Sorry, too late for Christmas delivery of custom calligraphy. But I do have a lot of in-stock calligraphy. If you have an emergency, I have a limited number of blank scrolls and can have a local calligrapher create something for you.
Want to order a custom scroll now? I can also create a web page to show the gift recipient about the scroll they will receive in January. Contact me!

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Try searching again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
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Life Is What You Make of It in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Life Is What You Make of It calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Life Is What You Make of It" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Life Is What You Make of It" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Life is What You Make of It
  2. Life is What You Make It
  3. Life is Short
  4. My Life, My Rules
  5. Enjoy Life
  6. Live For The Day / Seize The Day
  7. Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication
  8. Mercy / Compassion...
  9. Trust / To Have Faith
10. Ikiru / To Live
11. Kindness / Caring
12. Pursue Your Dreams / Follow Your Dreams / Chase Your Dreams
13. Five Codes of Tang Soo Do
14. You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes
15. Banzai
16. Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance
17. Better Late Than Never


Life is What You Make of It

Japan jinsei wa tsukuru mono
Life is What You Make of It Wall Scroll

This means, "life is what you make of it," in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Life is What You Make It

China shēng huó shì zì jǐ chuàng zào de
Life is What You Make It Wall Scroll

This is a Chinese phrase meaning, "Life is what you make of it," or "Life is your own creation."

Life is Short

Even a 100-year-old is but a traveler passing through this life
China bǎi suì guāng yīn rú guò kè
Life is Short Wall Scroll

百歲光陰如過客 directly translates as: [Even a] hundred-year-old [person] is [just a] traveler passing by.

The simple message is, "Human life is short." Of course, there is an unspoken suggestion that you should make the best of the time you have here on earth.

My Life, My Rules

My life, I call the shots
China wǒ de shēng huó wǒ zuò zhǔ
My Life, My Rules Wall Scroll

我的生活我做主 is a Chinese phrase that can be translated as, "My life, my rules," or "My life, I call the shots."

The first four characters just say, "my life".

The fifth character is I, me, and/or my.

The last two characters can be interpreted a variety of ways, just as, to make the decision, to take charge of, to call the shot, or to make the rule.

Enjoy Life

Japan jin sei o tano shi mi ni shi te i ru
Enjoy Life Wall Scroll

This is one way to write "enjoy life" in Japanese.

The character breakdown:
人生 (jinsei) life (i.e. conception to death) human lifetime, living.
を (o) connecting particle.
楽しみ (tanoshimi) enjoyment; pleasure; anticipation; looking forward to.
に (ni) connecting particle.
し (shi) to do; to cause; to become; to make (into).
て (te) connecting particle.
いる (iru) indicates continuing action or resulting state.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Live For The Day / Seize The Day

Japan ima wo i ki ru
Live For The Day / Seize The Day Wall Scroll

This Japanese phrase can be translated as "live for the day," "live for the moment," "seize the day," or "make the most of the present." You can think of this as the Japanese version of "Carpe Diem."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication

(complete bodily devotion)
China xiàn shēn
Japan ken shin
Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication Wall Scroll

獻身 is used to describe being so devoted to something that you will make sacrifices for that goal/thing/person. You can also translate this word as any of the following:
Give one's life for...
Sacrifice one's life for...
To dedicate oneself to...
Self-devotion
Dedication
Commit ones energy to...
Devote to...
Self-sacrifice
Giving your whole body to...

This can be a dedication to or for someone but more often is used in reference to a dedication or making sacrifices for your country, public service, or a cause. For instance, an Olympic athlete makes great sacrifices to train in his/her sport for their country and compatriots.


献
身
While the form shown to the upper-left is considered an ancient Japanese version, in modern Japan, they use the simplified version of the first Kanji (shown to the right). Click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version.

If you are looking for a more religious meaning of devotion, see Faith.


See Also:  Confidence | Dedication

Mercy / Compassion
Buddhist Loving Kindness

China cí bēi
Japan ji hi
Mercy / Compassion / Buddhist Loving Kindness Wall Scroll

Besides the title above, 慈悲 can also be defined as clemency or lenience and sometimes the act of giving charity.

In Buddhist context, it can be defined as, "benevolence," "loving kindness and compassion," or "mercy and compassion."

This Buddhist virtue is perhaps the most important to employ in your life. All sentient beings that you encounter should be given your loving kindness. And trust me, however much you can give, it comes back. Make your life and the world a better place!

This Chinese/Japanese Buddhist term is the equivalent of Metta Karuna from Pali or Maitri Karuna from Sanskrit.

慈 can mean loving-kindness by itself.
悲 adds a component of sorrow, empathy, compassion, and sympathy for others.


See Also:  Benevolence

Trust / To Have Faith

China xìn lài
Japan shinrai
Trust / To Have Faith Wall Scroll

Trust is having faith in someone or something. It is a positive attitude about life. You are confident that the right thing will happen without trying to control it or make it happen. Even when difficult things happen, trust helps us to find the gift or lesson in it.

信賴 can also be translated as confidence, reliance, or dependence; thus it can also mean "to rely on" or "to depend on."


頼There is a slight deviation in the Japanese Kanji form of the second character. If you want the modern Japanese version, please click on the special Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above. Note that the traditional Chinese form is still readable and understood by Japanese people.


See Also:  Confidence | Truth | Honor

Ikiru / To Live

Japan ikiru
Ikiru / To Live Wall Scroll

This Japanese title means, to live, to exist, to make a living, to subsist, to come to life, or to be enlivened.

This is also the title of a 1952 Japanese movie that uses the translated English title of, "To Live."

Note: This term, when used in the context of baseball, and some Japanese games such as "go" can mean "safe."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Kindness / Caring

China qīn qiè
Japan shin setsu
Kindness / Caring Wall Scroll

Kindness is showing you care, doing some good to make life better for others. Be thoughtful about people's needs. Show love and compassion to someone who is sad or needs your help. When you are tempted to be cruel, to criticize or tease, decide to be kind instead.

This Chinese / Japanese / Korean word can also mean affectionate, cordial, warmly, or close (emotionally).


See Also:  Love | Caring | Benevolence

Pursue Your Dreams / Follow Your Dreams / Chase Your Dreams

China zhuī xún mèng xiǎng
Pursue Your Dreams / Follow Your Dreams / Chase Your Dreams Wall Scroll

The first two characters mean "to pursue," "to track down," or "to search for."

The last two mean dreams. This version of dreams refers to those with an element of reality (not the dreams you have when you sleep but rather your aspirations or goals in life).

This title will tell everyone that you want to make your dreams come true.


See Also:  Pursuit of Happiness

Five Codes of Tang Soo Do

China guó jiā zhōng chéng fù mǔ xiào dào péng yǒu yǒu xìn shā shēng yǒu zé lín zhàn wú tuì
Five Codes of Tang Soo Do Wall Scroll

These are the five codes of Tang Soo Do.

I suggest you have this arranged in five columns when you get to the options page for your custom calligraphy wall scroll.

Here are my translations of each of the five codes:
國家忠誠 Be loyal to your country.
父母孝道 In regards to parents, behave in a filial way.
朋友有信 Be faithful in friendship.
殺生有擇 When fighting for life and death, make noble choices.
臨戰無退 No retreat in battle.

Note: "Tang Soo Do" is a romanization of 唐手道. It's 당수도 in Korean Hangul. It can also be romanized as "Tangsudo" or "Dangsudo."

You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes

China qíng rén yǎn lǐ chū xī shī
You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes Wall Scroll

Any woman with affection for Asian art and you will love a gift of this Chinese proverb calligraphy on a wall scroll. She will melt in your arms as you tell her the meaning of these characters.

Contained in this phrase is a reference to the most beautiful woman in Chinese history. Her name was Xi Shi, and she was known to have good looks that need not fine robes or make up. Her charms were so powerful that she brought down an entire kingdom (in a successful effort to bring honor and pride back to her people).

This is a great way to express that the woman in your life is your one love.

Banzai

Modern Japanese Version
China wàn suì
Japan banzai
Banzai Wall Scroll

We've made two almost identical entries for this word. This is the modern Japanese way to write banzai. In the last century, the first character was simplified in Japan and China. The new generation will expect it to be written this way but the old generation can still read the more traditional form. You must make your own determination as to what version is best for you. If your audience is mostly Japanese, I suggest this form.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray." The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years." It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. This is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Other translations: hurrah, long life, congratulations, cheers, live long.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance

China nián nián yǒu yú
Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance Wall Scroll

年年有餘 is a common proverb or wish of prosperity you'll hear around the time of Chinese New Years.

Directly translated character by character it means, "Year Year Have Surplus." A more natural English translation including the deeper meaning would be "Every Year may you Have Abundance in your life."

On a side note, this phrase often goes with a gift of something related to fish. This is because the last character "yu" which means surplus or abundance has exactly the same pronunciation in Mandarin as the word for "fish."

This is also one of the most common titles for traditional paintings that feature koi fish.

In China, this phrase might make an odd wall scroll - a customer asked especially for this common phrase which is why it appears here. See my other abundance-related words if you want a wall scroll that will seem more comfortable in Chinese culture.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Prosperity | Good Fortune

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King’s court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King’s ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin’s words.
Seeing the King’s displeasure with him and the King’s fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it’s never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Life is What You Make of It 人生は作るものjinsei wa tsukuru mono
jinseiwatsukurumono
Life is What You Make It 生活是自己創造的
生活是自己创造的
shēng huó shì zì jǐ chuàng zào de
sheng1 huo2 shi4 zi4 ji3 chuang4 zao4 de
sheng huo shi zi ji chuang zao de
sheng huo shih tzu chi ch`uang tsao te
sheng huo shih tzu chi chuang tsao te
Life is Short 百歲光陰如過客
百岁光阴如过客
bǎi suì guāng yīn rú guò kè
bai3 sui4 guang1 yin1 ru2 guo4 ke4
bai sui guang yin ru guo ke
baisuiguangyinruguoke
pai sui kuang yin ju kuo k`o
paisuikuangyinjukuoko
pai sui kuang yin ju kuo ko
My Life, My Rules 我的生活我做主wǒ de shēng huó wǒ zuò zhǔ
wo3 de sheng1 huo2 wo3 zuo4 zhu3
wo de sheng huo wo zuo zhu
wodeshenghuowozuozhu
wo te sheng huo wo tso chu
woteshenghuowotsochu
Enjoy Life 人生を楽しみにしているjin sei o tano shi mi ni shi te i ru
Live For The Day
Seize The Day
今を生きるima wo i ki ru
imawoikiru
Sacrifice
Devotion
Dedication
獻身
献身
ken shin / kenshinxiàn shēn
xian4 shen1
xian shen
xianshen
hsien shen
hsienshen
Mercy
Compassion
Buddhist Loving Kindness
慈悲ji hi / jihicí bēi / ci2 bei1 / ci bei / cibei tz`u pei / tzupei / tzu pei
Trust
To Have Faith
信賴
信赖
shinraixìn lài / xin4 lai4 / xin lai / xinlai hsin lai / hsinlai
Ikiru
To Live
生きるikiru
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

A Vast Sky Full of Stars
Acceptance of Fate
Ambition
Believe
Big Brother
Bliss
Born
Breath
Brotherly Love
Devoted
Diligence
Discipline
Dojo
Dragon and Phoenix
Dream Big
Earth
Endless
Energy
Enjoy
Enlightened
Enthusiasm
Essence
Experience
Faith
Fate
Fire
Flying
Football
Forgiven
Give Me Strength
God Bless You
God is With You Always
Grace from Heaven
Guan Gong
Guardian
Guestbook
Happy Buddha
Harmony
Have Faith in God
Heart
Heart Mind and Soul
Hope
Independent Spirit
Inner Strength
Justice
Kajukenbo
Kenshin
Life Energy Spiritual
Live Without Regrets
Lonely
Lotus Sutra
Love With All My Heart
Love You Always
Luck
Miya
Namo Amitabha Buddha
Ninja
No Pain
Open Mind
Panda Bear
Peaceful Warrior
Qian
Qiang
Respect and Loyalty
Right Mindfulness
Samurai
Scholar
Self-Denial
Sherry
Shinigami
Soldier
Spirit
Spring
Superman
Sword
Taekwondo
Teach
The Way of the Samurai
The Way of the Sword
Tiger
Tranquil
Undaunted
Warrior
Water Dragon
Wedding
Wind
Wisdom Intellect Reason
Wolf
Yellow Dragon
Zazen

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Life Is What You Make of It Kanji, Life Is What You Make of It Characters, Life Is What You Make of It in Mandarin Chinese, Life Is What You Make of It Characters, Life Is What You Make of It in Chinese Writing, Life Is What You Make of It in Japanese Writing, Life Is What You Make of It in Asian Writing, Life Is What You Make of It Ideograms, Chinese Life Is What You Make of It symbols, Life Is What You Make of It Hieroglyphics, Life Is What You Make of It Glyphs, Life Is What You Make of It in Chinese Letters, Life Is What You Make of It Hanzi, Life Is What You Make of It in Japanese Kanji, Life Is What You Make of It Pictograms, Life Is What You Make of It in the Chinese Written-Language, or Life Is What You Make of It in the Japanese Written-Language.