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Korean Symbol for Integrity in old Korean Hanja...

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Start your custom "Korean Symbol for Integrity" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Korean Symbol for Integrity" title below...

See also: Selections of just old Korean Hanja Calligraphy

I've noticed you are looking for "korean symbol for integrity". Words like "Oriental", "Asian", "Chinese", "Japanese" and "Korean" are sometimes a bit too general since most of the phrases and words in my database are related to these terms. You may want to try your search again with just the base words for better results.

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Integrity
  2. Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity
  3. Sense of Shame / Sense of Honor...
  4. Personal Integrity
  5. Loyalty
  6. Honesty
  7. Glory and Honor
  8. Better Late Than Never
  9. Taekwondo Tenets / Spirit of Taekwon-do
10. Giri
11. Korean CKD Virtues
12. Oneness / Unity
13. Tang Soo Do Tenets


Integrity

China zhèng zhí
Japan shoujiki
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Integrity is living by your highest values. It is being honest and sincere. Integrity helps you to listen to your conscience, to do the right thing, and to tell the truth. You act with integrity when your words and actions match. Integrity gives you self-respect and a peaceful heart.

Japanese jikiPlease note that the second Kanji sometimes has an alternate form in Japanese. Let us know if you want the alternate form shown to the right.

Note: This entry is cross-listed as "honesty" because it also fits that definition.


Beyond Integrity, this word also means "upright" and "honest" in Chinese. Means "integrity", "honesty" or "frankness" in Japanese.


See Also...  Honor | Honesty | Truth | Trust

Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity

China zūn yán
Japan son gen
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This form of honor is showing great respect for yourself, other people, and the rules you live by.

When you are honorable, you keep your word. You do the right thing regardless of what others are doing.

This is the kind of personal honor or dignity that is of great value. If you lose this, you have lost yourself and perhaps the reputation of your family as well.

While this is not directly the same thing as "face" or "saving face" in Asian culture, it is associated with the same concept in China.


厳In Japan, they currently use a more simplified second character for this word. The ancient Japanese form is the same as China, but after WWII some Kanji were changed. If you want the modern Japanese version, just click on the Kanji image shown to the right, instead of the button above.

Sense of Shame / Sense of Honor
Integrity / Modesty (Korean)

China lián chǐ
Japan ren chi
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This simultaneously means "sense of honor" and "sense of shame" in Korean.

This term is often used as a tenet of Taekwondo where the English terms "integrity" and/or "modesty" are applied.

This is also a Chinese word, though it is usually read with the "sense of shame" meaning, and is a poor choice for a wall scroll if your audience is Chinese.

Personal Integrity

China zhì cāo
Japan shi sou
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This is personal integrity - basically, holding yourself to a higher standard of honesty and reliability. These two characters also contain the ideas of constancy, principles, and faithfulness.

Note: In Japanese, this just means "principle".

Loyalty

Japanese Chinese Korean
China zhōng chéng
Japan chuu sei
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Loyalty is staying true to someone. It is standing up for something you believe in without wavering. It is being faithful to your family, country, school, friends or ideals, when the going gets tough as well as when things are good. With loyalty, you build relationships that last forever.

Notes:
1. This written form of loyalty is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

2. There is also a Japanese version that is part of the Bushido Code which may be more desirable depending on whether your intended audience is Japanese or Chinese.

3. This version of loyalty is sometimes translated as devotion, sincerity, fidelity, or allegiance.


See Also...  Honor | Trust | Integrity | Sincerity

Honesty

China zhèng zhí
Japan shoujiki
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Honesty is being truthful and sincere. It is important because it builds trust. When people are honest, they can be relied on not to lie, cheat or steal. Being honest means that you accept yourself as you are. When you are open and trustworthy, others can believe in you.

This is one of the 8 key concepts of Tang Soo Do.


Note: This entry is cross-listed as "integrity" because it also fits that definition.

Japanese jikiPlease note that the second Kanji sometimes has an alternate form in Japanese. Let us know if you want the alternate form shown to the right.


See Also...  Truth | Trust | Integrity

Glory and Honor

China róng
Japan ei
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This character relates to giving someone a tribute or praise. It's a little odd as a gift, so this may not be the best selection for a wall scroll.

I've made this entry just because this character is often misused as "honorable" or "keeping your honor". It's not quite the same meaning, as this usually refers to a tribute or giving an honor to someone.

This is often found in tattoo books incorrectly listed as the western idea of personal honor or being honorable. Check with us before you get a tattoo that does not match the meaning you are really looking for. As a tattoo, this suggests that you either have a lot of pride in yourself or that you have a wish for prosperity for you and/or your family.

栄In modern Japanese Kanji, glory and honor looks like the image to the right.

There is a lot of confusion about this character, so here are some alternate translations for this character: prosperous, flourishing, blooming (like a flower), glorious beauty, proud, praise, rich, or it can be the family name "Rong". The context in which the character is used can change the meaning between these various ideas.

In the old days, this could be an honor paid to someone by the Emperor (basically a designation by the Emperor that a person has high standing).

To sum it up: This character has a positive meaning, however, it's a different flavor than the idea of being honorable and having integrity.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
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Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large, but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King’s court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King’s ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins".

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu, but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation". The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin’s words.
Seeing the King’s displeasure with him and the King’s fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it’s never too late to mend the fence".

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation, but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

Taekwondo Tenets / Spirit of Taekwon-do

China tái quán dào jīng shén lǐ yì lián chǐ rěn nài kè jǐ bǎi zhé bù qū
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Taekwondo TenetsThis is General Choi's writing that is often called "The Tenets of Taekwon-do". The actual title would be translated as, "Taekwondo Spirit" or "The Spirit of Taekwondo". It was originally written in Korean Hanja (Chinese characters used in Korea for about 1600 years).

General Choi's original calligraphy is shown to the right. Your custom calligraphy will be unique, and not an exact match, as each calligrapher has their own style.

In modern times, the common form of written Korean is Hangul (a phonetic character set). The table below shows the text in Hangul and Hanja along with a pronunciation guide and a brief English translation:

Traditional Korean HanjaModern Korean HangulPronunciationEnglish
跆拳道精神태권도정신tae gweon do jeong sinTaekwondo Spirit
禮儀예의 or 례이ye yiCourtesy / Etiquette / Propriety / Decorum / Formality
廉耻렴치 or 염치yeom ciIntegrity / Sense of Honor
忍耐인내in naePatience / Perseverance / Endurance
克己극기geug giSelf-Control / Self-Denial / Self-Abnegation
百折不屈백절불굴baeg jeor bur gurIndomitable Spirit (Undaunted even after repeated attacks from the opponent)
Note that the pronunciation is the official version now used in South Korea. However, it is different than what you may be used to. For instance, "Taekwon-do" is "tae gweon do". This new romanization is supposed to be closer to actual Korean pronunciation.

Giri

(obligation or duty in Japanese)
China yì lǐ
Japan giri
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This term means obligation or a sense of duty that one may have to their employer, country or culture.

This is a specifically Japanese term, as in Chinese, these two characters form a word that means "religious doctrine" or refers to the argument presented in an essay.

This term has similar meaning in Korean where is can be translated as justice, sense of duty, loyalty, integrity or obligation.

This is kind of a weird selection for a wall scroll. So this entry is intended more for educational purposes.


More information about Giri

Korean CKD Virtues

China qiān xùn zhèng zhí wēn róu rěn nài kè jǐ bù qū
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These are the virtues used by Choi Kwang Do Martial Arts.

EnglishHanjaHangulPronunciation
1. Humility (Humble / Modesty)謙遜겸손gyeom son
2. Honesty (Integrity)正直정직jeong jig
3. Gentleness溫柔온유on yu
4. Perseverance (To Endure)忍耐인내in nae
5. Self-Control (Self-Restraint)克己극기geug gi
6. Unbreakable Spirit (Unyielding / Unbending)不屈불굴bur gur

The characters shown here are the ancient Korean Hanja form of writing. If you wish for a Korean Hangul form of these tenets, we can arrange that with our Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping (click on the Hangul next to the South Korean flag above to order this in Hangul).

Oneness / Unity

China yī tǐ xìng
Japan ittaisei
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This title represents the idea of oneness, unity, integrity, and/or inclusion in Japanese.

The Kanji breakdown:
一 One    体 Body    性 Nature


Note: This word can be understood in Chinese, but it more a Japanese word. Best if your audience is Japanese.

Tang Soo Do Tenets

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These are the tenets of Tang Soo Do...

EnglishOld HanjaModern HangulPronunciation
1. Integrity廉耻렴치 or 염치yeom ci
2. Concentration精進정진jeong jin
3. Perseverence忍耐인내in nae
4. Respect & Obedience遵守준수jun su
5. Self-Control克己극기geug gi
6. Humility謙遜겸손gyeom son
7. Indomitable Spirit百折不屈백절불굴baeg jeor bur gur

After some research, it appears this list was compiled in English based on Taekwondo tenets. We filled in a few of the words that did not have a corresponding Hanja or Hangul. If someone else has a better list with characters included, please contact me.


Check dictionary for for integrity


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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The scroll that I am holding in this picture is a "medium size"
4-character wall scroll.
As you can see, it is a great size to hang on your wall.
(We also offer custom wall scrolls in larger sizes)

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.




If your search is not successful, just post your request on our forum, and we'll be happy to do research or translation for any reasonable request.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Breath
Energy
Forever in My Heart
Forgive Me of My Sins
Hello
Humility
Intelligence
Intelligent
Karate-do
Kempo
Loyality
Loyalty
Peace and Security
Respect
Talent
Together Forever in Love
Wine
Xian

With so many searches, we had to upgrade to our own Linux server.
Of course, only one in 500 searches results in a purchase - Hey buy a wall scroll!!!



See: Our list of specifically Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls. And, check out Our list of specifically old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title
Characters 
Simplified
Traditional
Romaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Integrity正直
正直
shoujiki
shojiki
zhèng zhí
zheng zhi
cheng chih
zheng4 zhi2
zhengzhi
Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity尊严 / 尊厳
尊嚴
son gen
songen
zūn yán
zun yan
tsun yen
zun1 yan2
zunyan
Sense of Shame / Sense of Honor / Integrity / Modesty (Korean)廉耻
廉恥
ren chi
renchi
lián chǐ
lian chi
lien ch`ih
lian2 chi3
lianchi
lienchih
lien chih
Personal Integrity志操
志操 / 誌操
shi sou
shisou
shi so
zhì cāo
zhi cao
chih ts`ao
zhi4 cao1
zhicao
chihtsao
chih tsao
Loyalty忠诚
忠誠
chuu sei
chuusei
chu sei
zhōng chéng
zhong cheng
chung ch`eng
zhong1 cheng2
zhongcheng
chungcheng
chung cheng
Honesty正直
正直
shoujiki
shojiki
zhèng zhí
zheng zhi
cheng chih
zheng4 zhi2
zhengzhi
Glory and Honor荣 / 栄
eiróng
rong
jung
rong2
Better Late Than Never亡羊补牢犹未为晚
亡羊補牢猶未為晚
n/awáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
Taekwondo Tenets / Spirit of Taekwon-do跆拳道精神礼义廉耻忍耐克己百折不屈
跆拳道精神禮義廉耻忍耐克己百折不屈
n/atái quán dào jīng shén lǐ yì lián chǐ rěn nài kè jǐ bǎi zhé bù qū
tai quan dao jing shen li yi lian chi ren nai ke ji bai zhe bu qu
t`ai ch`üan tao ching shen li i lien ch`ih jen nai k`o chi pai che pu ch`ü
tai2 quan2 dao4 jing1 shen2 li3 yi4 lian2 chi3 ren3 nai4 ke4 ji3 bai3 zhe2 bu4 qu1
tai chüan tao ching shen li i lien chih jen nai ko chi pai che pu chü
Giri义理
義理
giriyì lǐ
yi li
i li
yi4 li3
yili
Korean CKD Virtues谦逊正直温柔忍耐克己不屈
謙遜正直溫柔忍耐克己不屈
n/aqiān xùn zhèng zhí wēn róu rěn nài kè jǐ bù qū
qian xun zheng zhi wen rou ren nai ke ji bu qu
ch`ien hsün cheng chih wen jou jen nai k`o chi pu ch`ü
qian1 xun4 zheng4 zhi2 wen1 rou2 ren3 nai4 ke4 ji3 bu4 qu1
chien hsün cheng chih wen jou jen nai ko chi pu chü
Oneness / Unity一体性
一體性
ittaiseiyī tǐ xìng
yi ti xing
i t`i hsing
yi1 ti3 xing4
yitixing
itihsing
i ti hsing
Tang Soo Do Tenets廉耻精进忍耐遵守克己谦逊百折不屈
廉耻精進忍耐遵守克己謙遜百折不屈 / 廉恥精進忍耐遵守克己謙遜百折不屈
n/an/a

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