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Enemy in Chinese / Japanese...

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Start your custom "Enemy" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Enemy" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose
  2. Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles
  3. Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself
  4. Attack When The Enemy Has Low Morale
  5. Hunt Foxes with Stealth, Hunt Wolves in the Open
  6. True Victory is Victory Over Oneself
  7. Unity / United
  8. Intelligence...
  9. You May Learn from Victory,...
10. Advance Bravely...
11. Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis
12. Drain the pond to get all the fish
13. Sworn Friend / Ally
14. Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial


Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose

China zhí bǐ zhí jī bǎi zhàn bú dài
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This is from Sun Tzu's (Sunzi's) Art of War. It means that if you know and understand the enemy, you also know yourself, and thus with this complete understanding, you cannot lose.

This proverb is often somewhat-directly translated as, "Know the enemy and know yourself, and you can fight a hundred battles without defeat".

It can also be translated as, "If you know both yourself and your enemy, you can come out of hundreds of battles without danger", or "Know your enemy, know yourself, and your victory will not be threatened".

Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles

Japanese
Japan teki o shi ri o no o shi re ba hya ku sen aya u ka ra zu
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This is the longer/full Japanese version of this proverb. This means, "Know your enemy, know yourself, and you will not fear a hundred battles".

Others will translate this as, "Know thy enemy, know thyself, yields victory in one hundred battles".

Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself

China zhí bǐ zhí jī
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This proverb is from Sun Tzu's (Sunzi's) Art of War. It means that if you know and understand the enemy, you also know yourself. There is a secondary four characters that come after this in the Art of War (not included here) which suggest you cannot lose a battle when you follow this philosophy.

In a very literal and somewhat-boring way, this can also be translated as, "Estimate correctly one's strength as well as that of one's opponent".

Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself

Japanese
Japan te ki o shi ri o no re o shi ru
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This is the Japanese version of "know your enemy, know yourself". There is a longer version of this proverb which adds, "...and you can win 100 battles".

Attack When The Enemy Has Low Morale

China bì qí ruì qì jī qí duò guī
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This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Avoid [your enemy's] fighting spirit [and] attack [when] his [morale is] declining.

Figuratively, this means: Avoid the enemy when his morale is high. and strike him when his morale is flagging.

Hunt Foxes with Stealth, Hunt Wolves in the Open

China àn dǎ hú li míng dǎ láng
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This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Hunt foxes stealthily, [and] hunt wolves openly [just as they themselves do].

Figuratively, this means:
Different opponents require different appropriate strategies.

This is a suggestion that you should know your enemy, and know that each enemy is different, that therefore requires a specialized approach (attack).


See Also...  Art Of War Military

True Victory is Victory Over Oneself

Japan masa katsu a gatsu
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This proverb is often translated as, "True victory is victory over oneself".

However, literally, Kanji by Kanji, it means, "True victory [is] my/self victory".

My Japanese friends rate this very highly for a wall scroll.

Unity / United

Join Forces / Rally Together
China tuán jié
Japan dan ketsu
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There's not a perfect match to the English word "unity" in Chinese. But this word is pretty close. It speaks to the idea of joining forces, and working as one. It could even mean to rally together to achieve a goal, or defeat a common enemy.


団 There are several variations of these characters such as 团结, 団結, 團結, 糰結, etc. Modern Japanese will write it 団結. Just the first Kanji varies. Click on the image of that modern Japanese first Kanji to the right if you want this version instead of the traditional one.

Intelligence
Information-Gathering

China qíng bào
Japan jouhou
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If you are a government spy, engaged in business espionage, or in some military intelligence department, this is both the title of what you are doing and what you are collecting about your enemy.

It is suggestive by itself of military intelligence, but applies to corporate intelligence if you are keeping an eye on your competition in business.

You May Learn from Victory,
You Will Learn from Failure

China bǎi shèng nán lǜ dí sān zhé nǎi liáng yī
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This Chinese proverbs literally translates as: [Even a general who has won a] hundred victories [may be] hard put to see through the enemy's [strategy], [but one who has] broken [his] arm three [times] [will] be a good doctor.

Figuratively, this means: One cannot always depend on past successes to guarantee future success, but one can always learn from lessons drawn from failure.


See Also...  Failure - Mother Of Success | Experience - Mother Of Success | Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 | Hard Knocks

Advance Bravely
Indomitable Spirit

China yǒng wàng zhí qián
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This proverb creates an image of a warrior bravely advancing against an enemy regardless of the odds.

This proverb can also be translated as "indomitable spirit" or "march fearlessly onward".


See Also...  Indomitable | Fortitude

Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

China dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
Japan dou ten chi shou hou
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The first chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War lists five key points to analyzing your situation. It reads like a 5-part military proverb. Sun Tzu says that to sharpen your skills, you must plan. To plan well, you must know your situation. Therefore, you must consider and discuss the following:

1. Philosophy and Politics: Make sure your way or your policy is agreeable among all of your troops (and the citizens of your kingdom as well). For when your soldiers believe in you and your way, they will follow you to their deaths without hesitation, and will not question your orders.

2. Heaven/Sky: Consider climate / weather. This can also mean to consider whether God is smiling on you. In the modern military, this could be waiting for clear skies so that you can have air support for an amphibious landing.

3. Ground/Earth: Consider the terrain in which the battle will take place. This includes analyzing defensible positions, exit routes, and using varying elevation to your advantage. When you plan an ambush, you must know your terrain, and the best location from which to stage that ambush. This knowledge will also help you avoid being ambushed, as you will know where the likely places in which to expect an ambush from your enemy.

4. Leadership: This applies to you as the general, and also to your lieutenants. A leader should be smart and be able to develop good strategies. Leaders should keep their word, and if they break a promise, they should punish themselves as harshly as they would punish subordinates. Leaders should be benevolent to their troops, with almost a fatherly love for them. Leaders must have the ability to make brave and fast decisions. Leaders must have steadfast principles.

5. [Military] Methods: This can also mean laws, rules, principles, model, or system. You must have an efficient organization in place to manage both your troops and supplies. In the modern military, this would be a combination of how your unit is organized, and your SOP (Standard Operating Procedure).


Notes: This is a simplistic translation and explanation. Much more is suggested in the actual text of the Art of War (Bing Fa). It would take a lot of study to master all of these aspects. In fact, these five characters can be compared to the modern military acronyms such as BAMCIS or SMEAC.

CJK notes: I have included the Japanese and Korean pronunciations, but in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, this does not make a typical phrase (with subject, verb and object) it is a list that only someone familiar with Sun Tzu's writings would understand.

Drain the pond to get all the fish

Kill the goose that lays the golden eggs
China jié zé ér yú
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In 632 BC, Duke Wen of the Kingdom of Jin was about to lead an army against the forces of the Kingdom of Chu.
The Duke asked one of his advisers, Jiu Fan, how they could possibly win the impending battle, as they were drastically outnumbered.
Jiu Fan said, "All is fair in war", and went on to suggest a plan of dishonorable tactics (cheating).
The Duke was not sure of this advice, so he asked another adviser, Yong Ji, who replied, "If you catch fish by draining the pond, you can certainly get all the fish. But there will be no fish the following year. You can cheat this one time in battle, but such tactics can only be used once, as the enemy will be wise in future encounters".

The Duke heard the words of his wiser adviser, but cheated to gain victory in the battle. However, he rewarded Yong Ji more than Jiu Fan at the victory celebration, stating that while Jiu Fan's advice gained one victory, the wise words of Yong Ji would last forever.

This Chinese idiom/proverb is still used, over 2600 years later to remind people not to burn bridges, cheat, or dishonor oneself in exchange for a short term gain, while sacrificing the future.

This is very similar to the meaning of the English phrase, "Kill the goose that lays the golden eggs".

Sworn Friend / Ally

China méng yǒu
Japan meiyuu
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This means a sworn friend or ally. If you stand on the same side of an issue with someone, and perhaps fight for the same cause together, this is the term you would use to describe such a partner.

There may not be a personal relationship, as this term is also used to describe whole countries that make a coalition, or fight against a common enemy.

This would be most appropriate if you are a high-level military officer, giving this wall scroll to an officer of another country as you join forces together, and go to war.

Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

China dà gōng wú sī
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This Chinese proverb comes from an old story from some time before 476 BC. About a man named Qi Huangyang, who was commissioned by the king to select the best person for a certain job in the Imperial Court.

Qi Huangyang selected his enemy for the job. The king was very confused by the selection, but Qi Huangyang explained that he was asked to find the best person for the job, not necessarily someone that he personally liked or had a friendship with.

Later, Confucius commented on how unselfish and impartial Qi Huangyang was by saying "Da Gong Wu Si" which if you look it up in a Chinese dictionary, is generally translated as "Unselfish" or "Just and Fair".

If you translate each character, you'd have something like,

"Big/Deep Justice Without Self".

Direct translations like this leave out a lot of what the Chinese characters really say. Use your imagination, and suddenly you realize that "without self" means "without thinking about yourself in the decision" - together, these two words mean "unselfish". The first two characters serve to really drive the point home that we are talking about a concept that is similar to "blind justice".

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries translates this simply as "just and fair". So that is the short and simple version.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly-used term.


See Also...  Selflessness | Work Unselfishly For The Common Good | Altruism


Check dictionary for enemy
A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The scroll that I am holding in this picture is a "medium size"
4-character wall scroll.
As you can see, it is a great size to hang on your wall.
(We also offer custom wall scrolls in larger sizes)

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.




If your search is not successful, just post your request on our forum, and we'll be happy to do research or translation for any reasonable request.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

A Life of Serenity
A New Life
Aikido
Autumn
Bamboo
Be Happy
Beautiful
Beautiful Princess
Beautiful Virtue
Beautiful Woman
Beauty
Believe
Best Love
Bird
Black
Black Belt
Black Eagle
Blossom
Blue
Bodhi Tree
Brown
Buddha
Buddhism
Bushido
Caitlin
Cause and Effect
Cherry Blossom
Children
Confucius
Courage
Dance
Danielle
Double Happiness
Dragon
Dragon Snake
Dragon Tiger
Drink
Eden
Emperor
Eternal Life
Eternity
Faith
Fear Not
Fish
Flower
Flowers
Flying
Forest
Fortune
Four
Free Spirit
Goat
God is Always With You
God is Love
God of Abraham
Gold
Golden
Gonzalez
Good
Good Fortune
Grace from Heaven
Great
Great Ambitions
Great Expectations
Guardian
Happiness
Happiness and Joy
Happy
Happy Birthday
Heart of A Warrior
Heart Soul
Home
Honest
Honor
Honor Integrity
Horse
I Need You
Independent Spirit
Integrity
Jesse
Jiang
John
Juan
Kempo
Koi Fish
Kung Fu
Leopard
Light
Lily
Little
Live for Today
Live in Prosperity
Logan
Longevity
Lotus
Lotus Flower
Love
Love Always
Love Eternal
Love Forever
Love With All My Heart
Love You Forever
Luck
Marcus
Maria
Marie
Martial Arts
Martinez
Mountain
New Year
Nikki
Old Sage
One True Love
Patience
Peaceful
Penny
People
Pursuit of Happiness
Reason
Respect
Sara
Scorpio
Serenity Prayer
Seth
Sexy
Sheep
Snow
Song
South America
Southern
Spirit of Dragon
Spirit of the Tiger
Stan
Stanley
Stewart
Strength
Taylor
The Saint
Tigers
Today
Together
Tree
Tristan
Trust God
Trust No Man
Warrior
Warriors
Wedding
White
Will
Wind
Wisdom
Wisdom from Hard Knocks
Wisdom in Chinese
Wish
Wishes
Woman
Wyatt
Year of the Dragon

With so many searches, we had to upgrade to our own Linux server.
Of course, only one in 500 searches results in a purchase - Hey buy a wall scroll!!!



See: Our list of specifically Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls. And, check out Our list of specifically old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title
Characters 
Simplified
Traditional
Japanese Romaji
(Romanized Japanese)
Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose知彼知己百战不殆
知彼知己百戰不殆
n/azhí bǐ zhí jī bǎi zhàn bú dài
zhi bi zhi ji bai zhan bu dai
chih pi chih chi pai chan pu tai
zhi2 bi3 zhi2 ji1 bai3 zhan4 bu2 dai4
zhibizhijibaizhanbudai
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles敵を知り己を知れば百戦危うからず
敵を知り己を知れば百戦危うからず
teki o shi ri o no o shi re ba hya ku sen aya u ka ra zun/a
Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself知彼知己
知彼知己
n/azhí bǐ zhí jī
zhi bi zhi ji
chih pi chih chi
zhi2 bi3 zhi2 ji1
zhibizhiji
Know Thy Enemy, Know Thyself敵を知り己を知る
敵を知り己を知る
te ki o shi ri o no re o shi ru
tekioshirionoreoshiru
n/a
Attack When The Enemy Has Low Morale避其锐气击其惰归
避其鋭氣擊其惰歸
n/abì qí ruì qì jī qí duò guī
bi qi rui qi ji qi duo gui
pi ch`i jui ch`i chi ch`i to kuei
bi4 qi2 rui4 qi4 ji1 qi2 duo4 gui1
biqiruiqijiqiduogui
pichijuichichichitokuei
pi chi jui chi chi chi to kuei
Hunt Foxes with Stealth, Hunt Wolves in the Open暗打狐狸明打狼
闇打狐狸明打狼
n/aàn dǎ hú li míng dǎ láng
an da hu li ming da lang
an ta hu li ming ta lang
an4 da3 hu2 li ming2 da3 lang2
andahulimingdalang
True Victory is Victory Over Oneself正胜吾胜
正勝吾勝
masa katsu a gatsu
masakatsuagatsu
n/a
Unity / United团结
團結 / 糰結
dan ketsu
danketsu
tuán jié
tuan jie
t`uan chieh
tuan2 jie2
tuanjie
tuanchieh
tuan chieh
Intelligence
Information-Gathering
情报
情報
jouhou
joho
qíng bào
qing bao
ch`ing pao
qing2 bao4
qingbao
chingpao
ching pao
You May Learn from Victory, You Will Learn from Failure百胜难虑敌三折乃良医
百勝難慮敵三折乃良醫
n/abǎi shèng nán lǜ dí sān zhé nǎi liáng yī
bai sheng nan lv di san zhe nai liang yi
pai sheng nan lü ti san che nai liang i
bai3 sheng4 nan2 lv4 di2 san1 zhe2 nai3 liang2 yi1
Advance Bravely
Indomitable Spirit
勇往直前
勇往直前
n/ayǒng wàng zhí qián
yong wang zhi qian
yung wang chih ch`ien
yong3 wang4 zhi2 qian2
yongwangzhiqian
yungwangchihchien
yung wang chih chien
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis道天地将法
道天地將法
dou ten chi shou hou
doutenchishouhou
do ten chi sho ho
dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
dao tian di jiang fa
tao t`ien ti chiang fa
dao4 tian1 di4 jiang4 fa3
daotiandijiangfa
taotientichiangfa
tao tien ti chiang fa
Drain the pond to get all the fish竭泽而渔
竭澤而漁
n/ajié zé ér yú
jie ze er yu
chieh tse erh yü
jie2 ze2 er2 yu2
jiezeeryu
Sworn Friend / Ally盟友
盟友
meiyuu
meiyu
méng yǒu
meng you
meng yu
meng2 you3
mengyou
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial大公无私
大公無私
n/adà gōng wú sī
da gong wu si
ta kung wu ssu
da4 gong1 wu2 si1
dagongwusi

If you have not set up your computer to display Chinese, the characters in this table probably look like empty boxes or random text garbage.
This is why I spent hundreds of hours making images so that you could view the characters in the "enemy" listings above.
If you want your Windows computer to be able to display Chinese characters you can either head to your Regional and Language options in your Win XP control panel, select the [Languages] tab and click on [Install files for East Asian Languages]. This task will ask for your Win XP CD to complete in most cases. If you don't have your Windows XP CD, or are running Windows 98, you can also download/run the simplified Chinese font package installer from Microsoft which works independently with Win 98, ME, 2000, and XP. It's a 2.5MB download, so if you are on dial up, start the download and go make a sandwich.

Some people may refer to this entry as Enemy Kanji, Enemy Characters, Enemy in Mandarin Chinese, Enemy Characters, Enemy in Chinese Writing, Enemy in Japanese Writing, Enemy in Asian Writing, Enemy Ideograms, Chinese Enemy symbols, Enemy Hieroglyphics, Enemy Glyphs, Enemy in Chinese Letters, Enemy Hanzi, Enemy in Japanese Kanji, Enemy Pictograms, Enemy in the Chinese Written-Language, or Enemy in the Japanese Written-Language.

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