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Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Eye for an Eye"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth
  2. Eye for an eye
  3. The Eye of the Buddha
  4. Tooth for a tooth
  5. Impartial and Fair to the...
  6. Kayla
  7. Jai
  8. Eyeballs / Eyes
  9. Seeing is Believing
10. Intelligence...
11. Islam
12. The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100
13. The Whole Room Rocks With Laughter


Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth

China yǐ yá huán yá yǐ yǎn huán yǎn
Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth Wall Scroll

Here's the full proverb, with the first and second parts.

However, in Chinese, it's more natural to put the "tooth" part first, so this more accurately reads "Tooth for a tooth, eye for an eye."

If revenge is important to you, I suppose this is the phase you want on your wall.

Eye for an eye

China yǐ yǎn huán yǎn
Eye for an eye Wall Scroll

This same proverb seems to be used in virtually every language and culture around the world. Whether you are Arab, Persian, Jewish, European, British, Asian, or American, this proverb is well known as the "original form of justice."

The Eye of the Buddha

China wǔ yǎn
Japan butsugen
The Eye of the Buddha Wall Scroll

The eye of Buddha, the enlightened one who sees all and is omniscient.


仏In modern Japan, they also write the first Kanji as shown to the right. Both versions are correct but if you want the modern Japanese version, click on the Kanji to the right instead of the button above.

Tooth for a tooth

China yǐ yá huán yá
Tooth for a tooth Wall Scroll

This phase often goes with "An eye for an eye," even in Chinese. Revenge seems to cross all languages, cultures, and even species (animals are known to take revenge too).

If a Chinese person uses just one part of the full proverb, it will be this "tooth for a tooth" one. Although, we are more likely to say "eye for an eye" alone in English.

Chinese people may also read this with a meaning of "Bite me and I will bite you back." However, it literally means "tooth for a tooth" or "you take my tooth, I take yours."

Impartial and Fair to the
Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World

AKA: Universal Benevolence
China yí shì tóng rén
Japan isshidoujin
Impartial and Fair to the / Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World Wall Scroll

一視同仁 is how to write "universal benevolence." 一視同仁 is also how to express the idea that you see all people the same.

If you are kind and charitable to all people, this is the best way to state that virtue. It is the essence of being impartial to all mankind, regardless of social standing, background, race, sex, etc. You do not judge others but rather you see them eye to eye on the same level with you.


See Also:  Benevolence | Compassion | Equality | Justice | Right Decision | Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common

Kayla

China kǎi lā
Kayla Wall Scroll

凱拉 is an alternate way to transliterate the name Kayla into Mandarin Chinese.

This one has a first syllable vowel sound like eye and kite.

Jai

Japan jai
Jai Wall Scroll

ジャイ is the name Jai written in Katakana (phonetic Japanese). This version sounds like "Jai" with a vowel sound like "eye."


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Eyeballs / Eyes

China yǎn
Japan gan
Eyeballs / Eyes Wall Scroll

眼 is the simplest way to write eyes or eyeballs in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This can also mean eyesight, sight, vision, look, stare, glance, viewpoint, insight, perceptivity, the power of observation, or simply the eye.

Seeing is Believing

Japan hyakubun wa ikken ni shikazu
Seeing is Believing Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb is the rough equivalent of "seeing is believing," "one eye-witness is better than many hearsays," or "a picture is worth a thousand words."

Sometimes it's simply more prudent to verify with your own eyes.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Intelligence
Information-Gathering

China qíng bào
Japan jouhou
Intelligence / Information-Gathering Wall Scroll

If you are a government spy, engaged in business espionage, or in some military intelligence department, this is both the title of what you are doing and what you are collecting about your enemy.

It is suggestive by itself of military intelligence but applies to corporate intelligence if you are keeping an eye on your competition in business.

Islam

(phonetic version)
China yī sī lán jiào
Islam Wall Scroll

This both means and sounds like "Islam" in Mandarin Chinese.

The first three characters sound like the word "Islam," and the last character means "religion" or "teaching." It's the most general term for "Islam" in China. The highest concentration of Muslims in China is Xinjiang (the vast region in northwest China that was called The East Turkistan Republic until 1949 and is sometimes called Chinese Turkistan, Uyghuristan). Here you will find Uygurs, Kazakhs, and Kyrgyz and others that are descendants of Turkmen (possibly mixed with Persians and Arabs). Many of their ancestors were traders who traveled the silk road to buy and sell spices, silk, and exchange other goods from the Orient and the Middle East.

I spent some time in Xinjiang and got to know this community. They are strong people who can endure much. They are friendly and love to have a good time. I was a stranger but treated by villagers (near China's border with Afghanistan) as if I was a good friend.
However, I have heard that it's best not to cross them, as in this land, the law is the blade, and everything is "eye for an eye." The Chinese government has little control in Xinjiang with almost no police officers except in the capital of Urumqi (so it's a 60-hour roundtrip train ride to seek the aid of law enforcement in most cases).

While few seem to be devout, there are at least small mosques in every village. And you will never see a man or woman outside without a head covering.

It should be noted that these people are all citizens of China, but they are officially of the Caucasian race. A visit to Xinjiang will change your idea what it means to be Chinese.

The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

The pot calls the kettle black
China wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100 Wall Scroll

During the Warring States Period of what is now China (475 - 221 B.C.), the King of Wei was in love with war. He often fought with other kingdoms just for spite or fun.

One day, the King of Wei asked the philosopher Mencius, "I love my people, and all say I do the best for them. I move the people from famine-stricken areas to places of plenty, and transport grains from rich areas to the poor. Nobody goes hungry in my kingdom, and I treat my people far better than other kings. But why does the population of my kingdom not increase, and why does the population of other kingdoms not decrease?"

Mencius answered, "Since you love war, I will make this example: When going to war, and the drums beat to start the attack, some soldiers flee for their lives in fear. Some run 100 paces in retreat, and others run 50 steps. Then the ones who retreated 50 paces laugh and taunt those who retreated 100 paces, calling them cowards mortally afraid of death. Do you think this is reasonable?

The King of Wei answered, "Of course not! Those who run 50 paces are just as timid as those who run 100 paces."

Mencius then said, "You are a king who treats his subjects better than other kings treat their people but you are so fond of war, that your people suffer from great losses in battle. Therefore, your population does not grow. While other kings allow their people to starve to death, you send your people to die in war. Is there really any difference?"

This famous conversation led to the six-character proverb shown here. It serves as a warning to avoid hypocrisy. It goes hand-in-hand with the western phrase, "The pot calls the kettle black," or the Biblical phrase, "Before trying to remove a splinter from your neighbor's eye, first remove the plank from your own eye."

The Whole Room Rocks With Laughter

The perfect scroll if you love humor…
...or as a gift for the comedian in your life
China hōng tāng dà xiào
The Whole Room Rocks With Laughter Wall Scroll

In China, this proverb is used in response to a good joke or witty comment.

The story goes that Mr. Feng and Mr. He were both senior officials in the Song Dynasty (about a thousand years ago). One day, Mr. Feng walked into their shared office wearing a new pair of boots. The boots caught the eye of Mr. He who said, "New boots! - how much were they?." Mr. Feng lifted one of the boots off the ground as if to show it off and responded, "900 coins."
Astonished, Mr. Feng explained, "900? How can that be? - I paid 1800 coins for my boots!." Mr. Feng then lifted his other foot off the ground and said, "This boot was also 900 coins."

It is said that the whole room was shaking from the laughter of all that heard Mr. Feng's joke on Mr. He.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth 以牙還牙以眼還眼
以牙还牙以眼还眼
yǐ yá huán yá yǐ yǎn huán yǎn
yi3 ya2 huan2 ya2 yi3 yan3 huan2 yan3
yi ya huan ya yi yan huan yan
yiyahuanyayiyanhuanyan
i ya huan ya i yen huan yen
iyahuanyaiyenhuanyen
Eye for an eye 以眼還眼
以眼还眼
yǐ yǎn huán yǎn
yi3 yan3 huan2 yan3
yi yan huan yan
yiyanhuanyan
i yen huan yen
iyenhuanyen
The Eye of the Buddha 佛眼
佛眼 / 仏眼
butsugen / butsugenwǔ yǎn / wu3 yan3 / wu yan / wuyan wu yen / wuyen
Tooth for a tooth 以牙還牙
以牙还牙
yǐ yá huán yá
yi3 ya2 huan2 ya2
yi ya huan ya
yiyahuanya
i ya huan ya
iyahuanya
Impartial and Fair to the
Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World
一視同仁
一视同仁
isshidoujin
ishidojin
yí shì tóng rén
yi2 shi4 tong2 ren2
yi shi tong ren
yishitongren
i shih t`ung jen
ishihtungjen
i shih tung jen
Kayla 凱拉
凯拉
kǎi lā / kai3 la1 / kai la / kaila k`ai la / kaila / kai la
Jai ジャイjai
Eyeballs
Eyes
ganyǎn / yan3 / yan yen
Seeing is Believing 百聞は一見に如かずhyakubun wa ikken ni shikazu
hyakubunwaikkennishikazu
hyakubun wa iken ni shikazu
hyakubunwaikennishikazu
Intelligence
Information-Gathering
情報
情报
jouhou / johoqíng bào / qing2 bao4 / qing bao / qingbao ch`ing pao / chingpao / ching pao
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiki
Aikido
Beautiful
Beautiful Princess
Belierve in Yourself
Beloved Daughter
Benjamin
Benny
Best Friends Forever
Bright
Buddhism
Buddhist
Calm
Catholic
Christian
Courage
Craig
Crystal
Dallas
Dance
Daughter
Diane
Dragon
Dragon Spirit
Endless
Essence
Faith
Fire
Flower
Forever in My Heart
Four Noble Truths
Grace of God
Heroic Spirit
Hope
Illusion
Jamie
Jean
John
Kari
Karma
Katie
Kind Heart
Long Life
Lotus
Lotus Flower
Love
Loyalty
Michael
Miracle
Namaste
Noah
Northern Praying Mantis
Patricia
Peace
Prince
Protect
Rabbit
Ravi
Rebirth
Revenge
Robert
Self-Control
Shotokan
Shotokan Karate-Do
Spirit
Spirit of Taekwondo
Strong Will
Survival of the Fittest
Taekwondo
Tiger Spirit
Together
Travis

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Eye for an Eye Kanji, Eye for an Eye Characters, Eye for an Eye in Mandarin Chinese, Eye for an Eye Characters, Eye for an Eye in Chinese Writing, Eye for an Eye in Japanese Writing, Eye for an Eye in Asian Writing, Eye for an Eye Ideograms, Chinese Eye for an Eye symbols, Eye for an Eye Hieroglyphics, Eye for an Eye Glyphs, Eye for an Eye in Chinese Letters, Eye for an Eye Hanzi, Eye for an Eye in Japanese Kanji, Eye for an Eye Pictograms, Eye for an Eye in the Chinese Written-Language, or Eye for an Eye in the Japanese Written-Language.