earlier in your current life). This term is not commonly used outside of the Buddhist faith (you'll have a tough time finding a non-Buddhist Asian person that knows this word).

Other ways to translate this: "The karma of previous existence," "The karma remaining from prior existences," or simply "Former karma."


See Also:  Buddhism

Best Friends

China zhì jiāo
Best Friends

This an alternate way to say best friend in Chinese.

The first character can mean "most," "extreme" or "best." The second character means "making friends" or "building friendship." There's sort of a suggestion with the second character that fate caused you to intersect in life and become friends (that character can mean intersection in some context).

This can also mean "most intimate friend," "very good friend of long standing," or "closest friend."


See Also:  Friendship | Soulmates

Read

China yuè
Read

This Chinese character means to read. It can also refer to observing (the world, and learning from it), or gaining life experiences. 閱 is a good character to relay the idea of being "well read," which can include reading books, studying, and learning through experience.

The dictionary definition also includes: to inspect; to review; to peruse; to go through; to experience.

Technically, this is also a Japanese Kanji but it only used by some Japanese Buddhists (most of the population will not recognize it).

In both Chinese and Japanese Buddhism, this means: Examine, inspect, look over.

You must endure a harsh winter
to appreciate the warmth of springtime

You must know hardship to appreciate happiness
China bù jīng dōng hán bù zhī chūn nuǎn
You must endure a harsh winter / to appreciate the warmth of springtime

This literally translates as: Without having experienced the cold of winter, one cannot appreciate the warmth of spring.

Figuratively, this means: One cannot truly appreciate happiness without having gone through hardship.

There are many contrasts in life. One simply cannot fully know what joy is without having experienced misery, difficulty, and pain. How could you explain "light" if you did not have "darkness" to compare it to?

Embrace hardship, as it makes the good times seem even better.

You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes

China qíng rén yǎn lǐ chū xī shī
You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes

Any woman with affection for Asian art and you will love a gift of this Chinese proverb calligraphy on a wall scroll. She will melt in your arms as you tell her the meaning of these characters.

Contained in this phrase is a reference to the most beautiful woman in Chinese history. Her name was Xi Shi, and she was known to have good looks that need not fine robes or make up. Her charms were so powerful that she brought down an entire kingdom (in a successful effort to bring honor and pride back to her people).

This is a great way to express that the woman in your life is your one love.

Great Aspirations / Ambition

China hóng hú zhī zhì
Great Aspirations / Ambition

This Chinese proverb implies that having great ambitions also means that others will not understand your great expectations and ideas.

Though the actual words come from a longer saying of Confucius which goes, "The little swallows living under the eaves wouldn't understand the lofty ambitions of a swan (who flies far and wide)."

This Confucius quote has led to this idiomatic expression in China that means "think big." What you'd really be saying is "The lofty ambitions of a swan."

Note that Chinese people sometimes refer to the little swallow, as one who does not "think big" but is, instead, stuck in a rut, or just leading a mundane life. Therefore, it's a compliment to be called a swan but not a good thing to be called a swallow.

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
China bǎi zhé bù náo
Japan hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks." More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching." 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks," "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable."

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks," the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times." The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up."
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

The Whole Room Rocks With Laughter

The perfect scroll if you love humor or as a gift for the comedian in your life
China hōng tāng dà xiào
The Whole Room Rocks With Laughter

In China, this proverb is used in response to a good joke or witty comment.

The story goes that Mr. Feng and Mr. He were both senior officials in the Song Dynasty (about a thousand years ago). One day, Mr. Feng walked into their shared office wearing a new pair of boots. The boots caught the eye of Mr. He who said, "New boots! - how much were they?." Mr. Feng lifted one of the boots off the ground as if to show it off and responded, "900 coins."
Astonished, Mr. Feng explained, "900? How can that be? - I paid 1800 coins for my boots!." Mr. Feng then lifted his other foot off the ground and said, "This boot was also 900 coins."

It is said that the whole room was shaking from the laughter of all that heard Mr. Feng's joke on Mr. He.

Search for The Good Life in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
The Good Life
Beautiful Life
美好的生活měi hǎo de shēng huó
mei3 hao3 de sheng1 huo2
mei hao de sheng huo
meihaodeshenghuo
mei hao te sheng huo
meihaoteshenghuo
Life is Good
Life is Beautiful
人生は素晴らしいjinsei wa subarashii
jinseiwasubarashii
jinsei wa subarashi
jinseiwasubarashi
Life is Good
Life is Beautiful
生活美好shēng huó měi hǎo
sheng1 huo2 mei3 hao3
sheng huo mei hao
shenghuomeihao
Life is Good人生良好jin sei ryou kou
jinseiryoukou
jin sei ryo ko
jinseiryoko
rén shēng liáng hǎo
ren2 sheng1 liang2 hao3
ren sheng liang hao
renshenglianghao
jen sheng liang hao
jenshenglianghao
Life is Good生活是美好的shēng huó shì měi hǎo de
sheng1 huo2 shi4 mei3 hao3 de
sheng huo shi mei hao de
shenghuoshimeihaode
sheng huo shih mei hao te
shenghuoshihmeihaote
Beautiful Life
Life in Perfect Harmony
和美wa mi / wamihé měi / he2 mei3 / he mei / hemeiho mei / homei
Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance年年有餘
年年有馀
nián nián yǒu yú
nian2 nian2 you3 yu2
nian nian you yu
niannianyouyu
nien nien yu yü
niennienyuyü
Work Unselfishly for the Common Good克己奉公kè jǐ fèng gōng
ke4 ji3 feng4 gong1
ke ji feng gong
kejifenggong
k`o chi feng kung
kochifengkung
ko chi feng kung
Longevity
Long Life Wishes
南山之壽
南山之寿
nan zan no jyu
nanzannojyu
Choose Life選擇生活
选择生活
xuǎn zé shēng huó
xuan3 ze2 sheng1 huo2
xuan ze sheng huo
xuanzeshenghuo
hsüan tse sheng huo
hsüantseshenghuo
Longevity
Long Life Wishes
福如東海壽比南山
福如东海寿比南山
fú rú dōng hǎi shòu bǐ nán shān
fu2 ru2 dong1 hai3 shou4 bi3 nan2 shan1
fu ru dong hai shou bi nan shan
furudonghaishoubinanshan
fu ju tung hai shou pi nan shan
fujutunghaishoupinanshan
Soul Mates靈魂伴侶
灵魂伴侣
reikon hanryo
reikonhanryo
líng hún bàn lǚ
ling2 hun2 ban4 lv3
ling hun ban lv
linghunbanlv
ling hun pan lü
linghunpanlü
Live Laugh Love笑愛生活
笑爱生活
xiào ài shēng huó
xiao4 ai4 sheng1 huo2
xiao ai sheng huo
xiaoaishenghuo
hsiao ai sheng huo
hsiaoaishenghuo
Vitality生命力seimeiryokushēng mìng lì
sheng1 ming4 li4
sheng ming li
shengmingli
Destiny
Fate
inochi / meimìng / ming4 / ming
Death with Dignity尊厳死son gen shi
songenshi
100 Years of Happy Marriage百年好合bǎi nián hǎo hé
bai3 nian2 hao3 he2
bai nian hao he
bainianhaohe
pai nien hao ho
painienhaoho
Courtesy
Politeness
禮貌
礼貌
lǐ mào / li3 mao4 / li mao / limao
Rabbit
Hare
usagitù / tu4 / tut`u / tu
Best Love
Most Sincere Love
至愛
至爱
zhì ài / zhi4 ai4 / zhi ai / zhiaichih ai / chihai
Best Love
Most Sincere Love
最愛moai
Smooth Sailing一帆風順
一帆风顺
yī fán fēng shùn
yi1 fan2 feng1 shun4
yi fan feng shun
yifanfengshun
i fan feng shun
ifanfengshun
Kindness
Caring
親切
亲切
shin setsu / shinsetsuqīn qiè / qin1 qie4 / qin qie / qinqiech`in ch`ieh / chinchieh / chin chieh
Faithful
Honorable
Trustworthy
Fidelity
Loyalty
信義
信义
shingixìn yì / xin4 yi4 / xin yi / xinyihsin i / hsini
Karma (of your past lives)宿業
宿业
shukugou / shukugosù yè / su4 ye4 / su ye / suyesu yeh / suyeh
Best Friends至交zhì jiāo / zhi4 jiao1 / zhi jiao / zhijiaochih chiao / chihchiao
Read
yuè / yue4 / yueyüeh
You must endure a harsh winter
to appreciate the warmth of springtime
不經冬寒不知春暖
不经冬寒不知春暖
bù jīng dōng hán bù zhī chūn nuǎn
bu4 jing1 dong1 han2 bu4 zhi1 chun1 nuan3
bu jing dong han bu zhi chun nuan
pu ching tung han pu chih ch`un nuan
pu ching tung han pu chih chun nuan
You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes情人眼里出西施qíng rén yǎn lǐ chū xī shī
qing2 ren2 yan3 li3 chu1 xi1 shi1
qing ren yan li chu xi shi
qingrenyanlichuxishi
ch`ing jen yen li ch`u hsi shih
chingjenyenlichuhsishih
ching jen yen li chu hsi shih
Great Aspirations
Ambition
鴻鵠之誌
鸿鹄之志
hóng hú zhī zhì
hong2 hu2 zhi1 zhi4
hong hu zhi zhi
honghuzhizhi
hung hu chih chih
hunghuchihchih
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks百折不撓
百折不挠
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
hyakusetsusuto
bǎi zhé bù náo
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
bai zhe bu nao
baizhebunao
pai che pu nao
paichepunao
The Whole Room Rocks With Laughter哄堂大笑hōng tāng dà xiào
hong1 tang1 da4 xiao4
hong tang da xiao
hongtangdaxiao
hung t`ang ta hsiao
hungtangtahsiao
hung tang ta hsiao
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Achieve Inner Peace
Angel
Balance
Bear
Black
Blessing
Brave Heart
Chaos
Confidence
Devil
Diamond
Dream
Energy
Enso
Family
Family Over Everything
Father
Fire
Fire Dragon
Follow Your Dreams
Follow Your Heart
Forever
Future
Good Fortune
Grace
Gratitude
Hanawa
Happy Birthday
Happy Life
Harmony
Heaven
Holy Spirit
Honor
Independence
Inner Peace and Serenity
Jeet Kune Do
Justice
Kingdom of Heaven
Kung Fu
Live Laugh Love
Love
Loyalty
Mixed Martial Arts
Nature
Never Give Up
New Beginning New Life
Noble
Once in a Lifetime
Pain
Peace and Happiness
Phoenix
Phoenix Rise from the Ashes
Power
Protect
Responsibility
River
Samurai
Self-Discipline
Shadow
Shogun
Silence
Spiritual Strength
Strength
Strong Will
Tai Chi
Tao Te Ching
Tiger
Together
Trust
Truth
Vitality
Water
Wing Chun
Winter

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as The Good Life Kanji, The Good Life Characters, The Good Life in Mandarin Chinese, The Good Life Characters, The Good Life in Chinese Writing, The Good Life in Japanese Writing, The Good Life in Asian Writing, The Good Life Ideograms, Chinese The Good Life symbols, The Good Life Hieroglyphics, The Good Life Glyphs, The Good Life in Chinese Letters, The Good Life Hanzi, The Good Life in Japanese Kanji, The Good Life Pictograms, The Good Life in the Chinese Written-Language, or The Good Life in the Japanese Written-Language.