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My One and Only in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a My One and Only calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "My One and Only" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "My One and Only" title below...

  1. Only the sleepless know the length of night
  2. You Only Live Once
  3. Fear not long roads;...
  4. A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One
  5. Soul Mates
  6. Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened,...
  7. Once in a Lifetime
  8. Eternal Love
  9. No man knows what he owes to his parents...
10. 1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad
11. Religious Seeker
12. I’d Rather Be With You
13. Life in Every Breath
14. Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home
15. Leanna
16. Control of Power
17. Shinkou / Shinko
18. Perseverance is the Key
19. Honor and Integrity
20. Hiroshi / Katsu
21. Prayer / Praying
22. Seiseki
23. Daddy / Father
24. Happy Birthday
25. Hiro
26. Happy Birthday
27. Renni
28. Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country
29. Destiny / Fate
30. Acupuncture
31. Sword
32. Dynamic
33. Ninja
34. Brotherly and Sisterly Love
35. Cherry Blossom
36. Hanawa
37. Lingering Mind
38. Naruto
39. Drain the pond to get all the fish
40. Kendo / The Way of the Sword
41. Rank Holder
42. Indomitable Spirit
43. 5. Right Living / Right Livelihood / Perfect Livelihood
44. Wing Chun
45. Love Binds Us Together
46. Diligence
47. Northern Praying Mantis
48. Better to be Happy than Rich
49. Fight / Beat Someone
50. Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude
51. Holy Bible
52. Buddhism / Buddha
53. Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight
54. Better Late Than Never
55. Tea Fate
56. Kung Fu / Gong Fu
57. Body and Earth in Unity
58. If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?
59. Past experience is the teacher for the future.
60. Hapkido

Only the sleepless know the length of night

China bù mián zhī yè cháng jiǔ jiāo zhī rén xīn
Only the sleepless know the length of night

This literally translates as: [Only one who does] not sleep, learns how long the night is; [Only by] long acquaintance [does one] learn a person ['s true] character.

Basically, this proverb suggests that we really need to experience something intimately and for a long time to really know everything about it.

This can also be translated as, "Spending years with someone is the only way to know them."

Note: Sometimes this proverb is split into just the first or second idea alone (first 5 or last 5 characters only).

You Only Live Once

Japan ichi do da ke i ki ru
You Only Live Once

This is the simplest Japanese phrase that means, "[you] only live once" or "only one [life] to live."

The first four characters create a word that means "only once."
The last three characters create a word that means, "to live" or "to exist."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Fear not long roads;
fear only short ambition

China bú pà lù yuǎn zhǐ pà zhì duǎn
Fear not long roads; / fear only short ambition

This Chinese proverb literally translates as, "Fear not a long roads; fear only short ambition," or "Don't fear that the road is long, only fear that your will/ambition/aspiration is short."

Figuratively, this means: However difficult the goal is, one can achieve it as long as one is determined to do so.

Others may translate the meaning as, "Don't let a lack of willpower stop you from pressing onwards in your journey."

A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One

Japan sen ri mo ichi ri
A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One

This Japanese proverb states that, "A journey of a thousand miles feels like only one mile." It is understood that in the proverb, this applies when going to see the one you love.

Note that the "mile" or 里 used in this proverb is an old Chinese "li" (pronounced "ri" in Japanese). It's not actually a mile, as the measurement is really closer to 500 meters (it would take 3 of these to get close to a western mile). Still, 1000里 (333 miles) is a long way.

Soul Mates

Japan reikon no nakama tachi
Soul Mates

This is a Japanese-only title for soulmates.

The first half means "of the soul" or "spiritual."

The second half means "eminent mates" or "eminent partners."

Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened,
Listen to One Side and be in the Dark

China jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, / Listen to One Side and be in the Dark

A man named Wei Zheng lived between 580-643 AD. He was a noble and wise historian and minister in the court of the early Tang Dynasty.

The emperor once asked him, "What should an emperor do to understand the real-world situation and what makes an emperor out-of-touch with reality?"

Wei Zheng replied, "Listen to both sides and you will be enlightened; listen to only one side and you will be left in the dark."

Then Wei Zheng went on to site examples of leaders in history that were victorious after heeding both sides of the story, and other leaders that met their doom because they believed one-sided stories which often came from flattering lips.

Please note that there is an unwritten rule when the same character appears twice in the same phrase, the calligrapher will alter the appearance so that no two characters are exactly alike in the same piece. This calligraphy has two repeating characters that will be written differently than they appear here.

Once in a Lifetime

China yī qī yī huì
Japan ichigoichie
Once in a Lifetime

This Japanese title can be translated as "for this time only," "chance meeting," "one meeting, one opportunity," "never again," or "one chance in a lifetime."

The characters literally mean "one time one meeting" - of course, the Kanji characters have meaning far beyond a direct translation like this.

Some might use this proverb to talk of an opportunity that presents itself just once in your life. It could also be the single chance-meeting with your true soul mate. Basically an expression for any event that might happen once in a lifetime.


This is primarily a Japanese title, however, there is also a Traditional Chinese (and old Korean) version of this proverb. Just the last character is different.
會The traditional form was used in Japan before WWII and in Korea prior to 1900. This title is somewhat known in China.

If you want the older traditional form, just click on the character to the right.

Eternal Love

Japan ei en no ai
Eternal Love

The first two characters mean eternal, eternity, perpetuity, forever, immortality, and permanence.

The third character is a possessive article which sort of makes this selection mean "Love, of the eternal kind."

The last character is "love."

Cultural note: Most of the time, it is taboo to use the word "love" in Japanese. For instance, a Japanese man will say, "I like you," rather than, "I love you," to his spouse/girlfriend. However, this entry for eternal love is acceptable because of the way it is composed.

This entry is only appropriate if your audience is Japanese. We also have a Chinese version of this phrase.

No man knows what he owes to his parents
till he comes to have children of his own

Japan ko wo motte shiru oya no on
No man knows what he owes to his parents / till he comes to have children of his own

This literally translates as: Only after you have a baby, you would appreciate your parents (feel the way they do, etc).

This is a bit like the "walk a mile in another man's shoes" saying. Basically, it's about you cannot fully understand the plight of others until you experience it yourself. It also shows appreciation for the plight of parents.

This Japanese proverb can also be translated a few more ways:

No man knows what he owes to his parents till he comes to have children of his own.

One knows not what one owes to one's parents till one comes to have children of one's own.

Only after you have a baby, you will appreciate your parents or feel the way they do.

Only after becoming a parent yourself do you realize how much you owe [how indebted you are] to your own parents.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad

China bú pà qiān zhāo huì zhǐ pà yī zhāo shú
1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Do not worry about making a thousand clever moves; what [one has to] fear is one bad move.

Figuratively, this means: Even if you have made many clever moves before, one wrong move will ruin the whole game.

I compare this to the English saying, "It takes only one Aw-shit to wipe out a thousand Attaboys."

Religious Seeker

China qǐ qiú zhě
Japan kotsugusha
Religious Seeker

乞求者 is a rare Buddhist-only term for a seeker (one who seeks religion or enlightenment).

I’d Rather Be With You

China wǒ zhǐ yuàn hé nǐ zài yī qǐ
I’d Rather Be With You

This is a Chinese phrase that is the rough equivalent to, "You are the one I want to be with," or "I only wish to be with you."

Life in Every Breath

Japan hakuiki hitotsu nimo seimei ga yadori
Life in Every Breath

This means, "life in every breath" in Japanese.

This phrase is more like "every single breath as you live and dwell."

The characters breakdown this way:
吐く息 (hakuiki) to breathe; exhaled air; one's breath; breathing.
一つ (hitotsu) one; only; just.
にも (nimo) also; too; as well; even.
生命 (seimei) life; existence; living.
が (ga) particle.
宿り (yadori) to lodge; to dwell; lodging; abode; shelter.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home

China sì hǎi wéi jiā
Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home

This literally reads, "Four Seas Serve-As [my/one's] Home."

Together, 四海 which literally means "four seas" is understood to mean, "the whole world" or "the seven seas." It's presumed to be an ancient word, from back when only four seas were known - so it equates to the modern English term, "seven seas."

This can be translated or understood a few different ways:
To regard the four corners of the world all as home.
To feel at home anywhere.
To roam about unconstrained.
To consider the entire country, or the world, to be one's own.

Leanna

China lì ān nà
Leanna

李安娜 is another transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Leanna.

The first character is the only difference. Both ways, the first character is pronounced like "lee" but this one happens to be the same "lee" as in "Bruce Lee" - it also means plum.

Control of Power

Him Cho Chung
China lì cào zhèng
Control of Power

力操正 is a Korean martial arts title meaning, "Power Control."

It's most often cited as one of the 8 key concepts from Tang Soo Do.

This can be pronounced in Chinese but will only be recognized by those familiar with martial arts terms.

Shinkou / Shinko

Japan shinkou / shinko
Shinkou / Shinko

信耕 is a Japanese surname that can be romanized as Shinkou or Shinko.

信耕 is not the only Japanese Kanji surname that romanize as Shinkou, so make sure it's the right one before you order.

Perseverance is the Key

Skills cannot be perfected without perseverance in practice
China bú pà liàn bù chéng jiù pà xīn bù héng
Perseverance is the Key

This literally translates as: Do not worry about not being able to master [a skill]; What [one should] be concerned about is lack of perseverance.

Figuratively, this means: One's skills cannot be perfected without perseverance in practice.

For me, I've learned that you can only get so much from school or studying. You've really got to do "on-the-job training" to perfect your ability and skill.

For martial arts students: You can read about a kick in a book, or someone can tell you about a certain kick but until you practice the kick, there's no way you'll master it.

Honor and Integrity

China jié cāo
Japan sessou
Honor and Integrity

節操 means honorable, integrity of principle, constancy, honor, and in a certain context, chastity.

Please note that there are a few ways to relay the idea of integrity in Asian languages, and more than one way to define honor in English. 節操 is far from the only way to express "honor and integrity."

Hiroshi / Katsu

Japan hiroshi / katsu
Hiroshi / Katsu

濶 is a Japanese given name that romanizes as Hiroshi, and is a surname that romanizes as Katsu.

濶 is not the only Japanese Kanji that romanize as Hiroshi or Katsu. Make sure you are getting the right one!

Prayer / Praying

China qǐ dǎo
Japan kitou
Prayer / Praying

祈禱 is a second way to write "prayer." It is a little more formal than "dao gao" but the general meaning is the same. This Chinese/Japanese/Korean word can be translated as "to pray," "to say one's prayers" or simply "prayer." Like the other common term for prayer, this term generally applies only to western religions that pray to the God of Abraham (Christians, Jews, and Muslims).

Seiseki

Japan seiseki
Seiseki

星石 is a Japanese word that means meteorite (literally "star stone").

星石 is also the common given name "Seiseki."
Please note this is not the only Japanese given name that romanizes as Seiseki. Be sure to get the right one before order (contact me first if needed).

Daddy / Father

China bà ba
Daddy / Father

爸爸 is the colloquial way to say "Daddy" in Chinese. Sometimes Chinese people will refer to their father with just one of these characters, "Ba," which would be like "Dad." With both characters, "Baba," it's more like "Daddy."

爸爸 is really a weird selection for a wall scroll, so consider this entry to be for educational purposes only (don't order this).

Happy Birthday

Japan shuku tan jou bi
Happy Birthday

祝誕生日 is the shortest way to write "Happy Birthday" in Japanese. The first Kanji means "wish" or "express good wishes," and the last three characters mean "birthday."

Because a birthday only lasts one day per year, we strongly suggest that you find an appropriate and personal calligraphy gift that can be hung in the recipient's home year round.

Hiro

Japan hiro
Hiro

緋色 means brilliant red or scarlet in Japanese.

緋色 is often romanized as Hiro or Hiiro and can be a given name (more often for females than males).

緋色 is not the only Japanese word or name that romanizes as Hiro, so be sure you have the right one before you order.

Happy Birthday

China shēng rì kuài lè
Happy Birthday

生日快樂 is how to write "Happy Birthday" in Chinese. The first two characters mean "birthday," and the second two characters mean "happiness," or rather a wish for happiness.

Because a birthday only lasts one day per year, we strongly suggest that you find an appropriate and personal calligraphy gift that can be hung in the recipient's home year round.

Renni

China rén nī
Renni

仁妮 is a name Renni in Mandarin Chinese. The name literally means "benevolent girl" in Chinese.

I kind of made up this name when my second daughter was born. The idea came for a feeling I got after performing a benevolent act for a poor family in Southern China. I want my daughter to follow that mode, and experience the same feeling one can only experience by doing benevolent acts.

Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history
China jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

This proverb is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as "Serve the country with the utmost loyalty." More literally, it means, "[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country."

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means "serve the country faithfully" or "die for the country." Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean, "Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country."

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei

Destiny / Fate

China mìng yùn
Destiny / Fate

These two characters contain the ideas of "fate," "destiny," "fortune" and "luck." You can also say that it means "what life throws at you" or "your lot in life" because the first character contains the idea of "life" or "living."

This version is really only used in Chinese. There's another version with just the characters reversed that is more universal. In fact, just skip this one. The opposite character order is better.

Acupuncture

China zhēn liáo fǎ
Japan hari ryou hou
Acupuncture

針療法 is one of two ways to write acupuncture in Chinese and Japanese.

The first character means "needle" or "pin." The second character means "to treat" or "to cure." The last character means "method" or "way."

針療法 is the only reasonable selection if your audience is Japanese. 針療法 is the formal way to express acupuncture in Chinese, so this version is universal in most of Asia (the best all around choice in most cases).

Sword

China jiàn
Japan ken
Sword

剱 is the modern Japanese way to write sword.

This Kanji character comes from original Chinese. This form would also be understood in Chinese (there are often several ways to write the same character) but I suggest this one only if your audience is Japanese (because they've settled on a slightly different form as the standard in China).

In Japanese, this character also means saber/sabre, blade, bayonet, stinger and clock hand (clock hands are the "swords" of the clock).


See Also:  Katana

Dynamic

Moving / Motion / Ever-Changing
China dòng
Japan dou
Dynamic

動 is the only Chinese/Japanese/Korean word that can encompass the idea of "dynamic" into one character.

動 can also mean:
to use; to act; to move; to change; motion; stir.

In Buddhist context, it means: Movement arises from the nature of wind which is the cause of motion.

The key point of this word is that it represents motion or always moving. Some might say "lively" or certainly the opposite of something that is stagnant or dead.

Note: In Japanese, this can also be a female given name, Yurugi.

Ninja

China rěn zhě
Japan ninja
Ninja

In feudal Japan, ninja or shinobi (literally, "one who is concealed" or "one that endures") were sometimes assassins and agents of espionage. The ninja, like samurai, followed their own special code of conduct.

The role of the ninja has been romanticized in many American movies (and to a lesser extent in Japanese movies). Because the ninja-craze has taken off in the west, Japan has followed the trend and you'll see plenty of ninja-related imagery in Japan.

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect that form. Our Chinese calligraphers can also write it in the Japanese form but only if you request it (in the special instructions about your order during checkout).


See Also:  Samurai | Warrior | Ninjitsu

Brotherly and Sisterly Love

China shǒu zú qíng
Brotherly and Sisterly Love

手足情 is the love between siblings. When you love, protect, care for, and have a deep bond that only brothers or sisters can.

The actual translation is "Hand and Foot" but it is said the relationship between brothers or sisters is like that of hands and feet. They belong together, and complete the body. Even though this says "hand and foot," it will always be read with the brotherly and sisterly love meaning in Chinese.

Note: During the past 20 years, the "One child policy" in China is slowly making this term obsolete.

Cherry Blossom

China yīng huā
Japan ouka
Cherry Blossom

櫻花 is how to write "cherry blossom" in Chinese and traditional Japanese Kanji.

The first character means "cherry" or sometimes "cherry tree."
The second character means "flowers" or "blossoms."

Oddly, my Chinese dictionary also defines these two characters as "Japanese oriental cherry tree" or "Oriental cherry blossom." However, the first character is the only one that means "cherry," so it can refer to any cherry blossoms in the whole world (not just those in Asia).


桜There is an alternate version of the first character, which has become the standard for Japanese Kanji. If you want this version, instead of the one shown to the upper left, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above. Although this is an alternate form in Chinese, most Chinese people will think this is just the Japanese version (Chinese people don't necessarily know the history and all alternate forms of Chinese characters from the past). Therefore, this version shown to the right is best if your audience is Japanese (though most Japanese will recognize the form shown in the upper left).

Hanawa

China què
Japan hanawa
Hanawa

塙 is the most common Kanji for a surname that romanizes as Hanawa.

塙 is not the only Kanji that romanizes as Hanawa in Japanese, so make sure you are getting the right one.

The meaning of this character is originally something like truly (has this meaning currently in Chinese and old Korean). This can also be romanizes several other ways in Japanese for other names such as Ban, Han, Hane, Haniwa, Hani, Kou, Kasa, or Kaku. Names are kind of complicated in Japanese, as there are often many ways to pronounce the same Kanji.

Lingering Mind

Zanshin
China cán xīn
Japan zan shin
Lingering Mind

First off, this should only be used in context of Japanese martial arts. In Chinese, it's a rather sad title (like a broken heart). In Chinese, the first character alone means destroyed, spoiled, ruined, injured, cruel, oppressive, savage, incomplete, disabled. However, in Japanese, it's remainder, leftover, balance, or lingering.
The second character means heart, mind, soul, or essence in both languages.

殘心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: The spirit of zanshin is the state of the remaining or lingering spirit. It is often described as a sustained and heightened state of awareness and mental follow-through. However, true zanshin is a state of focus or concentration before, during, and after the execution of a technique, where a link or connection between uke and nage is preserved. Zanshin is the state of mind that allows us to stay spiritually connected, not only to a single attacker but to multiple attackers and even an entire context; a space, a time, an event.


残In modern Japan (and Simplified Chinese), they use a different version of the first character, as seen to the right. Click on this character to the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version of lingering mind / zanshin.

Naruto

Japanese Anime Series
Japan na ru to
Naruto

ナルト is the title "Naruto" from the Japanese animation series. See Naruto Anime Series.

Because of the special Japanese character set used to write this title, it can only be written by the Japanese master calligrapher. Do not try to order it from one of our Chinese calligraphers.

Please note that while this is the correct title for this anime series, it can also mean the "@" sign or "at" in Japanese under different context (a Japanese person not familiar with the series may be confused by your wall scroll).


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Drain the pond to get all the fish

Kill the goose that lays the golden eggs
China jié zé ér yú
Drain the pond to get all the fish

In 632 BC, Duke Wen of the Kingdom of Jin was about to lead an army against the forces of the Kingdom of Chu.
The Duke asked one of his advisers, Jiu Fan, how they could possibly win the impending battle, as they were drastically outnumbered.
Jiu Fan said, "All is fair in war," and went on to suggest a plan of dishonorable tactics (cheating).
The Duke was not sure of this advice, so he asked another adviser, Yong Ji, who replied, "If you catch fish by draining the pond, you can certainly get all the fish. But there will be no fish the following year. You can cheat this one time in battle but such tactics can only be used once, as the enemy will be wise in future encounters."

The Duke heard the words of his wiser adviser but cheated to gain victory in the battle. However, he rewarded Yong Ji more than Jiu Fan at the victory celebration, stating that while Jiu Fan's advice gained one victory, the wise words of Yong Ji would last forever.

This Chinese idiom/proverb is still used, over 2600 years later to remind people not to burn bridges, cheat, or dishonor oneself in exchange for a short term gain, while sacrificing the future.

竭澤而漁 is very similar to the meaning of the English phrase, "Kill the goose that lays the golden eggs."

Kendo / The Way of the Sword

China jiàn dào
Japan kendou
Kendo / The Way of the Sword

Often associated with Kenjutsu, this word means "The way of the sword" in Japanese (and Korean with alternate form of the first character).
剱道 / 劍道 is also the term used for swordsmanship and even fencing in Japanese and Korean, depending on context.

Note: These same characters are also used separately in Chinese but this exact combination yields a common title in Japanese only (perhaps someone who is really into swords would use this in China).

Note: There is more than one way to write the "sword" character (shown above is the Japanese version - if you want the Korean version, please let me know when you place your order).


See Also:  Sword | Katana

Rank Holder

The one who has achieved rank in martial arts
China yǒu duàn zhě
Japan yuu dan sha
Rank Holder

有段者 is a Japanese term for someone who holds rank in karate, judo, etc.
This term theoretically applies to anyone with rank (above a white belt). However, some schools or dojos may reserve this title for a holder of a black belt.

I'd suggest that you only order this phrase if you have honestly reached this level.

This title does kind of make sense in Chinese but only to those Chinese who practice "kong shou dao" (karate) or when used in the context of martial arts.

Indomitable Spirit

Korean Only
China bǎi shé bù qū
Indomitable Spirit

This Korean proverb means "indomitable spirit," at least, that is the way it is commonly translated in martial arts circles (Taekwondo, Hapkido, etc.).

The literal translation is "[one] hundred [times] broken [still] don't succumb."
Or more naturally translated, "Even if attacked/beaten one hundred times, still be undaunted/indomitable."

Notes:
Some will say this is one long word rather than a proverb.
百折不屈 is also a proverb/word in Chinese though rarely used in modern times.

5. Right Living / Right Livelihood / Perfect Livelihood

Samyag Ajiva / Samma Ajiva
China zhèng mìng
Japan sei myou
5. Right Living / Right Livelihood / Perfect Livelihood

正命 (right living) is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism.

Right Living, along with Right Speech and Right Action constitute the path to Virtue.

Right Living means that a Buddhist should only take a job or pursue a career in a field that does no harm. Buddhists should not work in the arms trade, as pimps or in the field of prostitution, as a butcher or in a shop that kills or sells meat, in a laboratory that does animal research, or any other business that involves scheming or unethical behavior.

Another definition: Avoidance of professions that are harmful to sentient beings, such as slaughterer, hunter, dealer in weaponry or narcotics, etc.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Wing Chun

China yǒng chūn
HK wing2 cheun1
Japan ei haru
Wing Chun

This martial arts technique has an oral history (versus a written one) so very little can be said for sure about its origins.
Wing Chun (or Wing Cheun) is a Chinese martial art that emphasizes short combat strokes.

The characters literally mean "Singing Spring" (as in springtime).

If you are wondering, the spelling and pronunciation of this martial arts style in English comes from the Cantonese pronunciation of these characters. The second character sounds similar in both Mandarin and Cantonese but the first is quite different.

Note: This title can be pronounced in Japanese but only a Japanese practitioner of Wing Chun would recognize or understand this title. It is not considered to be a Japanese word or martial art at all.

Love Binds Us Together

Japan ai ha subete o kanzen ni musubu obi de aru
Love Binds Us Together

This Japanese phrase suggests that we (or a couple) are bound together by love.

I searched the web and found all of these English translation variations for this phrase:

Have love; The only way in which you may be completely joined together.

Love is the sash that perfectly binds us together.

Love is what binds us together

Love, which binds all things together in perfect unity.

This same Japanese phrase is used as part of Colossians 3:14 in at least one version of the Japanese Bible.

A few Biblical versions include:

...Charity, which is the bond of perfectness. (KJV)

...Love, which binds them all together in perfect unity. (NIV)


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Diligence

China qín
Japan kin
Diligence

This single-character means diligence or "sense of duty" in Chinese and Korean (also understood in Japanese but not commonly-seen as a stand-alone Kanji).

As a single character on a wall scroll, this will only be seen with this meaning. However, it can also mean industrious, hardworking, frequent, regular, constant, energy, zeal, fortitude, or virility.

In Buddhism this can represent vīrya (viriya), the idea of energy, diligence, enthusiasm, or effort. It can be defined as an attitude of gladly engaging in wholesome activities, and it functions to cause one to accomplish wholesome or virtuous actions. Some Buddhists may even define this as "manliness" (a definition from a hundred years ago, before equality).

If you, or someone you know is a hard-worker (or needs a reminder to be diligent), then this is the wall scroll to have in your/their office.


See Also:  Tenacity | Undaunted

Northern Praying Mantis

China táng láng quán
Japan tou rou ken
Northern Praying Mantis

This can be translated literally as "Praying Mantis Fist."
螳螂拳 is sometimes called Shandong Praying Mantis after its place of origin. It was created by Wang Lang and was named after the praying mantis, an insect, the aggressiveness of which inspired the style.
Shaolin records document that Wang Lang was one of the 18 masters gathered by the Shaolin Abbot Fu Ju, which dates him and Northern Praying Mantis style to the Song Dynasty (960-1279 A.D.).
The fact that the word "Northern" is used in the English title has more to do with where this style came from (Shandong is in northern China) but "north" is absent from this Chinese title.

Note: 螳螂拳 is also a title in Japanese - however, only a Japanese person who practices or is familiar with "Praying Mantis Fist" style would recognize it.

Better to be Happy than Rich

China ān pín lè dào
Better to be Happy than Rich

Even if you are poor, you should still feel satisfied in your life...

...Satisfaction, happiness, and the meaning of your life come from within yourself and not from money or riches of the world.

In Chinese, there are a lot of four-character proverbs which express some very old philosophies.
Though there are only four characters on this scroll, in Chinese the meanings often surpass the dictionary definition of each character.

In this case, you should not set your expectations too high for the amount to money or riches you wish to have. One who sets their expectations too high is almost always disappointed. Instead, you should cherish what you have, and seek to improve yourself from within, and not measure your personal worth by the size of your bank account.


See Also:  A Sly Rabbit Will Have Three Openings to Its Den

Fight / Beat Someone

China dòu
Fight / Beat Someone

斗 is how to express the act of fighting in Chinese.

Generally, this means fighting against someone or some force whether physically or metaphorically.

Note: There is more than one way to write this character. You will notice variations on the next page after you click "Select and Customize." If you have a preference, please let us know when you place your order.

Please note that there is a secondary pronunciation and meaning of this character. It can also mean "measuring cup" or in Japanese "sake dipper" or even "The Big Dipper." In Japanese and Korean, this does not have the fighting meaning associated with it. You should, therefore, select this character only if your audience is Chinese, or you are a big fan of sake dippers or The Big Dipper (as that is how it will be read by Japanese and Korean people).

Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude

A Japanese martial arts title/concept
China xǐ xīn
Japan sen shin
Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude

The first Kanji alone means to wash, to bathe, primness, cleanse or purify.

The second Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these two Kanji create a word that is defined as "purified spirit" or "enlightened attitude" within the context of Japanese martial arts.

洗心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context it's often defined this way: A spirit that protects and harmonizes the universe. Senshin is a spirit of compassion that embraces and serves all humanity and whose function is to reconcile discord in the world. It holds all life to be sacred. It is the Buddha mind.

This title will only be familiar to Japanese who practice certain martial arts. Others may not recognize this word at all.

洗心 does not show up as a word in too many Chinese dictionaries but it can be read and has the same meaning in Chinese.


先心 There is an issue with the first character. The original, and probably most correct version is shown above. However, many dojo documents and other sources have used a more simple first character. Arguments ensue about which version is correct. If you want to be correct in the Japanese language, use the "Select and Customize" button above. If you want to match the Kanji used by your dojo, click the Kanji shown to the right. There is a slightly different meaning with this first character which means before, ahead, previous, future, precedence.

Holy Bible

China shèng jīng
Holy Bible

聖經 is how to write Bible in Chinese.

The first character means Holy, sacred, saint, or sage.
The second character means sacred book or scripture.

Each Sunday morning, if you are near a Catholic or Protestant Church, you will see plenty of Chinese people carrying their Bibles. Virtually every large or medium city in China has, at least, one Christian church. Beijing has about 14 Christian churches of Catholic and various Protestant denominations. That number doubles if you count all the church services that are for foreigners only, and doubles again if you count all of the underground Christian Churches. Many Embassies (Canadian, Italian, French, etc.) offer Protestant and Catholic services. However, the U.S. Embassy is the most unfriendly Embassy in all of China, and offers no such religious services and regularly denies entry and kicks out Americans and others, whether or not they have official business.


See Also:  Christian | Disciple

Buddhism / Buddha

China
Japan hotoke
Buddhism / Buddha

佛 is the essence of the Buddha or Buddhism. Depending on context, this word and character can be used to refer to the religion and lifestyle of Buddhism, or in some cases, the Buddha himself.

It is interesting to note that this word is separate from all others in the Chinese language. The sound of "fo" has only this meaning. 佛 is in contrast to many sounds in the Chinese language which can have one of four tones, and more than 20 possible characters and meanings. This language anomaly shows just how significant Buddhism has affected China since the ancient times.

More about Buddhism

佛 is also used with the same meaning in Korean Hanja.

It's used in the very religious context of Buddhism in Japan. It should be noted that there are two forms of this Kanji in use in Japan - this is the more formal/ancient version but it's rarely seen outside of religious artwork, and may not be recognized by all Japanese people.

It also acts as a suffix or first syllable for many Buddhist-related words in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.


See our Buddhism & Zen page


See Also:  Bodhisattva | Enlightenment

Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

Always rising after a fall or repeated failures
Japan shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

This Japanese proverb relays the vicissitudes of life, with the meaning "seven times down eight times up."

Some would more naturally translate it into English as "Always rising after a fall or repeated failures" or compare it to the English, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again."

The first Kanji is literally "7." The second means "fall down" (sometimes this Kanji means "turn around," "revolve" or "turn over" but in this case, it holds the meaning of "fall"). The third is "8." And the last is "get up," "rouse," or "rise."

Basically, if you fail 7 times, you should recover from those events and be prepared to rise an 8th time. This also applies if it is the world or circumstances that knock you down seven times...
...just remember that you have the ability to bounce back from any kind of adversity.

Note: This can be pronounced two ways. One is "shichi ten hakki" or "shichitenhakki." The other is "nana korobi ya oki" also written, "nanakorobi-yaoki."

Special Note: The second character is a Kanji that is not used in China. Therefore, please only select our Japanese master calligrapher for this selection.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

Tea Fate

China chá yuán
Tea Fate

茶緣 is a special title for the tea lover. This kind of means "tea fate" but it's more spiritual and hard to define. Perhaps the tea brought you in to drink it. Perhaps the tea will bring you and another tea-lover together. Perhaps you were already there, and the tea came to you. Perhaps it's the ah-ha moment you will have when drinking the tea.

I've been told not to explain this further, as it will either dilute or confuse the purposefully-ambiguous idea embedded in this enigma.

I happen to be the owner of a piece of calligraphy written by either the son or nephew of the last emperor of China, and this is the title he wrote. It was given to me at a Beijing tea house in 2001. 茶緣 is where I learned to love tea after literally spending weeks tasting and studying everything I could about Chinese tea. I did not understand the significance of the authorship, or meaning of the title at all. Some 10 years later, I realized the gift was so profound and had such providence. Only now I realize the value of a gift that it is too late to give proper thanks for. It was also years later that I ended up in this business, and could have the artwork properly mounted as a wall scroll. It has been borrowed for many exhibitions and shows, and always amazes native Chinese and Taiwanese who read the signature. This piece of calligraphy which I once thought just a bit of ink on a thin and wrinkled piece of paper is now one of my most valued possessions. And by fate, it has taught me to be more thankful of seemingly simple gifts.

Kung Fu / Gong Fu

China gōng fu
HK gung fu
Japan kan fu / ku fu
Kung Fu / Gong Fu

One of the most famous types of martial arts in the world - and not just because of Bruce Lee.

Some translate the meaning as "Accomplishment by Great Effort." I think this is partially true but directly translated it literally means "Merit/Achievement/Accomplishment Man." The word "fu" can sometimes mean "husband" or "porter" but in this case, it can only mean "man." However, few in China will think "man" when they hear the word "Gong Fu" spoken.

This term is also used for things other than martial arts. In fact, it's used to refer to a person with excellent skills in crafts that require a great deal of effort such as cooking, tea ceremonies, and calligraphy.

What a lot of people don't know is that the spelling of "Kung Fu" was actually taken from the old Wade Giles form of Romanization. Using this method, the sounds of the English "G" and "K" were both written as "K" and an apostrophe after the "K" told you it was supposed to sound like a "G." Nobody in the west knew this rule, so most people pronounce it with a "K-sound." And so Gong Fu will always be Kung Fu for most westerners.

Also, just to educate you a little more, the "O" in "Gong" has a sound like the English word "oh."

The popular Chinese dish "Kung Pao Chicken" suffers from the same problem. It should actually be "Gong Bao Chicken."

Historical note: Many will claim that Kung Fu was invented by the monks of the Shaolin monastery. This fact is argued in both directions by scholars of Chinese history. Perhaps it is more accurate to say that the Shaolin Monks brought the original fame to Kung Fu many generations ago.


Japanese note: While most Japanese martial artists will recognize these characters, Katakana is more often used to approximate the pronunciation of "Kung Fu" with "カンフー." Some will argue as to whether this should be considered a Japanese word at all.


See Also:  Bruce Lee

Body and Earth in Unity

Japan shindofuni / shindofuji
Body and Earth in Unity

身土不二 (Shindofuni) is originally a Buddhist concept or proverb referring to the inseparability of body-mind and geographical circumstances.

身土不二 literally reads, "Body [and] earth [are] not two".

Other translations or matching ideas include:
Body and land are one.
Body and earth can not be separated.
Body earth sensory curation.
You are what you eat.
Indivisibility of the body and the land (because the body is made from food and food is made from the land).

Going further, this speaks of our human bodies and the land from which we get our food being closely connected. This phrase is used often when talking about natural and organic vegetables coming directly from the farm to provide the healthiest foods in Japan.

Character notes: 身(shin) in this context does not just mean your physical body rather a concept including both body and mind.
土 (do) refers to soil, earth, clay, land, or in some cases, locality. It's not the proper name of Earth, the planet. However, in can refer to the land or realm we live in.

Japanese note: This has been used in Japan, on and off since 1907 as a slogan for a governmental healthy eating campaign (usually pronounced as shindofuji instead of the original shindofuni in this context). It may have been hijacked from Buddhism for this propaganda purpose, but at least this is "healthy propaganda."

Korean note: The phrase 身土不二 was in use by 1610 A.D. in Korea where it can be found in an early medical journal.
In modern South Korea, it's written in Hangul as 신토불이. Korea used Chinese characters (same source for Japanese Kanji) as their only written standard form of the language until about a hundred years ago. Therefore, many Koreans will recognize 身土不二 as a native phrase and concept.


See Also:  Strength and Love in Unity

If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?

Only by experiencing hardship will allow you to understand the plight of others
China bù dāng hé shang bù zhī zhāi jiè kǔ
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?

This literally translates as:
[One who has] not been a monk [does not] know the suffering of [being on a] vegetarian diet.

This is a bit like the "walk a mile in another man's shoes" saying. Basically it's about you cannot fully understand the plight of others until you experience it yourself.

Past experience is the teacher for the future.

Past events not forgotten serve as teachers for later events.
China qián shì bú wàng hòu shí zhī shī
Past experience is the teacher for the future.

The most literal translation to English of this ancient Chinese proverb is:
"Past events not forgotten serve as teachers for later events."

However, it's been translated several ways:
Don't forget past events, they can guide you in future.
Benefit from past experience.
Past experience, if not forgotten, is a guide for the future.
Past calamity is my teacher.
A good memory for the past is a teacher for the future.
The remembrance of the past is the teacher of the future.
If one remembers the lessons of the past; They will serve as a guide to avoid mistakes in the future.

The origin:
This proverb comes from the 5th century B.C. just before the Warring States Period in the territory now known as China.
The head of the State of Jin, Zhi Bo, seized power in a coup. He did this with help from the armies of the State of Han and Wei. Instead of being grateful for the help from Han and Wei, he treacherously took the land of Han and Wei. Never satisfied, Zhi Bo employed the armies of Han and Wei to attack and seize the State of Zhao.

The king of Zhao took advice from his minister Zhang Mengtan and secretly contacted the Han and Wei armies to reverse their plans and attack the army of Zhi Bo instead. The plan was successful, and the State of Zhao was not only saved but was set to become a powerful kingdom in the region.

Zhang Mengtan immediately submitted his resignation to a confused king of Zhao. When asked why, Zhang Mengtan said, "I've done my duty to save my kingdom but looking back at past experience, I know sovereign kings are never satisfied with the power or land at hand. They will join others and fight for more power and more land. I must learn from past experiences, as those experiences are the teachers of future events."
The king could not dispute the logic in that statement and accepted Zhang Mengtan's resignation.

For generations, the State of Zhao continued to fight for power and land until finally being defeated and decimated by the State of Qin (which lead to the birth of the Qin Dynasty in 221 B.C.).

Hapkido

Korean Martial Art of re-directing force
China hé qì dào
Japan ai ki do
Hapkido

Hapkido is a mostly-defensive martial art of Korea. It has some connection to Aikido of Japan. In fact, they are written with the same characters in both languages. However, it should be noted that the Korean Hanja characters shown here are the traditional Chinese form - but in modern Japan, the middle character was slightly simplified.
Note: You can consider this to be the older Japanese written form of Aikido. Titles on older books and signs about Aikido use this form.

The connection between Japanese Aikido and Korean Hapkido is a bit muddled in history. 合氣道 is probably due to the relationship between the two countries - especially during WWII when many Koreans became virtual slaves for the Japanese (many Koreans are still bitter about that, so many things were disassociated from having any Japanese origin).

Looking at the characters, the first means "union" or "harmony."
The second character means "universal energy" or "spirit."
The third means "way" or "method."
One way to translate this into English is "Harmonizing Energy Method." This makes since, as Hapkido has more to do with redirecting energy, rather that fighting with strength against strength.

More Hapkido info

More notes:
1. Sometimes Hapkido is Romanized as "hap ki do," "hapki-do" "hab gi do" or "hapgido."

2. Korean Hanja characters are actually Chinese characters that usually hold the same meaning in both languages. There was a time when these characters were the standard and only written form of Korean. The development of modern Korean Hangul characters is a somewhat recent event in the greater scope of history. There was a time when Chinese characters were the written form of many languages in places known in modern times as North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Mainland China, and a significant portion of Malaysia. Even today, more people in the world can read Chinese characters than can read English.

3. While these Korean Hanja characters can be pronounced in Chinese, this word is not well-known in China and is not considered part of the Chinese lexicon.

Search for My One and Only in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Only the sleepless know the length of night不眠之夜長久交知人心
不眠之夜长久交知人心
bù mián zhī yè cháng jiǔ jiāo zhī rén xīn
bu4 mian2 zhi1 ye4 chang2 jiu3 jiao1 zhi1 ren2 xin1
bu mian zhi ye chang jiu jiao zhi ren xin
pu mien chih yeh ch`ang chiu chiao chih jen hsin
pu mien chih yeh chang chiu chiao chih jen hsin
You Only Live Once一度だけ生きるichi do da ke i ki ru
ichidodakeikiru
Fear not long roads; fear only short ambition不怕路遠隻怕志短
不怕路远只怕志短
bú pà lù yuǎn zhǐ pà zhì duǎn
bu2 pa4 lu4 yuan3 zhi3 pa4 zhi4 duan3
bu pa lu yuan zhi pa zhi duan
bupaluyuanzhipazhiduan
pu p`a lu yüan chih p`a chih tuan
pu pa lu yüan chih pa chih tuan
A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One千里も一里sen ri mo ichi ri
senrimoichiri
Soul Mates霊魂の仲間達reikon no nakama tachi
reikonnonakamatachi
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark兼聽則明偏聽則暗
兼听则明偏听则暗
jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
jian1 ting1 ze2 ming2, pian1 ting1 ze2 an4
jian ting ze ming, pian ting ze an
chien t`ing tse ming, p`ien t`ing tse an
chien ting tse ming, pien ting tse an
Once in a Lifetime一期一會
一期一会
ichigoichieyī qī yī huì
yi1 qi1 yi1 hui4
yi qi yi hui
yiqiyihui
i ch`i i hui
ichiihui
i chi i hui
Eternal Love永遠の愛ei en no ai
eiennoai
No man knows what he owes to his parents
till he comes to have children of his own
子を持って知る親の恩ko wo motte shiru oya no on
kowomotteshiruoyanoon
1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad不怕千招會隻怕一招熟
不怕千招会只怕一招熟
bú pà qiān zhāo huì zhǐ pà yī zhāo shú
bu2 pa4 qian1 zhao1 hui4 zhi3 pa4 yi1 zhao1 shu2
bu pa qian zhao hui zhi pa yi zhao shu
pu p`a ch`ien chao hui chih p`a i chao shu
pu pa chien chao hui chih pa i chao shu
Religious Seeker乞求者kotsugushaqǐ qiú zhě
qi3 qiu2 zhe3
qi qiu zhe
qiqiuzhe
ch`i ch`iu che
chichiuche
chi chiu che
I’d Rather Be With You我隻願和你在一起
我只愿和你在一起
wǒ zhǐ yuàn hé nǐ zài yī qǐ
wo3 zhi3 yuan4 he2 ni3 zai4 yi1 qi3
wo zhi yuan he ni zai yi qi
wozhiyuanhenizaiyiqi
wo chih yüan ho ni tsai i ch`i
wochihyüanhonitsaiichi
wo chih yüan ho ni tsai i chi
Life in Every Breath吐く息一つにも生命が宿りhakuiki hitotsu nimo seimei ga yadori
Feel at Ease Anywhere
The World is My Home
四海為家
四海为家
sì hǎi wéi jiā
si4 hai3 wei2 jia1
si hai wei jia
sihaiweijia
ssu hai wei chia
ssuhaiweichia
Leanna李安娜lì ān nà
li4 an1 na4
li an na
lianna
Control of Power力操正lì cào zhèng
li4 cao4 zheng4
li cao zheng
licaozheng
li ts`ao cheng
litsaocheng
li tsao cheng
Shinkou
Shinko
信耕shinkou / shinko
shinko / shinko
shinko/shinko
Perseverance is the Key不怕練不成就怕心不恆
不怕练不成就怕心不恒
bú pà liàn bù chéng jiù pà xīn bù héng
bu2 pa4 lian4 bu4 cheng2 jiu4 pa4 xin1 bu4 heng2
bu pa lian bu cheng jiu pa xin bu heng
pu p`a lien pu ch`eng chiu p`a hsin pu heng
pu pa lien pu cheng chiu pa hsin pu heng
Honor and Integrity節操
节操
sessou / sesojié cāo / jie2 cao1 / jie cao / jiecaochieh ts`ao / chiehtsao / chieh tsao
Hiroshi
Katsu

hiroshi / katsu
Prayer
Praying
祈禱
祈祷
kitou / kitoqǐ dǎo / qi3 dao3 / qi dao / qidaoch`i tao / chitao / chi tao
Seiseki星石seiseki
Daddy
Father
爸爸bà ba / ba4 ba / ba ba / babapa pa / papa
Happy Birthday祝誕生日shuku tan jou bi
shukutanjoubi
shuku tan jo bi
shukutanjobi
Hiro緋色hiro
Happy Birthday生日快樂
生日快乐
shēng rì kuài lè
sheng1 ri4 kuai4 le4
sheng ri kuai le
shengrikuaile
sheng jih k`uai le
shengjihkuaile
sheng jih kuai le
Renni仁妮rén nī / ren2 ni1 / ren ni / rennijen ni / jenni
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country盡忠報國
尽忠报国
jìn zhōng bào guó
jin4 zhong1 bao4 guo2
jin zhong bao guo
jinzhongbaoguo
chin chung pao kuo
chinchungpaokuo
Destiny
Fate
命運
命运
mìng yùn / ming4 yun4 / ming yun / mingyunming yün / mingyün
Acupuncture針療法
针疗法
hari ryou hou
hariryouhou
hari ryo ho
hariryoho
zhēn liáo fǎ
zhen1 liao2 fa3
zhen liao fa
zhenliaofa
chen liao fa
chenliaofa
Sword
kenjiàn / jian4 / jianchien
Dynamic
dou / dodòng / dong4 / dongtung
Ninja忍者ninjarěn zhě / ren3 zhe3 / ren zhe / renzhejen che / jenche
Brotherly and Sisterly Love手足情shǒu zú qíng
shou3 zu2 qing2
shou zu qing
shouzuqing
shou tsu ch`ing
shoutsuching
shou tsu ching
Cherry Blossom櫻花
樱花 / 桜花
ouka / okayīng huā / ying1 hua1 / ying hua / yinghua
Hanawahanawaquè / que4 / quech`üeh / chüeh
Lingering Mind殘心
残心
zan shin / zanshincán xīn / can2 xin1 / can xin / canxints`an hsin / tsanhsin / tsan hsin
Narutoナルトna ru to / naruto
Drain the pond to get all the fish竭澤而漁
竭泽而渔
jié zé ér yú
jie2 ze2 er2 yu2
jie ze er yu
jiezeeryu
chieh tse erh yü
chiehtseerhyü
Kendo
The Way of the Sword
剱道 / 劍道
剣道
kendou / kendojiàn dào / jian4 dao4 / jian dao / jiandaochien tao / chientao
Rank Holder有段者yuu dan sha
yuudansha
yu dan sha
yudansha
yǒu duàn zhě
you3 duan4 zhe3
you duan zhe
youduanzhe
yu tuan che
yutuanche
Indomitable Spirit百折不屈bǎi shé bù qū
bai3 she2 bu4 qu1
bai she bu qu
baishebuqu
pai she pu ch`ü
paishepuchü
pai she pu chü
5. Right Living
Right Livelihood
Perfect Livelihood
正命sei myou / seimyou / sei myo / seimyozhèng mìng
zheng4 ming4
zheng ming
zhengming
cheng ming
chengming
Wing Chun詠春
咏春
ei haru / eiharuyǒng chūn
yong3 chun1
yong chun
yongchun
yung ch`un
yungchun
yung chun
Love Binds Us Together愛は全てを完全に結ぶ帯であるai ha subete o kanzen ni musubu obi de aru
Diligencekinqín / qin2 / qinch`in / chin
Northern Praying Mantis螳螂拳tou rou ken
tourouken
to ro ken
toroken
táng láng quán
tang2 lang2 quan2
tang lang quan
tanglangquan
t`ang lang ch`üan
tanglangchüan
tang lang chüan
Better to be Happy than Rich安貧樂道
安贫乐道
ān pín lè dào
an1 pin2 le4 dao4
an pin le dao
anpinledao
an p`in le tao
anpinletao
an pin le tao
Fight
Beat Someone
dòu / dou4 / doutou
Purified Spirit
Enlightened Attitude
洗心
先心
sen shin / senshinxǐ xīn / xi3 xin1 / xi xin / xixinhsi hsin / hsihsin
Holy Bible聖經
圣经
shèng jīng
sheng4 jing1
sheng jing
shengjing
sheng ching
shengching
Buddhism
Buddha
hotokefó / fo2 / fo
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight七転八起shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
shichi ten haki / nana korobi ya oki
shichitenhaki/nanakorobiyaoki
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
Tea Fate茶緣
茶缘
chá yuán / cha2 yuan2 / cha yuan / chayuanch`a yüan / chayüan / cha yüan
Kung Fu
Gong Fu
功夫kan fu / ku fu
kanfu / kufu
gōng fu / gong1 fu / gong fu / gongfukung fu / kungfu
Body and Earth in Unity身土不二shindofuni / shindofuji
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?不當和尚不知齋戒苦
不当和尚不知斋戒苦
bù dāng hé shang bù zhī zhāi jiè kǔ
bu4 dang1 he2 shang bu4 zhi1 zhai1 jie4 ku3
bu dang he shang bu zhi zhai jie ku
pu tang ho shang pu chih chai chieh k`u
pu tang ho shang pu chih chai chieh ku
Past experience is the teacher for the future.前事不忘后事之師
前事不忘后事之师
qián shì bú wàng hòu shí zhī shī
qian2 shi4 bu2 wang4 hou4 shi2 zhi1 shi1
qian shi bu wang hou shi zhi shi
ch`ien shih pu wang hou shih chih shih
chien shih pu wang hou shih chih shih
Hapkido合氣道
合气道
ai ki do / aikidohé qì dào
he2 qi4 dao4
he qi dao
heqidao
ho ch`i tao
hochitao
ho chi tao
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiki Jujutsu
Archangel
Aster
Berserk
Bushido
Christ
Create
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Energy
Enlighten
Enlightened
Faith in God
Family
Father
Fortune
Heart of a Warrior
House
Iaido
Jesus
Keep Fighting
Kung Fu
Love
Loyalty
Mind Body Soul Spirit
Mind Body Spirit
Mother
Mushin
Music
Overcome
Pleasure
Protector
Rain
Rebirth
Right Intention
Rooster
Samurai
Strength
Strength of Spirit
Strong Heart
Sword
The Red String
The Way
The Way of the Warrior
Thunder Lightning in Kanji
Trust in God
Trust No Man
Victory
Wedding
White
Winter
Wolf
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as My One and Only Kanji, My One and Only Characters, My One and Only in Mandarin Chinese, My One and Only Characters, My One and Only in Chinese Writing, My One and Only in Japanese Writing, My One and Only in Asian Writing, My One and Only Ideograms, Chinese My One and Only symbols, My One and Only Hieroglyphics, My One and Only Glyphs, My One and Only in Chinese Letters, My One and Only Hanzi, My One and Only in Japanese Kanji, My One and Only Pictograms, My One and Only in the Chinese Written-Language, or My One and Only in the Japanese Written-Language.