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Soldiers in Chinese / Japanese...

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Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Soldiers
  2. Soldiers Adapt Actions to the Situation
  3. Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children
  4. Valkyrie
  5. Mighty / Powerful / Strong
  6. Guardian / Defender
  7. American Soldier / American Serviceman
  8. Warrior Saint / Saint of War
  9. The Value of Warriors Lies in Their Quality
10. Marine Corps
11. Value of Warrior Generals
12. Aikido
13. Warriors: Quality Over Quantity
14. Guan Yu
15. Warriors Adapt and Overcome
16. Guan Gong / Warrior Saint
17. Flying Tigers
18. Police / Public Security Bureau
19. United States Marine Corps
20. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks
21. Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu
22. Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis
23. The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100
24. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu


Soldiers

China bīng
Japan hei
Soldiers Wall Scroll

兵 can be used to express soldiers, troops, a force, an army, weapons, arms, military, warfare, tactics, strategy, or warlike. The final meaning depends on context. It's also part of the Chinese title for the Terracotta soldiers. In fact, this character is usually used in compound words (words of more than one character). Sometimes this single character is the title used for the pawns in a chess game (in a related issue, this is also a nickname for soldiers with the rank of Private).


See Also:  Military | Warrior

Soldiers Adapt Actions to the Situation

China bīng lái jiàng dǎng shuǐ lái tǔ yǎn
Soldiers Adapt Actions to the Situation Wall Scroll

This Chinese military proverb means, counter soldiers with arms, and counter water with an earthen dam.

This is about how different situations call for different action. You must adopt measures appropriate to the actual situation.

To explain the actual proverb, one would not attack a flood of water with gunfire, nor would you counter-attack soldiers by building an earth weir. You must be adaptable and counter whatever threatens with relevant action.

Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children

China shì cù rú yīng ér gù kě yǐ yú zhī fù shēn xī shì cù rú ài zǐ gù kě yú zhī jū sǐ
Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children Wall Scroll

This is an entry from the 10th section within the Earth/Terrain chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War.

This is often translated as, "Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys. Look upon them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death."

Valkyrie

China nǚ wǔ shén
Valkyrie Wall Scroll

女武神 is the Chinese title for Valkyrie, the female spirit who determines which Soldiers live and die in battle.

Mighty / Powerful / Strong

China qiáng dà
Japan kyoudai
Mighty / Powerful / Strong Wall Scroll

This can mean mighty, powerful, large, formidable, or strong.

This term is often used to describe soldiers/troops/warriors, and whole armies.

Guardian / Defender

China wèi shì
Japan eishi
Guardian / Defender Wall Scroll

衛士 is a Chinese title that means guardian or defender.

衛士 is also used in Japanese to refer to soldiers of the Ritsuryo system that were guardians of the gates of the imperial palace / court or guards posted at the grand shrine.

American Soldier / American Serviceman

China méi guó jūn rén
American Soldier / American Serviceman Wall Scroll

美國軍人 means "American Soldier" or literally "American Military Person." This can also be translated as, "American military personnel," or "American serviceman." Gender is not specified in this title, so it's appropriate for male or female soldiers.

Warrior Saint / Saint of War

China wǔ shèng
Warrior Saint / Saint of War Wall Scroll

This Chinese title, Wusheng means, Saint of War.

This is usually a reference to Guan Yu (關羽), also known as Guan Gong (關公).

Some Chinese soldiers still pray to Wusheng for protection. They would especially do this before going into battle.

The Value of Warriors Lies in Their Quality

China bīng zài jīng
The Value of Warriors Lies in Their Quality Wall Scroll

This literally means: [The value of] soldiers/warriors lies in [their] quality.
This is part of a longer phrase which ends with "not [just] in [their] quantity."

This is a well known phrase in military circles, so the second part is suggested when one hears or reads these three characters.


See Also:  兵在精而不在多

Marine Corps

Japan kaiheitai
Marine Corps Wall Scroll

海兵隊 is the Japanese and Korean way to express "Marine Corps" or simply "Marines." It is not specific, so this can be the Marine Corps of any country, such as the British Royal Marines to the U.S. Marines.

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea soldiers/army corps/regiment/group."


See Also:  Military

Value of Warrior Generals

China bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō jiàng zài móu ér bú zài yǒng
Value of Warrior Generals Wall Scroll

This literally means: [Just as] soldiers/warriors [are valued for their] quality and not [just] for quantity, [so] generals [are valued] for their tactics, not [just] for [their] bravery.

This is a proverb that follows one about how it is better to have warriors of quality, rather than just a large quantity of warriors in your army/force.


See Also:  兵在精而不在多

Aikido

China hé qì dào
Japan ai ki dou
Aikido Wall Scroll

合気道 is the modern Japanese way to write Aikido.

Aikido is often referred to as the defensive martial art.

While Aikido was born in Japan, it has become a somewhat famous form of defensive tactics taught to soldiers and Marines, as well as some law enforcement officers in the West.

Looking at the characters, the first means "union" or "harmony."
The second character means "universal energy" or "spirit."
The third means "way" or "method."


Please note that while the original 合氣道 characters can be pronounced in Chinese, this word is not well-known in China and is not considered part of the Chinese lexicon.

Note: It is somewhat accepted that this is the origin of Hapkido in Korea. And other than a modern simplification to the middle Kanji of this 3-Kanji word, it is written the same in Korean Hanja.


See Also:  Martial Arts | Hapkido

Warriors: Quality Over Quantity

China bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō
Warriors: Quality Over Quantity Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally means: [The value of] soldiers/warriors lies in [their] quality, not [just] in [their] quantity.

In simple terms, this says that in regard to warriors, quality is better than quantity.

Most tacticians will agree that this can aid in the factor known as "force multiplication." Having good troops, of high morale, excellent training, and good discipline is like having a force that is three times larger.


See Also:  兵在精

Guan Yu

China guān yǔ
Guan Yu Wall Scroll

關羽 is the name Guan Yu, Army General for the Kingdom of Shu.

He is also known as Guan Gong (like saying Duke Guan or Sir Guan)

He was immortalized in the novel, "Romance of the Three Kingdoms."

He was a fearsome fighter, also famous for his virtue and loyalty. He is worshiped by some modern-day soldiers and has the title "Warrior Saint" in China. Some believe he offers safety and protection for military servicemen.

Guan Yu lived until 219 A.D.

Warriors Adapt and Overcome

Soldiers need a fluid plan
China bīng wú cháng shì shuǐ wú cháng xíng
Warriors Adapt and Overcome Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Troops/soldiers/warriors have no fixed [battlefield] strategy [just as] water has no constant shape [but adapts itself to whatever container it is in].

Figuratively, this means: One should seek to find whatever strategy or method is best suited to resolving each individual problem.

This proverb is about as close as you can get to the military idea of "adapt improvise overcome." This is best way to express that idea in both an ancient way, and a very natural way in Chinese.

Guan Gong / Warrior Saint

China guān gōng
Guan Gong / Warrior Saint Wall Scroll

Guan Gong Warrior Saint

This Chinese title, Guan Gong means, Lord Guan (The warrior saint of ancient China).

While his real name was Guan Yu / 關羽, he is commonly known by this title of Guan Gong / 關公.

Some Chinese soldiers still pray to Guan Gong for protection. They would especially do this before going into battle. Statues of Guan Gong are seen throughout China.

Flying Tigers

China fēi hǔ
Flying Tigers Wall Scroll

飛虎 is the short, or rather, Korean title of the "Flying Tigers." This short title is not very often used in China but is a title used in Korea. At the time the Flying Tigers volunteers were in China, Korea was also occupied by Japanese forces. Because many Korean civilians were enslaved and killed at the hands of the Japanese soldiers, any group that fought against the Japanese at that time was held in high-esteem by Korean people.

Note: I suggest the other 3-character entry since this group was so strongly related with China.

飛虎 is also used as an adjective in Korean to describe a courageous person (or tiger).

Police / Public Security Bureau

China gōng ān
Japan kou an
Police / Public Security Bureau Wall Scroll

公安 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja title for (The Ministry of) Public Security. 公安 can also generally mean public safety, public security, or public welfare. It is a positive term in Japan, were some even name their daughters "Kouan" (this title).

In China, this is the kinder name for the PSB or Public Security Bureau. It's really the national police of China - occasionally brutal, and seldom properly-trained or educated. Once in a while, you find a PSB officer who lives up to the title of 公安. Before the 1989 massacre, it was the PSB officers who refused to stop nor kill any of the protesting college students (so they're not all bad). The Chinese government had to call in soldiers from Inner-Mongolia to kill thousands of protesters.

United States Marine Corps

Japan bei kai hei tai
United States Marine Corps Wall Scroll

米海兵隊 is the Japanese way to write "United States Marine Corps" or simply "U.S. Marines."

Breaking down each Kanji, this means:
"rice (American) ocean/sea soldiers/army/military corps/regiment/group."

This title will only make sense in Japanese, it is not the same in Chinese! Make sure you know your audience before ordering a custom wall scroll.

If you are wondering about the rice, America is known as "rice country" or "rice kingdom" when literally translated. The Kanji for rice is often used as an abbreviation in front of words (like a sub-adjective) to make something "American." Americans say "rice-burner" for a Japanese car, and "rice-rocket" for a Japanese motorcycle. If you did the same in Japanese, it would be exactly the opposite meaning.


Note: I have not verified this but I've found this title used for U.S. Marines in Korean articles, so it's most likely a normal Korean term as well (but only in Korean Hanja).


See Also:  Marine Corps | Navy | Army | Art of War | Warrior | Military

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
China bǎi zhé bù náo
Japan hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks." More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching." This is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks," "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable."

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks," the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times." The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up."
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu

China jiàn shù
Japan kenjutsu
Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu Wall Scroll

In Japanese, the modern definition, using simple terms is "A martial art involving swords" or "The art of the sword." However, in Chinese, this is the word for fencing (as in the Olympic sport).

I will suppose that you want this for the Japanese definition which comes from skills and techniques developed in the 15th century. At that time, Kenjutsu (or swordsmanship) was a strictly military art taught to Samurai and Bushi (soldiers). The fact that swords are rarely used in military battles anymore, and with the pacification of Japan after WWII, Kenjutsu is strictly a ceremonial practice often studied as a form of martial art (more for the discipline aspect rather than practical purpose).

Language note: The Korean definition is close the Japanese version described above. However, it should be noted that this can mean "fencing" depending on context in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean.

術Character alternative notes: Japanese tend to write the second Kanji in the form shown to the right. It is a very slight difference, and the two forms were merged under the same computer font code point (thus, you will not see the Japanese version in Kanji images shown during the options selection process). If you choose our Japanese Master Calligrapher, this will be automatically written in the proper Japanese form.
Since there are about 5 common ways to write the sword character, if you are particular about which version you want, please note that in the "special instructions" when you place your order.

Romanization note: This term is often Romanized as Kenjitsu, however, following the rules of Japanese Romaji, it should be Kenjutsu.

Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

China dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
Japan dou ten chi shou hou
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis Wall Scroll

The first chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War lists five key points to analyzing your situation.

It reads like a 5-part military proverb. Sun Tzu says that to sharpen your skills, you must plan. To plan well, you must know your situation. Therefore, you must consider and discuss the following:

1. Philosophy and Politics: Make sure your way or your policy is agreeable among all of your troops (and the citizens of your kingdom as well). For when your soldiers believe in you and your way, they will follow you to their deaths without hesitation, and will not question your orders.

2. Heaven/Sky: Consider climate / weather. This can also mean to consider whether God is smiling on you. In the modern military, this could be waiting for clear skies so that you can have air support for an amphibious landing.

3. Ground/Earth: Consider the terrain in which the battle will take place. This includes analyzing defensible positions, exit routes, and using varying elevation to your advantage. When you plan an ambush, you must know your terrain, and the best location from which to stage that ambush. This knowledge will also help you avoid being ambushed, as you will know where the likely places in which to expect an ambush from your enemy.

4. Leadership: This applies to you as the general, and also to your lieutenants. A leader should be smart and be able to develop good strategies. Leaders should keep their word, and if they break a promise, they should punish themselves as harshly as they would punish subordinates. Leaders should be benevolent to their troops, with almost a fatherly love for them. Leaders must have the ability to make brave and fast decisions. Leaders must have steadfast principles.

5. [Military] Methods: This can also mean laws, rules, principles, model, or system. You must have an efficient organization in place to manage both your troops and supplies. In the modern military, this would be a combination of how your unit is organized, and your SOP (Standard Operating Procedure).


Notes: This is a simplistic translation and explanation. Much more is suggested in the actual text of the Art of War (Bing Fa). It would take a lot of study to master all of these aspects. In fact, these five characters can be compared to the modern military acronyms such as BAMCIS or SMEAC.

CJK notes: I have included the Japanese and Korean pronunciations but in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, this does not make a typical phrase (with subject, verb, and object) it is a list that only someone familiar with Sun Tzu's writings would understand.

The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

The pot calls the kettle black
China wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100 Wall Scroll

During the Warring States Period of what is now China (475 - 221 B.C.), the King of Wei was in love with war. He often fought with other kingdoms just for spite or fun.

One day, the King of Wei asked the philosopher Mencius, "I love my people, and all say I do the best for them. I move the people from famine-stricken areas to places of plenty, and transport grains from rich areas to the poor. Nobody goes hungry in my kingdom, and I treat my people far better than other kings. But why does the population of my kingdom not increase, and why does the population of other kingdoms not decrease?"

Mencius answered, "Since you love war, I will make this example: When going to war, and the drums beat to start the attack, some soldiers flee for their lives in fear. Some run 100 paces in retreat, and others run 50 steps. Then the ones who retreated 50 paces laugh and taunt those who retreated 100 paces, calling them cowards mortally afraid of death. Do you think this is reasonable?

The King of Wei answered, "Of course not! Those who run 50 paces are just as timid as those who run 100 paces."

Mencius then said, "You are a king who treats his subjects better than other kings treat their people but you are so fond of war, that your people suffer from great losses in battle. Therefore, your population does not grow. While other kings allow their people to starve to death, you send your people to die in war. Is there really any difference?"

This famous conversation led to the six-character proverb shown here. It serves as a warning to avoid hypocrisy. It goes hand-in-hand with the western phrase, "The pot calls the kettle black," or the Biblical phrase, "Before trying to remove a splinter from your neighbor's eye, first remove the plank from your own eye."

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

China yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Wall Scroll

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty. It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.

Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds peoples homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.

Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Soldiers heibīng / bing1 / bing ping
Soldiers Adapt Actions to the Situation 兵來將擋水來土掩
兵来将挡水来土掩
bīng lái jiàng dǎng shuǐ lái tǔ yǎn
bing1 lai2 jiang4 dang3 shui3 lai2 tu3 yan3
bing lai jiang dang shui lai tu yan
ping lai chiang tang shui lai t`u yen
ping lai chiang tang shui lai tu yen
Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children 視卒如嬰兒故可以與之赴深溪視卒如愛子故可與之俱死
视卒如婴儿故可以与之赴深溪视卒如爱子故可与之俱死
shì cù rú yīng ér gù kě yǐ yú zhī fù shēn xī shì cù rú ài zǐ gù kě yú zhī jū sǐ
shi4 cu4 ru2 ying1 er2 gu4 ke3 yi3 yu2 zhi1 fu4 shen1 xi1 shi4 cu4 ru2 ai4 zi3 gu4 ke3 yu2 zhi1 ju1 si3
shi cu ru ying er gu ke yi yu zhi fu shen xi shi cu ru ai zi gu ke yu zhi ju si
shih ts`u ju ying erh ku k`o i yü chih fu shen hsi shih ts`u ju ai tzu ku k`o yü chih chü ssu
shih tsu ju ying erh ku ko i yü chih fu shen hsi shih tsu ju ai tzu ku ko yü chih chü ssu
Valkyrie 女武神nǚ wǔ shén
nv3 wu3 shen2
nv wu shen
nvwushen
nü wu shen
nüwushen
Mighty
Powerful
Strong
強大
强大
kyoudai / kyodaiqiáng dà / qiang2 da4 / qiang da / qiangda ch`iang ta / chiangta / chiang ta
Guardian
Defender
衛士
卫士
eishiwèi shì / wei4 shi4 / wei shi / weishi wei shih / weishih
American Soldier
American Serviceman
美國軍人
美国军人
méi guó jūn rén
mei2 guo2 jun1 ren2
mei guo jun ren
meiguojunren
mei kuo chün jen
meikuochünjen
Warrior Saint
Saint of War
武聖
武圣
wǔ shèng / wu3 sheng4 / wu sheng / wusheng
The Value of Warriors Lies in Their Quality 兵在精bīng zài jīng
bing1 zai4 jing1
bing zai jing
bingzaijing
ping tsai ching
pingtsaiching
Marine Corps 海兵隊
海兵队
kaiheitai
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

A Life of Serenity
A New Beginning
Ability
Achieve Inner Peace
Achievement
Acupuncture
Aiki
Aiki Jujutsu
Aikido
Alive
Allah
Anarchy
Animals
Archangel
Aries
Army
Be Free
Beautiful Girl
Beautiful Princess
Beauty of Nature
Beauty of Spirit
Believe
Bill
Bird
Birthday
Bless and Protect
Blessed by Heaven
Blue Dragon
Bodhidharma
Bonsai
Boxing
Brave Heart
Brave Warrior
Bravery
Bright Future
Broken Hearted
Brown
Buddha
Bujinkan
Bushido
Bushido Code
Chase
Cherry
Community
Courageous
Crisis
Daoism
Dear
Discipline
Divine Protection
Double Happiness
Electricity
Empress
Enjoy
Enlighten
Equality
Everlasting
Excellence
Faithfulness
Family
Fidelity
Fire Dragon
Flowers
Forgive and Forget
Forgive Me of My Sins
Four Seasons
Free Will
Friend
Frog
Garden
General
Generosity
Gentleness
Genuine
God Bless
God is My Judge
God is With You
Golden Dragon
Goodness
Grace
Grace of God
Grandmother
Grant
Hanko
Harmony
Heart of a Lion
Holy Spirit
Honesty
Honorable
Hope
Immortality
Impermanence
Indomitable
Infinite Love
Inner Peace and Serenity
Inner Strength
Integrity
Invincible
Iron Fist
Jujutsu
Justice
Kara
Karate
Kempo
Kiss
Leadership
Learning is Eternal
Leopard
Life is a Journey
Life of Happiness
Little Dragon
Livestrong
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Love and Peace
Love and Strength
Love is Patient
Love You Forever
Love Yourself First
Luck and Fortune
Marriage
Melody
Mighty
Mirror
Miss You
Mysterious
Mystery
Nam Myoho Renge Kyo
New Beginning New Life
New Start
Ninpo
No Mind
No Surrender
Nothing
Nothingness
One Love One Heart
Orchid
Panther
Peace and Harmony
Peace and Prosperity
Peace Love
Peaceful Chaos
Pearl
Phoenix
Physical Strength
Prosperous
Pure
Pure Heart
Purple
Qi Gong
Queen
Reality
Reason
Reborn
Rectitude
Regret
Resolve
Respect
Respect and Love
Responsibility
Right Mindfulness
Sacred Fire
Sagittarius
Saint
Salvation
Satori
Self-Confidence
Self-Discipline
Selflessness
Semper Fidelis
Seven Rules of Happiness
Shine
Shogun
Shotokan Karate
Sifu
Sincere
Sing
Space
Spiritual Soul Mates
Steel
Strength
Strength and Courage
Strength from Within
Strength of the Heart
Strive
Study
Sun Tzu
Surrender
Sushi
Taekwondo Tenets
Tai Chi Chuan
Talent
Taoism
Tenacious
Thankfulness
The Red String
The Way of the Warrior
Training
Trustworthy
United
Vampire

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Soldiers Kanji, Soldiers Characters, Soldiers in Mandarin Chinese, Soldiers Characters, Soldiers in Chinese Writing, Soldiers in Japanese Writing, Soldiers in Asian Writing, Soldiers Ideograms, Chinese Soldiers symbols, Soldiers Hieroglyphics, Soldiers Glyphs, Soldiers in Chinese Letters, Soldiers Hanzi, Soldiers in Japanese Kanji, Soldiers Pictograms, Soldiers in the Chinese Written-Language, or Soldiers in the Japanese Written-Language.