Not what you want?

Try searching again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Karate Wall Scrolls in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Karate Wall Scrolls calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Karate Wall Scrolls" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Karate Wall Scrolls" title below...

See also: Martial Arts Words and Phrases

  1. Karate
  2. Law of the Fist Karate / Kempo Karate
  3. Karate-Do
  4. Danketsu Karate-Do
  5. Kempo Karate / Law of the Fist Empty Hand
  6. Isshin Ryu Karate Do
  7. Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do
  8. Shidokan Karate-Do
  9. Shidokan
10. Shotokan Karate-Do
11. Wado-Ryu Karate
12. Goju Ryu Karate-Do
13. Nippon Karate-Do Genbu-Kai
14. Uechi-Ryu Karate-Do
15. Shito-Ryu Ki-Me-Kan Karate-Do
16. Tang Hand
17. Goju Ryu
18. Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo
19. Kyokushinkai
20. Kyokushin
21. Wado-Ryu
22. Rank Holder
23. Shuri-Ryu
24. Shotokan-Ryu
25. Shorin-Ryu
26. Budokan
27. Uechi-Ryu
28. Jin Ji Du Li
29. Isshin-Kai / Isshinkai
30. Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister
31. Shorin Ji Ryu
32. Kajukenbo Slogan
33. Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa
34. Wado-Kai
35. Isshin-Ryu / Isshinryu
36. Martial Arts / Wu Shu
37. Shotokan
38. Jujitsu / Jujutsu

Karate

China kōng shǒu
Japan kara te
Karate

The short, and widely-used-in-English version of karate-do without the "do" or "dao" on the end.


Literal meaning: Empty Hand.

Law of the Fist Karate / Kempo Karate

China quán fǎ táng shǒu
Japan ken pou kara te
Law of the Fist Karate / Kempo Karate

The first two characters mean "fist law" which is Romanized from Japanese as "Kenpo" or "Kempo."

The last two are a secondary way to express "karate."

Notes:
The more common way to express "karate" is literally "empty hand" (meaning "without weapons in your hand"). This version would be translated literally as "Tang hand" (as in the Tang Dynasty) or "China hand" (sometimes "Tang" means "China" in Japanese). Even though the character for "Tang" is used instead of "empty," it's still pronounced "kara-te" in Japanese.

拳法唐手 is not commonly used in China - so please consider it to be a Japanese-only title.

Many Japanese people will say the last two Kanji are the old and antiquated way to say Karate. This fact does not stop this title from existing, as these four characters are often seen in Kenpo / Kempo Dojos around the western world.

Karate-Do

China kōng shǒu dào
Japan kara te dou
Karate-Do

Credit is given that karate started in China but migrated and became refined, and vastly popular in Japan. The literal meaning of these characters is "empty hand method" or "empty hand way." Karate is a martial art that uses no blades of weapons other than the "natural weapons" that God gave to humans (fists and feet). The last character somehow became optional but the meaning of that character is "method" or "the way" as in Taoism / Daoism.

Danketsu Karate-Do

Japan dan ketsu kara te dou
Danketsu Karate-Do

団結空手道 is the title for Danketsu Karate-Do, a dojo located in Stroudsburg, PA.

団結 (danketsu) means union, unity, or combination.

空手道 (karate-do) means "empty hand way".


If you need you martial arts school/dojo/academy added to my database, just give me the info (actual Chinese/Japanese text if you have it).

Kempo Karate / Law of the Fist Empty Hand

China kōng shǒu quán fǎ
Japan kara te ken pou
Kempo Karate / Law of the Fist Empty Hand

The first two characters mean "karate" - technically they express "empty hand."

The last two express "fist law" which is Romanized from Japanese as "Kenpo" or "Kempo."

That "empty hand" translation can be understood better when you grasp the idea that karate is a martial art without weapons (other than the weapons organic to your body, such as your foot, hand, fist, etc). When you practice karate, you do so with empty hands (no weapons).

Note: There is also an antiquated way to write karate. It has the same pronunciation but a different first character which means "Tang" as in the Tang Dynasty. Some dojos use that form - let us know if you need that alternate form, and we'll add it for you.

Isshin Ryu Karate Do

Japan i sshin ryuu kara te dou
Isshin Ryu Karate Do

This is the full title for Isshin-Ryu Karate-Do.

The literal meaning is "one heart method empty hand way."

There are also other ways you can translate this, but if you are looking for this title, you already know that.

This would make a great wall scroll for your dojo or private studio, if you study this form of Japanese (technically from Okinawa) Karate.

Because this is a specifically-Japanese title, I strongly recommend that you select our Japanese Master Calligrapher to create this artwork for you.

Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do

China táng shǒu dào
Japan kara te do
Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do

唐手道 is the alternate title for Karate-do. This title uses a character which represents the Tang Dynasty of China. Thus, this is often translated as the "Tang Hand Way" or incorrectly, "Tang Fist Way." I have also seen some call it "China Hand Way."

There is not a lot of information on this title but some believe that a simplified form of Kung Fu that started in China, and ended up very popular in Japan used this title initially. It was later changed in Japan to a different Karate title which means "Empty Hand" (as in, without weapons).

In Korean, this title represents a certain style of martial arts. From Korean, this is often romanized as "Tang Soo Do," "Tangsudo," "Dang Su Do," or "Dangsudo." The last two romanizations on that list are the official Korean government romanization, though martial arts schools tend to use other non-standard versions.

Shidokan Karate-Do

Japan shi dou kan kara te dou
Shidokan Karate-Do

This is the full Japanese title for Shidōkan Karate-Do, a style of full-contact karate.

This is a newer karate style, founded in 1980 by Yoshiji Soeno.

Shidokan (Karate)

Japan shi dou kan
Shidokan (Karate)

士道館 is the Japanese title for Shidōkan, a style of full-contact karate.

士道館 is a newer karate style, founded in 1980 by Yoshiji Soeno.

Shotokan Karate-Do

China sōng tāo guǎn kōng shǒu dào
Japan shou tou kan kara te dou
Shotokan Karate-Do

These Japanese Kanji make up the title for Shotokan Karate.

This should be considered a Japanese-only title. It does make sense and is pronounceable in Chinese and Korean but only as a title for a building (perhaps a martial arts hall) surrounded by pine trees - followed by the characters for "The empty hand method" (kong shou dao / Karate-do). Also, the first two characters were simplified in both Japanese and Chinese. The third character was simplified in Chinese but not Japanese.

Upon request, we can offer the fully traditional Chinese version but be sure you know what you are asking for.

Note: This would be understood in Chinese and Korean Hanja by a person from those cultures who is familiar with martial arts and various schools of Japanese karate.

Wado-Ryu Karate

Japan wa dou ryuu kara te
Wado-Ryu Karate

和道流空手 is the Japanese martial arts title, "Wado-Ryu Karate."


See Also:  Wado-Kai

Goju Ryu Karate-Do

Japan gou juu ryuu kara te dou
Goju Ryu Karate-Do

This is the title of the Goju-Ryu Karate-Do school of martial arts.

Nippon Karate-Do Genbu-Kai

Japanese Genbu Karate Club
China rì běn kōng shǒu dào xuán wǔ huì
Japan ni ppon kara te dou gen bu kai
Nippon Karate-Do Genbu-Kai

This is the title for Nippon Karate-Do Genbu-Kai.
A Japanese karate association of the Genbu school.

Note that while this title does make perfect sense in Chinese, it is really a Japanese title. In fact, the first word is "Japanese/Japan."


If you'd like your martial arts school, dojo or club added to our calligraphy database for easy ordering of a custom calligraphy wall scroll, just post your request on our Custom Asian Calligraphy Request Forum.

Uechi-Ryu Karate-Do

Japan ue chi ryuu kara te dou
Uechi-Ryu Karate-Do

This is the title of the Uechi-Ryu Karate-Do school of Okinawan martial arts. Uechi actually means "higher stages of practice" in a Buddhist context.

Shito-Ryu Ki-Me-Kan Karate-Do

China mì dōng liú qì mù guǎn kōng shǒu dào
Japan shito-ryu ki-me-kan karate-dou
Shito-Ryu Ki-Me-Kan Karate-Do

This is the title for Shito-Ryu Ki-Me-Kan Karate-Do.
A school of Karate.

Note that while this title can be pronounced in Chinese, it only makes complete sense in Japanese.

Tang Hand

China táng shǒu
Japan kara te
Tang Hand

唐手 is a very seldom-used title for Karate. This title uses a character which represents the Tang Dynasty of China. Thus, this is often translated as the "Tang Hand" or incorrectly, "Tang Fist." I have also seen some call it "China Hand."


There is not a lot of information on this title but some believe that a simplified form of Kung Fu that started in China, and ended up very popular in Japan used this title initially. It was later changed in Japan to a different Karate title which means "Empty Hand" (as in, without weapons).

I am sure that some will suggest a different history or argue a different origin. I think that nobody can be sure.

Note: Just like the more conventional Karate title, this one can have the "way" or "method" character added to the end, as in Karate-Do.

Goju Ryu

Japan gou juu ryuu
Goju Ryu

剛柔流 is the title of the Goju-Ryu or Gōjū-Ryū school / style of Karate / Japanese martial arts.

Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo

China shào lín sì quán fǎ
Japan shourinji kenpou
Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo

少林寺拳法 is a specific type of martial arts in Japan that claims origins in the Kung Fu practiced in the original Shaolin Monastery of China.

The first three characters mean "Shaolin Monastery" and you might notice the Japanese is pronounced in a very similar way. 少林寺拳法 is because many words were "borrowed" from the original Chinese when Japan did not have a written language and simply absorbed Chinese characters into their language around the 5th century. When a Japanese word did not exist, the Chinese pronunciation was often absorbed as well as the written form.

The last two characters mean "fist law" or "method of the fist." It has long been argued as to whether the Japanese for these characters should be Romanized as "kempo" or "kenpo." The official method should be "kenpou" but it's common to drop the "u" that comes after the "o."

I imagine if you are looking for this title, you already know what it means, so the above is simply extra information that a student of Shorinji Kempo might want to know.

Kyokushinkai

Japan kyoku shin kai
Kyokushinkai

極真會 is the Japanese title Kyokushinkai, which is a school / type of Karate-Do.

If you want a longer title, such as Kyokushinkaikan, Kyokushinkai-Karate, Kyokushin-Karate please contact me.

Kyokushin

Japan kyoku shin
Kyokushin

極真 is the Japanese title Kyokushin.

The literal meaning is "great truth" or "ultimate truth". However, 極真 is usually associated with the style of stand-up, full contact karate, founded in 1964 by Masutatsu Oyama (大山倍達).

Practitioners of the Kyokushinkai Karate follow a philosophy of discipline and self-improvement.

Wado-Ryu

Style of Karate or Jujitsu
Japan wa dou ryuu
Wado-Ryu

Wado-Ryu is a style of Karate or Jujutsu (Jujitsu).
Note: Many will argue as to whether this is a style of Karate or Jujutsu.

While some find Wado-Ryu similar to Shotokan Karate, enough differences exist in perspective and technique that it stands by itself.

Breaking down the characters into the proper Japanese Romaji, you have "wa dou ryuu" or "wa dō ryū." The meaning is roughly-translated as "Harmony Way Style" or "Peace Method Style." The first Kanji should probably be read as harmony, rather than peace in this case.


See Also:  Wado-Kai

Rank Holder

The one who has achieved rank in martial arts
China yǒu duàn zhě
Japan yuu dan sha
Rank Holder

有段者 is a Japanese term for someone who holds rank in karate, judo, etc.
This term theoretically applies to anyone with rank (above a white belt). However, some schools or dojos may reserve this title for a holder of a black belt.

I'd suggest that you only order this phrase if you have honestly reached this level.

This title does kind of make sense in Chinese but only to those Chinese who practice "kong shou dao" (karate) or when used in the context of martial arts.

Shuri-Ryu

Japan shu ri ryuu
Shuri-Ryu

首里流 is the title of Shuri-Ryu, a style of Karate established in the mid-1900s by Robert Trias in Arizona.

Shotokan-Ryu

Martial arts term
Japan shou tou kan ryuu
Shotokan-Ryu

松濤館流 is the Japanese martial arts title, Shotokan-Ryu.

松濤館流 is a style or school of karate.

Shorin-Ryu

Shaolin Style
Japan shou rin ryuu
Shorin-Ryu

少林流 is the Japanese martial arts title "Shorin-ryu."

Though the first part of the title comes from the Shaolin (small forest) monks of China.
In Japan, this refers to the Okinawa School of Karate.


小Note that often in Japanese, the first Kanji of this title was changed to the version shown to the right. If you prefer this version, please click on the Kanji to the right instead of the button above.

Budokan

Japan budoukan
Budokan

Budokan literally means "martial arts stadium."

However, the title Budokan is often used to refer to a certain style of karate. This style originated in Malaysia and has spread throughout the world.

Uechi-Ryu

Japan ue chi ryuu
Uechi-Ryu

上地流 is the short title of the Uechi-Ryu school of Okinawan karate. Uechi actually means "higher stages of practice" in a Buddhist context. Ryu means method or style in this context.

Jin Ji Du Li

China jīn jī dú lì
Japan kin kei doku ritsu
Jin Ji Du Li

"Jin Ji Du Li," means "golden rooster stands on one leg."

This also called "crane stance" in English. 金雞獨立 is used in wushu, karate and other forms of martial arts.

This can be pronounced, "kinkei dokuritsu" in Japanese but it's rarely a title used in Japanese.

Isshin-Kai / Isshinkai

Japan isshin kai
Isshin-Kai / Isshinkai

This is the Japanese martial arts title "Isshinkai" or "Isshin-Kai." It literally means "One Heart Association" or "Single-Heart Club." This title is often associated with Isshin-Ryu Aikido and Isshin-Ryu Karate-Do. This title is appropriate for the name for a dojo that teaches these styles.

Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister

China xiān shēng
Japan sen sei
Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister

If you've taken even a single karate class in your life, you know this term. 先生 is sensei, which is associated in the west with a master or instructor of karate, aikido, judo, and other Japanese martial arts.

In reality, this is a term of respect for almost any professional or skilled person (doctor, lawyer, teacher, etc). In some cases, it is used for musicians and artists who have achieved a certain level of fame, skill, or accomplishment.

It should be noted that this is also a courtesy title in Chinese but more like calling someone "mister" or "gentleman." It doesn't really have the "master" or "teacher" meaning in Chinese - see our Chinese "Master / Sifu / Shi Fu" entry if your audience is Chinese.

In Korean Hanja, this means teacher, instructor, schoolmaster, or schoolmistress.

This entry is more for educational purposes. 先生 is kind of a strange thing to put on a wall scroll. It's a title that is used more orally to show respect, rather than something written in calligraphy. If you feel that it is appropriate in your circumstances, we are very willing to create a piece of sensei Japanese calligraphy artwork for you.

Shorin Ji Ryu

Shaolin Temple Style
Japan shou rin ji ryuu
Shorin Ji Ryu

少林寺流 is the Japanese martial arts title "Shorin-ji-ryu."

Though the first part of the title comes from the Shaolin temple of China. In Japan, this refers to the Okinawa school of karate.

Note: Sometimes this title is written without the "ji" or "temple" Kanji.

Kajukenbo Slogan

Japan kenpo kunfu
Kajukenbo Slogan

拳法功夫 is the Japanese slogan associated with Kajukenbo.

There is not a way to really write Kajukenbo in Japanese (as the "ka" for karate cannot be separated from the "kara" character it is supposed to represent - among a few other language issues). This slogan which reads, "fist law, kung fu" is often written on banners and patches for Kajukenbo clubs or dojos.

Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

China quán fǎ
Japan kenpou
Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

This form of martial arts can be translated in several ways. Some will call it "fist principles" or "the way of the fist," or even "law of the fist." The first character literally means fist. The second can mean law, method, way, principle or Buddhist teaching.

Kempo is really a potluck of martial arts. Often a combination of Chinese martial arts such as Shaolin Kung Fu with Japanese martial arts such as Karate, Jujutsu (Jujitsu), Aikido, and others. You may see the term "Kempo Karate" which basically means Karate with other disciplines added. In this way, Kempo becomes an adjective rather than a title or school of martial arts.

These facts will long be argued by various masters and students of Kempo. Even the argument as to whether it should be spelled "kenpo" or "Kempo" ensues at dojos around the world (the correct Romaji should actually be "kenpou" if you precisely follow the rules).

The benefit of Kempo is that the techniques are easier to learn and master compared to pure Kung Fu (wu shu). Students are often taught basic Karate moves, kicks, and punches before augmenting the basic skills with complex Kung Fu techniques. This allows students of Kempo achieve a level where they can defend themselves or fight in a relatively short amount of time (a few years rather than a decade or more).

Because the definition of this word is so fluid, I should make some notes here:

1. Purists in Okinawa will claim that "Okinawa Kenpo" or "Ryukyu Hon Kenpo" is the original and true version of this martial art from the old kingdom. There is actually little or no connection between Okinawa Kenpo and the way the word is used elsewhere.

2. In Chinese, where these characters are pronounced "quan fa" (sometimes Romanized as "chuan fa" because the Chinese-pinyin "q" actually sounds like an English "ch" sound), these characters do not hold the connotation of being a mixed martial art. It is simply defined as "the law of the fist."

3. In my Japanese dictionary, it oddly defines Kenpo as "Chinese art of self-defense." I personally don't feel this is the most common way that people perceive the word but just something you should know.

Wado-Kai

Japan wa dou kai
Wado-Kai

Wado-Kai is used as a title for styles of Karate and Aikido.

Breaking down the characters into the proper Japanese Romaji, you have "wa dou kai" or "wa dō kai." The meaning is roughly-translated as "Harmony Way Club" or "Peace Method Association." The first Kanji should probably be read as harmony, rather than peace in this case.


See Also:  Wado-Ryu

Isshin-Ryu / Isshinryu

Japan i sshin ryuu
Isshin-Ryu / Isshinryu

一心流 is the title for Isshin-Ryu Karate.

The literal meaning is "one heart method." You could also translate it as "unified hearts methods." It implies people doing things as if with one heart and mind.
The second Kanji can be defined as heart, mind, or the essence of your being. Clearly, there's a multitude of ways you can define this title in English.


See Also:  Isshin-Kai

Martial Arts / Wu Shu

China wǔ shù
Japan bujutsu
Martial Arts / Wu Shu

武術 is the very Chinese way to express "Martial Arts." Some even use this word to directly describe Kung Fu. But this is a label that fits all disciplines from Karate to Kung Fu to Taekwondo.

Note: This also means Martial Arts with the same appearance in old Korean Hanja characters and is pronounced "musul" or "musur" in Korean.

While this is best if your audience is Chinese or Korean, this also means "martial arts" in Japanese.

Shotokan

China sōng tāo guǎn
Japan shou tou kan
Shotokan

These Kanji characters make up the title for Shotokan.

This should be considered a Japanese-only title. It does make sense and is pronounceable in Chinese and Korean but only as a title for a building (perhaps a martial arts hall) surrounded by pine trees. Also, the first two characters were simplified in both Japanese and Chinese. The third character was simplified in Chinese but not Japanese.

Upon request, we can offer the fully traditional Chinese version but be sure you know what you are asking for.

Note: This would be understood in Chinese and Korean Hanja by a person from those cultures who is familiar with martial arts and various schools of Japanese karate.

Jujitsu / Jujutsu

China róu shù
Japan juu jutsu
Jujitsu / Jujutsu

柔術 has been somewhat incorrectly spelled and pronounced "Jujitsu" for some time in the English-speaking world. The correct Japanese Romaji is Jujutsu or Juujutsu.

A little background on the word: By combining the Kanji pronounced "Ju" (which means flexible, pliable, gentle, yielding) with the Kanji pronounced "Jutsu" (which means art, or technique), we get a meaning that can be translated as "flexible technique," "gentle art" or "yielding technique."
柔術 does make sense in Chinese as well, although pronounced, "rou shu" in China.

The Jujutsu system has a history in Japan that started well-before the 1600's. Some see this style as a variation of the "Empty Hand Method" (Karate-do). Even the samurai of old used some Jujutsu methods in defending themselves with their unarmed hands against weapons that could pierce their heavy armor.

There are convoluted relationships between various schools and systems of martial arts but it's generally accepted that Jujutsu led to the development of Judo and a few other variations.

Search for Karate Wall Scrolls in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...

Gallery Price: $81.00

Your Price: $44.88

Gallery Price: $231.00

Your Price: $127.88

Gallery Price: $54.00

Your Price: $29.88

Gallery Price: $54.00

Your Price: $29.88

Gallery Price: $54.00

Your Price: $29.88

Gallery Price: $220.00

Your Price: $78.88

Great Happy Buddha Wall Scroll

Great Happy Buddha Wall Scroll

Discounted Blemished

Gallery Price: $87.50

Your Price: $35.00

Gallery Price: $72.00

Your Price: $39.88

Gallery Price: $65.00

Your Price: $32.88

Gallery Price: $65.00

Your Price: $32.88

Jolly Happy Buddha Wall Scroll

Jolly Happy Buddha Wall Scroll

Discounted Blemished

Gallery Price: $87.50

Your Price: $45.00

Gallery Price: $120.00

Your Price: $45.00

Gallery Price: $120.00

Your Price: $45.00

Gallery Price: $70.00

Your Price: $38.88

Gallery Price: $81.00

Your Price: $45.00


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Karate空手kara te / karatekōng shǒu
kong1 shou3
kong shou
kongshou
k`ung shou
kungshou
kung shou
Law of the Fist Karate
Kempo Karate
拳法唐手ken pou kara te
kenpoukarate
ken po kara te
kenpokarate
quán fǎ táng shǒu
quan2 fa3 tang2 shou3
quan fa tang shou
quanfatangshou
ch`üan fa t`ang shou
chüanfatangshou
chüan fa tang shou
Karate-Do空手道kara te dou
karatedou
kara te do
karatedo
kōng shǒu dào
kong1 shou3 dao4
kong shou dao
kongshoudao
k`ung shou tao
kungshoutao
kung shou tao
Danketsu Karate-Do団結空手道dan ketsu kara te dou
danketsukaratedou
dan ketsu kara te do
danketsukaratedo
Kempo Karate
Law of the Fist Empty Hand
空手拳法kara te ken pou
karatekenpou
kara te ken po
karatekenpo
kōng shǒu quán fǎ
kong1 shou3 quan2 fa3
kong shou quan fa
kongshouquanfa
k`ung shou ch`üan fa
kungshouchüanfa
kung shou chüan fa
Isshin Ryu Karate Do一心流空手道i sshin ryuu kara te dou
isshinryuukaratedou
i shin ryu kara te do
ishinryukaratedo
Old Karate
Tang Hand Way
Tang Soo Do
唐手道kara te do / karatedotáng shǒu dào
tang2 shou3 dao4
tang shou dao
tangshoudao
t`ang shou tao
tangshoutao
tang shou tao
Shidokan Karate-Do士道館空手道shi dou kan kara te dou
shidoukankaratedou
shi do kan kara te do
shidokankaratedo
Shidokan (Karate)士道館shi dou kan
shidoukan
shi do kan
shidokan
Shotokan Karate-Do鬆濤館空手道
松涛館空手道
shou tou kan kara te dou
shoutoukankaratedou
sho to kan kara te do
shotokankaratedo
sōng tāo guǎn kōng shǒu dào
song1 tao1 guan3 kong1 shou3 dao4
song tao guan kong shou dao
songtaoguankongshoudao
sung t`ao kuan k`ung shou tao
sungtaokuankungshoutao
sung tao kuan kung shou tao
Wado-Ryu Karate和道流空手wa dou ryuu kara te
wadouryuukarate
wa do ryu kara te
wadoryukarate
Goju Ryu Karate-Do剛柔流空手道
刚柔流空手道
gou juu ryuu kara te dou
goujuuryuukaratedou
go ju ryu kara te do
gojuryukaratedo
Nippon Karate-Do Genbu-Kai日本空手道玄武會
日本空手道玄武会
ni ppon kara te dou gen bu kai
nipponkaratedougenbukai
ni pon kara te do gen bu kai
niponkaratedogenbukai
rì běn kōng shǒu dào xuán wǔ huì
ri4 ben3 kong1 shou3 dao4 xuan2 wu3 hui4
ri ben kong shou dao xuan wu hui
jih pen k`ung shou tao hsüan wu hui
jih pen kung shou tao hsüan wu hui
Uechi-Ryu Karate-Do上地流空手道ue chi ryuu kara te dou
uechiryuukaratedou
ue chi ryu kara te do
uechiryukaratedo
Shito-Ryu Ki-Me-Kan Karate-Do糸東流氣目館空手道
糸东流気目馆空手道
shito-ryu ki-me-kan karate-dou
shito-ryu ki-me-kan karate-do
shito-ryuki-me-kankarate-do
mì dōng liú qì mù guǎn kōng shǒu dào
mi4 dong1 liu2 qi4 mu4 guan3 kong1 shou3 dao4
mi dong liu qi mu guan kong shou dao
mi tung liu ch`i mu kuan k`ung shou tao
mi tung liu chi mu kuan kung shou tao
Tang Hand唐手kara te / karatetáng shǒu
tang2 shou3
tang shou
tangshou
t`ang shou
tangshou
tang shou
Goju Ryu剛柔流
刚柔流
gou juu ryuu
goujuuryuu
go ju ryu
gojuryu
Shorinji Kempo
Kenpo
少林寺拳法shourinji kenpou
shourinjikenpou
shorinji kenpo
shorinjikenpo
shào lín sì quán fǎ
shao4 lin2 si4 quan2 fa3
shao lin si quan fa
shaolinsiquanfa
shao lin ssu ch`üan fa
shaolinssuchüanfa
shao lin ssu chüan fa
Kyokushinkai極真會
極真会
kyoku shin kai
kyokushinkai
Kyokushin極真kyoku shin / kyokushin
Wado-Ryu和道流wa dou ryuu
wadouryuu
wa do ryu
wadoryu
Rank Holder有段者yuu dan sha
yuudansha
yu dan sha
yudansha
yǒu duàn zhě
you3 duan4 zhe3
you duan zhe
youduanzhe
yu tuan che
yutuanche
Shuri-Ryu首里流shu ri ryuu
shuriryuu
shu ri ryu
shuriryu
Shotokan-Ryu松濤館流shou tou kan ryuu
shoutoukanryuu
sho to kan ryu
shotokanryu
Shorin-Ryu少林流shou rin ryuu
shourinryuu
sho rin ryu
shorinryu
Budokan武道館budoukan / budokan
Uechi-Ryu上地流ue chi ryuu
uechiryuu
ue chi ryu
uechiryu
Jin Ji Du Li金雞獨立
金鸡独立
kin kei doku ritsu
kinkeidokuritsu
jīn jī dú lì
jin1 ji1 du2 li4
jin ji du li
jinjiduli
chin chi tu li
chinchituli
Isshin-Kai
Isshinkai
一心会 / 一心會
一心会
isshin kai / isshinkai / ishin kai / ishinkai
Sensei
Master
Teacher
Mister
先生sen sei / senseixiān shēng
xian1 sheng1
xian sheng
xiansheng
hsien sheng
hsiensheng
Shorin Ji Ryu少林寺流shou rin ji ryuu
shourinjiryuu
sho rin ji ryu
shorinjiryu
Kajukenbo Slogan拳法功夫kenpo kunfu
kenpokunfu
Kenpo
Kempo
Quan Fa
Chuan Fa
拳法kenpou / kenpoquán fǎ / quan2 fa3 / quan fa / quanfach`üan fa / chüanfa / chüan fa
Wado-Kai和道會
和道会
wa dou kai / wadoukai / wa do kai / wadokai
Isshin-Ryu
Isshinryu
一心流i sshin ryuu
isshinryuu
i shin ryu
ishinryu
Martial Arts
Wu Shu
武術
武术
bujutsuwǔ shù / wu3 shu4 / wu shu / wushu
Shotokan鬆濤館
松涛館
shou tou kan
shoutoukan
sho to kan
shotokan
sōng tāo guǎn
song1 tao1 guan3
song tao guan
songtaoguan
sung t`ao kuan
sungtaokuan
sung tao kuan
Jujitsu
Jujutsu
柔術
柔术
juu jutsu / juujutsu / ju jutsu / jujutsuróu shù / rou2 shu4 / rou shu / roushujou shu / joushu
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiki Jujutsu
Archangel
Aster
Believe
Berserk
Bushido
Calm
Change
Christ
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Enlighten
Enlightened
Faith in God
Family
Father
Furinkazan
Gemini
Heart of a Warrior
Hello
I Love You Forever and Always
Iaido
Jesus
Keep Fighting
Kenshin
Kung Fu
Lion
Love
Loyalty
Mind Body Soul Spirit
Mind Body Spirit
Mother
Mushin
Music
Overcome
Pleasure
Powerful
Protector
Rain
Rebirth
Right Intention
Rooster
Strength
Strong Heart
The Red String
The Way
The Way of the Warrior
Thunder Lightning in Kanji
Trust in God
Trust No Man
Victory
White
Wing Chun
Winter
Wolf
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Karate Kanji, Karate Characters, Karate in Mandarin Chinese, Karate Characters, Karate in Chinese Writing, Karate in Japanese Writing, Karate in Asian Writing, Karate Ideograms, Chinese Karate symbols, Karate Hieroglyphics, Karate Glyphs, Karate in Chinese Letters, Karate Hanzi, Karate in Japanese Kanji, Karate Pictograms, Karate in the Chinese Written-Language, or Karate in the Japanese Written-Language.