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Respect All in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Respect All calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Respect All" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Respect All" title below...

  1. Respect / Honor / Esteem
  2. Self-Respect / Self-Esteem
  3. Love and Respect / Kindness and Respect
  4. Respect out of fear is never genuine...
  5. Prideful Mind...
  6. Love and Respect
  7. Respect
  8. Respect, Honor, Truth
  9. Respect and Loyalty
10. The Five Tenets of Confucius
11. Pride
12. Courtesy / Politeness
13. Courtesy / Etiquette
14. Teacher / Master / Old Sage
15. Love and Honor
16. Qin / Chin
17. Fear God
18. Filial Piety / Filial Conduct
19. Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister
20. Wa Kei Sei Jaku
21. Namo Shakyamuni Buddha
22. Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity
23. Respectful Heart
24. Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself
25. Integrity
26. Pillars of Marriage
27. Gassho
28. Filial Piety
29. Bushido / The Way of the Samurai
30. Asian Pride / Oriental Pride...
31. Tang Soo Do Tenets
32. Honor
33. Banzai / Wansui
34. Banzai

Respect / Honor / Esteem

China zūn jìng
Japan sonkei
Respect / Honor / Esteem

尊敬 is how to express the ideas of respect, honor, reverence, esteem, nobility, and sometimes the state of being noble, all in one word. Most of the time this is used in the form of "giving respect" but depending on context, it can suggest that you should try to be "worthy of respect."

Although pronounced differently, the Chinese characters, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja are the same across these languages. 尊敬 is an indication that this word is very old, and crosses many barriers and cultures in the Orient (East Asia).

Self-Respect / Self-Esteem

China zì zūn
Japan jison
Self-Respect / Self-Esteem

自尊 means self-respect or self-esteem in Chinese, Korean and Japanese. It can also mean "pride in oneself."

Note: Japanese sometimes put the character for heart after these two. However, this two-character word is universal between all three languages (which is often better since more than a third of the world's population can read this version as a native word).

Love and Respect / Kindness and Respect

China ài jìng
Japan aikei / aikyou
Love and Respect / Kindness and Respect

This Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja title can mean, "love and respect," "kindness and respect," "to love with reverence," "charm," "amiability," "winsomeness," "courtesy," or "ingratiating behavior."


Note: The wide-ranging definitions show that this word is a bit ambiguous without the context of being used in a sentence.

Respect out of fear is never genuine
Reverence out of respect is never false

China dǎ pà de rén shì jiǎ de jìng pà de rén shì zhēn de
Respect out of fear is never genuine / Reverence out of respect is never false

This is a proverb that seems to be aimed at world leaders or others in power. Perhaps a suggestion to avoid the practice of "fear mongering" opting instead for a policy of benevolence and justice.

An example: When the Bush administration told Pakistan they could either join America in the "war on terror," or expect some bombs to be coming their way, Bush gained this kind of "less-than-genuine respect" from Pakistanis.
Leaders in places like North Korea and even Saudi Arabia reap the same bogus respect from their own citizens.


Note that calligraphers do not like to repeat the same characters in exactly the same way in the same piece of artwork. So expect the characters that are repeated to be written in different forms in the real artwork (unlike the way they are displayed to the left).

Prideful Mind
Self-Respecting Heart

China zì zūn xīn
Japan ji son shin
Prideful Mind / Self-Respecting Heart

This Japanese and Korean word means "pride" or "self-respect."

The first Kanji/Hanja means oneself. The second can mean revered, valuable, precious, noble or exalted. And the last Kanji/Hanja means heart, mind and/or spirit.


While these characters make sense and hold the same general meaning in Chinese, this is not a normal Chinese word. This selection should only be used if your audience is Japanese or Korean.


See Also:  Respect | Pride | Self-Reliance | Self-Control | Self-Discipline

Love and Respect

China jìng ài
Japan kei ai
Love and Respect

敬愛 is the short and sweet way to say "love and respect" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Besides "respect and love," this could be translated as, "respect and affection," "Reverence and love," or "reverent love."

In Japanese, this can also be the personal name Yoshinari.

Love and Respect

Love and respect each other
China xiāng jìng xiāng ài
Love and Respect

相敬相愛 is an old Chinese proverb that suggests love and respect go together and are to be exchanged between people (especially couples).

The first two characters mean, "exchanging respect" or "mutual respect."

The last two characters create a word that means, "to love each other" or "mutual love."

You'll notice that the first and third characters are the same. So you can read this literally as something like "Exchange respect, exchange love" or "Mutual respect, mutual love." In English, we'd probably just say, "Mutual love and respect." Grammar differs in every language - So while the literal translation might sound a bit awkward in English, this phrase is very natural in Chinese.

Love and Respect

Love each other and show mutual respect
China xiāng ài hù jìng
Love and Respect

相愛互敬 is a nice way to say "Love and Respect" in Chinese.

This proverb is about the mutual exchange of love and respect within a good relationship.

The first two characters create a word that means, "to love each other" or "mutual love."

The third character means mutual, interlocking, or in some contexts "to dovetail" (as in the way joints are made in fine furniture).

The last character means, "to respect," "to venerate," "to salute," "reverence," or simply "respect."

Respect (Japanese / Simplified version)

Can also be a sign of gratitude
China
Japan rei
Respect (Japanese / Simplified version)

We show respect by speaking and acting with courtesy. We treat others with dignity and honor the rules of our family, school and nation. Respect yourself, and others will respect you.

禮 is also one of the five tenets of Confucius.

禮 can also be translated as propriety, good manners, politeness, rite, worship or an expression of gratitude.

Chinese RespectPlease note that Japanese use a simplified version of the character for respect - it also happens to be the same simplification used in mainland China. Click on the character to the right if you want the Traditional Chinese version.


This is also a virtue of the Samurai Warrior
See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Confucius

Respect, Honor, Truth

Japan keii meiyo shinjitsu
Respect, Honor, Truth

This means "Respect, Honor, Truth" in Japanese.


This is a word list, which is not the most natural kind of composition in Japanese (usually there is a subject, object, and verb - or a single word).

Respect, Honor, Truth

China zūn zhòng róng yù zhēn shí
Respect, Honor, Truth

尊重, 榮譽, 真實 means "Respect, Honor, Truth" in Chinese.


This is a word list, which is not the most natural kind of composition in Chinese (usually there is a subject, object, and verb - or a single word).

Respect and Loyalty

China zūn jìng zhōng chéng
Japan son kei chu sei
Respect and Loyalty

尊敬忠誠 means respect and loyalty in Chinese.

尊敬忠誠 is a word list (not a normal Chinese or Japanese phrase).

Word lists like this are not very common or natural in Chinese, so try to look for a better phrase to match your idea before you settle on this.

The Five Tenets of Confucius

The Five Cardinal Rules / Virtues of Confucius
China rén yì lǐ zhì xìn
Japan jin gi rei tomo nobu
The Five Tenets of Confucius

These are the core of Confucius philosophy. Simply stated they are:
benevolence / charity
justice / rectitude
courtesy / politeness / tact
wisdom / knowledge
fidelity / trust / sincerity

Many of these concepts can be found in various religious teachings. Though it should be clearly understood that Confucianism is not a religion but should instead be considered a moral code for a proper and civilized society.

This title is also labeled, "5 Confucian virtues."


礼 If you order this from the Japanese calligrapher, expect the middle Kanji to be written in a more simple form (as seen to the right). This can also be romanized as "jin gi rei satoshi shin" in Japanese. Not all Japanese will recognize this as Confucian tenets but they will know all the meanings of the characters.


See Also:  Confucius Teachings | Ethics

Pride

China zì zūn
HK chi juen
Japan jison
Pride

自尊 can mean "pride," "self-respect" or "self-esteem." The first character means "oneself" and the second can mean revered, valuable, precious, noble, exalted, honorable or simply "pride."

I have also seen this two-character word translated as "amour propre," self-regard, and self-pride.

自尊 is universal between Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja written languages. It may also be understood in old Vietnamese (they once used Chinese characters as well).

Courtesy / Politeness

China lǐ mào
Courtesy / Politeness

Courtesy is being polite and having good manners. When you speak and act courteously, you give others a feeling of being valued and respected. Greet people pleasantly. Bring courtesy home. Your family needs it most of all. Courtesy helps life to go smoothly.


If you put the words "fēi cháng bù" in front of this, it is like adding "very much not." It's a great insult in China, as nobody wants to be called "extremely discourteous" or "very much impolite."


See Also:  Kindness | Respect

Courtesy / Etiquette

China lǐ yì
Japan rei gi
Courtesy / Etiquette

In Japanese, this word means "manners," "courtesy" or "etiquette."

This also clearly means etiquette in Chinese, though the first Japanese Kanji has been "modernized" and happens to be the same as the modern Simplified Chinese version. Therefore, this word will be understood by both Japanese and Chinese people but best if your audience is mostly Japanese (Chinese people would generally prefer the ancient Traditional Chinese version).


See Also:  Kindness | Respect

Teacher / Master / Old Sage

China lǎo shī
Teacher / Master / Old Sage

老師 directly translates as, "old teacher," "old master," or "old sage."

Together, they are understood as "teacher." When you think about that, also realize that with age comes respect in Asian cultures. So calling someone old is actually a term of respect (not like the way we mean it in English). You could actually replace "old" with "respected" and be closer to the way this is meant in Chinese.

Teachers, in general, are more respected by their students and the population in China. When I was a teacher in China, I certainly felt that.

This term is also used for masters of certain fields. For instance, a master calligrapher would respectfully be addressed as "teacher." In fact, in this case, "master" and "teacher" are synonymous.

Other artists (especially those are famous or accomplished) should be addressed with this term. Also, some schools of martial arts use this term of respect for their masters/teachers/instructors.


This title is recognized in Japanese as "roushi" with the same meaning but it's rarely used in Japan.

Love and Honor

Japan ai to keii
Love and Honor

愛と敬意 is a Japanese phrase that means "Love and Honor" or "Love and Respect." There's a few ways to express this idea in Japanese, so you may see other versions used.

Qin / Chin

Surname
China qīn
Japan kin
Qin / Chin

欽 is one of a few Chinese characters that can be a surname romanized as Qin or Chin.

The actual meaning of this characters is: reverence; to respect; to admire; to venerate; by the emperor himself; imperial.

In Japanese, this can be the name Makoto.

Fear God

China jìng wèi shàng dì
Fear God

敬畏上帝 is probably the best way to translate the Christian English phrase, "Fear God," into Chinese.

The first two characters mean to revere, be in awe of, or a general term of reverence. It can mean fear, but only in the context of respect or fear of authority.

Filial Piety / Filial Conduct

China xiào xìng
Japan koukou
Filial Piety / Filial Conduct

These two characters express the idea of filial piety or filial conduct. The second character suggests "action" so these are the actions you take to show your respect and obedience to your elders or ancestors.

Confucius is probably the first great advocate for filial piety.

Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister

China xiān shēng
Japan sen sei
Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister

If you've taken even a single karate class in your life, you know this term. 先生 is sensei, which is associated in the west with a master or instructor of karate, aikido, judo, and other Japanese martial arts.

In reality, this is a term of respect for almost any professional or skilled person (doctor, lawyer, teacher, etc). In some cases, it is used for musicians and artists who have achieved a certain level of fame, skill, or accomplishment.

It should be noted that this is also a courtesy title in Chinese but more like calling someone "mister" or "gentleman." It doesn't really have the "master" or "teacher" meaning in Chinese - see our Chinese "Master / Sifu / Shi Fu" entry if your audience is Chinese.

In Korean Hanja, this means teacher, instructor, schoolmaster, or schoolmistress.

This entry is more for educational purposes. 先生 is kind of a strange thing to put on a wall scroll. It's a title that is used more orally to show respect, rather than something written in calligraphy. If you feel that it is appropriate in your circumstances, we are very willing to create a piece of sensei Japanese calligraphy artwork for you.

Wa Kei Sei Jaku

Japan wa kei sei jaku
Wa Kei Sei Jaku

Wa, Kei, Sei, Jaku are the principles of the way of tea or 茶道.

The meanings are:
Harmony 和 (wa).
Respect 敬 (kei).
Purity 清 (sei).
Tranquility 寂 (jaku).


These principles or tenets were created by tea master Sen Rikyu (1522-1591). More about these ideas: Chanoyu


See Also:  The Way of Tea

Namo Shakyamuni Buddha

China nán wú shì jiā móu ní fó
Japan namu shakamuni butsu
Namo Shakyamuni Buddha

南無釋迦牟尼佛 is a Buddhist chant or prayer of respect to the Shakyamuni Buddha.

Some will translate this as the Buddhist vow.

The first two characters, 南無, are sometimes translated as "amen"; others will translate it as, "believe in," or "homage to."
To expand on this, 南無 can also mean, "taking of refuge in," while also representing devotion or conviction. 南無 as with most religious concepts or words, different people or denominations will have varying definitions.

Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity

China zūn yán
Japan son gen
Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity

This form of honor is showing great respect for yourself, other people, and the rules you live by.

When you are honorable, you keep your word. You do the right thing regardless of what others are doing.

尊嚴 is the kind of personal honor or dignity that is of great value. If you lose this, you have lost yourself and perhaps the reputation of your family as well.

While this is not directly the same thing as "face" or "saving face" in Asian culture, it is associated with the same concept in China.


厳In Japan, they currently use a more simplified second character for this word. The ancient Japanese form is the same as China but after WWII some Kanji were changed. If you want the modern Japanese version, just click on the Kanji image shown to the right, instead of the button above.

Respectful Heart

China zūn jìng xīn
Japan son kei shin
Respectful Heart

尊敬心 means respectful heart in Japanese, Chinese and Korean.

The root is 尊敬 which means respect, honor, reverence, esteem, and/or nobility. Therefore, you can also define this as honorable heart, reverent heart, noble heart, etc.

In ancient times, it was thought your brain was the heart in your chest. Therefore, 心 or heart can also mean "mind". Hence, 尊敬心 can also be translated as respectful mind, honorable mind, etc.

You'll see 尊敬心 romanized as Sonkeishin or Sonkeshin from Japanese.

Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself

China zì ài
Japan ji ai
Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself

This title means: self-love; self-regard; regard for oneself; to cherish one's good name; taking care of oneself.

In Buddhist context, this is the cause of all pursuit or seeking, which in turn causes all suffering. All Buddhas discharge themselves from self-love and all pursuits of personal gratification. Such elimination of self-love is a step towards nirvāṇa.

This title can be taken as positive or negative, depending on how you read it. Some will see it as arrogant, others will read it as a token of self-respect. Because of this ambiguity, I do not recommend this title for a wall scroll.

Integrity

China zhèng zhí
Japan shoujiki
Integrity

Integrity is living by your highest values. It is being honest and sincere. Integrity helps you to listen to your conscience, to do the right thing, and to tell the truth. You act with integrity when your words and actions match. Integrity gives you self-respect and a peaceful heart.

Japanese jikiPlease note that the second Kanji sometimes has an alternate form in Japanese. Let us know if you want the alternate form shown to the right.

Note: This entry is cross-listed as "honesty" because it also fits that definition.


Beyond Integrity, this word also means "upright" and "honest" in Chinese. Means "integrity," "honesty" or "frankness" in Japanese.


See Also:  Honor | Honesty | Truth | Trust

Pillars of Marriage

Respect / Loyalty / Honesty
China zūn zhòng zhōng chéng chéng shí
Pillars of Marriage

These are the pillars of marriage (at least they are for some - if you have a different set of pillars and want them on a wall scroll, just post a custom phrase request on our forum).

This is actually a "word list," consisting of "Respect/Loyalty/Honesty." Word lists are not as common in Chinese as they are in English but leaving that concern behind, this has a good meaning.

If you want to customize it more, add an inscription with your wedding date or names (just a small extra fee for translation).

Note: Because these are three separate words, the calligrapher may be inclined to leave a small space between each two-character word. Let us know if you have any preference when you place your order.

Gassho

China hé zhǎng
Japan gasshou
Gassho

合掌 is the act of greeting someone (can also be done when departing) with hands brought together in a prayerful manner.

In India, this would be accompanied by the verbal greeting and blessing of "Namaste." In China, Japan, and Korea, this is how Buddhists will greet each other. Sometimes done by people who are not devout Buddhists in China, Japan, and Korea to show respect, reverence or great thanks to someone for a gift, forgiveness, or some honor that has been bestowed.

In Japan, this is almost always associated with a deep bow. In China where bowing is not an everyday occurrence, there may be a shallow bow but the act will be done with deep feeling. Korean culture seems to have more bowing than China but less than Japan.


See Also:  Namaste

Filial Piety

China xiào
Japan kou
Filial Piety

孝 represents filial piety. Some will define this in more common English as "respect for your parents and ancestors."

孝 is a subject deeply emphasized by the ancient philosophy and teachings of Confucius.

Some have included this in the list for the Bushido, although generally not considered part of the 7 core virtues of the warrior.

Note: 孝 is not the best of meanings when seen along as a single character. Some will read the single character form to mean "missing my dead ancestors." However, when written at part of Confucian tenets, or in the two-character word that means filial piety, the meaning is better or read differently (context is important for this character).

We suggest one of our other two-character filial piety entries instead of this one.


See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Filial Piety | Confucius

Bushido / The Way of the Samurai

China wǔ shì dào
Japan bu shi do
Bushido / The Way of the Samurai

武士道 is the title for, "The Code of the Samurai."

Sometimes called "The Seven Virtues of the Samurai," "The Bushido Code," or "The Samurai Code of Chivalry."

This would be read in Chinese characters, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja as "The Way of the Warrior," "The Warrior's Way," or "The Warrior's Code."

It's a set of virtues that the Samurai of Japan and ancient warriors of China and Korea had to live and die by. However, while known throughout Asia, this title is mostly used in Japan, and thought of as being of Japanese origin.

The seven commonly-accepted tenets or virtues of Bushido are: Benevolence 仁, Courage 勇, Honesty 誠, Honour 名誉, Loyalty 忠実, Respect 礼(禮), and Rectitude 義. These tenets were part of an oral history for generations, thus, you will see variations in the list Bushido tenets depending on who you talk to.


See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Samurai | Warrior

Asian Pride / Oriental Pride
Asian Pryde / AZN Pryde

China dōng fāng zì zūn
HK dung fong chi juen
Japan tou hou zi son
Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / Asian Pryde / AZN Pryde

東方自尊 is the most universal way to write "Asian Pride."

We worked on this one for a long time. The effort involved both Chinese and Japanese translators and lengthy discussions. If you have been searching for this term, there is a reason that it's hard to find the way to write "Asian Pride" in Chinese and Japanese - it's because of the inherent difficulties in figuring out a universal combination of characters that can be read in all languages that use forms of Chinese characters.

This final solution that you see to the left creates a reasonable title in Chinese, and an exotic (perhaps unusual) title in Japanese (This could be read as "Eastern Self-Respect" in Japanese").
Although not as natural, it does have the same meaning in Korean Hanja and the older-generation of Vietnamese people will be able to read it too.

The first two characters literally mean "Oriental" and the second two mean "pride," "self-esteem," or "self-respect" (we chose the most non-arrogant way to say "pride"). If you have "Asian Pride" (sometimes spelled Asian Pryde) these are the characters for you.

Note: For those of you that wonder, there is nothing technically wrong with the word "Oriental." It is a correct word, and any bad meanings were created by so-called "Asian Americans" and Caucasians in the United States. To say "Asian" would not completely correct to the intended meaning, since that would include people from Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, India, and portions of Russia.

For further proof, if you were of East Asian ancestry and born in England, you would be known as a "British Oriental" (The "Oriental stigma" is basically an American creation and, therefore, applies mostly to the American English language - where they get a bit overzealous with political correctness).

Further, since the Chinese and Japanese word for Oriental is not English, it can not be construed having ill-meaning. One trip to China or Japan, and you will find many things titled with these two characters such as malls, buildings, and business names. These places also use "Oriental" as their English title (much as we do, since our Chinese business name starts with these same two characters).

In short, the first two character have the meaning that Americans attach to "Asian" but is more technically correct.

Tang Soo Do Tenets

Tang Soo Do Tenets

These are the tenets of Tang Soo Do...

EnglishOld HanjaModern HangulPronunciation
1. Integrity廉耻렴치 or 염치yeom ci
2. Concentration精進정진jeong jin
3. Perseverence忍耐인내in nae
4. Respect & Obedience遵守준수jun su
5. Self-Control克己극기geug gi
6. Humility謙遜겸손gyeom son
7. Indomitable Spirit百折不屈백절불굴baeg jeor bur gur

After some research, it appears this list was compiled in English based on Taekwondo tenets. We filled in a few of the words that did not have a corresponding Hanja or Hangul. If someone else has a better list with characters included, please contact me.

Honor (Japanese / Simplified version)

China míng yù
Japan meiyo
Honor (Japanese / Simplified version)

This version of honor is about having or earning the respect of others and about your reputation.

It is the status of being worthy of honor (not to be confused with doing honorable things or specific actions - see our other "honor" listing for that).

譽 Both modern Japanese and modern mainland Chinese use the same simplified version of the second character of honor. You can make a special request for the traditional second character as shown to the right (just click on that character to the right of you want to order that version). Before WWII, both Japan and China used the traditional form but modern Japanese and Chinese use this simplified form. Koreans still use the traditional form when they are not writing in their modern Hangul glyphs.


This is also a virtue of the Samurai Warrior
See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here

Banzai / Wansui

Old Japanese / Traditional Chinese & Korean
China wàn suì
Japan banzai / manzai
Banzai / Wansui

We've made two almost identical entries for this word. 萬歲 is the traditional Chinese, Korean Hanja, and ancient Japanese way to write banzai. In modern times, the first character was simplified in Japan and China. So you might want to select the other entry for more universal readability.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray." The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years." It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. 萬歲 is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

Other translations include: Cheers! (not the drinking kind), hurrah!, long live [name]!, congratulations!

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Banzai

Modern Japanese Version
China wàn suì
Japan banzai
Banzai

We've made two almost identical entries for this word. 萬歲 is the modern Japanese way to write banzai. In the last century, the first character was simplified in Japan and China. The new generation will expect it to be written this way but the old generation can still read the more traditional form. You must make your own determination as to what version is best for you. If your audience is mostly Japanese, I suggest this form.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray." The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years." It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. 萬歲 is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Other translations: hurrah, long life, congratulations, cheers, live long.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Search for Respect All in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Respect
Honor
Esteem
尊敬sonkeizūn jìng / zun1 jing4 / zun jing / zunjingtsun ching / tsunching
Self-Respect
Self-Esteem
自尊jisonzì zūn / zi4 zun1 / zi zun / zizuntzu tsun / tzutsun
Love and Respect
Kindness and Respect
愛敬
爱敬
aikei / aikyou
aikei / aikyo
aikei/aikyo
ài jìng / ai4 jing4 / ai jing / aijingai ching / aiching
Respect out of fear is never genuine
Reverence out of respect is never false
打怕的人是假的敬怕的人是真的dǎ pà de rén shì jiǎ de jìng pà de rén shì zhēn de
da3 pa4 de ren2 shi4 jia3 de jing4 pa4 de ren2 shi4 zhen1 de
da pa de ren shi jia de jing pa de ren shi zhen de
ta p`a te jen shih chia te ching p`a te jen shih chen te
ta pa te jen shih chia te ching pa te jen shih chen te
Prideful Mind
Self-Respecting Heart
自尊心ji son shin
jisonshin
zì zūn xīn
zi4 zun1 xin1
zi zun xin
zizunxin
tzu tsun hsin
tzutsunhsin
Love and Respect敬愛
敬爱
kei ai / keiaijìng ài / jing4 ai4 / jing ai / jingaiching ai / chingai
Love and Respect相敬相愛
相亲相爱
xiāng jìng xiāng ài
xiang1 jing4 xiang1 ai4
xiang jing xiang ai
xiangjingxiangai
hsiang ching hsiang ai
hsiangchinghsiangai
Love and Respect相愛互敬
相爱互敬
xiāng ài hù jìng
xiang1 ai4 hu4 jing4
xiang ai hu jing
xiangaihujing
hsiang ai hu ching
hsiangaihuching
Respect (Japanese
Simplified version)

reilǐ / li3 / li
Respect, Honor, Truth敬意, 名譽, 真実
敬意, 名誉, 真実
keii meiyo shinjitsu
keiimeiyoshinjitsu
kei meiyo shinjitsu
keimeiyoshinjitsu
Respect, Honor, Truth尊重, 榮譽, 真實
尊重, 荣誉, 真实
zūn zhòng róng yù zhēn shí
zun1 zhong4 rong2 yu4 zhen1 shi2
zun zhong rong yu zhen shi
zunzhongrongyuzhenshi
tsun chung jung yü chen shih
tsunchungjungyüchenshih
Respect and Loyalty尊敬忠誠
尊敬忠诚
son kei chu sei
sonkeichusei
zūn jìng zhōng chéng
zun1 jing4 zhong1 cheng2
zun jing zhong cheng
zunjingzhongcheng
tsun ching chung ch`eng
tsunchingchungcheng
tsun ching chung cheng
The Five Tenets of Confucius仁義禮智信
仁义礼智信
jin gi rei tomo nobu
jingireitomonobu
rén yì lǐ zhì xìn
ren2 yi4 li3 zhi4 xin4
ren yi li zhi xin
renyilizhixin
jen i li chih hsin
jenilichihhsin
Pride自尊jisonzì zūn / zi4 zun1 / zi zun / zizuntzu tsun / tzutsun
Courtesy
Politeness
禮貌
礼貌
lǐ mào / li3 mao4 / li mao / limao
Courtesy
Etiquette
礼儀 / 禮儀
礼仪
rei gi / reigilǐ yì / li3 yi4 / li yi / liyili i / lii
Teacher
Master
Old Sage
老師
老师
lǎo shī / lao3 shi1 / lao shi / laoshilao shih / laoshih
Love and Honor愛と敬意ai to keii / aitokeii / ai to kei / aitokei
Qin
Chin

kinqīn / qin1 / qinch`in / chin
Fear God敬畏上帝jìng wèi shàng dì
jing4 wei4 shang4 di4
jing wei shang di
jingweishangdi
ching wei shang ti
chingweishangti
Filial Piety
Filial Conduct
孝行koukou / kokoxiào xìng
xiao4 xing4
xiao xing
xiaoxing
hsiao hsing
hsiaohsing
Sensei
Master
Teacher
Mister
先生sen sei / senseixiān shēng
xian1 sheng1
xian sheng
xiansheng
hsien sheng
hsiensheng
Wa Kei Sei Jaku和敬清寂wa kei sei jaku
wakeiseijaku
Namo Shakyamuni Buddha南無釋迦牟尼佛
南无释迦牟尼佛
namu shakamuni butsu
namushakamunibutsu
nán wú shì jiā móu ní fó
nan2 wu2 shi4 jia1 mou2 ni2 fo2
nan wu shi jia mou ni fo
nanwushijiamounifo
nan wu shih chia mou ni fo
nanwushihchiamounifo
Dignity
Honor
Sanctity
Integrity
尊嚴
尊严 / 尊厳
son gen / songenzūn yán / zun1 yan2 / zun yan / zunyantsun yen / tsunyen
Respectful Heart尊敬心son kei shin
sonkeishin
zūn jìng xīn
zun1 jing4 xin1
zun jing xin
zunjingxin
tsun ching hsin
tsunchinghsin
Self-Love
Love Yourself
Love Onself
自愛
自爱
ji ai / jiaizì ài / zi4 ai4 / zi ai / ziaitzu ai / tzuai
Integrity正直shoujiki / shojikizhèng zhí
zheng4 zhi2
zheng zhi
zhengzhi
cheng chih
chengchih
Pillars of Marriage尊重忠誠誠實
尊重忠诚诚实
zūn zhòng zhōng chéng chéng shí
zun1 zhong4 zhong1 cheng2 cheng2 shi2
zun zhong zhong cheng cheng shi
tsun chung chung ch`eng ch`eng shih
tsun chung chung cheng cheng shih
Gassho合掌gasshou / gashohé zhǎng / he2 zhang3 / he zhang / hezhangho chang / hochang
Filial Pietykou / koxiào / xiao4 / xiaohsiao
Bushido
The Way of the Samurai
武士道bu shi do / bushidowǔ shì dào
wu3 shi4 dao4
wu shi dao
wushidao
wu shih tao
wushihtao
Asian Pride
Oriental Pride
Asian Pryde
AZN Pryde
東方自尊
东方自尊
tou hou zi son
touhouzison
to ho zi son
tohozison
dōng fāng zì zūn
dong1 fang1 zi4 zun1
dong fang zi zun
dongfangzizun
tung fang tzu tsun
tungfangtzutsun
Tang Soo Do Tenets廉耻精進忍耐遵守克己謙遜百折不屈 / 廉恥精進忍耐遵守克己謙遜百折不屈
廉耻精进忍耐遵守克己谦逊百折不屈
Honor (Japanese
Simplified version)
名譽
名誉
meiyomíng yù / ming2 yu4 / ming yu / mingyuming yü / mingyü
Banzai
Wansui
萬歲
万岁
banzai / manzaiwàn suì / wan4 sui4 / wan sui / wansui
Banzai萬歲
万岁
banzaiwàn suì / wan4 sui4 / wan sui / wansui
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiki Jujutsu
Archangel
Aster
Believe
Berserk
Bushido
Calm
Change
Christ
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Enlighten
Enlightened
Faith in God
Family
Father
Furinkazan
Gemini
Heart of a Warrior
Hello
Humble
I Love You Forever and Always
Iaido
Jesus
Kaizen
Keep Fighting
Kenshin
Kung Fu
Lion
Love
Loyalty
Mind Body Soul Spirit
Mind Body Spirit
Mother
Mushin
Music
Overcome
Pleasure
Powerful
Protector
Rain
Rebirth
Right Intention
Rooster
Strength
Strong Heart
The Red String
The Way
The Way of the Warrior
Thunder Lightning in Kanji
Trust in God
Trust No Man
Victory
Wave
White
Wing Chun
Winter
Wolf
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Respect All Kanji, Respect All Characters, Respect All in Mandarin Chinese, Respect All Characters, Respect All in Chinese Writing, Respect All in Japanese Writing, Respect All in Asian Writing, Respect All Ideograms, Chinese Respect All symbols, Respect All Hieroglyphics, Respect All Glyphs, Respect All in Chinese Letters, Respect All Hanzi, Respect All in Japanese Kanji, Respect All Pictograms, Respect All in the Chinese Written-Language, or Respect All in the Japanese Written-Language.