Asian Art Gallery

Adventures in Asian Art



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All custom calligraphy items are made-to-order in our little Beijing artwork-mounting workshop.

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Maybe try to search again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

I Will Persevere in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy an I Will Persevere calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "I Will Persevere" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "I Will Persevere" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Strong Hearted / Strong Willed
  2. Perseverance / Will-Power
  3. Stay Strong / Iron Will
  4. To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible
  5. Where there's a will there's a way
  6. Indomitable / Unyielding
  7. Patience / Perseverance
  8. Patience / Perseverance / To Endure / Tolerant
  9. Indomitable Spirit
10. Perseverance
11. Each Time You Stumble and Fall,...
12. Always Striving for Inner Strength
13. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks
14. No Pain No Gain
15. Heaven Blesses the Diligent
16. Bounce Back...
17. Determination to Achieve
18. Never Give Up
19. Phoenix Rise from the Ashes
20. Pursue Your Dreams / Follow Your Dreams / Chase Your Dreams
21. Taekwondo Tenets / Spirit of Taekwon-do


Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

China yì zhì jiān qiáng
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This phrase can mean either "strong hearted", "strong willed" or "determination".

The first two characters can be translated as "will", "willpower", "determination", "volition", "intention", or "intent". But, it should be noted that this first part possess the element of "heart" in the lower portion of both characters (they also partially carry the meaning "with whole heart").

The last two characters mean "strong" or "staunch".

Chinese word order and grammar is a bit different than English, so in this case, they are in reverse order of English, but have the correct meaning in a natural form.


See Also...  Strong Willed | Discipline | Will-Power

Perseverance / Will-Power

China yì lì
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These two characters are a way to express "perseverance" with the idea of "willpower" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. It can also mean "strong willed".

The first character means "strong" and "persistent", while the second means "strength" and "power".

Stay Strong / Iron Will

Japan tesshin sekichou
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This is a Japanese proverb which suggest you should have the inner-strength and will as hard and steadfast as iron. It's the Japanese way to say, "stay strong". This is an especially uplifting thing to say to a person in distress or recovering from a disaster. It's kind of the survivor's creed.

If you literally translate this, it means, "iron will, stone guts" or "iron heart, rock-hard bowels".

To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

Where there is a will, there is a way
China yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
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This old Chinese proverb has been translated many different ways into English. As you read the translations below, keep in mind that in Chinese, heart=mind.

Nothing is impossible to a willing heart.
Nothing is impossible to a willing mind.
Nothing is difficult to a willing heart.
Where there is a will, there is a way.
Nothing in the world is impossible if you set your mind to do it.
A wilful man will have his way.
If you wish it,you will do it.
A determined heart can accomplish anything.
All things are possible to a strong mind.


Where there's a will there's a way

persevere and you will succeed
China yǒu zhì jìng chéng
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This Chinese proverb means, "persevere and you will succeed".

It's very much like the English idiom, "where there's a will, there's a way".

Indomitable / Unyielding

China bù qū bù náo
Japan fukutsu futou
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This is a long word by Chinese standards. At least it is often translated as a single word into English. It's actually a proverb in Chinese.

This simply means "Indomitable" or "Unyielding".

If you want to break it down, you can see that the first and third characters are the same. Both meaning "not" (they work as a suffix to make a negative or opposite meaning to whatever character follows). The second character means "bendable". The last means "scratched" or "bothered".
So this really means "Won't be bent, can't be bothered". I have also seen it written as "Will not crouch, will not submit". This comes from the fact that the second character can mean, "to crouch" and the last can mean "to submit" (as in "to give in" such as "submitting to the rule of someone else"). This may explain better why these four characters mean "indomitable".

Notes:
Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.
The first two characters can be a stand-alone word in Chinese.
In Japanese, this is considered to be two words (with very similar meanings).
The same characters are used in Korean, but the 2nd and 4th characters are swapped to create a word pronounced "불요불굴" in Korean.
Just let me know if you want the Korean version, which will also make sense in Japanese, and though not as natural, will also make sense in Chinese as well.


See Also...  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Patience / Perseverance

China rěn
Japan nin
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This character contains the ideas of patience, equanimity, perseverance and endurance. Alone, this single character can be a bit ambiguous or flexible. It can also mean to endure, to bear, to put up with or to conceal. If you want to simply decide what this character means to you within the general meaning, but keep it a mystery to others, this is a good choice.

If you want to be more direct, you may want to choose one of our other selections that mean perseverance or patience (you will see this character within those larger words/phrases).

There is a secondary meaning in Japanese, since this is the first character of the word ninja.

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write it in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).


See Also...  Perseverance | Patience | Tenacious

Patience / Perseverance / To Endure / Tolerant

China rěn nài
Japan nin tai
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Patience is quiet hope and trust that things will turn out right. You wait without complaining. You are tolerant and accepting of difficulties and mistakes. You picture the end in the beginning and persevere to meet your goals.

These characters can also mean "to endure", "restrain oneself" and in some context it can mean "perseverance" or "endurance".

This is also used as a tenet of Taekwondo, Tang Soo Do, and other Korean martial arts where it's titled "Endurance" and romanized as "In Neh".


忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).


See Also...  Peace | Harmony | Perseverance

Indomitable Spirit

Japanese
Japan ma ke ji damashii
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This Japanese proverb means "indomitable spirit" or "unyielding spirit".

Perseverance

(single character)
China
Japan see note
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This is the simplest way to express perseverance in Chinese and Korean Hanja.
This single-character version leaves a bit of mystery about what kind of perseverance you might want to convey.

In Korean, this is usually associated with "strength of character".

In Japanese, this character can be pronounced about a dozen different ways (so we have left out the Japanese pronunciation guide that normally appears above). In Japanese this Kanji would usually be translated "strong" (perhaps strong-willed).


See Also...  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Each Time You Stumble and Fall,
You Gain Experience and Wisdom

China chī yí qiàn, zhǎng yí zhì
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This Chinese proverb means:

"Fall into a moat and you will gain wisdom from the experience"

It really suggests that the failures, troubles, frustrations, and setbacks that you encounter in your life are actually helping you to find wisdom. Some would also translate this proverb as:

"Learn from your mistakes" or "Learn from your experience".

If you are studying Chinese, you will recognize the first character as "eat", but in this case, it means to "experience" (as used in this proverb, it is suggesting that you have fallen into a moat and/or had a hard time crossing it).
Literally translated character by character, this whole proverb is:

"Experience one moat, gain one wisdom/knowledge".

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly-used phrase.

Always Striving for Inner Strength

China zì qiáng bú xī
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This proverb or idiom suggests that the pursuit self-improvement is eternal. It can also be a suggestion to strive unremittingly in life.

The first two characters mean inner-strength with the idea of self-improvement. The last two characters mean "never rest" or "striving without giving up".

Some will translate these four characters as, "Exert and strive hard without any let up".

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
China bǎi zhé bù náo
Japan hyaku setsu su tou
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This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks". More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching". This is of Chinese origin, but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery, but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks", "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable".

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks", the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times". The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up".
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning, but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also...  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

No Pain No Gain

Literally: No Pain, No Strength
China bú tòng bù qiáng
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This proverb is close to our idea of "no pain, no gain" in English. It holds this meaning in the context of working out at the gym etc.

This literally means, "no pain, no strength", meaning that if you don't experience a little pain, you will not gain any strength.

Heaven Blesses the Diligent

China tiān dào chóu qín
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This can be interpreted a few different ways:
God blesses those who work hard.
It is the way of Heaven to smile on the diligent.
God will reward those that are worthy.
Heaven blesses those who are diligent.

Whichever translation you like, a scroll like this on your wall may serve as a reminder to work hard because your diligence will pay off both in this life and the next.


Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly-used term.

Bounce Back
Stage a Comeback

China dōng shān zài qǐ
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This Chinese proverb means, "make a comeback", or "resuming after a failure". It's sometimes used in terms of losing a job and then getting it back. However, it applies to any kind of comeback after difficulty.

The literal meaning of this Chinese idiom is, "[The] Eastern Mountain Again [will] Rise".

Determination to Achieve

Ichinen Hokki
Japan ichi nen ho kki
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This Japanese proverb suggests being resolved to do something or having a wholehearted intention to accomplish something.

Some will translate this as, "the determination to accomplish something", "turning over a new leaf and being determined to find success".

Never Give Up

China yǒng bù fàng qì
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The first character means "eternal" or "forever", the second means "not" (together they mean "never"). The last two characters mean "give up" or "abandon". Altogether, you can translate this proverb as "never give up" or "never abandon".

Depending on how you want to read this, it is also a statement that you will never abandon your hopes, dreams, family or friends.


See Also...  Undaunted | No Fear | Hope

Phoenix Rise from the Ashes

China fèng huáng niè pán
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This proverb suggests "Legendary Phoenix rises from the ashes". Literally, it means, "Legendary Phoenix [reaches] Nirvana".

There is a legend in China of a great bird which is reborn once every 500 years. This bird gathers all the ill-will, suffering, desire, and other negative things of the whole world. The bird then plunges into the fire to burn away all negative things, sacrificing itself in the process (achieving Nirvana, or perhaps allowing others the opportunity to reach Nirvana).

500 years later, the phoenix is reborn from the ashes again, and the cycle repeats.

Pursue Your Dreams / Follow Your Dreams / Chase Your Dreams

China zhuī xún mèng xiǎng
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The first two characters mean "to pursue", "to track down", or "to search for".

The last two mean dreams. This version of dreams refers to those with an element of reality (not the dreams you have when you sleep, but rather your aspirations or goals in life).

This title will tell everyone that you want to make your dreams come true.


See Also...  Pursuit Of Happiness

Taekwondo Tenets / Spirit of Taekwon-do

China tái quán dào jīng shén lǐ yì lián chǐ rěn nài kè jǐ bǎi zhé bù qū
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Taekwondo TenetsThis is General Choi's writing that is often called "The Tenets of Taekwon-do". The actual title would be translated as, "Taekwondo Spirit" or "The Spirit of Taekwondo". It was originally written in Korean Hanja (Chinese characters used in Korea for about 1600 years).

General Choi's original calligraphy is shown to the right. Your custom calligraphy will be unique, and not an exact match, as each calligrapher has their own style.

In modern times, the common form of written Korean is Hangul (a phonetic character set). The table below shows the text in Hangul and Hanja along with a pronunciation guide and a brief English translation:

Traditional Korean HanjaModern Korean HangulPronunciationEnglish
跆拳道精神태권도정신tae gweon do jeong sinTaekwondo Spirit
禮儀예의 or 례이ye yiCourtesy / Etiquette / Propriety / Decorum / Formality
廉耻렴치 or 염치yeom ciIntegrity / Sense of Honor
忍耐인내in naePatience / Perseverance / Endurance
克己극기geug giSelf-Control / Self-Denial / Self-Abnegation
百折不屈백절불굴baeg jeor bur gurIndomitable Spirit (Undaunted even after repeated attacks from the opponent)
Note that the pronunciation is the official version now used in South Korea. However, it is different than what you may be used to. For instance, "Taekwon-do" is "tae gweon do". This new romanization is supposed to be closer to actual Korean pronunciation.


Check dictionary for i will persevere


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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The scroll that I am holding in this picture is a "medium size"
4-character wall scroll.
As you can see, it is a great size to hang on your wall.
(We also offer custom wall scrolls in larger sizes)

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.




If your search is not successful, just post your request on our forum, and we'll be happy to do research or translation for any reasonable request.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Adrian
Aikido
Austin
Autumn
Ba Gua Zhang
Balanced Life
Bamboo
Beautiful
Beautiful Princess
Beautiful Woman
Beauty
Best Love
Bird
Black
Black Belt
Bless and Protect
Blessed
Blessing
Blessings
Blossom
Bonsai
Brotherly Love
Buddhism
Bushido
Cause and Effect
Cherry Blossom
Children
Courage
Destiny
Double Happiness
Dragon
Empty
Energy
Enso
Erin
Face
Family
Flowers
Flying
Forever
Forever Family
Forgiveness
Frog
God is Always With You
God is Love
Goddess
Gold
Gold Fish
Golden
Good Fortune
Good Health
Good Luck
Great
Great Ambitions
Hannah
Hapkido
Happiness
Happy
Happy Family
Harmony
Health
Heart
Hope
I Need You
Inner Peace and Serenity
Integrity
Jenna
Jennifer
Jenny
Jordan
Jorge
Justine
Kaiden
Leanne
Life of Happiness
Life of Serenity
Like
Live for Today
Long Life
Longevity
Lotus
Love
Love Always
Love and Honor
Love and Peace
Love and Strength
Love Eternal
Love Life
Love You Forever
Loyal
Loyality
Loyalty
Luck
Lukas
Moon
Mother
Mountain
Mugen
Murphy
Mushin
Music
New Year
No Mind
One Life One Chance
One True Love
Only God Can Judge Me
Open Heart
Pain
Paul
Paula
Peace
Pearl
People
Plum
Power of the Dragon
Prosperity
Reason
Riley
River
Rose
Sandra
Serenity
Sexy
Smile
Spirit of the Tiger
Spiritual Strength
Strengt
Strength
Strength and Courage
Strong
Success
Taekwondo
The Past
Tiger
Tigers
Warrior
Water
White
Wisdom
Wolf
Year of the Dragon

With so many searches, we had to upgrade to our own Linux server.
Of course, only one in 500 searches results in a purchase - Hey buy a wall scroll!!!



See: Our list of specifically Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls. And, check out Our list of specifically old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title
Characters 
Simplified
Traditional
Japanese Romaji
(Romanized Japanese)
Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Strong Hearted / Strong Willed意志坚强
意志堅強
n/ayì zhì jiān qiáng
yi zhi jian qiang
i chih chien ch`iang
yi4 zhi4 jian1 qiang2
yizhijianqiang
ichihchienchiang
i chih chien chiang
Perseverance / Will-Power毅力
毅力
n/ayì lì
yi li
i li
yi4 li4
yili
Stay Strong / Iron Will鉄心石腸
鉄心石腸
tesshin sekichou
tesshinsekichou
teshin sekicho
n/a
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible有志者事竟成
有志者事竟成 / 有誌者事竟成
n/ayǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
you zhi zhe shi jing cheng
yu chih che shih ching ch`eng
you3 zhi4 zhe3 shi4 jing4 cheng2
youzhizheshijingcheng
yuchihcheshihchingcheng
yu chih che shih ching cheng
Where there's a will there's a way有志竟成
有志竟成
n/ayǒu zhì jìng chéng
you zhi jing cheng
yu chih ching ch`eng
you3 zhi4 jing4 cheng2
youzhijingcheng
yuchihchingcheng
yu chih ching cheng
Indomitable / Unyielding不屈不挠
不屈不撓
fukutsu futou
fukutsufutou
fukutsu futo
bù qū bù náo
bu qu bu nao
pu ch`ü pu nao
bu4 qu1 bu4 nao2
buqubunao
puchüpunao
pu chü pu nao
Patience / Perseverance
ninrěn
ren
jen
ren3
Patience / Perseverance / To Endure / Tolerant忍耐
忍耐
nin tai
nintai
rěn nài
ren nai
jen nai
ren3 nai4
rennai
Indomitable Spirit負けじ魂
負けじ魂
ma ke ji damashii
makejidamashii
ma ke ji damashi
n/a
Perseverance
see note
seenote
se note

yi
i
yi4
Each Time You Stumble and Fall, You Gain Experience and Wisdom吃一堑长一智
吃一塹長一智
n/achī yí qiàn, zhǎng yí zhì
chi yi qian zhang yi zhi
ch`ih i ch`ien chang i chih
chi1 yi2 qian4 zhang3 yi2 zhi4
chiyiqianzhangyizhi
chihichienchangichih
chih i chien chang i chih
Always Striving for Inner Strength自强不息
自強不息
n/azì qiáng bú xī
zi qiang bu xi
tzu ch`iang pu hsi
zi4 qiang2 bu2 xi1
ziqiangbuxi
tzuchiangpuhsi
tzu chiang pu hsi
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks百折不挠
百折不撓
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
bǎi zhé bù náo
bai zhe bu nao
pai che pu nao
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
baizhebunao
No Pain No Gain不痛不强
不痛不強
n/abú tòng bù qiáng
bu tong bu qiang
pu t`ung pu ch`iang
bu2 tong4 bu4 qiang2
butongbuqiang
putungpuchiang
pu tung pu chiang
Heaven Blesses the Diligent天道酬勤
天道酬勤
n/atiān dào chóu qín
tian dao chou qin
t`ien tao ch`ou ch`in
tian1 dao4 chou2 qin2
tiandaochouqin
tientaochouchin
tien tao chou chin
Bounce Back
Stage a Comeback
东山再起
東山再起
n/adōng shān zài qǐ
dong shan zai qi
tung shan tsai ch`i
dong1 shan1 zai4 qi3
dongshanzaiqi
tungshantsaichi
tung shan tsai chi
Determination to Achieve一念発起
一念発起
ichi nen ho kki
ichinenhokki
ichi nen ho ki
n/a
Never Give Up永不放弃
永不放棄
n/ayǒng bù fàng qì
yong bu fang qi
yung pu fang ch`i
yong3 bu4 fang4 qi4
yongbufangqi
yungpufangchi
yung pu fang chi
Phoenix Rise from the Ashes凤凰涅磐
鳳凰涅磐
n/afèng huáng niè pán
feng huang nie pan
feng huang nieh p`an
feng4 huang2 nie4 pan2
fenghuangniepan
fenghuangniehpan
feng huang nieh pan
Pursue Your Dreams / Follow Your Dreams / Chase Your Dreams追寻梦想
追尋夢想
n/azhuī xún mèng xiǎng
zhui xun meng xiang
chui hsün meng hsiang
zhui1 xun2 meng4 xiang3
zhuixunmengxiang
Taekwondo Tenets / Spirit of Taekwon-do跆拳道精神礼义廉耻忍耐克己百折不屈
跆拳道精神禮義廉耻忍耐克己百折不屈
n/atái quán dào jīng shén lǐ yì lián chǐ rěn nài kè jǐ bǎi zhé bù qū
tai quan dao jing shen li yi lian chi ren nai ke ji bai zhe bu qu
t`ai ch`üan tao ching shen li i lien ch`ih jen nai k`o chi pai che pu ch`ü
tai2 quan2 dao4 jing1 shen2 li3 yi4 lian2 chi3 ren3 nai4 ke4 ji3 bai3 zhe2 bu4 qu1
tai chüan tao ching shen li i lien chih jen nai ko chi pai che pu chü

If you have not set up your computer to display Chinese, the characters in this table probably look like empty boxes or random text garbage.
This is why I spent hundreds of hours making images so that you could view the characters in the "i will persevere" listings above.
If you want your Windows computer to be able to display Chinese characters you can either head to your Regional and Language options in your Win XP control panel, select the [Languages] tab and click on [Install files for East Asian Languages]. This task will ask for your Win XP CD to complete in most cases. If you don't have your Windows XP CD, or are running Windows 98, you can also download/run the simplified Chinese font package installer from Microsoft which works independently with Win 98, ME, 2000, and XP. It's a 2.5MB download, so if you are on dial up, start the download and go make a sandwich.

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