Not what you want?

Try searching again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Kanji Strong in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Kanji Strong calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Kanji Strong" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Kanji Strong" title below...

See also: Selections of just Japanese Kanji Calligraphy

  1. Strong-Willed / Strong of Heart
  2. Strong / Healthy
  3. Strong and Beautiful
  4. The Weak are Meat, The Strong Eat.
  5. Woman of Strong Character...
  6. Strong Hearted / Strong Willed
  7. Strong Mind Strong Body
  8. Strong Body, Strong Mind
  9. Strong / Healthy
10. Strong Woman
11. Strong Willed
12. The Strong One
13. Strong / Powerful
14. Strong / Powerful / Force
15. Strong / Robust
16. Mighty / Powerful / Strong
17. Strong-Minded Woman
18. Strength: Strong and Solid
19. Stay Strong / Iron Will
20. Strong bones come from hard knocks
21. Stay Strong / Indestructible / Unbreakable
22. Tempering Makes Strong Steel
23. Firm Belief...
24. Strength / Ability
25. Immovable Mind
26. Power / Strength
27. Physical Strength
28. Unbreakable
29. Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit
30. Fortitude / Strength of Character
31. Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude
32. Inner Strength
33. Robust / Sturdy
34. Indomitable / Unyielding
35. Inner Strength
36. Perseverance / Fortitude
37. Inner Strength / Self-Improvement
38. Always Striving for Inner Strength
39. Free Will
40. No Pain No Gain
41. Romantic Passion
42. Resiliency
43. Herculean Strength
44. Intensity
45. Longing for Lover
46. Almighty / Omnipotent
47. Jacques
48. Perception of Knowledge
49. Courage and Strength
50. Good Health
51. Resilient in the Face of Adversity
52. Big Wave
53. God is Good
54. Desire / Craving
55. Christian / Disciple of Christ
56. Silent / Solitary
57. Warrior
58. Phoenix
59. Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things
60. Tiger
61. Gutsy / Daring / Bold
62. Family / Household
63. Profound / Powerful Words
64. With all the strength of your heart

Strong-Willed / Strong of Heart

Japan ki no tsuyo i
Strong-Willed / Strong of Heart

Here's the character breakdown of this Japanese title:
気 (ki) spirit; mind; heart; nature; motivation; intention; feelings; essence.
の (no) possessive particle.
強い (tsuyoi) strong; powerful; mighty; potent; resistant; resilient; durable.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong / Healthy

Japan sukoyaka
Strong / Healthy

健やか is a verbose way to say strong and healthy in Japanese. 健やか is the "strong" that is appropriate for an athlete.

Beyond "healthy," it can also mean strength, persistence, vigorous or invigorated.

Japanese also use the first Kanji to mean the same thing. This version just adds two hiragana which serve to emphasize or amplify the word and clarify the meaning.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong and Beautiful

China jiàn měi
Japan takemi
Strong and Beautiful

We don't really have a word like this in English but these two characters create a word that means "strong and beautiful." It could also be translated as "healthy and beautiful."

Note: 健美 is a word in Chinese and Korean but it's also the family name Takemi in Japanese. The characters hold the same meaning in Japanese but It's kind of like having the English name Stillwell, when few people would perceive the meanings of still and well.

The Weak are Meat, The Strong Eat.

Meaning: Survival of the fittest
China ruò ròu qiáng shí
Japan jaku niku kyoo shoku
The Weak are Meat, The Strong Eat.

This Japanese and Chinese proverb literally means, "The weak are meat; the strong eat" or "The weak are prey to the strong."

The closest English version is, "Survival of the fittest." It also fits with the ideas of, "predatory behavior," or "The law of the jungle."

Woman of Strong Character
Woman Hero

China nǚ jiá
Japan joketsu
Woman of Strong Character / Woman Hero

女傑 can mean brave woman, heroine, lady of character, distinguished woman, outstanding woman, and sometimes prominent woman.

In modern usage, some people might use this to give a title to women like Oprah Winfrey, Hillary Clinton, or Sarah Palin. I would rather use it for a woman like Araceli Segarra (the first woman from Spain to climb Mt. Everest).

Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

China yì zhì jiān qiáng
Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

This phrase can mean either "strong hearted," "strong willed" or "determination."

The first two characters can be translated as "will," "willpower," "determination," "volition," "intention," or "intent." But, it should be noted that this first part possess the element of "heart" in the lower portion of both characters (they also partially carry the meaning "with whole heart").

The last two characters mean "strong" or "staunch."

Chinese word order and grammar is a bit different than English, so in this case, they are in reverse order of English but have the correct meaning in a natural form.


See Also:  Strong Willed | Discipline | Will-Power

Strong Mind Strong Body

China qiáng zhuàng de shēn tǐ jiān qiáng de xīn tài
Strong Mind Strong Body

This is the Chinese phrase for "Strong Mind, Strong Body," however, the character order is actually "Strong Body, Strong Mind," as that's the more natural word order in Chinese.

Strong Body, Strong Mind

Japan tsuyo i karada tsuyo i kokoro
Strong Body, Strong Mind

強い体強い心 is a way to write "strong mind, strong body" in Japanese.

Each of the two lines starts with 強い (tsuyoi) which means: strong; powerful; mighty; potent; resistant; resilient; durable; tough; stiff; hard; inflexible.

Body is represented with 体 (ancient version is 體, romanized as karada) which means: body; build; physique; posture; torso; trunk; health.

Mind is represented with 心 (kokoro) which can mean heart, mind, or soul depending on context.

This is not a common phrase in Japanese, so it's not the most natural title for calligraphy. In English, you might want to write it, "strong mind, strong body" but, "strong mind, strong body," is more natural in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong / Healthy

China jiàn
Japan ken
Strong / Healthy

This "strong" character is the more "healthy" version of strong. 健 is the "strong" that is appropriate for an athlete.

Beyond "healthy," it can also mean strength, persistence, vigorous or invigorated.

Strong Woman

China nǚ qiáng rén
Strong Woman

女強人 is the best way to say "strong woman" or "strong and independent woman" in Chinese.

Grammar in China is a bit different, so these three characters literally read as "female strength person" or "woman strong person." This might sound funny in English but this is a natural-sounding title in Chinese.

Strong Willed

China yìng qì
Strong Willed

硬氣 means firm, unyielding, or strong-willed in Chinese.

If you take pride in being strong-willed, or a bit stubborn, this could be the title for you.

The Strong One

Japan tsuyoi mono
The Strong One

強いもの means, "strong one," in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong / Powerful

China qiáng zhuàng
Japan kyousou
Strong / Powerful

強壯 is an adjective that means powerful or strong.

It can also be translated as able-bodied, robust, or sturdy.
This version of strength also suggests muscularity.


壮Note that the second character was simplified in Japan after WWII (also simplified in mainland China but not for calligraphy). If you want the modern Japanese/simplified version, please click on the Kanji shown to the right.


See Also:  Strength | Vitality | Health

Strong / Powerful / Force

China qiáng
Japan kyou
Strong / Powerful / Force

This "strong" character means strength, force, powerful, better, stubborn, and stiff (yes, all of this in one character). This "strong" has less to do with physical strength and more to do with having a winning attitude, or just having the ability to win at something.

Note that most of the time, this character is pronounced "qiang" but when used with the meaning of stubborn, unyielding, or stiff, it is pronounced "jiang" in Chinese.

Also, sometimes "qiang" is used in modern Chinese to describe people that do crazy things (Example: Bicycling from Beijing to Tibet alone). I sometimes can be found outside my Beijing apartment wearing nothing but shorts and a tee-shirt while eating an ice cream during a snow storm, just to hear my neighbors call me "qiang." Maybe they mean "strong" but perhaps they are using the new meaning of "crazy strong."

Also a Korean Hanja with same meaning but mostly used in compound words.

強 is used in Japanese (though normally in compound words). In Japanese, it has the same meaning but in some context can mean "a little more than..." or "a little over [some amount]." Most Japanese would read this as tough, strength, stiff, hard, inflexible, obstinate, or stubborn.

Strong / Robust

China zhuàng
Japan sou
Strong / Robust

This "strong" character means "to strengthen" or robust. This brings images of a muscle-bound hulk of a weight lifter or body builder to an Asian person who sees this character.

Note that in Korean and Japanese, this character is normally part of compound words, and is not seen alone too often.


壮Note that the this character was simplified in Japan after WWII (also simplified in mainland China but not for calligraphy). If you want the modern Japanese/simplified version, please click on the Kanji shown to the right.

Mighty / Powerful / Strong

China qiáng dà
Japan kyoudai
Mighty / Powerful / Strong

強大 can mean mighty, powerful, large, formidable, or strong.

This term is often used to describe soldiers/troops/warriors, and whole armies.

Strong-Minded Woman

Japan reppu
Strong-Minded Woman

烈婦 is a Japanese title for a strong-minded woman, virtuous woman, or heroine.

In some context, it can refer to a pure or chaste woman.

Strength: Strong and Solid

China qiáng gù
Japan kyouko
Strength: Strong and Solid

Means firmness, stability, security, and strength in Japanese. It's not used commonly in China but it means "powerful," "firm," "solid," "strong" or "better than others" in Chinese. There is a slight variation in the top of the first character between Chinese and Japanese. Because this is more a Japanese word, we are showing the Japanese form here.

強固 is also a Korean word but Korean Hanja uses the Chinese form of the first character (one tiny stroke is a little different), so just let me now if your audience is Korean when you place your order, and we'll have it written in the Chinese/Korean version.

Stay Strong / Iron Will

Japan tesshin sekichou
Stay Strong / Iron Will

鉄心石腸 is a Japanese proverb which suggest you should have the inner-strength and will as hard and steadfast as iron. It's the Japanese way to say, "stay strong." 鉄心石腸 is an especially uplifting thing to say to a person in distress or recovering from a disaster. It's kind of the survivor's creed.

If you literally translate this, it means, "iron will, stone guts" or "iron heart, rock-hard bowels."

Strong bones come from hard knocks

China bù kē bù pèng gǔ tóu bù yìng
Strong bones come from hard knocks

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Without being knocked around a bit, [one's] bones won't become hard.

Figuratively, this means: One can't become strong without first being tempered by "hard knocks."

While true for everyone, this sounds like the "Iron Body" form of Kung Fu, where practitioners bodies are beaten (and often bone fractured) in order to become stronger.
For the rest of us, this is just about how we can be tempered and build character through the hardships in our lives.

This is not a common title for a wall scroll in China.

Stay Strong / Indestructible / Unbreakable

China jīn gāng bù huài
Japan kon gou fu e
Stay Strong / Indestructible / Unbreakable

This is originally a Buddhist term for, "The diamond indestructible." Sometimes, it's written 金剛不壞身, The diamond indestructible body. Outside that context, it still means firm and solid, sturdy and indestructible, unshakable, or adamantine (a mythological indestructible material).


壊 Note: If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, the last Kanji will look like the one shown to the right.

Tempering Makes Strong Steel

Hardship Develops Strong Character
China bǎi liàn cái chéng gāng
Tempering Makes Strong Steel

This literally translates as: Only after much tempering is steel produced.

Figuratively, this means: True character must be tested in hardship.

This is a mild form of saying, "Whatever doesn't kill me, makes me stronger."

Firm Belief
Strong Faith

China jiān xìn
Japan ken shin
Firm Belief / Strong Faith

堅信 means: to believe firmly; firm faith; without any doubt.

Japanese Christians sometimes use this term to mean the rite of confirmation.

This can also be the Japanese given name, Kenshin.

Strength / Ability

China lì liàng
Japan riki ryou
Strength / Ability

力量 is a general strength term. It can refer to mental or physical strength (depending on context). 力量 can also be used to describe strength in terms of capability, capacity, ability and even tact. Some may translate this as power or force.

Immovable Mind

fudoshin
Japan fu dou shin
Immovable Mind

不動心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet.

Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: An unshakable mind and an immovable spirit is the state of fudoshin. It is courage and stability displayed both mentally and physically. Rather than indicating rigidity and inflexibility, fudoshin describes a condition that is not easily upset by internal thoughts or external forces. It is capable of receiving a strong attack while retaining composure and balance. It receives and yields lightly, grounds to the earth, and reflects aggression back to the source.

Other translations of this title include imperturbability, steadfastness, keeping a cool head in an emergency, or keeping one's calm (during a fight).

The first two Kanji alone mean immobility, firmness, fixed, steadfastness, motionless, idle.

The last Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these three Kanji create a title that is defined as "immovable mind" within the context of Japanese martial arts. However, in Chinese it would mean "motionless heart" and in Korean Hanja, "wafting heart" or "floating heart."

Power / Strength

China
Japan chikara / ryoku
Power / Strength

力 is the simplest form of "power" or "strength."

In Japanese it is pronounced "chikara" when used alone, and "ryoku" when used in a sentence (there are also a few other possible pronunciations of this Kanji in Japanese).

In some context, this can mean ability, force, physical strength, capability, and influence.


See Also:  Strength | Vitality | Health

Physical Strength

China tǐ lì
Japan tai ryoku
Physical Strength

體力 means "physical strength," "physical power," or "physical stamina" in Chinese, ancient Japanese, and old Korean Hanja.


See Also:  Fortitude | Health

Physical Strength

China tǐ lì
Japan tairyoku
Physical Strength

体力 means "physical strength" or "physical power."

The first character was first simplified in Japan. Later, that simplified version became the standard in mainland China. Just in case you want this version, it is offered here. I suggest it if you audience is Japanese. Most Chinese know the older traditional version which looks like 體力.

体力 can also be defined: stamina; endurance; physical strength; resilience; resistance to disease; clout; stability.

Unbreakable

Japan kowa re na i
Unbreakable

壊れない means unbreakable in Japanese. The first two characters mean to be broken; to break; to fall through; to come to nothing. But the last two characters create a negative meaning (like adding "un-" to "breakable").


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Indomitable Spirit

Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit

China jīng shén lì liàng
Japan seishin rikiryou
Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit

This title speaks of one's soul or spirit, and the capacity or strength that soul possesses.

The first two characters mean mind, heart, spirit, and/or soul.

The last two characters mean strength, capacity, or ability.

Note: Separately, these are two words in Japanese, and can be pronounced but this does not make a natural title in Japanese (best if your audience is Chinese).

Fortitude / Strength of Character

China gāng yì
Japan gouki
Fortitude / Strength of Character

This Japanese and Chinese word means, "resolute and firm," "fortitude," "firmness of character," "hardihood," "manliness" or "macho."


See Also:  Perseverance | Strength | Tenacity

Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude

China bù qū
Japan fukutsu
Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude

不屈 is the short form of a longer Chinese word, and also a word used in Korean and Japanese to express the idea of being indomitable. It literally means, "will not bend," "will not crouch," "will not yield," "will not flinch," or "will not submit."

Note: Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Inner Strength

China nèi lì
Japan nai ryoku
Inner Strength

內力 is the shorter version of inner-strength (can also be translated as "internal force"). The first character holds the meaning of "inner" or "internal." The second character means "power," "force" or "strength."

內力 is kind of a Kung Fu way of talking about an inner power or strength from within. 內力 is sort of a way to express "inner-chi." 內力 is clearly something that you might hear in a real Chinese Kung Fu movie.

While understood in both Chinese and Japanese, this can have a secondary meaning of "inner stress" in Japanese.

Robust / Sturdy

China qiáng jiàn
Japan kyouken
Robust / Sturdy

強健 means robustness or sturdiness in regards to being healthy and fit. This can also be used to say "persistently good health."

Indomitable / Unyielding

China bù qū bù náo
Japan fukutsu futou
Indomitable / Unyielding

不屈不撓 means "Indomitable" or "Unyielding."

不屈不撓 is a long word by Chinese standards. At least, it is often translated as a single word into English. It's actually a proverb in Chinese.

If you want to break it down, you can see that the first and third characters are the same. Both meaning "not" (they work as a suffix to make a negative or opposite meaning to whatever character follows).

The second character means "bendable."

The last means "scratched" or "bothered."

So this really means "Won't be bent, can't be bothered." I have also seen it written as "Will not crouch, will not submit." This comes from the fact that the second character can mean, "to crouch" and the last can mean "to submit" (as in "to give in" such as "submitting to the rule of someone else"). This may explain better why these four characters mean "indomitable."

Notes:
Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.
The first two characters can be a stand-alone word in Chinese.
In Japanese, this is considered to be two words (with very similar meanings).
The same characters are used in Korean, but the 2nd and 4th characters are swapped to create a word pronounced "불요불굴" in Korean.
Just let me know if you want the Korean version, which will also make sense in Japanese, and though not as natural, will also make sense in Chinese as well.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Inner Strength

China nèi zài lì liàng
Inner Strength

內在力量 is the slightly-verbose way to say inner-strength. The first two characters mean "intrinsic" or "inner." The second two characters mean "power," "force" or "strength" (especially physical strength). 內在力量 is more a short phrase rather than just a word in Chinese and Korean. This can sort of be understood in Japanese but it's not normal/proper Japanese.

Perseverance / Fortitude

China jiǎn rěn
Japan ken nin
Perseverance / Fortitude

The first character means "strong," "solid," "firm," "unyielding" or "resolute."
The second character means "to beat," "to endure," or "to tolerate."
Together they speak of the strength from within yourself. Some may also translate this as "long-suffering" in a more Biblical sense.

堅忍 is a common term in Chinese and Korean Hanja but a little less commonly used in modern Japanese Kanji. For that reason, this selection is best if your audience is Chinese or Korean.


忍忍 Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the second Kanji a little differently. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect the form where the little horizontal stroke crosses the vertical stroke. See differences in the images to the right. Technically, they are both the same character, and will be read the same in either language.

Inner Strength / Self-Improvement

China zì qiáng
Inner Strength / Self-Improvement

自強 is the kind of inner-strength that applies to a person who has will-power and can inspire themselves to do great things.

自強 can also be the creed of a person that always pursues self-improvement.

Other translations: self-strengthening, striving for improvement, self-improvement, strive to become stronger, and self-renewal.

Always Striving for Inner Strength

China zì qiáng bú xī
Always Striving for Inner Strength

This proverb or idiom suggests that the pursuit self-improvement is eternal. It can also be a suggestion to strive unremittingly in life.

The first two characters mean inner-strength with the idea of self-improvement. The last two characters mean "never rest" or "striving without giving up."

Some will translate these four characters as, "Exert and strive hard without any let up."

Free Will

China zì yóu yì zhì
Japan jiyuu ishi
Free Will

This concept has existed for thousands of years that humans have the ability to understand right and wrong, then make a decision one way or the other (thus affecting their own fate).

Sources such as Confucius, Buddhist scriptures, the Qur'an and the Bible all address this idea.

As for the characters shown here, the first two mean free, freedom, or liberty. The last two simply mean "will."


See Also:  Freedom | Strong Willed | Fate

No Pain No Gain

Japan itami naku shite erumono wa nashi
No Pain No Gain

This Japanese phrase means "no pain, no gain."

Literally, this suggests that with pain, a gain must follow.

The pain Kanji here can also be translated as sorrow or suffering. The gain can also mean profit, advantage, or benefit. In Japanese Buddhist context, that gain Kanji can mean rebirth in paradise, entering nirvana.

The character break down:
痛みなく (itami naku) <strong>painstrong>; ache; sore; grief; distress. The naku part adds a meaning of "a lot of" or "extended"
して (shite) and then. (indicates a causative expression; acts as a connective particle)
得る (eru) to get; to acquire; to obtain; to procure; to earn; to win; to <strong>gainstrong>; to secure; to attain.
もの (mono) conjunctive particle indicating a cause or reason.
なし (nashi) none of; -less; without; <strong>nostrong>.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Romantic Passion

China jī qíng
Japan gekijou
Romantic Passion

Also means "strong emotion" or "fervor."


The meaning in Japanese is a little more radical, as beyond "passion" it can be understood as "violent emotion" or "fury."

Resiliency

China qiáng rèn
Resiliency

This Chinese word means resilient, or "tough and strong."

Herculean Strength

China qiáng lì
Japan kyou ryoku
Herculean Strength

強力 means herculean strength, powerful, or strong. I've even hear this described as, "strength to carry a mountain."


Note: This can also be the Japanese surname Gouriki (like Mr. Strong).

Intensity

China qiáng liè
Japan kyouretsu
Intensity

強烈 means intensity in regards to strength.

Note: In some context, this can mean violently strong or severe.

Longing for Lover

China sī liàn
Longing for Lover

思戀 is a term used for when you miss a lover. It suggests that you are separated (not by choice) and have longing for each other. It's a strong feeling of missing your lover.

Almighty / Omnipotent

China quán néng
Japan zennou
Almighty / Omnipotent

全能 means almighty or omnipotent in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

In some context, this can mean all-round, or strong in every area (especially in the context of athletics).

Jacques

China jié kè
Jacques

杰克 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Jacques.

This version has a strong "j" sound. The Mandarin sounds like the English name "Jack" or "Jake."

Perception of Knowledge

China zhī shi
Japan chishiki
Perception of Knowledge

The first character represents "to know" or "to realize." The second character alone refers to the ability to "recognize," or "realize" and can also be used to mean "knowing." Combined, these two characters have the very strong meaning of "knowledge" and in some context, "learning."


See Also:  Wisdom | Learn From Wisdom

Courage and Strength

China yǒng lì
Japan yuu ri
Courage and Strength

勇力 is a very short way to say "courage and strength" in Chinese and Japanese.

In Japanese, it's read more like "strong courage" or "powerful courage." This can also be the personal name Yuri or Yuuri in Japanese.

Good Health

China jiàn kāng
Japan kenkou
Good Health

健康 is the best way to express good health in Chinese, Korean and Japanese.

健康 also suggest the ideas of being solid, strong, sound, wholesome and at peace.

Can also be used to express "healthy," "vitality," or "well-being."


See Also:  Health | Vitality | Wellness

Resilient in the Face of Adversity

Japan u ta re tsuyo i
Resilient in the Face of Adversity

打たれ強い is often used as a martial arts term. It means being able to take a lot of punishment, or able to take a hit. In the context of Japanese baseball, it can also refer to the pitcher's ability to keep his cool when the batter gets a hit. In general, this is about being resilient and strong in the face of criticism or adversity.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Big Wave

China tāo
Japan nami
Big Wave

濤 is the Chinese character for "Big Wave." It suggests a wave unlike most, strong and powerful.

濤 is technically also a Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja but it's not commonly used in those Asian languages. Pronunciation in Japanese and Korean provided above for reference only. Just order this if your audience is Chinese.

God is Good

China shén zhēn měi hǎo
God is Good

神真美好 means, "God is good," in Chinese.

You can also translate this as, "God is really good" or "God is so good."

The last two characters are a version of good that suggests a very strong goodness. The characters literally read, "beautifully good."

Desire / Craving

China yù wàng
Japan yokubou
Desire / Craving

The first character of this word means desire, longing, hunger, covetousness, greed, passion, desire, craving, or wish. The second character means to hope for, ambition, to desire, to aspire, to expect, to gaze (into the distance) or to look for something.

Together, they create a word that means strong desire, while some might translate it as "lust."

Christian / Disciple of Christ

China jī dū tú
Japan kirisuto
Christian / Disciple of Christ

基督徒 is a very strong and direct word in Chinese for "Christian."

The literal translation of the first two characters is "Christ." The last character means apprentice, follower, or disciple. Altogether these three characters mean "Christ's Disciple" or "Christ's Apprentice." 基督徒 is a pretty cool title to hang on your wall if you are a devout Christian.

Also used by Japanese Christians (but may be unfamiliar to non-Christian Japanese people).


See Also:  Jesus Christ | God of Abraham

Silent / Solitary

China
Japan jaku
Silent / Solitary

寂 means silent, solitary, quiet, calm, still, rest, or tranquil.

This also has a strong Buddhist association where it can mean "entering into Nirvana." In that context, this is sometimes used to refer to the passing of a Buddhist monk (he is silent, as he has entered Nirvana). For the living, this is about tranquility (especially of mind).

Some will also use this to mean "elegant simplicity."

From Sanskrit, this can represent praśama, vivikta, śānti, or nibbāna (nirvāṇa).

Warrior

China wǔ shì
Japan bu shi
Warrior

The first character is the spirit or essence of a warrior. The second character means soldier, officer, or official. 武士 is also used appropriately enough to describe a piece of a chess game. This can also be translated as soldier, cavalier, palace guard, or samurai and sometimes as knight. I've occasionally seen this translated as strong man or tough man (gender not necessarily implied).

By far, this is the most common way to write warrior in Chinese characters, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Note: In Japanese, this is Bushi, as in Bushido.


See Also:  Knight | Army | Marines | Samurai

Phoenix (female)

China huáng
Japan ou
Phoenix (female)

凰 is another simple way to write "Phoenix" in Chinese. 凰 is the specifically female element of phoenix, so this is how you write "female phoenix." 凰 is sometimes used to represent the female empress (many times in history, China was ruled by a woman, in much the same way queens came to power in Europe).

Note that the emperor is always represented as a dragon (not the male version of phoenix).

If you see yourself as a strong woman, this might be scroll for you to express "woman power" or "powerful woman" in a cool way.

Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

China zhēn rú
Japan shinnyo
Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

This comes from the Sanskrit and Pali word often romanized as "tathata" or "tathatā." Originally written, "तथता."

It's a Buddhist term that is often translated as "thusness" or "suchness" but this does not explain it.
A better explanation may be, "the ultimate nature of all things." However, this gives it too strong of a feeling. This concept is sometimes described as being in awe of the simple nature of something - like a blade of grass blowing in the wind, or ripples on water. It is what it is supposed to be, these things are following their nature. Amazing in their mundane simplicity.

Every sect of Buddhism will have a slightly different flavor, or explanation, so don't get fixated on one definition.


Notes: Sometimes Buddhists use the word dharmatā, a synonym to tathatā.

In Japan, this can also be the female given name Mayuki, or the surname Majo.

Tiger

Year of the Tiger / Zodiac Sign
China
Japan tora
Tiger

虎 is the character for tiger in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

Since you already know what a tiger is, here's some trivia: If you look at the Japanese pronunciation, you might remember a movie called "Tora Tora Tora" which was the code word used to initiate the attack on Pearl Harbor. It simply means "Tiger Tiger Tiger."

In Chinese culture, the tiger is considered to be the king of all animals (in much the way we see the lion in western culture).

From the Chinese Zodiac, if you were born in the year of the tiger, you . . .

Have a strong personality.
Are full of self-confidence.
Love adventure
Don't like to obey others.


See also our Chinese Zodiac or Tiger Calligraphy pages.

Gutsy / Daring / Bold

China pò lì
Japan hakuryoku
Gutsy / Daring / Bold

This Chinese word is a form of personal strength.

It is a word that describes a person who is willing to take a risk. In English, we might say, "Someone with guts."

An example might be a person that is not rich but invests a lot of money into something (knowing they could double their money, or lose it all). Win or lose, this is a person that knows or pushes their potential.

Tearing this word apart, the first character means "to compel," urgent, urge, force, imminent, or "spur on." The second means power, strong, bear, or exert.

Note: 迫力 is also a word in Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja but with a meaning more like force, intensity, appeal, strength, impact, force, or simply power.

Family / Household

China jiā tíng
Japan ka tei
Family / Household

家庭 / 傢庭 is a common way to express family, household, or home in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

However, for a wall scroll, we recommend the single-character form (which is just the first character of this two-character word). If you want that, just click here: Family Single-Character

The first character means "family" or "home." The second means "courtyard" or "garden." When combined, the meaning is a bit different, as it becomes "household" or "family." The home and/or property traditionally has a strong relationship with family in Asia. Some Chinese, Korean, and Japanese families have lived in the same house for 7 or more generations!

Profound / Powerful Words

China rù mù sān fēn
Profound / Powerful Words

These four characters together translate in English to a strong form of "profound" or "written with a forceful hand."

But there is much more to the story...

The deep meaning behind this proverb comes from a man named Wan Xizhi who lived in the third century.

He was a great writer and calligrapher whose writing style influenced generations of other writers and calligraphers.

He once wrote words on a piece of wood to be taken to an engraver.
When the engraver began to carve the characters into the wood, he found that Wang Xizhi's writing had penetrated the wood about 3/8 of an inch.

Thus people believed that his words were so powerful, and so profound this it caused the ink from his brush to penetrate the wood deeply.

The proverb literally means "penetrated wood three fen" (fen is an ancient Chinese measurement a little over to 1/8 of an inch or almost 4mm).

With all the strength of your heart

Japan omoi kiri
With all the strength of your heart

This can be translated as, "with all one's strength," "with all one's heart," "to the limits of your heart," or "to the end of your heart/emotions."

The character breakdown:
思い (omoi) thought; mind; heart; feelings; emotion; sentiment; love; affection; desire; wish; hope; expectation; imagination; experience
切り (kiri) bounds; limits.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Search for Kanji Strong in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...

Gallery Price: $150.00

Your Price: $78.88

Gallery Price: $81.00

Your Price: $44.88

Gallery Price: $250.00

Your Price: $138.88

Gallery Price: $81.00

Your Price: $44.88

Gallery Price: $132.00

Your Price: $72.88

Gallery Price: $132.00

Your Price: $72.88

Gallery Price: $65.00

Your Price: $32.88

Gallery Price: $65.00

Your Price: $32.88

Gallery Price: $31.00

Your Price: $16.88

Gallery Price: $31.00

Your Price: $16.88

Gallery Price: $81.00

Your Price: $44.88

Gallery Price: $250.00

Your Price: $138.88

Gallery Price: $65.00

Your Price: $32.88

Gallery Price: $65.00

Your Price: $32.88

Gallery Price: $132.00

Your Price: $72.88


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Strong-Willed
Strong of Heart
氣の強い
気の強い
ki no tsuyo i
kinotsuyoi
Strong
Healthy
健やかsukoyaka
Strong and Beautiful健美takemijiàn měi / jian4 mei3 / jian mei / jianmeichien mei / chienmei
The Weak are Meat, The Strong Eat.弱肉強食jaku niku kyoo shoku
jakunikukyooshoku
jaku niku kyo shoku
jakunikukyoshoku
ruò ròu qiáng shí
ruo4 rou4 qiang2 shi2
ruo rou qiang shi
ruorouqiangshi
jo jou ch`iang shih
jojouchiangshih
jo jou chiang shih
Woman of Strong Character
Woman Hero
女傑
女杰
joketsunǚ jiá / nv3 jia2 / nv jia / nvjianü chia / nüchia
Strong Hearted
Strong Willed
意志堅強
意志坚强
yì zhì jiān qiáng
yi4 zhi4 jian1 qiang2
yi zhi jian qiang
yizhijianqiang
i chih chien ch`iang
ichihchienchiang
i chih chien chiang
Strong Mind Strong Body強壯的身體堅強的心態
强壮的身体坚强的心态
qiáng zhuàng de shēn tǐ jiān qiáng de xīn tài
qiang2 zhuang4 de shen1 ti3 jian1 qiang2 de xin1 tai4
qiang zhuang de shen ti jian qiang de xin tai
ch`iang chuang te shen t`i chien ch`iang te hsin t`ai
chiang chuang te shen ti chien chiang te hsin tai
Strong Body, Strong Mind強い體強い心
強い体強い心
tsuyo i karada tsuyo i kokoro
tsuyoikaradatsuyoikokoro
Strong
Healthy
kenjiàn / jian4 / jianchien
Strong Woman女強人
女强人
nǚ qiáng rén
nv3 qiang2 ren2
nv qiang ren
nvqiangren
nü ch`iang jen
nüchiangjen
nü chiang jen
Strong Willed硬氣
硬气
yìng qì / ying4 qi4 / ying qi / yingqiying ch`i / yingchi / ying chi
The Strong One強いものtsuyoi mono
tsuyoimono
Strong
Powerful
強壯
强壮
kyousou / kyosoqiáng zhuàng
qiang2 zhuang4
qiang zhuang
qiangzhuang
ch`iang chuang
chiangchuang
chiang chuang
Strong
Powerful
Force

kyou / kyoqiáng / qiang2 / qiangch`iang / chiang
Strong
Robust

sou / sozhuàng / zhuang4 / zhuangchuang
Mighty
Powerful
Strong
強大
强大
kyoudai / kyodaiqiáng dà / qiang2 da4 / qiang da / qiangdach`iang ta / chiangta / chiang ta
Strong-Minded Woman烈婦reppu / repu
Strength: Strong and Solid強固
强固
kyouko / kyokoqiáng gù / qiang2 gu4 / qiang gu / qiangguch`iang ku / chiangku / chiang ku
Stay Strong
Iron Will
鉄心石腸tesshin sekichou
tesshinsekichou
teshin sekicho
teshinsekicho
Strong bones come from hard knocks不磕不碰骨頭不硬
不磕不碰骨头不硬
bù kē bù pèng gǔ tóu bù yìng
bu4 ke1 bu4 peng4 gu3 tou2 bu4 ying4
bu ke bu peng gu tou bu ying
bukebupenggutoubuying
pu k`o pu p`eng ku t`ou pu ying
pukopupengkutoupuying
pu ko pu peng ku tou pu ying
Stay Strong
Indestructible
Unbreakable
金剛不壞 / 金剛不壊
金刚不坏
kon gou fu e
kongoufue
kon go fu e
kongofue
jīn gāng bù huài
jin1 gang1 bu4 huai4
jin gang bu huai
jingangbuhuai
chin kang pu huai
chinkangpuhuai
Tempering Makes Strong Steel百煉才成鋼 / 百煉纔成鋼
百炼才成钢
bǎi liàn cái chéng gāng
bai3 lian4 cai2 cheng2 gang1
bai lian cai cheng gang
bailiancaichenggang
pai lien ts`ai ch`eng kang
pailientsaichengkang
pai lien tsai cheng kang
Firm Belief
Strong Faith
堅信
坚信
ken shin / kenshinjiān xìn / jian1 xin4 / jian xin / jianxinchien hsin / chienhsin
Strength
Ability
力量riki ryou / rikiryou / riki ryo / rikiryolì liàng / li4 liang4 / li liang / liliang
Immovable Mind不動心fu dou shin
fudoushin
fu do shin
fudoshin
Power
Strength
chikara / ryokulì / li4 / li
Physical Strength體力
体力
tai ryoku / tairyokutǐ lì / ti3 li4 / ti li / tilit`i li / tili / ti li
Physical Strength體力
体力
tairyokutǐ lì / ti3 li4 / ti li / tilit`i li / tili / ti li
Unbreakable壊れないkowa re na i
kowarenai
Spiritual Strength
Strength of Spirit
精神力量seishin rikiryou
seishinrikiryou
seishin rikiryo
seishinrikiryo
jīng shén lì liàng
jing1 shen2 li4 liang4
jing shen li liang
jingshenliliang
ching shen li liang
chingshenliliang
Fortitude
Strength of Character
剛毅
刚毅
gouki / gokigāng yì / gang1 yi4 / gang yi / gangyikang i / kangi
Indomitable
Persistence
Fortitude
不屈fukutsubù qū / bu4 qu1 / bu qu / buqupu ch`ü / puchü / pu chü
Inner Strength內力
内力
nai ryoku / nairyokunèi lì / nei4 li4 / nei li / neili
Robust
Sturdy
強健
强健
kyouken / kyokenqiáng jiàn
qiang2 jian4
qiang jian
qiangjian
ch`iang chien
chiangchien
chiang chien
Indomitable
Unyielding
不屈不撓
不屈不挠
fukutsu futou
fukutsufutou
fukutsu futo
fukutsufuto
bù qū bù náo
bu4 qu1 bu4 nao2
bu qu bu nao
buqubunao
pu ch`ü pu nao
puchüpunao
pu chü pu nao
Inner Strength內在力量
内在力量
nèi zài lì liàng
nei4 zai4 li4 liang4
nei zai li liang
neizaililiang
nei tsai li liang
neitsaililiang
Perseverance
Fortitude
堅忍
坚忍
ken nin / kenninjiǎn rěn / jian3 ren3 / jian ren / jianrenchien jen / chienjen
Inner Strength
Self-Improvement
自強
自强
zì qiáng / zi4 qiang2 / zi qiang / ziqiangtzu ch`iang / tzuchiang / tzu chiang
Always Striving for Inner Strength自強不息
自强不息
zì qiáng bú xī
zi4 qiang2 bu2 xi1
zi qiang bu xi
ziqiangbuxi
tzu ch`iang pu hsi
tzuchiangpuhsi
tzu chiang pu hsi
Free Will自由意志jiyuu ishi / jiyuuishi / jiyu ishi / jiyuishizì yóu yì zhì
zi4 you2 yi4 zhi4
zi you yi zhi
ziyouyizhi
tzu yu i chih
tzuyuichih
No Pain No Gain痛みなくして得るものなしitami naku shite erumono wa nashi
Romantic Passion激情gekijou / gekijojī qíng / ji1 qing2 / ji qing / jiqingchi ch`ing / chiching / chi ching
Resiliency強韌
强韧
qiáng rèn
qiang2 ren4
qiang ren
qiangren
ch`iang jen
chiangjen
chiang jen
Herculean Strength強力
强力
kyou ryoku / kyouryoku / kyo ryoku / kyoryokuqiáng lì / qiang2 li4 / qiang li / qianglich`iang li / chiangli / chiang li
Intensity強烈
强烈
kyouretsu / kyoretsuqiáng liè
qiang2 lie4
qiang lie
qianglie
ch`iang lieh
chianglieh
chiang lieh
Longing for Lover思戀
思恋
sī liàn / si1 lian4 / si lian / silianssu lien / ssulien
Almighty
Omnipotent
全能zennou / zennoquán néng
quan2 neng2
quan neng
quanneng
ch`üan neng
chüanneng
chüan neng
Jacques杰克jié kè / jie2 ke4 / jie ke / jiekechieh k`o / chiehko / chieh ko
Perception of Knowledge知識
知识
chishikizhī shi / zhi1 shi / zhi shi / zhishichih shih / chihshih
Courage and Strength勇力yuu ri / yuuri / yu ri / yuriyǒng lì / yong3 li4 / yong li / yongliyung li / yungli
Good Health健康kenkou / kenkojiàn kāng
jian4 kang1
jian kang
jiankang
chien k`ang
chienkang
chien kang
Resilient in the Face of Adversity打たれ強いu ta re tsuyo i
utaretsuyoi
Big Wave
namitāo / tao1 / taot`ao / tao
God is Good神真美好shén zhēn měi hǎo
shen2 zhen1 mei3 hao3
shen zhen mei hao
shenzhenmeihao
shen chen mei hao
shenchenmeihao
Desire
Craving
欲望yokubou / yokuboyù wàng / yu4 wang4 / yu wang / yuwangyü wang / yüwang
Christian
Disciple of Christ
基督徒kirisutojī dū tú / /
Silent
Solitary
jakujì / ji4 / jichi
Warrior武士bu shi / bushiwǔ shì / wu3 shi4 / wu shi / wushiwu shih / wushih
Phoenix (female)ou / ohuáng / huang2 / huang
Tathata
Ultimate Nature of All Things
真如shinnyozhēn rú / zhen1 ru2 / zhen ru / zhenruchen ju / chenju
Tigertorahǔ / hu3 / hu
Gutsy
Daring
Bold
迫力hakuryokupò lì / po4 li4 / po li / polip`o li / poli / po li
Family
Household
家庭 / 傢庭
家庭
ka tei / kateijiā tíng / jia1 ting2 / jia ting / jiatingchia t`ing / chiating / chia ting
Profound
Powerful Words
入木三分rù mù sān fēn
ru4 mu4 san1 fen1
ru mu san fen
rumusanfen
ju mu san fen
jumusanfen
With all the strength of your heart思い切りomoi kiri / omoikiri
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiki Jujutsu
Archangel
Aster
Berserk
Bushido
Christ
Create
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Energy
Enlighten
Enlightened
Faith in God
Family
Father
Fortune
Heart of a Warrior
House
Iaido
Jesus
Keep Fighting
Kung Fu
Love
Loyalty
Mind Body Soul Spirit
Mind Body Spirit
Mother
Mushin
Music
Overcome
Peach
Pleasure
Protector
Rain
Rebirth
Right Intention
Rooster
Samurai
Strength
Strength of Spirit
Strong Heart
Sword
The Red String
The Way
The Way of the Warrior
Thunder Lightning in Kanji
Trust in God
Trust No Man
Victory
Wedding
White
Winter
Wolf
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Strong Kanji, Strong Characters, Strong in Mandarin Chinese, Strong Characters, Strong in Chinese Writing, Strong in Japanese Writing, Strong in Asian Writing, Strong Ideograms, Chinese Strong symbols, Strong Hieroglyphics, Strong Glyphs, Strong in Chinese Letters, Strong Hanzi, Strong in Japanese Kanji, Strong Pictograms, Strong in the Chinese Written-Language, or Strong in the Japanese Written-Language.