Not what you want?

Try searching again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Rules in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Rules calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Rules" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Rules" title below...

  1. Seven Rules of Happiness
  2. My Life, My Rules
  3. Ten perfect Mahayana rules
  4. Ritsu
  5. Dojo Kun
  6. Principles of Life
  7. Suzaku
  8. State of Anarchy
  9. Discipline
10. American Football
11. Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity
12. Cooperation / Collaboration
13. White Tiger
14. Respect
15. Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu
16. Qi Gong / Chi Kung
17. Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis
18. Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa
19. Science
20. Kung Fu / Gong Fu
21. Golden Rule
22. Way of Life / Art of Life
23. Unbridled Creativity
24. Indomitable / Unyielding
25. Mixed Martial Arts
26. The Five Tenets of Confucius
27. Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity
28. Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened,...
29. Not Only Can Water Float A Boat, It Can Sink It Also

Seven Rules of Happiness

Japan kou fuku no nana ka jou
Seven Rules of Happiness

This is the title for the 7 rules of happiness in Japanese. The rules themselves take up a lot of space:

1. 成功や栄誉や勝ち負けを目的に、ことを行ってはいけない。
2. しないではいられないことをし続けなさい。
3. 他人との比較ではない、あくまで自分の楽しさを追及すべし。
4. 好きの力を信じる。
5. 才能と収入は別、努力は人を裏切ると心得よ。
6. 怠け者になりなさい。
7. 目に見えない世界を信じる。

...so this title is probably all you need.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Katakana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

My Life, My Rules

My life, I call the shots
China wǒ de shēng huó wǒ zuò zhǔ
My Life, My Rules

我的生活我做主 is a Chinese phrase that can be translated as, "My life, my rules," or "My life, I call the shots."

The first four characters just say, "my life".

The fifth character is I, me, and/or my.

The last two characters can be interpreted a variety of ways, just as, to make the decision, to take charge of, to call the shot, or to make the rule.

Ten perfect Mahayana rules

China shí fǎ
Japan jippou
Ten perfect Mahayana rules

十法 is the title of the ten perfect or perfecting Mahāyāna rules.

The order of rules are as follows:
1. right belief.
2. right conduct.
3. right spirit.
4. joy of the bodhi mind.
5. joy in the dharma.
6. joy in meditation.
7. pursuing the correct dharma.
8. obedience to, or accordance with dharma.
9. departing from pride, desire, etc.
10. comprehending the inner teaching of Buddha and taking no pleasure attaining such knowledge or noting the ignorance of others.

This title is only used in the context of Buddhism. Japanese and Chinese people who are not familiar with Buddhism will not recognize this title.

Ritsu

China
Japan ritsu
Ritsu

While this character literally means law, regulation or rules, it's also a surname Lü in Chinese and name Ritsu in Japanese.

In more ancient times (and for some people still), this can refer to East Asian criminal code, or vinaya (rules for the monastic community). For Japanese Buddhists, this can be the Ritsu school.

In some context, this can refer to certain musical scales used in Asia.

Dojo Kun

Japan dou jou kun
Dojo Kun

道場訓 is the Japanese term for the rules or doctrine of the dojo.

道場訓 is often a list of roles and expectations posted near the front entrance of a dojo.

Principles of Life

China shēng huó xìn tiáo
Principles of Life

This Chinese proverb means "principles of life" or "The personal obligations and rules that you live by."

For instance, if you were a vegetarian, the act of not eating meat fits into this category.
This could also be translated as "Way of living."

Suzaku

China zhū què
Japan suzaku
Suzaku

朱雀 is a Japanese surname that romanizes as Suzaku.

The meaning in Chinese and Japanese is "Vermilion Bird" or "Red Bird." 朱雀 is also the name of a Chinese start constellation (the seven mansions, or the god, who rules the southern sky).


This is not the only Japanese name that romanizes as Suzaku. Make sure you have the right one before you order.

State of Anarchy

China wú jíng chá
Japan mukeisatsu
State of Anarchy

無警察 means the state of anarchy. More literally it means "without rules or judges." This combination of characters makes sense in Korean and Chinese but with a meaning closer to, "without police." 無警察 is kind of a weird selection for a wall scroll, and a rather obscure idea (a couple of customers begged for this term, so we added it).

Discipline

China guī
Japan kiritsu
Discipline

This Japanese word for discipline relays the ideas of keeping order, observance (of rules, laws, regulations).

規律 is also a word in Chinese and old Korean Hanja where it suggests that you are one who follows a certain law of behavior, or have a regular and dependable pattern of behavior, personal regime or rhythm.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

American Football

China měi shì gǎn lǎn qiú
American Football

美式橄欖球 is the Chinese title for "American football" (not to be confused with international football known as soccer in the USA).

If you are a player or fan of American football, this would make a great wall scroll for your home.

The first two characters mean "American style."
The last three characters mean football or rugby (a game involving an oblong or ovoid ball).
The "American" adjective is needed in this title to differentiate from Canadian football, Australian rules football, and rugby.


See Also:  Soccer

Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity

China zūn yán
Japan son gen
Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity

This form of honor is showing great respect for yourself, other people, and the rules you live by.

When you are honorable, you keep your word. You do the right thing regardless of what others are doing.

尊嚴 is the kind of personal honor or dignity that is of great value. If you lose this, you have lost yourself and perhaps the reputation of your family as well.

While this is not directly the same thing as "face" or "saving face" in Asian culture, it is associated with the same concept in China.


厳In Japan, they currently use a more simplified second character for this word. The ancient Japanese form is the same as China but after WWII some Kanji were changed. If you want the modern Japanese version, just click on the Kanji image shown to the right, instead of the button above.

Cooperation / Collaboration

China xié zuò
Japan kyou saku
Cooperation / Collaboration

Cooperation is working together and sharing the load. When we cooperate, we join with others to do things that cannot be done alone. We are willing to follow the rules which keep everyone safe and happy. Together we can accomplish great things.

The first character means "united" or "to coordinate." The second character means "to do," "to make," or "to compose." Knowing this, you can understand why together, these characters create a word that can be defined as "cooperation" in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

It is implied that you are cooperating to create some project or product.


See Also:  Partnership

White Tiger

China bái hǔ
Japan byakko / hakko
White Tiger

白虎 is the title "White Tiger" in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean Hanja.

In Chinese folklore, the White Tiger rules or represents the seven mansions (constellations) of the west sky. However, in modern Chinese, a "white tiger" is also slang for hairless female genitalia (be careful about this, as Chinese men might secretly laugh or snicker when they see your white tiger wall scroll).

In Japanese folklore, the White Tiger is a god said to rule over the western heavens. They also know of the Chinese seven mansions of the western heavens. In Japanese, this can also be the given name Byakko.

Respect (Japanese / Simplified version)

Can also be a sign of gratitude
China
Japan rei
Respect (Japanese / Simplified version)

We show respect by speaking and acting with courtesy. We treat others with dignity and honor the rules of our family, school and nation. Respect yourself, and others will respect you.

禮 is also one of the five tenets of Confucius.

禮 can also be translated as propriety, good manners, politeness, rite, worship or an expression of gratitude.

Chinese RespectPlease note that Japanese use a simplified version of the character for respect - it also happens to be the same simplification used in mainland China. Click on the character to the right if you want the Traditional Chinese version.


This is also a virtue of the Samurai Warrior
See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Confucius

Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu

China jiàn shù
Japan kenjutsu
Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu

In Japanese, the modern definition, using simple terms is "A martial art involving swords" or "The art of the sword." However, in Chinese, this is the word for fencing (as in the Olympic sport).

I will suppose that you want this for the Japanese definition which comes from skills and techniques developed in the 15th century. At that time, Kenjutsu (or swordsmanship) was a strictly military art taught to Samurai and Bushi (soldiers). The fact that swords are rarely used in military battles anymore, and with the pacification of Japan after WWII, Kenjutsu is strictly a ceremonial practice often studied as a form of martial art (more for the discipline aspect rather than practical purpose).

Language note: The Korean definition is close the Japanese version described above. However, it should be noted that this can mean "fencing" depending on context in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean.

術Character alternative notes: Japanese tend to write the second Kanji in the form shown to the right. It is a very slight difference, and the two forms were merged under the same computer font code point (thus, you will not see the Japanese version in Kanji images shown during the options selection process). If you choose our Japanese Master Calligrapher, this will be automatically written in the proper Japanese form.
Since there are about 5 common ways to write the sword character, if you are particular about which version you want, please note that in the "special instructions" when you place your order.

Romanization note: This term is often Romanized as Kenjitsu, however, following the rules of Japanese Romaji, it should be Kenjutsu.

Qi Gong / Chi Kung

China qì gōng
Japan kikou
Qi Gong / Chi Kung

Qigong is the title of a technique that is somewhere between a medical practice, meditation, and in some cases a religion. The definition is blurred depending on which school of Qigong you are following. In some cases, it is even incorporated with martial arts.

Some people (even Chinese people) mix this title with Tai Chi (Tai Qi) exercises.

Lately in China, people will claim to practice Tai Chi rather than Qigong because the Qigong title was recently used as a cover for an illegal pseudo-religious movement in China with the initials F.G. or F.D. (I can not write those names here for fear of our website being banned in China).

You can learn those names and more here: Further info about Qigong

If you are wondering about why I wrote "Qi Gong" and "Chi Kung" as the title of this calligraphy entry, I should teach you a little about the various ways in which Chinese can be Romanized. One form writes this as "Chi Kung" or "Chikung" (Taiwan). In the mainland and elsewhere, it is Romanized as "Qi Gong" or "Qigong." The actual pronunciation is the same in Taiwan, mainland, and Singapore Mandarin. Neither Romanization is exactly like English. If you want to know how to say this with English rules, it would be something like "Chee Gong" (but the "gong" has a vowel sound like the "O" in "go").

Romanization is a really confusing topic and has caused many Chinese words to be mispronounced in the west. One example is "Kung Pao Chicken" which should actually be more like "Gong Bao" with the "O" sounding like "oh" for both characters. Neither system of Romanization in Taiwan or the Mainland is perfect in my opinion and lead to many misunderstandings.

Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

China dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
Japan dou ten chi shou hou
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

The first chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War lists five key points to analyzing your situation.

It reads like a 5-part military proverb. Sun Tzu says that to sharpen your skills, you must plan. To plan well, you must know your situation. Therefore, you must consider and discuss the following:

1. Philosophy and Politics: Make sure your way or your policy is agreeable among all of your troops (and the citizens of your kingdom as well). For when your soldiers believe in you and your way, they will follow you to their deaths without hesitation, and will not question your orders.

2. Heaven/Sky: Consider climate / weather. This can also mean to consider whether God is smiling on you. In the modern military, this could be waiting for clear skies so that you can have air support for an amphibious landing.

3. Ground/Earth: Consider the terrain in which the battle will take place. This includes analyzing defensible positions, exit routes, and using varying elevation to your advantage. When you plan an ambush, you must know your terrain, and the best location from which to stage that ambush. This knowledge will also help you avoid being ambushed, as you will know where the likely places in which to expect an ambush from your enemy.

4. Leadership: This applies to you as the general, and also to your lieutenants. A leader should be smart and be able to develop good strategies. Leaders should keep their word, and if they break a promise, they should punish themselves as harshly as they would punish subordinates. Leaders should be benevolent to their troops, with almost a fatherly love for them. Leaders must have the ability to make brave and fast decisions. Leaders must have steadfast principles.

5. [Military] Methods: This can also mean laws, rules, principles, model, or system. You must have an efficient organization in place to manage both your troops and supplies. In the modern military, this would be a combination of how your unit is organized, and your SOP (Standard Operating Procedure).


Notes: This is a simplistic translation and explanation. Much more is suggested in the actual text of the Art of War (Bing Fa). It would take a lot of study to master all of these aspects. In fact, these five characters can be compared to the modern military acronyms such as BAMCIS or SMEAC.

CJK notes: I have included the Japanese and Korean pronunciations but in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, this does not make a typical phrase (with subject, verb, and object) it is a list that only someone familiar with Sun Tzu's writings would understand.

Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

China quán fǎ
Japan kenpou
Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

This form of martial arts can be translated in several ways. Some will call it "fist principles" or "the way of the fist," or even "law of the fist." The first character literally means fist. The second can mean law, method, way, principle or Buddhist teaching.

Kempo is really a potluck of martial arts. Often a combination of Chinese martial arts such as Shaolin Kung Fu with Japanese martial arts such as Karate, Jujutsu (Jujitsu), Aikido, and others. You may see the term "Kempo Karate" which basically means Karate with other disciplines added. In this way, Kempo becomes an adjective rather than a title or school of martial arts.

These facts will long be argued by various masters and students of Kempo. Even the argument as to whether it should be spelled "kenpo" or "Kempo" ensues at dojos around the world (the correct Romaji should actually be "kenpou" if you precisely follow the rules).

The benefit of Kempo is that the techniques are easier to learn and master compared to pure Kung Fu (wu shu). Students are often taught basic Karate moves, kicks, and punches before augmenting the basic skills with complex Kung Fu techniques. This allows students of Kempo achieve a level where they can defend themselves or fight in a relatively short amount of time (a few years rather than a decade or more).

Because the definition of this word is so fluid, I should make some notes here:

1. Purists in Okinawa will claim that "Okinawa Kenpo" or "Ryukyu Hon Kenpo" is the original and true version of this martial art from the old kingdom. There is actually little or no connection between Okinawa Kenpo and the way the word is used elsewhere.

2. In Chinese, where these characters are pronounced "quan fa" (sometimes Romanized as "chuan fa" because the Chinese-pinyin "q" actually sounds like an English "ch" sound), these characters do not hold the connotation of being a mixed martial art. It is simply defined as "the law of the fist."

3. In my Japanese dictionary, it oddly defines Kenpo as "Chinese art of self-defense." I personally don't feel this is the most common way that people perceive the word but just something you should know.

Science

The rules of life, the universe, and everything.
China
Japan kotowari
Science

At essence, this word means science. But it's a very ambiguous and open term. 理 speaks to the reason that all things exist, and how things work from the microscopic to the cosmic level.

There are many translations for this word, including: inner essence; intrinsic order; reason; logic; truth; science; natural science (esp. physics); principle; the underlying principles of the cosmos; way of things; ruling principle; fundamental law; intrinsicality; universal basis; essential element.

If you are a scientist, or just searching for, "the answer to life, the universe, and everything," this could be the character for you.

Kung Fu / Gong Fu

China gōng fu
HK gung fu
Japan kan fu / ku fu
Kung Fu / Gong Fu

One of the most famous types of martial arts in the world - and not just because of Bruce Lee.

Some translate the meaning as "Accomplishment by Great Effort." I think this is partially true but directly translated it literally means "Merit/Achievement/Accomplishment Man." The word "fu" can sometimes mean "husband" or "porter" but in this case, it can only mean "man." However, few in China will think "man" when they hear the word "Gong Fu" spoken.

This term is also used for things other than martial arts. In fact, it's used to refer to a person with excellent skills in crafts that require a great deal of effort such as cooking, tea ceremonies, and calligraphy.

What a lot of people don't know is that the spelling of "Kung Fu" was actually taken from the old Wade Giles form of Romanization. Using this method, the sounds of the English "G" and "K" were both written as "K" and an apostrophe after the "K" told you it was supposed to sound like a "G." Nobody in the west knew this rule, so most people pronounce it with a "K-sound." And so Gong Fu will always be Kung Fu for most westerners.

Also, just to educate you a little more, the "O" in "Gong" has a sound like the English word "oh."

The popular Chinese dish "Kung Pao Chicken" suffers from the same problem. It should actually be "Gong Bao Chicken."

Historical note: Many will claim that Kung Fu was invented by the monks of the Shaolin monastery. This fact is argued in both directions by scholars of Chinese history. Perhaps it is more accurate to say that the Shaolin Monks brought the original fame to Kung Fu many generations ago.


Japanese note: While most Japanese martial artists will recognize these characters, Katakana is more often used to approximate the pronunciation of "Kung Fu" with "カンフー." Some will argue as to whether this should be considered a Japanese word at all.


See Also:  Bruce Lee

Golden Rule

Japan ougonritsu
Golden Rule

黄金律 is, "The Golden Rule" in Japanese.

It's understood to mean, "do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

Way of Life / Art of Life

China shēng huó fǎ
Japan seikatsuhou
Way of Life / Art of Life

生活法 is a Japanese and Chinese title meaning, "art of living" or "way of life."

This can also be translated a few other ways, such as, "rule of life" and "the act of living."

The "art" title kind of comes from the fact that the last character is the same as the book, "The Art of War." So when you write your book, this is the title for, "The Art of Life," in Chinese and Japanese.

Unbridled Creativity

China bù jū yī gé
Unbridled Creativity

This Chinese proverb speaks of exploring different styles and not being stuck in conventional thinking. It can also be translated as "not sticking to one pattern" or "not limited to one type (or style)." The most simple translation is "being creative," or "unbridled creativity." Some may also say this means, "not being stuck in a rut," in the context of a designer or artist.

If you literally translate this, the first two characters mean, "not stick to," or "not confine oneself to."
The second two characters mean, "one mode," "one pattern," "one form," "one style," or "one rule."

Indomitable / Unyielding

China bù qū bù náo
Japan fukutsu futou
Indomitable / Unyielding

不屈不撓 means "Indomitable" or "Unyielding."

不屈不撓 is a long word by Chinese standards. At least, it is often translated as a single word into English. It's actually a proverb in Chinese.

If you want to break it down, you can see that the first and third characters are the same. Both meaning "not" (they work as a suffix to make a negative or opposite meaning to whatever character follows).

The second character means "bendable."

The last means "scratched" or "bothered."

So this really means "Won't be bent, can't be bothered." I have also seen it written as "Will not crouch, will not submit." This comes from the fact that the second character can mean, "to crouch" and the last can mean "to submit" (as in "to give in" such as "submitting to the rule of someone else"). This may explain better why these four characters mean "indomitable."

Notes:
Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.
The first two characters can be a stand-alone word in Chinese.
In Japanese, this is considered to be two words (with very similar meanings).
The same characters are used in Korean, but the 2nd and 4th characters are swapped to create a word pronounced "불요불굴" in Korean.
Just let me know if you want the Korean version, which will also make sense in Japanese, and though not as natural, will also make sense in Chinese as well.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Mixed Martial Arts

China zōng hé gé dòu
Mixed Martial Arts

綜合格鬥 is a common Chinese title for "Mixed Martial Arts" or "MMA."

The characters or words in this title break down this way:
綜合 zōng hé = composite / synthesized / to sum up / to integrate / to synthesize.
格 gé = style / frame / rule.
斗 dòu = fight / to battle / to struggle.

The Five Tenets of Confucius

The Five Cardinal Rules / Virtues of Confucius
China rén yì lǐ zhì xìn
Japan jin gi rei tomo nobu
The Five Tenets of Confucius

These are the core of Confucius philosophy. Simply stated they are:
benevolence / charity
justice / rectitude
courtesy / politeness / tact
wisdom / knowledge
fidelity / trust / sincerity

Many of these concepts can be found in various religious teachings. Though it should be clearly understood that Confucianism is not a religion but should instead be considered a moral code for a proper and civilized society.

This title is also labeled, "5 Confucian virtues."


礼 If you order this from the Japanese calligrapher, expect the middle Kanji to be written in a more simple form (as seen to the right). This can also be romanized as "jin gi rei satoshi shin" in Japanese. Not all Japanese will recognize this as Confucian tenets but they will know all the meanings of the characters.


See Also:  Confucius Teachings | Ethics

Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity

Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself
China jǐ suǒ bú yù wù shī yú rén
Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity

Some may think of this as a "Christian trait" but actually it transcends many religions.

This Chinese teaching dates back to about 2,500 years ago in China. Confucius had always taught the belief in being benevolent (ren) but this idea was hard to grasp for some of his students, as benevolence could be kind-heartedness, or an essence of humanity itself.

When answering Zhong Gong's question as to what "ren" actually meant, Confucius said:

"When you go out, you should behave as if you were in the presence of a distinguished guest, when people do favors for you, act as if a great sacrifice was made for you. Whatever you wouldn't like done to you, do not do that thing to others. Don't complain at work or at home."

Hearing this, Zhong Gong said humbly, "Although I am not clever, I will do what you say."

From this encounter, the Chinese version of the "Golden Rule" or "Ethic of Reciprocity" came to be.
The characters you see above express, "Do not do to others whatever you do not want done to yourself."


See Also:  Confucius Teachings | Benevolence

Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened,
Listen to One Side and be in the Dark

China jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, / Listen to One Side and be in the Dark

A man named Wei Zheng lived between 580-643 AD. He was a noble and wise historian and minister in the court of the early Tang Dynasty.

The emperor once asked him, "What should an emperor do to understand the real-world situation and what makes an emperor out-of-touch with reality?"

Wei Zheng replied, "Listen to both sides and you will be enlightened; listen to only one side and you will be left in the dark."

Then Wei Zheng went on to site examples of leaders in history that were victorious after heeding both sides of the story, and other leaders that met their doom because they believed one-sided stories which often came from flattering lips.

Please note that there is an unwritten rule when the same character appears twice in the same phrase, the calligrapher will alter the appearance so that no two characters are exactly alike in the same piece. This calligraphy has two repeating characters that will be written differently than they appear here.

Not Only Can Water Float A Boat, It Can Sink It Also

China shuǐ néng zài zhōu yì néng fù zhōu
Not Only Can Water Float A Boat, It Can Sink It Also

Many things have opposite properties. The water you drink can also drown you. Pork may nourish you and keep you alive but under-cook it and it could kill you. Potassium nitrate is often used as a fertilizer to grow the food that sustains us but it's also been used as an explosive to topple buildings and destroy us.

This concept is easily associated with "yin yang" where an element has two opposite properties that are as different as night and day.

This proverb's meaning can be summed up this way: "Anything that can lead you to success may also contain great risks."

This phrase is known in literary circles by Korean people (scholars or literature). It is therefore also a valid proverb in Korean Hanja, though most Koreans would not be able to make sense of it.

Please note that there is an unwritten rule when the same character appears twice in the same phrase, the calligrapher will alter the appearance so that no two characters are exactly alike in the same piece. This calligraphy has two repeating characters that will be written differently than they appear here.

Search for Rules in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...

Gallery Price: $88.00

Your Price: $48.88

Gallery Price: $88.00

Your Price: $48.88

Gallery Price: $88.00

Your Price: $48.88

Gallery Price: $144.00

Your Price: $79.88


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Seven Rules of Happiness幸福の七カ條
幸福の七カ条
kou fuku no nana ka jou
koufukunonanakajou
ko fuku no nana ka jo
kofukunonanakajo
My Life, My Rules我的生活我做主wǒ de shēng huó wǒ zuò zhǔ
wo3 de sheng1 huo2 wo3 zuo4 zhu3
wo de sheng huo wo zuo zhu
wodeshenghuowozuozhu
wo te sheng huo wo tso chu
woteshenghuowotsochu
Ten perfect Mahayana rules十法jippou / jiposhí fǎ / shi2 fa3 / shi fa / shifashih fa / shihfa
Ritsuritsulǜ / lu:4 / lu:
Dojo Kun道場訓
道場训
dou jou kun
doujoukun
do jo kun
dojokun
Principles of Life生活信條
生活信条
shēng huó xìn tiáo
sheng1 huo2 xin4 tiao2
sheng huo xin tiao
shenghuoxintiao
sheng huo hsin t`iao
shenghuohsintiao
sheng huo hsin tiao
Suzaku朱雀suzakuzhū què / zhu1 que4 / zhu que / zhuquechu ch`üeh / chuchüeh / chu chüeh
State of Anarchy無警察
无警察
mukeisatsuwú jíng chá
wu2 jing2 cha2
wu jing cha
wujingcha
wu ching ch`a
wuchingcha
wu ching cha
Discipline規律
规律
kiritsuguī / gui1 lu:4 / gui lu: / guilu:kuei lü / kueilü
American Football美式橄欖球
美式橄榄球
měi shì gǎn lǎn qiú
mei3 shi4 gan3 lan3 qiu2
mei shi gan lan qiu
meishiganlanqiu
mei shih kan lan ch`iu
meishihkanlanchiu
mei shih kan lan chiu
Dignity
Honor
Sanctity
Integrity
尊嚴
尊严 / 尊厳
son gen / songenzūn yán / zun1 yan2 / zun yan / zunyantsun yen / tsunyen
Cooperation
Collaboration
協作
协作
kyou saku / kyousaku / kyo saku / kyosakuxié zuò / xie2 zuo4 / xie zuo / xiezuohsieh tso / hsiehtso
White Tiger白虎byakko / hakko
byako / hako
byako/hako
bái hǔ / bai2 hu3 / bai hu / baihupai hu / paihu
Respect (Japanese
Simplified version)

reilǐ / li3 / li
Kenjutsu
Kenjitsu
剣術
剑术
kenjutsujiàn shù / jian4 shu4 / jian shu / jianshuchien shu / chienshu
Qi Gong
Chi Kung
氣功
气功
kikou / kikoqì gōng / qi4 gong1 / qi gong / qigongch`i kung / chikung / chi kung
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis道天地將法
道天地将法
dou ten chi shou hou
doutenchishouhou
do ten chi sho ho
dotenchishoho
dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
dao4 tian1 di4 jiang4 fa3
dao tian di jiang fa
daotiandijiangfa
tao t`ien ti chiang fa
taotientichiangfa
tao tien ti chiang fa
Kenpo
Kempo
Quan Fa
Chuan Fa
拳法kenpou / kenpoquán fǎ / quan2 fa3 / quan fa / quanfach`üan fa / chüanfa / chüan fa
Sciencekotowarilǐ / li3 / li
Kung Fu
Gong Fu
功夫kan fu / ku fu
kanfu / kufu
gōng fu / gong1 fu / gong fu / gongfukung fu / kungfu
Golden Rule黄金律ougonritsu / ogonritsu
Way of Life
Art of Life
生活法seikatsuhou
seikatsuho
shēng huó fǎ
sheng1 huo2 fa3
sheng huo fa
shenghuofa
Unbridled Creativity不拘一格bù jū yī gé
bu4 ju1 yi1 ge2
bu ju yi ge
bujuyige
pu chü i ko
puchüiko
Indomitable
Unyielding
不屈不撓
不屈不挠
fukutsu futou
fukutsufutou
fukutsu futo
fukutsufuto
bù qū bù náo
bu4 qu1 bu4 nao2
bu qu bu nao
buqubunao
pu ch`ü pu nao
puchüpunao
pu chü pu nao
Mixed Martial Arts綜合格鬥
综合格斗
zōng hé gé dòu
zong1 he2 ge2 dou4
zong he ge dou
zonghegedou
tsung ho ko tou
tsunghokotou
The Five Tenets of Confucius仁義禮智信
仁义礼智信
jin gi rei tomo nobu
jingireitomonobu
rén yì lǐ zhì xìn
ren2 yi4 li3 zhi4 xin4
ren yi li zhi xin
renyilizhixin
jen i li chih hsin
jenilichihhsin
Confucius: Golden Rule
Ethic of Reciprocity
己所不欲勿施於人
己所不欲勿施于人
jǐ suǒ bú yù wù shī yú rén
ji3 suo3 bu2 yu4, wu4 shi1 yu2 ren2
ji suo bu yu, wu shi yu ren
jisuobuyu,wushiyuren
chi so pu yü, wu shih yü jen
chisopuyü,wushihyüjen
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark兼聽則明偏聽則暗
兼听则明偏听则暗
jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
jian1 ting1 ze2 ming2, pian1 ting1 ze2 an4
jian ting ze ming, pian ting ze an
chien t`ing tse ming, p`ien t`ing tse an
chien ting tse ming, pien ting tse an
Not Only Can Water Float A Boat, It Can Sink It Also水能載舟亦能覆舟
水能载舟亦能覆舟
shuǐ néng zài zhōu yì néng fù zhōu
shui3 neng2 zai4 zhou1 yi4 neng2 fu4 zhou1
shui neng zai zhou yi neng fu zhou
shui neng tsai chou i neng fu chou
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Archangel
Aster
Berserk
Create
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Dragon Soul
Energy
Enlightened
Enso
Faith in God
Family
Father
Fortune
Friendship
House
Keep Fighting
Kung Fu
Love
Loyalty
Mind Body Soul Spirit
Mind Body Spirit
Mother
Music
Ninpo
Nirvana
Overcome
Peach
Rain
Rebirth
Right Intention
Rooster
Samurai
Strength
Strength of Spirit
Sword
The Red String
The Way
Thunder Lightning in Kanji
Trust in God
Trust No Man
Victory
Wedding
White
Wing Chun
Winter
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Rules Kanji, Rules Characters, Rules in Mandarin Chinese, Rules Characters, Rules in Chinese Writing, Rules in Japanese Writing, Rules in Asian Writing, Rules Ideograms, Chinese Rules symbols, Rules Hieroglyphics, Rules Glyphs, Rules in Chinese Letters, Rules Hanzi, Rules in Japanese Kanji, Rules Pictograms, Rules in the Chinese Written-Language, or Rules in the Japanese Written-Language.