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Love Some in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Love Some calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Love Some" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Love Some" title below...

  1. Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself
  2. Love Gems / Fruit of Love / Children
  3. Love and Affection
  4. Love and Respect
  5. I Love You
  6. Life of Love
  7. Faith Hope Love
  8. Kindness / Caring
  9. Body and Earth in Unity
10. Sushi
11. I Want You
12. Zendo / The Zen Way
13. Live in Prosperity
14. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching
15. I Need You
16. True Heart
17. I Need You
18. The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100
19. Generosity
20. Tiger
21. Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart
22. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu
23. Tea Fate
24. Islam
25. Broken Mirror Rejoined

Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself

China zì ài
Japan ji ai
Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself

This title means: self-love; self-regard; regard for oneself; to cherish one's good name; taking care of oneself.

In Buddhist context, this is the cause of all pursuit or seeking, which in turn causes all suffering. All Buddhas discharge themselves from self-love and all pursuits of personal gratification. Such elimination of self-love is a step towards nirvāṇa.

This title can be taken as positive or negative, depending on how you read it. Some will see it as arrogant, others will read it as a token of self-respect. Because of this ambiguity, I do not recommend this title for a wall scroll.

Love Gems / Fruit of Love / Children

Japan ainokesshou
Love Gems / Fruit of Love / Children

愛の結晶 is a Japanese word that literally means the crystals or gems of love.

Figuratively, it means the treasures you create with your love (namely, your children). Some will translate this as "fruit of love."
It's also kind of a nickname for your beloved children.

Love and Affection

China ài qíng
Japan aijou
Love and Affection

愛情 is a universal word in Japanese, Korean and Chinese which means love and affection. Some may translate this as "love between a man and a woman." Depending on context, it can mean utter devotion or favorite.

Love and Respect

Love each other and show mutual respect
China xiāng ài hù jìng
Love and Respect

相愛互敬 is a nice way to say "Love and Respect" in Chinese.

This proverb is about the mutual exchange of love and respect within a good relationship.

The first two characters create a word that means, "to love each other" or "mutual love."

The third character means mutual, interlocking, or in some contexts "to dovetail" (as in the way joints are made in fine furniture).

The last character means, "to respect," "to venerate," "to salute," "reverence," or simply "respect."

I Love You

Japan ai shi te ru
I Love You

It's very uncommon (some will say taboo) to say, "I love you" in Japanese culture. It's especially awkward for a man to tell a woman this in Japanese. Everyone is more likely to say "Watashi wa anata ga suki desu" or "I like you" (literally, "I regarding you, have like."

If you have to say, "I love you" in Japanese, this selection of Kanji and Hiragana shown to the left is the way.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Life of Love

China ài qíng shēng huó
Japan aijyou seikatsu
Life of Love

愛情生活 is the Chinese proverb for "Loving Life." Some also translate this as "[your] Loving Life" or "Life full of Love."

愛情生活 is about being a loving person (to spouse and/or family) during your life. 愛情生活 is not the same as loving the state of being alive - not "love of living" but rather "being loving person during your life."


Note: Korean pronunciation is included above, though use of this proverb in Korean has not been verified.

This proverb can be understood in Japanese but it's primarily a Chinese proverb (it will "feel" Chinese to a Japanese person).

Faith Hope Love

Japan shinkou to kibou to ai
Faith Hope Love

This is a Japanese list of words (not really a phrase) meaning faith, hope, and love. Some have associated this word list with Corinthians 13:13, though there are no specific religious connotations in this word list, and it's not directly from that Japanese Bible verse.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Kindness / Caring

China qīn qiè
Japan shin setsu
Kindness / Caring

Kindness is showing you care, doing some good to make life better for others. Be thoughtful about people's needs. Show love and compassion to someone who is sad or needs your help. When you are tempted to be cruel, to criticize or tease, decide to be kind instead.

This Chinese / Japanese / Korean word can also mean affectionate, cordial, warmly, or close (emotionally).


See Also:  Love | Caring | Benevolence

Body and Earth in Unity

Japan shindofuni / shindofuji
Body and Earth in Unity

身土不二 (Shindofuni) is originally a Buddhist concept or proverb referring to the inseparability of body-mind and geographical circumstances.

身土不二 literally reads, "Body [and] earth [are] not two".

Other translations or matching ideas include:
Body and land are one.
Body and earth can not be separated.
Body earth sensory curation.
You are what you eat.
Indivisibility of the body and the land (because the body is made from food and food is made from the land).

Going further, this speaks of our human bodies and the land from which we get our food being closely connected. This phrase is used often when talking about natural and organic vegetables coming directly from the farm to provide the healthiest foods in Japan.

Character notes: 身(shin) in this context does not just mean your physical body rather a concept including both body and mind.
土 (do) refers to soil, earth, clay, land, or in some cases, locality. It's not the proper name of Earth, the planet. However, in can refer to the land or realm we live in.

Japanese note: This has been used in Japan, on and off since 1907 as a slogan for a governmental healthy eating campaign (usually pronounced as shindofuji instead of the original shindofuni in this context). It may have been hijacked from Buddhism for this propaganda purpose, but at least this is "healthy propaganda."

Korean note: The phrase 身土不二 was in use by 1610 A.D. in Korea where it can be found in an early medical journal.
In modern South Korea, it's written in Hangul as 신토불이. Korea used Chinese characters (same source for Japanese Kanji) as their only written standard form of the language until about a hundred years ago. Therefore, many Koreans will recognize 身土不二 as a native phrase and concept.


See Also:  Strength and Love in Unity

Sushi

China shòu sī
Japan su shi
Sushi

Got a sushi restaurant and need an appropriate wall scroll? Or maybe you love sushi enough to have it on your wall. This sushi calligraphy scroll is for you.

Note that the written characters for sushi are exactly the same in both Chinese and Japanese. However, the first character is actually a modern Japanese / Simplified Chinese so in some cases it will be written differently in Taiwan, Hong Kong and some older Japanese sushi restaurants.

I Want You

Japan ho shi i
I Want You

Some people like to say, "I love you," if you want to say "I want you," here it is in Japanese...

This can be read as "I want you" or as a single word, "wanted," "wished for," "in need of," or "desired."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Zendo / The Zen Way

China chán dào
Japan zen dou
Zendo / The Zen Way

This title is used in certain contexts but is not widely-known by the general population of China or Japan.

From Japanese, you will see this title romanized as "zendo," which is the brand name of a board game, and also a title used by some martial arts studios and karate dojos. Oddly, many translate this as "zen fist" although there is no "fist" in the title. If you literally translated this title, it would be "meditation way" or "meditation method."

In Chinese, this would be "chan dao" with the same literal meaning as the Japanese title. It's used in China by just a handful of martial arts styles/studios.

You should only order this title if you really understand the meaning, and it has some personal connection to you (such as practicing a martial art style that uses this title, or if you love the board game Zendo). Many who see your wall scroll will not be familiar with this title, and you'll have some explaining to do.


禪The first character can also be written in a more complex traditional way as shown to the right. Let us know in the special instructions for your calligraphy project if you want this style.

禅If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, the first character will automatically be written with an extra dot on top. This is the variant form of the original Chinese character which is commonly used in modern Japan Kanji. See sample to the right.

Live in Prosperity

China shēng huó yú fán róng zhōng
Live in Prosperity

This means, "live in prosperity." It's kind of a suggestion to be prosperity the center of your world.

This is the way some people want to live (and you should always live for what you love). However, this phrase does not suggest a peaceful life - rather one that is always busy. It's not for everyone but it might be for you.


See Also:  Prosperity

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

Except from Chapter 67
China yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

This is an except from the 67th Chapter of Lao Tzu's (Lao Zi's) Te-Tao Ching (Dao De Jing). This is the part where the three treasures are discussed. In English, we'd say these three treasures are compassion, frugality, and humility. Some may translate these as love, moderation, and lack of arrogance. I have also seen them translated as benevolence, modesty, and "Not presuming to be at the forefront in the world." You can mix them up the way you want, as translation is not really a science but rather an art.

I should also explain that the first two treasures are single-character ideas, yet the third treasure was written out in six characters (there are also some auxiliary characters to number the treasures).

If Lao Tzu's words are important to you, then a wall scroll with this passage might make a great addition to your home.

I Need You

China wǒ xū yào nǐ
I Need You

Some people like to say, "I love you" but others might want to say "I need you." That is what this phrase is all about.

The first character means "I." The second and third create a compound word that means "need" and "want" at the same time. The last character means "you."

True Heart

China zhēn xīn
Japan mago koro
True Heart

While these two characters literally read as "true heart" or "genuine heart," the understood meaning is sincerity, devotion, sincere, or heartfelt. Some will extend the meaning to be like, "true love." Basically, it's the idea of doing something or treating someone with genuine feelings.

真心 is valid and has the same meaning in both Chinese characters and Japanese Kanji.

Note: While not too common, this can be the female given name "Mami" in Japanese.

I Need You

Japan ana ta ga hitsu you
I Need You

Some people like to say, "I love you" but others might want to say "I need you." 貴方が必要 is "I need you" in Japanese.

The first two characters mean "You."

The middle character is a connecting particle. In this case, it more or less means "are."

The last two characters mean necessary, needed, essential, indispensable, or necessity.

The "I" in the title is implied. Effectively this means "I need you."

The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

The pot calls the kettle black
China wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

During the Warring States Period of what is now China (475 - 221 B.C.), the King of Wei was in love with war. He often fought with other kingdoms just for spite or fun.

One day, the King of Wei asked the philosopher Mencius, "I love my people, and all say I do the best for them. I move the people from famine-stricken areas to places of plenty, and transport grains from rich areas to the poor. Nobody goes hungry in my kingdom, and I treat my people far better than other kings. But why does the population of my kingdom not increase, and why does the population of other kingdoms not decrease?"

Mencius answered, "Since you love war, I will make this example: When going to war, and the drums beat to start the attack, some soldiers flee for their lives in fear. Some run 100 paces in retreat, and others run 50 steps. Then the ones who retreated 50 paces laugh and taunt those who retreated 100 paces, calling them cowards mortally afraid of death. Do you think this is reasonable?

The King of Wei answered, "Of course not! Those who run 50 paces are just as timid as those who run 100 paces."

Mencius then said, "You are a king who treats his subjects better than other kings treat their people but you are so fond of war, that your people suffer from great losses in battle. Therefore, your population does not grow. While other kings allow their people to starve to death, you send your people to die in war. Is there really any difference?"

This famous conversation led to the six-character proverb shown here. It serves as a warning to avoid hypocrisy. It goes hand-in-hand with the western phrase, "The pot calls the kettle black," or the Biblical phrase, "Before trying to remove a splinter from your neighbor's eye, first remove the plank from your own eye."

Generosity

China kuān dà
Japan kandai
Generosity

Generosity is giving and sharing. You share freely, not with the idea of receiving something in return. You find ways to give others happiness, and give just for the joy of giving. Generosity is one of the best ways to show love and friendship.

寬大 can also be translated as charitable, magnanimity, liberality or in some context broad-mindedness.

Note: There is a tiny deviation in the first character when written in Japanese. If you choose our Japanese master calligrapher, the little dot on the lower right of the first character will be omitted. With or without the dot, this can be read in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.


See Also:  Benevolence | Altruism | Charity

Tiger

Year of the Tiger / Zodiac Sign
China
Japan tora
Tiger

虎 is the character for tiger in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

Since you already know what a tiger is, here's some trivia: If you look at the Japanese pronunciation, you might remember a movie called "Tora Tora Tora" which was the code word used to initiate the attack on Pearl Harbor. It simply means "Tiger Tiger Tiger."

In Chinese culture, the tiger is considered to be the king of all animals (in much the way we see the lion in western culture).

From the Chinese Zodiac, if you were born in the year of the tiger, you . . .

Have a strong personality.
Are full of self-confidence.
Love adventure
Don't like to obey others.


See also our Chinese Zodiac or Tiger Calligraphy pages.

Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart

China suí xīn ér xíng
Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart

隨心而行 is the closest way to express this idea in Chinese. Literally translated, this phrase means, "Allow your heart to dictate your behavior" or "Let your heart guide your conduct" in Chinese. You could also translate this as "follow your heart." Or, with a bit of imagination, it could mean: "let your spirit be your guide."

Note that in some cases, "heart" can mean "mind," "soul" or even "spirit" in Chinese. In ancient China, it was thought that the big pumping organ in your chest was where your thoughts came from, or where your soul resides.
Ancient western thought followed a similar belief. Thus phrases like "I love you with all my heart" and "I give you my whole heart."

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

China yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty. It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.

Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds peoples homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.

Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.

Tea Fate

China chá yuán
Tea Fate

茶緣 is a special title for the tea lover. This kind of means "tea fate" but it's more spiritual and hard to define. Perhaps the tea brought you in to drink it. Perhaps the tea will bring you and another tea-lover together. Perhaps you were already there, and the tea came to you. Perhaps it's the ah-ha moment you will have when drinking the tea.

I've been told not to explain this further, as it will either dilute or confuse the purposefully-ambiguous idea embedded in this enigma.

I happen to be the owner of a piece of calligraphy written by either the son or nephew of the last emperor of China, and this is the title he wrote. It was given to me at a Beijing tea house in 2001. 茶緣 is where I learned to love tea after literally spending weeks tasting and studying everything I could about Chinese tea. I did not understand the significance of the authorship, or meaning of the title at all. Some 10 years later, I realized the gift was so profound and had such providence. Only now I realize the value of a gift that it is too late to give proper thanks for. It was also years later that I ended up in this business, and could have the artwork properly mounted as a wall scroll. It has been borrowed for many exhibitions and shows, and always amazes native Chinese and Taiwanese who read the signature. This piece of calligraphy which I once thought just a bit of ink on a thin and wrinkled piece of paper is now one of my most valued possessions. And by fate, it has taught me to be more thankful of seemingly simple gifts.

Islam

(phonetic version)
China yī sī lán jiào
Islam

This both means and sounds like "Islam" in Mandarin Chinese.

The first three characters sound like the word "Islam," and the last character means "religion" or "teaching." It's the most general term for "Islam" in China. The highest concentration of Muslims in China is Xinjiang (the vast region in northwest China that was called The East Turkistan Republic until 1949 and is sometimes called Chinese Turkistan, Uyghuristan). Here you will find Uygurs, Kazakhs, and Kyrgyz and others that are descendants of Turkmen (possibly mixed with Persians and Arabs). Many of their ancestors were traders who traveled the silk road to buy and sell spices, silk, and exchange other goods from the Orient and the Middle East.

I spent some time in Xinjiang and got to know this community. They are strong people who can endure much. They are friendly and love to have a good time. I was a stranger but treated by villagers (near China's border with Afghanistan) as if I was a good friend.
However, I have heard that it's best not to cross them, as in this land, the law is the blade, and everything is "eye for an eye." The Chinese government has little control in Xinjiang with almost no police officers except in the capital of Urumqi (so it's a 60-hour roundtrip train ride to seek the aid of law enforcement in most cases).

While few seem to be devout, there are at least small mosques in every village. And you will never see a man or woman outside without a head covering.

It should be noted that these people are all citizens of China, but they are officially of the Caucasian race. A visit to Xinjiang will change your idea what it means to be Chinese.

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
China pò jìng chóng yuán
Broken Mirror Rejoined

A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:


You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon but as for you, I see not a trace.


The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb in Chinese is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce) but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.

Search for Love Some in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Self-Love
Love Yourself
Love Onself
自愛
自爱
ji ai / jiaizì ài / zi4 ai4 / zi ai / ziaitzu ai / tzuai
Love Gems
Fruit of Love
Children
愛の結晶ainokesshou
ainokesho
Love and Affection愛情
爱情
aijou / aijoài qíng / ai4 qing2 / ai qing / aiqingai ch`ing / aiching / ai ching
Love and Respect相愛互敬
相爱互敬
xiāng ài hù jìng
xiang1 ai4 hu4 jing4
xiang ai hu jing
xiangaihujing
hsiang ai hu ching
hsiangaihuching
I Love You愛してるai shi te ru
aishiteru
Life of Love愛情生活
爱情生活
aijyou seikatsu
aijyouseikatsu
aijyo seikatsu
aijyoseikatsu
ài qíng shēng huó
ai4 qing2 sheng1 huo2
ai qing sheng huo
aiqingshenghuo
ai ch`ing sheng huo
aichingshenghuo
ai ching sheng huo
Faith Hope Love信仰と希望と愛shinkou to kibou to ai
shinkoutokiboutoai
shinko to kibo to ai
shinkotokibotoai
Kindness
Caring
親切
亲切
shin setsu / shinsetsuqīn qiè / qin1 qie4 / qin qie / qinqiech`in ch`ieh / chinchieh / chin chieh
Body and Earth in Unity身土不二shindofuni / shindofuji
Sushi壽司
寿司
su shi / sushishòu sī / shou4 si1 / shou si / shousishou ssu / shoussu
I Want You欲しいho shi i / hoshii
Zendo
The Zen Way
禅道 / 禪道
禅道
zen dou / zendou / zen do / zendochán dào / chan2 dao4 / chan dao / chandaoch`an tao / chantao / chan tao
Live in Prosperity生活于繁榮中
生活于繁荣中
shēng huó yú fán róng zhōng
sheng1 huo2 yu2 fan2 rong2 zhong1
sheng huo yu fan rong zhong
shenghuoyufanrongzhong
sheng huo yü fan jung chung
shenghuoyüfanjungchung
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching
一曰慈二曰儉三曰不敢為天下先
一曰慈二曰俭三曰不敢为天下先
yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
yi1 yue1 ci2 er4 yue1 jian3 san1 yue1 bu4 gan3 wei2 tian1 xia4 xian1
yi yue ci er yue jian san yue bu gan wei tian xia xian
i yüeh tz`u erh yüeh chien san yüeh pu kan wei t`ien hsia hsien
i yüeh tzu erh yüeh chien san yüeh pu kan wei tien hsia hsien
I Need You我需要你wǒ xū yào nǐ
wo3 xu1 yao4 ni3
wo xu yao ni
woxuyaoni
wo hsü yao ni
wohsüyaoni
True Heart真心mago koro / magokorozhēn xīn / zhen1 xin1 / zhen xin / zhenxinchen hsin / chenhsin
I Need You貴方が必要ana ta ga hitsu you
anatagahitsuyou
ana ta ga hitsu yo
anatagahitsuyo
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100五十步笑百步wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
wu4 shi2 bu4 xiao4 bai3 bu4
wu shi bu xiao bai bu
wushibuxiaobaibu
wu shih pu hsiao pai pu
wushihpuhsiaopaipu
Generosity寬大
宽大
kandaikuān dà / kuan1 da4 / kuan da / kuandak`uan ta / kuanta / kuan ta
Tigertorahǔ / hu3 / hu
Listen to Your Heart
Follow Your Heart
隨心而行
随心而行
suí xīn ér xíng
sui2 xin1 er2 xing2
sui xin er xing
suixinerxing
sui hsin erh hsing
suihsinerhhsing
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu遠上寒山石徑斜白雲生處有人家停車坐愛楓林晚霜葉紅於二月花
远上寒山石径斜白云生处有人家停车坐爱枫林晚霜叶红于二月花
yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
yuan3 shang4 han2 shan1 shi2 jing4 xia2 bai2 yun2 sheng1 chu4 you3 ren2 jia1 ting2 che1 zuo4 ai4 feng1 lin2 wan3 shuang4 ye4 hong2 yu2 er4 yue4 hua1
yuan shang han shan shi jing xia bai yun sheng chu you ren jia ting che zuo ai feng lin wan shuang ye hong yu er yue hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng ch`u yu jen chia t`ing ch`e tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng chu yu jen chia ting che tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
Tea Fate茶緣
茶缘
chá yuán / cha2 yuan2 / cha yuan / chayuanch`a yüan / chayüan / cha yüan
Islam伊斯蘭教
伊斯兰教
yī sī lán jiào
yi1 si1 lan2 jiao4
yi si lan jiao
yisilanjiao
i ssu lan chiao
issulanchiao
Broken Mirror Rejoined破鏡重圓
破镜重圆
pò jìng chóng yuán
po4 jing4 chong2 yuan2
po jing chong yuan
pojingchongyuan
p`o ching ch`ung yüan
pochingchungyüan
po ching chung yüan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiki Jujutsu
Archangel
Aster
Berserk
Bushido
Christ
Create
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Dragon Soul
Energy
Enlighten
Enlightened
Enso
Faith in God
Family
Father
Fortune
House
Iaido
Jesus
Keep Fighting
Kung Fu
Love
Loyalty
Mind Body Soul Spirit
Mind Body Spirit
Mother
Music
Overcome
Peach
Pleasure
Rain
Rebirth
Right Intention
Rooster
Samurai
Strength
Strength of Spirit
Strong Heart
Sword
The Red String
The Way
The Way of the Warrior
Thunder Lightning in Kanji
Trust in God
Trust No Man
Victory
Wedding
White
Winter
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Love Some Kanji, Love Some Characters, Love Some in Mandarin Chinese, Love Some Characters, Love Some in Chinese Writing, Love Some in Japanese Writing, Love Some in Asian Writing, Love Some Ideograms, Chinese Love Some symbols, Love Some Hieroglyphics, Love Some Glyphs, Love Some in Chinese Letters, Love Some Hanzi, Love Some in Japanese Kanji, Love Some Pictograms, Love Some in the Chinese Written-Language, or Love Some in the Japanese Written-Language.