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Come Back in Chinese / Japanese...

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Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history
China jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country Vertical Wall Scroll

This proverb is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as "Serve the country with the utmost loyalty." More literally, it means, "[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country."

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means "serve the country faithfully" or "die for the country." Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean, "Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country."

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei

Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

China shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the last line of a famous poem. It is perceived as a tribute or ode to your parent's or mother from a child or children that have left home.

The poem was written by Meng Jiao during the Tang Dynasty (about 1200 years ago). The Chinese title is "You Zi Yin" which means "The Traveler's Recite."

The last line as shown here speaks of the generous and warm spring sun light which gives the grass far beyond what the little grass can could ever give back (except perhaps by showing its lovely green leaves and flourishing). The metaphor is that the sun is your mother or parents, and you are the grass. Your parents raise you and give you all the love and care you need to prepare you for the world. A debt which you can never repay, nor is repayment expected.

The first part of the poem (not written in the characters to the left) suggests that the thread in a loving mother's hands is the shirt of her traveling offspring. Vigorously sewing while wishing them to come back sooner than they left.
...This part is really hard to translate into English that makes any sense but maybe you get the idea. We are talking about a poem that is so old that many Chinese people would have trouble reading it (as if it was the King James Version of Chinese).

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
China pò jìng chóng yuán
Broken Mirror Rejoined Vertical Wall Scroll

A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:


You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon but as for you, I see not a trace.


The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb in Chinese is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce) but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.


Not the results for come back that you were looking for?

Below are some entries from our dictionary that may match your come back search...

Characters

If shown, 2nd row is Simp. Chinese

Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition

復活


复活

see styles
Mandarin fù huó / fu4 huo2
Taiwan fu huo
Japanese fukkatsu / ふっかつ
Chinese resurrection
Japanese (n,vs,adj-no) (1) revival (e.g. musical); come-back; (2) restoration; rebirth; resurrection
To live again, return to life; revived

絕處逢生

see styles
Mandarin jué chǔ féng shēng / jue2 chu3 feng2 sheng1
Taiwan chüeh ch`u feng sheng / chüeh chu feng sheng
Chinese to come back from death's door (idiom); unexpected rescue from danger; fig. to recover from a seemingly impossible situation; to find a way out of a predicament

下る

see styles
Japanese sagaru / さがる    kudaru / くだる Japanese (irregular okurigana usage) (v5r,vi) (1) to come down; to go down; to fall; to drop; to sink; to get lower; (2) to hang; to dangle; (3) to move back; to step back; to withdraw; to retire; (4) to deteriorate; to fall off; to be downgraded; (5) to get closer to the present day; (6) to go south; (v5r,vi) (1) to descend; to go down; to come down; (2) to be handed down (of an order, judgment, etc.); (3) to pass (of time); (4) to surrender; to capitulate; (5) (often in neg. form) to be less than; to be inferior to; (6) to have the runs; to have diarrhea

來る

see styles
Japanese kuru / くる Japanese (out-dated kanji) (vk,vi) (1) to come (spatially or temporally); to approach; to arrive; (vk,vi,aux-v) (2) to come back; to do ... and come back; (3) to come to be; to become; to get; to grow; to continue; (vk,vi) (4) to come from; to be caused by; to derive from; (5) to come to (i.e. "when it comes to spinach ...")

來電


来电

see styles
Mandarin lái diàn / lai2 dian4
Taiwan lai tien
Japanese raiden / らいでん
Chinese incoming telegram or telephone call; your telegram, telephone call, or message; to send a telegram or make a telephone call here (i.e. to the speaker); to have instant attraction to sb; to have chemistry with sb; to come back (of electricity, after an outage)
Japanese (personal name) Raiden

反撲


反扑

see styles
Mandarin fǎn pū / fan3 pu1
Taiwan fan p`u / fan pu
Chinese to counterattack; to come back after a defeat; to retrieve lost ground

回來


回来

see styles
Mandarin huí lai / hui2 lai5
Taiwan hui lai
Chinese to return; to come back

回返

see styles
Mandarin huí fǎn / hui2 fan3
Taiwan hui fan
Chinese to return; to go back; to come back

帰る

see styles
Japanese kaeru / かえる Japanese (v5r,vi) (1) to return; to come home; to go home; to go back; (2) to leave; (3) (baseb) to get home; to get to home plate

往復


往复

see styles
Mandarin wǎng fù / wang3 fu4
Taiwan wang fu
Japanese oufuku / ofuku / おうふく
Chinese to go and come back; to make a return trip; backwards and forwards (e.g. of piston or pump action); to reciprocate (of machine part)
Japanese (n,vs,adj-no) (1) making a round trip; going and returning; coming and going; (2) (abbreviation) (See 往復切符) round-trip ticket; return ticket; (3) correspondence; exchanging (letters); (4) socializing; visiting one another
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

復出


复出

see styles
Mandarin fù chū / fu4 chu1
Taiwan fu ch`u / fu chu
Chinese to come back out of retirement; to get involved again after having withdrawn

復歸


复归

see styles
Mandarin fù guī / fu4 gui1
Taiwan fu kuei
Chinese to return; to come back

復生


复生

see styles
Mandarin fù shēng / fu4 sheng1
Taiwan fu sheng
Japanese matao / またお    fukusei / fukuse / ふくせい
Chinese to be reborn; to recover; to come back to life; to regenerate
Japanese (given name) Matao; (given name) Fukusei
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

復返


复返

see styles
Mandarin fù fǎn / fu4 fan3
Taiwan fu fan
Chinese to come back; to return

来る

see styles
Japanese kuru / くる    kitaru / きたる Japanese (vk,vi) (1) to come (spatially or temporally); to approach; to arrive; (vk,vi,aux-v) (2) to come back; to do ... and come back; (3) to come to be; to become; to get; to grow; to continue; (vk,vi) (4) to come from; to be caused by; to derive from; (5) to come to (i.e. "when it comes to spinach ..."); (pre-noun adjective) (1) next (e.g. "next April"); forthcoming; coming; (v5r,vi) (2) to come; to arrive; to be due to

歸る

see styles
Japanese kaeru / かえる Japanese (out-dated kanji) (v5r,vi) (1) to return; to come home; to go home; to go back; (2) to leave; (3) (baseb) to get home; to get to home plate

浮現

see styles
Mandarin fú xiàn / fu2 xian4
Taiwan fu hsien
Chinese to appear before one's eyes; to come into view; to float into appearance; to come back (of images from the past); to emerge; it emerges; it occurs (to me that..)

返る

see styles
Japanese kaeru / かえる Japanese (v5r,vi) (1) to return; to come back; to go back; (2) to turn over; (suf,v5r) (3) (after the -masu stem of a verb) (to become) extremely; (to become) completely

返回

see styles
Mandarin fǎn huí / fan3 hui2
Taiwan fan hui
Chinese to return to; to come (or go) back

還る

see styles
Japanese kaeru / かえる Japanese (v5r,vi) (1) to return; to come home; to go home; to go back; (2) to leave; (3) (baseb) to get home; to get to home plate

下がる

see styles
Japanese sagaru / さがる Japanese (v5r,vi) (1) to come down; to go down; to fall; to drop; to sink; to get lower; (2) to hang; to dangle; (3) to move back; to step back; to withdraw; to retire; (4) to deteriorate; to fall off; to be downgraded; (5) to get closer to the present day; (6) to go south

復帰作

see styles
Japanese fukkisaku / ふっきさく Japanese come-back work (film, album, book, etc.)

打返す

see styles
Japanese uchikaesu / うちかえす Japanese (Godan verb with "su" ending) to return a blow repeat; to turn back; to rewhip; to plow up; to plough up; to come and retreat

立戻る

see styles
Japanese tachimodoru / たちもどる Japanese (v5r,vi) to return; to come back

舞戻る

see styles
Japanese maimodoru / まいもどる Japanese (v5r,vi) to come back

行交う

see styles
Japanese yukikau / ゆきかう    ikikau / いきかう Japanese (v5u,vi) to come and go; to go back and forth

ぶり返す

see styles
Japanese burikaesu / ぶりかえす Japanese (v5s,vi) to come back; to return; to recur

卷土重來


卷土重来

see styles
Mandarin juǎn tǔ chóng lái / juan3 tu3 chong2 lai2
Taiwan chüan t`u ch`ung lai / chüan tu chung lai
Chinese lit. to return in a swirl of dust (idiom); fig. to regroup and come back even stronger; to make a comeback

戦列復帰

see styles
Japanese senretsufukki / せんれつふっき Japanese (noun/participle) (yoji) return to the battle line; come back to the game (on to the field); a comeback

打ち返す

see styles
Japanese uchikaesu / うちかえす Japanese (Godan verb with "su" ending) to return a blow repeat; to turn back; to rewhip; to plow up; to plough up; to come and retreat

Search for Come Back in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersVarious forms of Romanized Chinese
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country盡忠報國
尽忠报国
jìn zhōng bào guó
jin4 zhong1 bao4 guo2
jin zhong bao guo
jinzhongbaoguo
chin chung pao kuo
chinchungpaokuo
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents誰言寸草心報得三春暉
谁言寸草心报得三春晖
shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
shui2 yan2 cun4 cao3 xin1 bao4 de2 san1 chun1 hui1
shui yan cun cao xin bao de san chun hui
shui yen ts`un ts`ao hsin pao te san ch`un hui
shui yen tsun tsao hsin pao te san chun hui
Broken Mirror Rejoined破鏡重圓
破镜重圆
pò jìng chóng yuán
po4 jing4 chong2 yuan2
po jing chong yuan
pojingchongyuan
p`o ching ch`ung yüan
pochingchungyüan
po ching chung yüan
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

7 Codes of the Samurai
Achieve
Adventure
Aikido
Ambitious
Ancestors
Archangel
Believe
Bravery
Bushido
Calm Mind
Death Before Dishonor
Destiny
Endurance
Enso
Faith
Family
Family First
Fire
Forever
Good Health
Grandmother
Heaven
Humility
I Love You
Jade
Jesus is Love
Karate
Lone Wolf
Love
Luck
Mercy
Monkey
Muso
One True Love
Peace and Good Health
Peaceful Warrior
Pisces
Power
Saint
Scarecrow
Scorpio
Shadow
Shinobi
Soul Mates
Soulmate
Strength
The Way of the Warrior
Thunder
Tiger
Trust
Water
Wind

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Come Back Kanji, Come Back Characters, Come Back in Mandarin Chinese, Come Back Characters, Come Back in Chinese Writing, Come Back in Japanese Writing, Come Back in Asian Writing, Come Back Ideograms, Chinese Come Back symbols, Come Back Hieroglyphics, Come Back Glyphs, Come Back in Chinese Letters, Come Back Hanzi, Come Back in Japanese Kanji, Come Back Pictograms, Come Back in the Chinese Written-Language, or Come Back in the Japanese Written-Language.