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I’d Rather Be With You in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy an I’d Rather Be With You calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "I’d Rather Be With You" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "I’d Rather Be With You" title below...

  1. I’d Rather Be With You
  2. Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice
  3. A Deliberate Inaction...
  4. Be Master of Mind, Not Mastered by Mind
  5. Live Free or Die
  6. Curious / Inquisitive
  7. Inner Beauty / Beauty of Spirit
  8. Milano
  9. Coffee / Café
10. Aysia
11. Castro
12. Chastity
13. Mixed Martial Arts
14. Time is more valuable than Jade
15. Ch'ang Hon Taekwondo
16. Diamond
17. The Force
18. Scarlet
19. Death Before Dishonor
20. State of Anarchy
21. Salvation
22. Blacksmith
23. Archer
24. Swan
25. Joy
26. Lonely
27. Rose
28. Kick-Boxing
29. Self-Discipline / Will-Power
30. Martial Arts Skills
31. Beautiful Princess
32. Schooled by Experience and Hard Knocks
33. The Way of the Dragon
34. Luo / Raku
35. Death Before Dishonor
36. Faith Hope Love
37. Inner Strength
38. Wado-Kai
39. Idea / Concept
40. Live in Prosperity
41. Woman of Strong Character...
42. Zen Contemplation
43. Jade
44. Seeing is Believing
45. Idea / Thought / Meaning
46. Happy Birthday
47. Death Before Surrender
48. Crystal
49. Body
50. Value of Warrior Generals
51. Impartial and Fair to the...
52. Peace / Peaceful
53. Forgiveness
54. Revenge
55. Spiritual Soul Mates
56. Danger
57. Pursue Your Dreams
58. Life of Love
59. Karma
60. Death Before Surrender
61. Sasuke
62. Indomitable Spirit
63. Wado-Ryu
64. Adventure
65. Inner Peace
66. Eternal Love
67. Flying Tigers
68. Iron Palm
69. Southern Praying Mantis
70. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching
71. Ninja
72. Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa
73. Death Before Dishonor
74. Bravery / Courage
75. Christianity / Christian
76. Nothingness
77. Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister
78. Lingering Mind
79. Immovable Mind
80. Taekwondo
81. A sly rabbit has three openings to its den
82. Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu
83. Corinthians 13:4
84. Qi Gong / Chi Kung
85. Hapkido

I’d Rather Be With You

China wǒ zhǐ yuàn hé nǐ zài yī qǐ
I’d Rather Be With You

This is a Chinese phrase that is the rough equivalent to, "You are the one I want to be with," or "I only wish to be with you."

Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice

China nìng quē wú làn
Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice

This Chinese proverb can be translated as, "Better to have nothing (than substandard choice)."

It basically suggests that one should prefer to go without something rather than accept a shoddy option.


See Also:  A Deliberate Inaction Is Better Than a Blind Action

A Deliberate Inaction
Is Better Than A Blind Action

China yí dòng bù rú yí jìng
A Deliberate Inaction / Is Better Than A Blind Action

Sometimes this is translated by others as "Look before you leap" but the more accurate and direct translation is the one I used in the title.

While somewhat military in its origin, this proverb can apply to any situation where a decision needs to be made, but perhaps there are still some "unknowns."

This phrase suggests that in our "action based" world, sometimes the "smarter move" is "no move at all."


See Also:  Better to Choose Nothing Rather Than Make a Poor Choice

Be Master of Mind, Not Mastered by Mind

China yuàn zuò xīn shī bù shī yú xīn
Be Master of Mind, Not Mastered by Mind

This is, "Be master of mind, rather than mastered by mind," in Chinese.

This is not an ancient Chinese phrase but rather something we added at the request of a customer.

Live Free or Die

Give me liberty or give me death
China bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
Live Free or Die

不自由毋寧死 means, "Give me liberty or give me death," in Chinese.

This is also the best way to say, "Live free or die."

The characters break down this way:
不 = Not; none; without.
自由 = Freedom; liberty; freewill; self-determination.
毋寧 = Rather; would rather; rather be.
死 = Dead; death.

This will go nicely next to your, "Don't tread on me," flag. This phrase is known well enough in China that it's listed in a few dictionaries. Though I doubt you will find too many Chinese citizens willing to yell this on the steps of the capital in Beijing.


See Also:  Death Before Dishonor

Curious / Inquisitive

China hào qí
Japan kouki
Curious / Inquisitive

好奇 means curiosity or inquisitive in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. It is a rather positive word in all three languages - though not as commonly used in Japanese.

Inner Beauty / Beauty of Spirit

China nèi zài měi
Inner Beauty / Beauty of Spirit

This three-character title speaks of beauty on the inside. It's not about outward or physical beauty but rather the inner beauty possessed by someone. This can also be translated as "beauty of spirit."

Inner Beauty / Beauty of Spirit

Japan nai men bi
Inner Beauty / Beauty of Spirit

This three-character title speaks of beauty on the inside. It's not about outward or physical beauty but rather the inner beauty possessed by someone. This can also be translated as "beauty of spirit."

Milano

Japan mirano
Milano

ミラノ is the Japanese Katakana (phonetic Japanese) for the name and city, Milano.

This version is more the Italian pronunciation with the "o" rather than just the English Milan.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Coffee / Café

Japan koohii
Coffee / Café

珈琲 is how they write coffee Japan.

珈琲 is a loanword from English or Spanish. It's meant to sound like coffee or café, rather than to mean coffee.

Coffee / Café

China kā fēi
Coffee / Café

咖啡 is how they write coffee in mainland China (it's 咖逼 in Taiwan).

咖啡 is a loanword from English or Spanish. It's meant to sound like coffee or café, rather than to mean coffee.

Aysia

China ài xī yà
Aysia

愛西亞 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Aysia.

The meaning is "Love West Asia," although it will be read as a name, rather than this meaning by most.

Castro

China kǎ sī tè luó
Castro

卡斯特羅 is the surname Castro transliterated into Mandarin Chinese.

A Chinese person may associate this title with Fidel Castro as this Cuban leader is rather famous in China.

Chastity

Japan chasutitii
Chastity

This is the name Chastity written in Katakana (phonetic Japanese). If your name is Chastity, I suggest using a word that means Chastity, rather than this transliteration of the name.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Mixed Martial Arts

Japan sougoukakutougi
Mixed Martial Arts

総合格闘技 is a Japanese title for mixed martial arts or MMA.

Note: Some will use other titles for this rather new word or evolving concept. This seems to be the most common right now in the Japanese language.

Time is more valuable than Jade

China bù guì chǐ zhī bì ér zhòng cùn zhī yīn
Time is more valuable than Jade

This literally translates as: Treasure not a foot long [piece of] jade, [rather] treasure an inch of time.

Figuratively, this suggests that time is the most important/valuable thing in life.

Ch'ang Hon Taekwondo

Ch'ang Hon Taekwondo

蒼軒跆拳道 is the title "Chang Hon Taekwon-Do" written in old Korean Hanja.

This literally means, "Pale Blue Kick Fist/Punch Way."

The rather awkward official romanization is "cang heon tae gweon do."


Occasionally, you will see the first Hanja character written as 苍 instead of 蒼. It's just a different way to write the same character. If you want 苍 instead of 蒼, just let me know.

Diamond

China dài méng dé
Diamond

戴矇德 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Diamond.

I suggest you use a word that means diamond, rather than this one that sounds like diamond.

The Force

Japan foosu
The Force

フォース is how Japanese will write The Force, as in Star Wars.

フォース is phonetic, so it's meant to sound like the English word "force" rather than mean force in Japanese.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Scarlet

Japan sukaaretto
Scarlet

This is the name Scarlet written in Katakana (phonetic Japanese).

If this is your name, please consider a title that means the color scarlet, rather than this, which sounds like Scarlet.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Death Before Dishonor

Better to be broken jade than unbroken pottery
China níng wéi yù suì
Death Before Dishonor

寧為玉碎 is the short version of a longer Chinese proverb which means, "rather be shattered piece of jade than an unbroken piece of pottery." The characters shown above just say the "rather be a broken piece of jade" part (the second half is implied - everyone in China knows this idiom).

A little more explanation:
Death is implied with the "broken" meaning. Jade is one of the most precious materials in Chinese history, and in this case is compared with one's honor and self-worth. Pottery is just something you eat off of, it has no deep value, just as a person who has lost their honor, or had none to begin with.
Thus, this means, "better to die with honor than to live in shame" or words to that effect.

寧為玉碎 is often translated in English as "Death Before Dishonor," the famous military slogan.

I would also compare this to the English proverb, "Better to die on your feet than live on your knees."

State of Anarchy

China wú jíng chá
Japan mukeisatsu
State of Anarchy

無警察 means the state of anarchy. More literally it means "without rules or judges." This combination of characters makes sense in Korean and Chinese but with a meaning closer to, "without police." 無警察 is kind of a weird selection for a wall scroll, and a rather obscure idea (a couple of customers begged for this term, so we added it).

Salvation

China jiù shì
Japan guze
Salvation

救世 is salvation in Chinese characters and Japanese Kanji.

This can refer to the saving, rescue, or salvation of one's life, the life or lives of others, a generation, an era, or even the whole world. As you can see, this is a rather generic and broad way to say salvation.

Blacksmith

China tiě jiang
Blacksmith

鐵匠 means blacksmith or ironworker in Chinese.

鐵 means iron or tough metal.

匠 means craftsman or artisan. 匠 can also mean carpenter (in the context of woodworking rather than metal forging).

Archer

China ā chè
Archer

阿徹 is a common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Archer.

However, I suggest you use a word that means archer rather than this transliteration that only sounds like Archer.

Swan

China sī mò
Swan

斯萬 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Swan. If your name is Swan, I suggest using one of the titles we have that mean "swan" rather than this one that just sounds like "swan."

Joy

China qiáo yī
Joy

喬伊 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Joy.

If your name is Joy, I recommend that you pick a character that means "joy" rather than this version which only sounds like "Joy."

Joy

Japan joi
Joy

ジョイ is the name Joy written in Katakana (phonetic Japanese).

If your name is Joy, I recommend that you pick a character that means "joy" rather than this version which only sounds like "Joy."


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Lonely

China gū dú
Japan ko doku
Lonely

孤獨 means lonely, solitude, loneliness, and lonesome.
In some context, it can mean reclusive, isolation, single or solo.

孤獨 is a Japanese word but not a good selection for a wall scroll.
In Chinese, this will relay a rather sad feeling to anyone who reads this calligraphy on your wall.


独The version shown to the left is the Traditional Chinese and ancient Japanese version. In modern Japan and China they often use a different more simplified version of the second character (as shown to the right). If you want this Japanese/Simplified version, please click on the character shown to the right instead of the button above.

Rose

China luō sī
Rose

羅斯 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Rose.

羅斯 is meant to sound like the English word rose, but does not mean the rose flower. You might want the meaning, rather than this transliteration if your name is Rose.

Kick-Boxing

Japan kikkubokushingu
Kick-Boxing

This is the Japanese Katakana word for kickboxing. This is a transliteration or borrowed word, meaning that it's meant to sound like "kick-boxing," rather than being an organic Japanese Kanji word that means "kick-boxing."


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Self-Discipline / Will-Power

China zì lǜ
Japan jiritsu
Self-Discipline / Will-Power

Self-discipline means self-control. It is doing what you really want to do, rather than being tossed around by your feelings like a leaf in the wind. You act instead of react. You get things done in an orderly and efficient way. With self-discipline, you take charge of yourself.


Not sure if this one works for a Japanese audience.


See Also:  Discipline | Self-Control

Martial Arts Skills

China wǔ jì
Japan bugi
Martial Arts Skills

This can be translated as "martial arts skills," "warrior skills," or "military skills" depending on usage. In both Japanese and Chinese, rather than meaning martial arts, this speaks more to the skills that you posses in regards to martial arts. This phrase also has a light suggestion of "having an itch to show off these skills."

Beautiful Princess

China měi lì de gōng zhǔ
Beautiful Princess

美麗的公主 is how to write beautiful princess in Chinese. The first two characters mean feminine beauty, or rather a way to say beautiful that only applies to women. The middle character is just a connecting character. The last two characters mean princess.


See Also:  Queen

Schooled by Experience and Hard Knocks

Japan hyakusenrenma
Schooled by Experience and Hard Knocks

百戦錬磨 is a Japanese proverb or title that mean veteran, or rather, someone schooled by adversity in many battles, or someone rich in life experience.

If you are who you are because of the adversity you experienced in life, this could be the title for you.

The Way of the Dragon

China lóng zhī dào
The Way of the Dragon

龍之道 is how the way of the dragon is written in Chinese.

龍之道 is not the same as the Chinese movie that was titled in English as "The Way of the Dragon". 龍之道 is rather, the literal meaning, of the dragon's way. The first character is dragon, the second is a possessive article, and the third character means way or path.

Luo / Raku

Surname
China luò
Japan raku
Luo / Raku

駱 is a character that can be a Chinese surname Luo or Japanese surname Raku.

The original meaning of this character is camel, but that is rather archaic. The surname is the first thing that comes to mind for any Chinese or Japanese person.

Death Before Dishonor

Japan fu mei yo yo ri shi
Death Before Dishonor

This is the Japanese version of "Death Before Dishonor." Japanese grammar is a bit different than English, so this really means something like "Rather die than to be dishonored." However, the "dishonor" is the first three Kanji, and death is the last Kanji. There are two Hiragana (より) which indicate the preference is death when comparing dishonor to death.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Faith Hope Love

China xìn wàng ài
Faith Hope Love

信望愛 is a Chinese list of words meaning faith, hope, and love.

信望愛 is not a typical phrase in Chinese but rather just random words strung together. There's no bad meaning, it's just not typical Chinese grammar.

Inner Strength

China nèi zài lì liàng
Inner Strength

內在力量 is the slightly-verbose way to say inner-strength. The first two characters mean "intrinsic" or "inner." The second two characters mean "power," "force" or "strength" (especially physical strength). 內在力量 is more a short phrase rather than just a word in Chinese and Korean. This can sort of be understood in Japanese but it's not normal/proper Japanese.

Wado-Kai

Japan wa dou kai
Wado-Kai

Wado-Kai is used as a title for styles of Karate and Aikido.

Breaking down the characters into the proper Japanese Romaji, you have "wa dou kai" or "wa dō kai." The meaning is roughly-translated as "Harmony Way Club" or "Peace Method Association." The first Kanji should probably be read as harmony, rather than peace in this case.


See Also:  Wado-Ryu

Idea / Concept

China lǐ niàn
Japan ri nen
Idea / Concept

理念 / 理唸 means idea, notion, concept, principle, theory, philosophy*, or doctrine in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

理念 / 理唸 is OK for a wall scroll, although it's more commonly used as an oral/informal word in Asia.

* 理念 / 理唸 is not the title for philosophy but rather is about having a certain philosophy or approach to something.

Live in Prosperity

China shēng huó yú fán róng zhōng
Live in Prosperity

This means, "live in prosperity." It's kind of a suggestion to be prosperity the center of your world.

This is the way some people want to live (and you should always live for what you love). However, this phrase does not suggest a peaceful life - rather one that is always busy. It's not for everyone but it might be for you.


See Also:  Prosperity

Woman of Strong Character
Woman Hero

China nǚ jiá
Japan joketsu
Woman of Strong Character / Woman Hero

女傑 can mean brave woman, heroine, lady of character, distinguished woman, outstanding woman, and sometimes prominent woman.

In modern usage, some people might use this to give a title to women like Oprah Winfrey, Hillary Clinton, or Sarah Palin. I would rather use it for a woman like Araceli Segarra (the first woman from Spain to climb Mt. Everest).

Zen Contemplation

China rù dìng
Zen Contemplation

This title can be defined as Zen contemplation in Japanese, or sit quietly in (Buddhist) meditation in Chinese. It also carries a similar meaning in Korean Hanja. Therefore, this is a rather universal term for meditation in the context of Buddhism throughout the Orient.

Can also be translated as "Meditatively equipoised" or "enter into meditation by stilling the karmic activities of deed, speech, and thought."

The original Sanskrit word is samapanna. In Tibetan: snyoms par zhugs pa.

Jade

China jiǎ dé
Jade

賈德 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Jade.

賈德 is meant to sound like the English pronunciation of jade using Mandarin Chinese sounds. It does not mean jade.

I suggest the character that means jade rather than this if your name is Jade.

Jade

(precious stone)
China
Japan tama / gyoku
Jade

玉 is how to write jade in Chinese, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji. This refers to the semi-precious stone that can be almost white or a vivid green.

Note: In Japanese, this character can mean jewel, ball, sphere or coin depending on context.

If your name is Jade, you may want to choose this to represent your name by meaning rather than pronunciation.

Seeing is Believing

China bǎi wén bù rú yí jiàn
Seeing is Believing

This proverb literally means "Better to see something once rather than hear about it one hundred times" or "Telling me about something 100 times is not as good as seeing it once." In English, we have the similar proverb of "Seeing is believing" but this has a bit of the "A picture paints a thousand words" meaning too.

Sometimes it's simply more prudent to verify with your own eyes.

Idea / Thought / Meaning

China
Japan kokoro
Idea / Thought / Meaning

意 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for idea, intention, meaning, thought, wish, desire, intention, feelings, thoughts.

In Buddhism, this is the last of the six means of perception (the others are sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and this one represents mind). It does not literally mean "mind", but rather something more like mental powers, intellect, intelligence, faculty of thought, or understanding in the Buddhist context.

Happy Birthday

China shēng rì kuài lè
Happy Birthday

生日快樂 is how to write "Happy Birthday" in Chinese. The first two characters mean "birthday," and the second two characters mean "happiness," or rather a wish for happiness.

Because a birthday only lasts one day per year, we strongly suggest that you find an appropriate and personal calligraphy gift that can be hung in the recipient's home year round.

Death Before Surrender

China nìng sǐ bù xiáng
Death Before Surrender

This ancient Chinese proverb can be translated as "Rather to die than surrender," "Prefer death over surrender," "To prefer death to surrender," or simply "No surrender."

寧死不降 is probably the closest proverb to the English proverb "Better to die on your feet than live on your knees."

Crystal

China shuǐ jīng
Japan suishou
Crystal

水晶 means "crystal" such as fine crystal glassware or diamonds in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Hanja.

水晶 is a cool selection if your name is Crystal, as it will match your name by meaning (rather than pronunciation).

It's also cool because it will universally contain the meaning of your name in most Asian languages.

Body

China shēn
Japan mi
Body

身 is how to write "body" as in your human body, in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja. Depending on context and certain language issues, this character can also mean: main part, hull, oneself, somebody, person, I, me, sword, lifetime, one's station in life, etc.

While this written word is universal in three languages, it still makes a rather odd selection for a wall scroll. Also, they tend to use 体 (karada) in Japanese for body (depending on context).


See Also:  Karada

Value of Warrior Generals

China bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō jiàng zài móu ér bú zài yǒng
Value of Warrior Generals

This literally means: [Just as] soldiers/warriors [are valued for their] quality and not [just] for quantity, [so] generals [are valued] for their tactics, not [just] for [their] bravery.

This is a proverb that follows one about how it is better to have warriors of quality, rather than just a large quantity of warriors in your army/force.


See Also:  兵在精而不在多

Impartial and Fair to the
Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World

China yí shì tóng rén
Japan isshidoujin
Impartial and Fair to the / Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World

一視同仁 is how to write "universal benevolence." 一視同仁 is also how to express the idea that you see all people the same.

If you are kind and charitable to all people, this is the best way to state that virtue. It is the essence of being impartial to all mankind, regardless of social standing, background, race, sex, etc. You do not judge others but rather you see them eye to eye on the same level with you.


See Also:  Benevolence | Compassion | Equality | Justice | Right Decision | Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common

Peace / Peaceful

China píng hé
Japan hei wa
Peace / Peaceful

平和 is the Japanese and Korean order of these characters used most often to express the idea of peace, tranquility and harmony.

It's just the reverse order of the Chinese. In this order in Chinese, it means takes the "mild" definition, rather than "peace." In Korean, the combination keeps the same meaning in either order.

The second character also means balance, so there is an element of harmony and balance along with peace.

Forgiveness (from the top down)

China róng shè
Japan you sha
Forgiveness (from the top down)

容赦 is the kind of forgiveness that a king might give to his subjects for crimes or wrong-doings.

容赦 is a rather high-level forgiveness. Meaning that it goes from a higher level to lower (not the reverse).

Alone, the first character can mean "to bear," "to allow" and/or "to tolerate," and the second can mean "to forgive," "to pardon" and/or "to excuse."

When you put both characters together, you get forgiveness, pardon, mercy, leniency, or going easy (on someone).


See Also:  Benevolence

Revenge

China fù chóu
Japan fukukyuu
Revenge

These two characters can be translated as revenge, avenge, reprisal or vengeance.

復仇 is actually a very odd selection for a calligraphy scroll. This would be unusual, if not shocking, to a Japanese or Chinese person that views such calligraphy artwork. Also, my Japanese translator has indicated this word is rather obscure in modern Japanese (see our Japanese version of this bad word).

We do not recommend this for a wall scroll - it is here for educational and reference purposes only.

Spiritual Soul Mates

China jīng shén bàn lǚ
Japan sei shin han ryo
Spiritual Soul Mates

精神伴侶 is title means "Spiritual Soul Mates." The first two characters mean "spiritual" or "soul." The second two characters mean "mates," "companions" or "partners."

精神伴侶 is more about the spiritual connection between partners rather than a "fate-brought-us-together" kind of soul mates.

Both halves of this title have meaning in Japanese but I've not yet confirmed that this is a commonly used title in Japan.

Danger

A dangerous character in every way
China wēi
Japan ki
Danger

危 means danger, peril or "to endanger." If you live a dangerous life, or want to subtly warn others that you are a dangerous person, this may be the selection for you.

This also means "danger" and sometimes "fear" in Japanese and Korean but is seldom seen outside of compound words in those languages (as a single character, it's kind of like an abbreviation for danger in Japanese and Korean). 危 is also a rather odd selection for a wall scroll anyway. It's only here because people search for danger on our website.

Pursue Your Dreams

China zhuī xún mèng xiǎng
Pursue Your Dreams

追尋夢想 means "pursue your dreams," "follow your dreams," or "chase your dreams" in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "to pursue," "to track down," or "to search for."

The last two mean dreams. This version of dreams refers to those with an element of reality (not the dreams you have when you sleep but rather your aspirations or goals in life).

This title will tell everyone that you want to make your dreams come true.


See Also:  Pursuit of Happiness

Life of Love

China ài qíng shēng huó
Japan aijyou seikatsu
Life of Love

愛情生活 is the Chinese proverb for "Loving Life." Some also translate this as "[your] Loving Life" or "Life full of Love."

愛情生活 is about being a loving person (to spouse and/or family) during your life. 愛情生活 is not the same as loving the state of being alive - not "love of living" but rather "being loving person during your life."


Note: Korean pronunciation is included above, though use of this proverb in Korean has not been verified.

This proverb can be understood in Japanese but it's primarily a Chinese proverb (it will "feel" Chinese to a Japanese person).

Karma

Transliterated personal name
China kǎ mǎ
Karma

卡瑪 is the most common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Karma.

Note: This sounds like Karma but does not have the meaning of Karma in Chinese. See our other entry if you are looking for the Buddhist idea of Karma.

In fact, if your name is Karma, I strongly suggest that you use a word that means Karma, rather than this one which sounds like Karma (meaning is more important and universal in Chinese/Japanese/Korean).

Death Before Surrender

Rather die than compromise
China níng sǐ bù qū
Death Before Surrender

寧死不屈 is often translated as "Death Before Dishonor."

The literal translation is more like, "Better die than compromise." The last two characters mean "not to bend" or "not to bow down." Some might even say that it means "not to surrender." Thus, you could say this proverb means, "Better to die than live on my knees" or simply "no surrender" (with the real idea being that you would rather die than surrender).

Sasuke

Japan sasuke
Sasuke

サスケ is the Japanese title of the TV show, Sasuke Rising.

サスケ is the original Japanese TV show that inspired the American Ninja Warrior, Ninja Warrior UK, and other variations.

It should be noted that in Japan, the shows title is usually displayed in capital Roman letters as "SASUKE", rather than the Japanese text, サスケ. Although, both titles are known in Japan (you'd probably need to search for サスケ if looking to buy a Sasuke DVD in Japan).


Notes: Sasuke can also be a given name (written the same way). There are also other names that romanize as Sasuke in Japanese.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Indomitable Spirit

Korean Only
China bǎi shé bù qū
Indomitable Spirit

This Korean proverb means "indomitable spirit," at least, that is the way it is commonly translated in martial arts circles (Taekwondo, Hapkido, etc.).

The literal translation is "[one] hundred [times] broken [still] don't succumb."
Or more naturally translated, "Even if attacked/beaten one hundred times, still be undaunted/indomitable."

Notes:
Some will say this is one long word rather than a proverb.
百折不屈 is also a proverb/word in Chinese though rarely used in modern times.

Wado-Ryu

Style of Karate or Jujitsu
Japan wa dou ryuu
Wado-Ryu

Wado-Ryu is a style of Karate or Jujutsu (Jujitsu).
Note: Many will argue as to whether this is a style of Karate or Jujutsu.

While some find Wado-Ryu similar to Shotokan Karate, enough differences exist in perspective and technique that it stands by itself.

Breaking down the characters into the proper Japanese Romaji, you have "wa dou ryuu" or "wa dō ryū." The meaning is roughly-translated as "Harmony Way Style" or "Peace Method Style." The first Kanji should probably be read as harmony, rather than peace in this case.


See Also:  Wado-Kai

Adventure

China tàn xiǎn
Japan tanken
Adventure

If you lead a life of adventure (like I do), a 探險 wall scroll is for you.

Alone, the first character can mean "to explore," "to search out," or "to scout." The second character holds the meanings of "dangerous" and "rugged." Together these two characters create the word that means "adventure" or "to explore."

探険 is a modern Japanese Kanji version, but it more precisely means exploration or expedition rather than adventure. 探險 is the old/ancient Japanese version used before WWII. Let us know if you want the modern Japanese version instead.


See Also:  Bon Voyage | Travel

Inner Peace

China nèi xīn píng jìng
Japan naishin heizyou
Inner Peace

This Chinese and Japanese phrase is a direct translation for the western idea of inner peace.

The first two characters contain the idea of "heart," "innermost being," or "deep in the/your inner mind."

The last two characters mean "tranquil" and "serene."

I have seen this phrase used as "inner peace" for art prints and even on the side of coffee cups. But I think the translation is too literal. It feels like a direct translation from English rather than a nicely composed Chinese or Japanese phrase. See my other entries for "inner peace."


See Also:  Serenity | Simplicity | Peace

Eternal Love

Japan ei en no ai
Eternal Love

The first two characters mean eternal, eternity, perpetuity, forever, immortality, and permanence.

The third character is a possessive article which sort of makes this selection mean "Love, of the eternal kind."

The last character is "love."

Cultural note: Most of the time, it is taboo to use the word "love" in Japanese. For instance, a Japanese man will say, "I like you," rather than, "I love you," to his spouse/girlfriend. However, this entry for eternal love is acceptable because of the way it is composed.

This entry is only appropriate if your audience is Japanese. We also have a Chinese version of this phrase.

Flying Tigers

China fēi hǔ
Flying Tigers

飛虎 is the short, or rather, Korean title of the "Flying Tigers." This short title is not very often used in China but is a title used in Korea. At the time the Flying Tigers volunteers were in China, Korea was also occupied by Japanese forces. Because many Korean civilians were enslaved and killed at the hands of the Japanese soldiers, any group that fought against the Japanese at that time was held in high-esteem by Korean people.

Note: I suggest the other 3-character entry since this group was so strongly related with China.

飛虎 is also used as an adjective in Korean to describe a courageous person.

Iron Palm

China tiě zhǎng
Japan tetsu-tenohira
Iron Palm

These two characters mean "iron palm," the martial arts technique taught by Brian Gray and others.

This term can mean different things to different people. The consensus is that rather than a type or style of martial arts, this is a technique for refining hand position and strengthening of hands to strike blows for with maximum force and effect.

The regime may include herbal treatments and special exercises to fortify the hands.

In more extreme versions, the carpals and metacarpal bones in the hand are systematically broken, so that when they heal, they will become stronger.

Japanese note: This does make sense in Japanese (though the version shown above is the ancient form of the first Kanji) this is far from a commonly-known term.

Southern Praying Mantis

China nán pài táng láng
Southern Praying Mantis

This can be translated literally as "Southern School Praying Mantis" or "Southern Style Praying Mantis."

Despite its name, the Southern Praying Mantis style of Chinese martial arts is unrelated to the Northern Praying Mantis style. Southern Praying Mantis is instead related most closely to fellow Hakka styles such as Dragon and more distantly to the Fujian family of styles that includes Fujian White Crane, Five Ancestors, and Wing Chun.

This style of martial arts focuses more on fighting skills rather than aesthetics.

Of course, you already knew that if you were looking for this term.

Note: This title can be pronounced and does have meaning in Korean but only to Koreans familiar with Chinese martial arts.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

Except from Chapter 67
China yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

This is an except from the 67th Chapter of Lao Tzu's (Lao Zi's) Te-Tao Ching (Dao De Jing). This is the part where the three treasures are discussed. In English, we'd say these three treasures are compassion, frugality, and humility. Some may translate these as love, moderation, and lack of arrogance. I have also seen them translated as benevolence, modesty, and "Not presuming to be at the forefront in the world." You can mix them up the way you want, as translation is not really a science but rather an art.

I should also explain that the first two treasures are single-character ideas, yet the third treasure was written out in six characters (there are also some auxiliary characters to number the treasures).

If Lao Tzu's words are important to you, then a wall scroll with this passage might make a great addition to your home.

Ninja

China rěn
Japan nin
Ninja

忍 is just the first character of "Ninja." It means to beat, to endure, or to tolerate. Some use this as the short form of "Ninja" but it would be more correct to use the two-character version in most cases (and for clarity). Other definitions of this Kanji include: to bear, put up with, conceal, spy or sneak. It is also a character in Korean Hanja and Chinese but not well-known with this meaning but rather a definition like "patience."

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write it in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).

Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

China quán fǎ
Japan kenpou
Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

This form of martial arts can be translated in several ways. Some will call it "fist principles" or "the way of the fist," or even "law of the fist." The first character literally means fist. The second can mean law, method, way, principle or Buddhist teaching.

Kempo is really a potluck of martial arts. Often a combination of Chinese martial arts such as Shaolin Kung Fu with Japanese martial arts such as Karate, Jujutsu (Jujitsu), Aikido, and others. You may see the term "Kempo Karate" which basically means Karate with other disciplines added. In this way, Kempo becomes an adjective rather than a title or school of martial arts.

These facts will long be argued by various masters and students of Kempo. Even the argument as to whether it should be spelled "kenpo" or "Kempo" ensues at dojos around the world (the correct Romaji should actually be "kenpou" if you precisely follow the rules).

The benefit of Kempo is that the techniques are easier to learn and master compared to pure Kung Fu (wu shu). Students are often taught basic Karate moves, kicks, and punches before augmenting the basic skills with complex Kung Fu techniques. This allows students of Kempo achieve a level where they can defend themselves or fight in a relatively short amount of time (a few years rather than a decade or more).

Because the definition of this word is so fluid, I should make some notes here:

1. Purists in Okinawa will claim that "Okinawa Kenpo" or "Ryukyu Hon Kenpo" is the original and true version of this martial art from the old kingdom. There is actually little or no connection between Okinawa Kenpo and the way the word is used elsewhere.

2. In Chinese, where these characters are pronounced "quan fa" (sometimes Romanized as "chuan fa" because the Chinese-pinyin "q" actually sounds like an English "ch" sound), these characters do not hold the connotation of being a mixed martial art. It is simply defined as "the law of the fist."

3. In my Japanese dictionary, it oddly defines Kenpo as "Chinese art of self-defense." I personally don't feel this is the most common way that people perceive the word but just something you should know.

Death Before Dishonor

Better to be broken jade than unbroken pottery
China níng wéi yù suì bú wéi wǎ quán
Death Before Dishonor

This is the long version of a Chinese proverb which means, "rather be shattered piece of jade than an unbroken piece of pottery."

A little more explanation:
Death is implied with the "broken" meaning. Jade is one of the most precious materials in Chinese history, and in this case is compared with one's honor and self-worth. Pottery is just something you eat off of, it has no deep value, just as a person who has lost their honor, or had none to begin with.
Thus, this means, "better to die with honor than to live in shame" or words to that effect.

This is often translated in English as "Death Before Dishonor," the famous military slogan.

I would also compare this to the English proverb, "Better to die on your feet than live on your knees."


This is an idiom. It therefore doesn't directly say exactly what it means. If you think about the English idiom, "The grass is always greener," it does not directly say "jealousy" or "envy" but everyone knows that it is implied.

Bravery / Courage

Courage in the face of Fear
China yǒng gǎn
Japan yuu kan
Bravery / Courage

勇敢 is about courage is bravery in the face of fear. You do the right thing even when it is hard or scary. When you are courageous, you don't give up. You try new things. You admit mistakes. This kind of courage is the willingness to take action in the face of danger and peril.

勇敢 can also be translated as: braveness, valor, heroic, fearless, boldness, prowess, gallantry, audacity, daring, dauntless and/or courage in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. This version of bravery/courage can be an adjective or a noun. The first character means bravery and courage by itself. The second character means "daring" by itself. The second character just emphasizes the meaning of the first but adds an idea that you are not afraid of taking a dare, and you are not afraid of danger.

勇敢 is about brave behavior versus the mental state of being brave. You'd more likely use this to say, "He fought courageously in the battle," rather than "He is very courageous."

Bravery / Courage

Courageous Energy
China yǒng qì
Japan yuuki
Bravery / Courage

There are several ways to express bravery and courage in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. This version is the most spiritual. 勇氣 is the essence of bravery from deep within your being. 勇氣 is the mental state of being brave versus actual brave behavior. You'd more likely use this to say, "He is very courageous," rather than "He fought courageously in the battle."

The first character also means bravery or courage when it's seen alone. With the second character added, an element of energy or spirit is added. The second character is the same "chi" or "qi" energy that Kung Fu masters focus when they strike. For this reason, you could say this means "spirit of courage" or "brave spirit."

勇氣 is certainly a stronger word than just the first character alone.

Beyond bravery or courage, dictionaries also translate this word as valor/valour, nerve, audacity, daring, pluck, plucky, gallantry, guts, gutsy and boldness.

勇氣 is also one of the 8 key concepts of tang soo do.


Japanese 気 While the version shown to the left is commonly used in Chinese and Korean Hanja (and ancient Japanese Kanji), please note that the second character is written with slightly fewer strokes in modern Japanese. If you want the modern Japanese version, please click on the character to the right. Both styles would be understood by native Chinese, Japanese, and many (but not all) Korean people. You should make your selection based on the intended audience for your calligraphy artwork. Or pick the single-character form of bravery/courage which is universal.

Christianity / Christian

China jī dū jiào
Japan kirisutokyou
Christianity / Christian

基督教 is the Chinese, Japanese and Korean word for "Christianity." Just as in English, this word is often used to mean "Protestant" but includes Catholics in the true definition.

It is the word used to refer to the whole "Christian religion" or "Christian Faith" and therefore, it can be translated as "Christianity." However, used as an adjective in regards to a person, it would translate as "Christian." But more like saying "His religion is Christianity" rather than a noun form.

If you break it apart, the characters mean Base/Foundation Leading/Supervising Religion/Teaching. It makes more sense in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. The first two characters together are translated as "Christ." So you can also say this means "Christ's Religion" or "Christ's Teachings" when directly translated, or in reverse, "The Religion of Christ" or "The Teaching of Christ."

Notes: The last character has a slight difference in one stroke - however, in calligraphic form, this will not be apparent. This entry can easily be read by any Korean person who knows Hanja characters (Chinese characters used in Korean).


See Also:  Jesus Christ | God of Abraham

Nothingness

China kōng wú
Japan kuu mu
Nothingness

空無 is "nothingness" in a Buddhist context.

The first character means empty but can also mean air or sky (air and sky have no form).

The second character means have not, no, none, not or to lack.

Together these characters reinforce each other into a word that means "absolute nothingness."

I know this is a term used in Buddhism but I have not yet figured out the context in which it is used. I suppose it can be the fact that Buddhists believe that the world in a non-real illusion, or perhaps it's about visualizing yourself as "nothing" and therefore leaving behind your desire and worldliness.
Buddhist concepts and titles often have this element of ambiguity or rather "mystery." Therefore, such ideas can have different meanings to different people, and that's okay. If you don't get it right in this lifetime, as there will be plenty more lifetimes to master it (whatever "it" is, and if "it" really exists at all).

Soothill defines this as "Unreality, or immateriality, of things, which is defined as nothing existing of independent or self-contained nature."

Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister

China xiān shēng
Japan sen sei
Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister

If you've taken even a single karate class in your life, you know this term. 先生 is sensei, which is associated in the west with a master or instructor of karate, aikido, judo, and other Japanese martial arts.

In reality, this is a term of respect for almost any professional or skilled person (doctor, lawyer, teacher, etc). In some cases, it is used for musicians and artists who have achieved a certain level of fame, skill, or accomplishment.

It should be noted that this is also a courtesy title in Chinese but more like calling someone "mister" or "gentleman." It doesn't really have the "master" or "teacher" meaning in Chinese - see our Chinese "Master / Sifu / Shi Fu" entry if your audience is Chinese.

In Korean Hanja, this means teacher, instructor, schoolmaster, or schoolmistress.

This entry is more for educational purposes. 先生 is kind of a strange thing to put on a wall scroll. It's a title that is used more orally to show respect, rather than something written in calligraphy. If you feel that it is appropriate in your circumstances, we are very willing to create a piece of sensei Japanese calligraphy artwork for you.

Lingering Mind

Zanshin
China cán xīn
Japan zan shin
Lingering Mind

First off, this should only be used in context of Japanese martial arts. In Chinese, it's a rather sad title (like a broken heart). In Chinese, the first character alone means destroyed, spoiled, ruined, injured, cruel, oppressive, savage, incomplete, disabled. However, in Japanese, it's remainder, leftover, balance, or lingering.
The second character means heart, mind, soul, or essence in both languages.

殘心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: The spirit of zanshin is the state of the remaining or lingering spirit. It is often described as a sustained and heightened state of awareness and mental follow-through. However, true zanshin is a state of focus or concentration before, during, and after the execution of a technique, where a link or connection between uke and nage is preserved. Zanshin is the state of mind that allows us to stay spiritually connected, not only to a single attacker but to multiple attackers and even an entire context; a space, a time, an event.


残In modern Japan (and Simplified Chinese), they use a different version of the first character, as seen to the right. Click on this character to the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version of lingering mind / zanshin.

Immovable Mind

fudoshin
Japan fu dou shin
Immovable Mind

不動心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet.

Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: An unshakable mind and an immovable spirit is the state of fudoshin. It is courage and stability displayed both mentally and physically. Rather than indicating rigidity and inflexibility, fudoshin describes a condition that is not easily upset by internal thoughts or external forces. It is capable of receiving a strong attack while retaining composure and balance. It receives and yields lightly, grounds to the earth, and reflects aggression back to the source.

Other translations of this title include imperturbability, steadfastness, keeping a cool head in an emergency, or keeping one's calm (during a fight).

The first two Kanji alone mean immobility, firmness, fixed, steadfastness, motionless, idle.

The last Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these three Kanji create a title that is defined as "immovable mind" within the context of Japanese martial arts. However, in Chinese it would mean "motionless heart" and in Korean Hanja, "wafting heart" or "floating heart."

Taekwondo

China tái quán dào
Japan te kon do
Taekwondo

跆拳道 is one of the most widespread types of martial arts in the world as well as being an Olympic sport. Taekwondo was born in Korea with influences of Chinese and Japanese styles, combined with traditional Korean combat skills. Some will define it as the "Korean art of empty-handed self-defense."

In the simplest translation, the first character means "kick," the second character can mean either "fist" or "punching" the third means "way" or "method." Altogether, you could say this is "Kick Punch Method." When heard or read in various Asian languages, all will automatically think of this famous Korean martial art. It is written the same in Japanese Kanji, Chinese, and Korean Hanja characters - so the appearance of the characters are rather universal. However, you should note that there is another way to write this in modern Korean Hangul characters which looks like the image to the right. Taekwondo Hangul Characters

We suggest the original Korean Hanja (Chinese characters) for a wall scroll but if you really need the Hangul version, you must use master calligrapher Xing An-Ping: Order Taekwondo in Korean Hangul

Note: Taekwondo is sometimes Romanized as Tae-Kwondo, Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-do, Taegwondo, Tae Gweon Do, Tai Kwon Do, Taikwondo, Taekwando, Tae Kwan Do and in Chinese Taiquandao, Tai Quan Dao, Taichuando, or Tai Chuan Tao.

A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

-or- The crafty rabbit has three different entrances to its lair
China jiǎo tù sān kū
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

This speaks to the cunning character of a sly rabbit. Such a rabbit will not have just one hole but rather a few entrances and exits from his liar.

About 2,250 years ago a very rich man told his assistant to go and buy something wonderful that he did not yet posses. He was a man that already had everything, so the assistant went to a local village that owed a great deal of money to the rich man. The assistant told the village elders that all debts were forgiven. All the villagers rejoiced and praised the rich man's name. The assistant returned to the rich man and told him he had purchased "benevolence" for him. The rich man was mildly amused but perhaps a bit confused by the action.

Some time later, the rich man fell from the favor of the Emperor, and was wiped out without a penny to his name. One day he was walking aimlessly and stumbled into the village in which the debts had been forgiven. The villagers recognized the man and welcomed him with open arms, clothed, fed, and gave him a place to live.

Without trying, the man had become like the sly and cunning rabbit. When his exit was blocked, he had another hole to emerge from - and was reborn. This story and idiom comes from a book titled "The Amendment" - it's unclear whether this man actually existed or not. But the book did propel this idiom into common use in China.

Still today this idiom about the rabbit is used in China when suggesting "backup plans" alternate methods, and anyone with a good escape plan.

Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu

China jiàn shù
Japan kenjutsu
Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu

In Japanese, the modern definition, using simple terms is "A martial art involving swords" or "The art of the sword." However, in Chinese, this is the word for fencing (as in the Olympic sport).

I will suppose that you want this for the Japanese definition which comes from skills and techniques developed in the 15th century. At that time, Kenjutsu (or swordsmanship) was a strictly military art taught to Samurai and Bushi (soldiers). The fact that swords are rarely used in military battles anymore, and with the pacification of Japan after WWII, Kenjutsu is strictly a ceremonial practice often studied as a form of martial art (more for the discipline aspect rather than practical purpose).

Language note: The Korean definition is close the Japanese version described above. However, it should be noted that this can mean "fencing" depending on context in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean.

術Character alternative notes: Japanese tend to write the second Kanji in the form shown to the right. It is a very slight difference, and the two forms were merged under the same computer font code point (thus, you will not see the Japanese version in Kanji images shown during the options selection process). If you choose our Japanese Master Calligrapher, this will be automatically written in the proper Japanese form.
Since there are about 5 common ways to write the sword character, if you are particular about which version you want, please note that in the "special instructions" when you place your order.

Romanization note: This term is often Romanized as Kenjitsu, however, following the rules of Japanese Romaji, it should be Kenjutsu.

Corinthians 13:4

All you need to know about LOVE
China ài shì héng jiǔ rěn nài yòu yǒu én cí ài shì bú jì dù ài shì bú zì kuā bù zhāng kuáng
Corinthians 13:4

愛是恆久忍耐又有恩慈愛是不嫉妒愛是不自誇不張狂 is 1st Corinthians 13:4 in Chinese.

Chinese Corinthians 13:4 Love

With large "love" character in Xing An-Ping's "Personal Lishu" style.

In English, this reads:

1st Corinthians 13:4 (KJV) Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up...

1st Corinthians 13:4 (NIV) Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud.

1st Corinthians 13:4 (Basic English) Love is never tired of waiting; love is kind; love has no envy; love has no high opinion of itself, love has no pride.

The Chinese translation follows the love meaning, rather than the King James use of "charity." I was a little confused when writing this description with the significant differences between the NIV vs. KJV translations. After speaking to a Greek scholar about this, it would seem that the KJV has an almost errant translation with the use of "charity" in place of "love."

We used the most popular Christian Chinese Bible, which is the Chinese Union Version (CUV). The CUV was first published in 1919. We use this so that the Chinese translation would be as accurate and standard as possible. Any Chinese Christian worth their salt will easily be able to identify this verse when they see these characters.

If you want a big "love" character written above the verse on your artwork, just make a note in the "special instructions" tab when you are customizing your artwork. There is no extra charge for that service on this special verse.

Qi Gong / Chi Kung

China qì gōng
Japan kikou
Qi Gong / Chi Kung

Qigong is the title of a technique that is somewhere between a medical practice, meditation, and in some cases a religion. The definition is blurred depending on which school of Qigong you are following. In some cases, it is even incorporated with martial arts.

Some people (even Chinese people) mix this title with Tai Chi (Tai Qi) exercises.

Lately in China, people will claim to practice Tai Chi rather than Qigong because the Qigong title was recently used as a cover for an illegal pseudo-religious movement in China with the initials F.G. or F.D. (I can not write those names here for fear of our website being banned in China).

You can learn those names and more here: Further info about Qigong

If you are wondering about why I wrote "Qi Gong" and "Chi Kung" as the title of this calligraphy entry, I should teach you a little about the various ways in which Chinese can be Romanized. One form writes this as "Chi Kung" or "Chikung" (Taiwan). In the mainland and elsewhere, it is Romanized as "Qi Gong" or "Qigong." The actual pronunciation is the same in Taiwan, mainland, and Singapore Mandarin. Neither Romanization is exactly like English. If you want to know how to say this with English rules, it would be something like "Chee Gong" (but the "gong" has a vowel sound like the "O" in "go").

Romanization is a really confusing topic and has caused many Chinese words to be mispronounced in the west. One example is "Kung Pao Chicken" which should actually be more like "Gong Bao" with the "O" sounding like "oh" for both characters. Neither system of Romanization in Taiwan or the Mainland is perfect in my opinion and lead to many misunderstandings.

Hapkido

Korean Martial Art of re-directing force
China hé qì dào
Japan ai ki do
Hapkido

Hapkido is a mostly-defensive martial art of Korea. It has some connection to Aikido of Japan. In fact, they are written with the same characters in both languages. However, it should be noted that the Korean Hanja characters shown here are the traditional Chinese form - but in modern Japan, the middle character was slightly simplified.
Note: You can consider this to be the older Japanese written form of Aikido. Titles on older books and signs about Aikido use this form.

The connection between Japanese Aikido and Korean Hapkido is a bit muddled in history. 合氣道 is probably due to the relationship between the two countries - especially during WWII when many Koreans became virtual slaves for the Japanese (many Koreans are still bitter about that, so many things were disassociated from having any Japanese origin).

Looking at the characters, the first means "union" or "harmony."
The second character means "universal energy" or "spirit."
The third means "way" or "method."
One way to translate this into English is "Harmonizing Energy Method." This makes since, as Hapkido has more to do with redirecting energy, rather that fighting with strength against strength.

More Hapkido info

More notes:
1. Sometimes Hapkido is Romanized as "hap ki do," "hapki-do" "hab gi do" or "hapgido."

2. Korean Hanja characters are actually Chinese characters that usually hold the same meaning in both languages. There was a time when these characters were the standard and only written form of Korean. The development of modern Korean Hangul characters is a somewhat recent event in the greater scope of history. There was a time when Chinese characters were the written form of many languages in places known in modern times as North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Mainland China, and a significant portion of Malaysia. Even today, more people in the world can read Chinese characters than can read English.

3. While these Korean Hanja characters can be pronounced in Chinese, this word is not well-known in China and is not considered part of the Chinese lexicon.

Search for I’d Rather Be With You in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
I’d Rather Be With You我隻願和你在一起
我只愿和你在一起
wǒ zhǐ yuàn hé nǐ zài yī qǐ
wo3 zhi3 yuan4 he2 ni3 zai4 yi1 qi3
wo zhi yuan he ni zai yi qi
wozhiyuanhenizaiyiqi
wo chih yüan ho ni tsai i ch`i
wochihyüanhonitsaiichi
wo chih yüan ho ni tsai i chi
Better to Choose Nothing, Rather than Make a Poor Choice寧缺毋濫
宁缺毋滥
nìng quē wú làn
ning4 que1 wu2 lan4
ning que wu lan
ningquewulan
ning ch`üeh wu lan
ningchüehwulan
ning chüeh wu lan
A Deliberate Inaction
Is Better Than A Blind Action
一動不如一靜
一动不如一静
yí dòng bù rú yí jìng
yi2 dong4 bu4 ru2 yi2 jing4
yi dong bu ru yi jing
yidongburuyijing
i tung pu ju i ching
itungpujuiching
Be Master of Mind, Not Mastered by Mind願作心師不師於心
愿作心师不师于心
yuàn zuò xīn shī bù shī yú xīn
yuan4 zuo4 xin1 shi1 bu4 shi1 yu2 xin1
yuan zuo xin shi bu shi yu xin
yuanzuoxinshibushiyuxin
yüan tso hsin shih pu shih yü hsin
Live Free or Die不自由毋寧死
不自由毋宁死
bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
bu2 zi4 you2 wu2 ning4 si3
bu zi you wu ning si
buziyouwuningsi
pu tzu yu wu ning ssu
putzuyuwuningssu
Curious
Inquisitive
好奇kouki / kokihào qí / hao4 qi2 / hao qi / haoqihao ch`i / haochi / hao chi
Inner Beauty
Beauty of Spirit
內在美
内在美
nèi zài měi
nei4 zai4 mei3
nei zai mei
neizaimei
nei tsai mei
neitsaimei
Inner Beauty
Beauty of Spirit
内面美nai men bi / naimenbi
Milanoミラノmirano
Coffee
Café
珈琲koohii / kohi
Coffee
Café
咖啡kā fēi / ka1 fei1 / ka fei / kafeik`a fei / kafei / ka fei
Aysia愛西亞
爱西亚
ài xī yà
ai4 xi1 ya4
ai xi ya
aixiya
ai hsi ya
aihsiya
Castro卡斯特羅
卡斯特罗
kǎ sī tè luó
ka3 si1 te4 luo2
ka si te luo
kasiteluo
k`a ssu t`e lo
kassutelo
ka ssu te lo
Chastityチャスチチーchasutitii / chasutiti
Mixed Martial Arts総合格闘技sougoukakutougi
sogokakutogi
Time is more valuable than Jade不貴尺之壁而重寸之陰
不贵尺之壁而重寸之阴
bù guì chǐ zhī bì ér zhòng cùn zhī yīn
bu4 gui4 chi3 zhi1 bi4 er2 zhong4 cun4 zhi1 yin1
bu gui chi zhi bi er zhong cun zhi yin
pu kuei ch`ih chih pi erh chung ts`un chih yin
pu kuei chih chih pi erh chung tsun chih yin
Ch'ang Hon Taekwondo蒼軒跆拳道
苍轩跆拳道
Diamond戴矇德
戴蒙德
dài méng dé
dai4 meng2 de2
dai meng de
daimengde
tai meng te
taimengte
The Forceフォースfoosu / fosu
Scarletスカーレットsukaaretto / sukaretto
Death Before Dishonor寧為玉碎
宁为玉碎
níng wéi yù suì
ning2 wei2 yu4 sui4
ning wei yu sui
ningweiyusui
ning wei yü sui
ningweiyüsui
State of Anarchy無警察
无警察
mukeisatsuwú jíng chá
wu2 jing2 cha2
wu jing cha
wujingcha
wu ching ch`a
wuchingcha
wu ching cha
Salvation救世guzejiù shì / jiu4 shi4 / jiu shi / jiushichiu shih / chiushih
Blacksmith鐵匠
铁匠
tiě jiang
tie3 jiang5
tie jiang
tiejiang
t`ieh chiang
tiehchiang
tieh chiang
Archer阿徹
阿彻
ā chè / a1 che4 / a che / achea ch`e / ache / a che
Swan斯萬
斯万
sī mò / si1 mo4 / si mo / simossu mo / ssumo
Joy喬伊
乔伊
qiáo yī / qiao2 yi1 / qiao yi / qiaoyich`iao i / chiaoi / chiao i
Joyジョイjoi
Lonely孤獨
孤独
ko doku / kodokugū dú / gu1 du2 / gu du / guduku tu / kutu
Rose羅斯
罗斯
luō sī / luo1 si1 / luo si / luosilo ssu / lossu
Kick-Boxingキックボクシングkikkubokushingu
kikubokushingu
Self-Discipline
Will-Power
自律jiritsuzì lǜ / zi4 lv4 / zi lv / zilvtzu lü / tzulü
Martial Arts Skills武技bugiwǔ jì / wu3 ji4 / wu ji / wujiwu chi / wuchi
Beautiful Princess美麗的公主
美丽的公主
měi lì de gōng zhǔ
mei3 li4 de gong1 zhu3
mei li de gong zhu
meilidegongzhu
mei li te kung chu
meilitekungchu
Schooled by Experience and Hard Knocks百戦錬磨hyakusenrenma
The Way of the Dragon龍之道
龙之道
lóng zhī dào
long2 zhi1 dao4
long zhi dao
longzhidao
lung chih tao
lungchihtao
Luo
Raku

rakuluò / luo4 / luolo
Death Before Dishonor不名譽より死
不名誉より死
fu mei yo yo ri shi
fumeiyoyorishi
Faith Hope Love信望愛
信望爱
xìn wàng ài
xin4 wang4 ai4
xin wang ai
xinwangai
hsin wang ai
hsinwangai
Inner Strength內在力量
内在力量
nèi zài lì liàng
nei4 zai4 li4 liang4
nei zai li liang
neizaililiang
nei tsai li liang
neitsaililiang
Wado-Kai和道會
和道会
wa dou kai / wadoukai / wa do kai / wadokai
Idea
Concept
理念 / 理唸
理念
ri nen / rinenlǐ niàn / li3 nian4 / li nian / linianli nien / linien
Live in Prosperity生活于繁榮中
生活于繁荣中
shēng huó yú fán róng zhōng
sheng1 huo2 yu2 fan2 rong2 zhong1
sheng huo yu fan rong zhong
shenghuoyufanrongzhong
sheng huo yü fan jung chung
shenghuoyüfanjungchung
Woman of Strong Character
Woman Hero
女傑
女杰
joketsunǚ jiá / nv3 jia2 / nv jia / nvjianü chia / nüchia
Zen Contemplation入定rù dìng / ru4 ding4 / ru ding / rudingju ting / juting
Jade賈德
贾德
jiǎ dé / jia3 de2 / jia de / jiadechia te / chiate
Jadetama / gyokuyù / yu4 / yu
Seeing is Believing百聞不如一見
百闻不如一见
bǎi wén bù rú yí jiàn
bai3 wen2 bu4 ru2 yi2 jian4
bai wen bu ru yi jian
baiwenburuyijian
pai wen pu ju i chien
paiwenpujuichien
Idea
Thought
Meaning
kokoroyì / yi4 / yii
Happy Birthday生日快樂
生日快乐
shēng rì kuài lè
sheng1 ri4 kuai4 le4
sheng ri kuai le
shengrikuaile
sheng jih k`uai le
shengjihkuaile
sheng jih kuai le
Death Before Surrender寧死不降
宁死不降
nìng sǐ bù xiáng
ning4 si3 bu4 xiang2
ning si bu xiang
ningsibuxiang
ning ssu pu hsiang
ningssupuhsiang
Crystal水晶suishou / suishoshuǐ jīng
shui3 jing1
shui jing
shuijing
shui ching
shuiching
Bodymishēn / shen1 / shen
Value of Warrior Generals兵在精而不在多將在謀而不在勇
兵在精而不在多将在谋而不在勇
bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō jiàng zài móu ér bú zài yǒng
bing1 zai4 jing1 er2 bu2 zai4 duo1 jiang4 zai4 mou2 er2 bu2 zai4 yong3
bing zai jing er bu zai duo jiang zai mou er bu zai yong
ping tsai ching erh pu tsai to chiang tsai mou erh pu tsai yung
Impartial and Fair to the
Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World
一視同仁
一视同仁
isshidoujin
ishidojin
yí shì tóng rén
yi2 shi4 tong2 ren2
yi shi tong ren
yishitongren
i shih t`ung jen
ishihtungjen
i shih tung jen
Peace
Peaceful
平和hei wa / heiwapíng hé / ping2 he2 / ping he / pinghep`ing ho / pingho / ping ho
Forgiveness (from the top down)容赦you sha / yousha / yo sha / yosharóng shè / rong2 she4 / rong she / rongshejung she / jungshe
Revenge復仇
复仇
fukukyuu / fukukyufù chóu / fu4 chou2 / fu chou / fuchoufu ch`ou / fuchou / fu chou
Spiritual Soul Mates精神伴侶
精神伴侣
sei shin han ryo
seishinhanryo
jīng shén bàn lǚ
jing1 shen2 ban4 lv3
jing shen ban lv
jingshenbanlv
ching shen pan lü
chingshenpanlü
Dangerkiwēi / wei1 / wei
Pursue Your Dreams追尋夢想
追寻梦想
zhuī xún mèng xiǎng
zhui1 xun2 meng4 xiang3
zhui xun meng xiang
zhuixunmengxiang
chui hsün meng hsiang
chuihsünmenghsiang
Life of Love愛情生活
爱情生活
aijyou seikatsu
aijyouseikatsu
aijyo seikatsu
aijyoseikatsu
ài qíng shēng huó
ai4 qing2 sheng1 huo2
ai qing sheng huo
aiqingshenghuo
ai ch`ing sheng huo
aichingshenghuo
ai ching sheng huo
Karma卡瑪
卡玛
kǎ mǎ / ka3 ma3 / ka ma / kamak`a ma / kama / ka ma
Death Before Surrender寧死不屈
宁死不屈
níng sǐ bù qū
ning2 si3 bu4 qu1
ning si bu qu
ningsibuqu
ning ssu pu ch`ü
ningssupuchü
ning ssu pu chü
Sasukeサスケsasuke
Indomitable Spirit百折不屈bǎi shé bù qū
bai3 she2 bu4 qu1
bai she bu qu
baishebuqu
pai she pu ch`ü
paishepuchü
pai she pu chü
Wado-Ryu和道流wa dou ryuu
wadouryuu
wa do ryu
wadoryu
Adventure探險
探险 / 探険
tankentàn xiǎn / tan4 xian3 / tan xian / tanxiant`an hsien / tanhsien / tan hsien
Inner Peace內心平靜
内心平静
naishin heizyou
naishinheizyou
naishin heizyo
naishinheizyo
nèi xīn píng jìng
nei4 xin1 ping2 jing4
nei xin ping jing
neixinpingjing
nei hsin p`ing ching
neihsinpingching
nei hsin ping ching
Eternal Love永遠の愛ei en no ai
eiennoai
Flying Tigers飛虎
飞虎
fēi hǔ / fei1 hu3 / fei hu / feihu
Iron Palm鐵掌
铁掌
tetsu-tenohiratiě zhǎng
tie3 zhang3
tie zhang
tiezhang
t`ieh chang
tiehchang
tieh chang
Southern Praying Mantis南派螳螂nán pài táng láng
nan2 pai4 tang2 lang2
nan pai tang lang
nanpaitanglang
nan p`ai t`ang lang
nanpaitanglang
nan pai tang lang
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching
一曰慈二曰儉三曰不敢為天下先
一曰慈二曰俭三曰不敢为天下先
yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
yi1 yue1 ci2 er4 yue1 jian3 san1 yue1 bu4 gan3 wei2 tian1 xia4 xian1
yi yue ci er yue jian san yue bu gan wei tian xia xian
i yüeh tz`u erh yüeh chien san yüeh pu kan wei t`ien hsia hsien
i yüeh tzu erh yüeh chien san yüeh pu kan wei tien hsia hsien
Ninjaninrěn / ren3 / renjen
Kenpo
Kempo
Quan Fa
Chuan Fa
拳法kenpou / kenpoquán fǎ / quan2 fa3 / quan fa / quanfach`üan fa / chüanfa / chüan fa
Death Before Dishonor寧為玉碎不為瓦全
宁为玉碎不为瓦全
níng wéi yù suì bú wéi wǎ quán
ning2 wei2 yu4 sui4 bu2 wei2 wa3 quan2
ning wei yu sui bu wei wa quan
ningweiyusuibuweiwaquan
ning wei yü sui pu wei wa ch`üan
ning wei yü sui pu wei wa chüan
Bravery
Courage
勇敢yuu kan / yuukan / yu kan / yukanyǒng gǎn / yong3 gan3 / yong gan / yongganyung kan / yungkan
Bravery
Courage
勇氣
勇气 / 勇気
yuuki / yukiyǒng qì / yong3 qi4 / yong qi / yongqiyung ch`i / yungchi / yung chi
Christianity
Christian
基督教kirisutokyou
kirisutokyo
jī dū jiào
ji1 du1 jiao4
ji du jiao
jidujiao
chi tu chiao
chituchiao
Nothingness空無
空无
kuu mu / kuumu / ku mu / kumukōng wú / kong1 wu2 / kong wu / kongwuk`ung wu / kungwu / kung wu
Sensei
Master
Teacher
Mister
先生sen sei / senseixiān shēng
xian1 sheng1
xian sheng
xiansheng
hsien sheng
hsiensheng
Lingering Mind殘心
残心
zan shin / zanshincán xīn / can2 xin1 / can xin / canxints`an hsin / tsanhsin / tsan hsin
Immovable Mind不動心fu dou shin
fudoushin
fu do shin
fudoshin
Taekwondo跆拳道te kon do / tekondotái quán dào
tai2 quan2 dao4
tai quan dao
taiquandao
t`ai ch`üan tao
taichüantao
tai chüan tao
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den狡兔三窟jiǎo tù sān kū
jiao3 tu4 san1 ku1
jiao tu san ku
jiaotusanku
chiao t`u san k`u
chiaotusanku
chiao tu san ku
Kenjutsu
Kenjitsu
剣術
剑术
kenjutsujiàn shù / jian4 shu4 / jian shu / jianshuchien shu / chienshu
Corinthians 13:4愛是恆久忍耐又有恩慈愛是不嫉妒愛是不自誇不張狂
爱是恒久忍耐又有恩慈爱是不嫉妒爱是不自夸不张狂
ài shì héng jiǔ rěn nài yòu yǒu én cí ài shì bú jì dù ài shì bú zì kuā bù zhāng kuáng
ai4 shi4 heng2 jiu3 ren3 nai4 you4 you3 en2 ci2 ai4 shi4 bu2 ji4 du4 ai4 shi4 bu2 zi4 kua1 bu4 zhang1 kuang2
ai shi heng jiu ren nai you you en ci ai shi bu ji du ai shi bu zi kua bu zhang kuang
ai shih heng chiu jen nai yu yu en tz`u ai shih pu chi tu ai shih pu tzu k`ua pu chang k`uang
ai shih heng chiu jen nai yu yu en tzu ai shih pu chi tu ai shih pu tzu kua pu chang kuang
Qi Gong
Chi Kung
氣功
气功
kikou / kikoqì gōng / qi4 gong1 / qi gong / qigongch`i kung / chikung / chi kung
Hapkido合氣道
合气道
ai ki do / aikidohé qì dào
he2 qi4 dao4
he qi dao
heqidao
ho ch`i tao
hochitao
ho chi tao
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

America
Angel
Awareness
Blessed by God
Buddhism
Budokan
Bujin
Bushido
Change
Commitment
Compassion
Dance
Destiny
Divine
Dream Big
Endurance
Eternal Friendship
Fall Seven Times Get Up Eight
Five Elements
Forever in My Heart
Gold
Gratitude
Honor
I Miss You
Impermanence
Independent
Infinity
Inner Strength
Invincible
Karate
Listen
Mind of the Beginner
Mindfulness
Mountain
Musashi
Ninja
Ninjutsu
Patience
Peaceful Warrior
Perserverance
Pursuit of Happiness
Respect
River
Semper Fi
Semper Fidelis
Seven Rules of Happiness
Shadow
Strength
Sword
Taekwondo
Way of the Dragon
Wealth
Wing Chun

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.