Not what you want?

Try searching again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Bo Wu in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Bo Wu calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Bo Wu" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Bo Wu" title below...

  1. Wu Xing Fist

  2. Wu Wei / Without Action

  3. Martial Arts / Wu Shu

  4. Jing Mo / Jing Wu

  5. Xishi / Xi Shi

  6. Shaolin Martial Arts

  7. Wudang Fist

  8. Warrior Essence / Warrior Spirit / Martial

  9. Morality of Deed

10. Adoring Love

11. Morality of Mind

12. Five Elements Tai Chi Fist

13. Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

14. Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa


Wu Xing Fist

Five Forms Fist of Kung Fu
China wǔ xíng quán
Japan gokeiken
Wu Xing Fist Vertical Wall Scroll

五形拳 is "Wu Xing Fist" or "Five Form Fist." The forms refer to Dragon, Snake, Tiger, Crane, and Leopard. This term is used in Kung Fu, and is recognized by both Chinese and Japanese practitioners of martial arts.

Wu Wei / Without Action

Daoist / Taoist Tenet
China wú wéi
Japan mui
Wu Wei / Without Action Vertical Wall Scroll

Wu Wei is a Daoist (Taoist) tenet, that speaks to the idea of letting nature take its course.

Some will say it's about knowing when to take action and when not to. In reality, it's more about not going against the flow. What is going to happen is controlled by the Dao (Tao), for which one who follows the Dao will not resist or struggle against.

There is a lot more to this concept but chances are, if you are looking for this entry, you already know the expanded concept.

Warning: Outside of Daoist context, this means idleness or inactivity (especially in Japanese where very few know this as a Daoist concept).

Martial Arts / Wu Shu

China wǔ shù
Japan bujutsu
Martial Arts / Wu Shu Vertical Wall Scroll

武術 is the very Chinese way to express "Martial Arts." Some even use this word to directly describe Kung Fu. But this is a label that fits all disciplines from Karate to Kung Fu to Taekwondo.

Note: This also means Martial Arts with the same appearance in old Korean Hanja characters and is pronounced "musul" or "musur" in Korean.

While this is best if your audience is Chinese or Korean, this also means "martial arts" in Japanese.

Jing Mo / Jing Wu

China jīng wǔ
HK jing mo
Jing Mo / Jing Wu Vertical Wall Scroll

This two-character title is used for a certain type of martial arts. You can translate this roughly as "Excellent Marital Arts" or "Excellence in Martial Arts." You will notice that the second character is "wu" as in wushu (martial arts) and wushi (warrior).

More information can be found at the Jing Mo website. You should probably only order this if you are a member of this association.

Note that "jing mo" is the Cantonese pronunciation of these characters. In Mandarin, they are "jing wu."
Also used in Korean but only by those involved with martial arts who can also read Korean Hanja (a small percentage of the population).

Xishi / Xi Shi

China xī shī
Japan sei shi
Xishi / Xi Shi Vertical Wall Scroll

西施 is the Chinese title for Xishi, who lived around 450 BC. She was a famous Chinese beauty, perhaps the foremost of the Four Beauties (四大美女). She was given by King Gou Jian of the Yue Kingdom as a concubine to the King of Wu. This was part of an elaborate plan to destroy the Wu Kingdom - and it worked.

Note: In Japanese, this can be an unrelated given name, Seishi. Though the Xishi story is somewhat known in Japan.

Shaolin Martial Arts

China shǎo lín wǔ gōng
Shaolin Martial Arts Vertical Wall Scroll

少林武功 is the title for "Shaolin Wu Gong" or "Shaolin martial arts."

Wudang Fist

China wǔ dāng quán
Wudang Fist Vertical Wall Scroll

武當拳 means Wudang Quan or Wudang Fist.

Wudang (sometimes romanized as Wutang or Wu Tang) refers to a Mountain range in northwest Hubei. The Wudang martial arts style refers to a version of Shaolin Kung Fu.

Warrior Essence / Warrior Spirit / Martial

China
Japan bu
Warrior Essence / Warrior Spirit / Martial Vertical Wall Scroll

武 is the essence or spirit of a warrior. 武 is part of the word "wu shu" which is sometimes translated as "martial arts" or "kung fu."

In more modern speech and other context, this can mean military, martial, warlike, fierce, and perhaps violent but usually as a prefix for a longer word or phrase.

Morality of Deed

China xíng dé
Morality of Deed Vertical Wall Scroll

The idea of "morality of deed" goes along with "wu de" (martial morality or virtues of the warrior).

Here, the first character is a representation of the actions or deeds that you engage in.
The second character refers to morality or virtue.

This translates better in English in the opposite order, as the Chinese order is literally "deed morality."


See Also:  Morality of Mind | Martial Morality

Adoring Love

China ài mù
Japan ai bou
Adoring Love Vertical Wall Scroll

愛慕 means "adoring love" in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

I suppose this is the best kind of love to have. 愛慕 has the well-known character for love. But the second character modifies and reinforces the meaning to become adore, adoring love, or to love and adore.

Ancient Chinese warning:
Adoring someone is fine until you are in the shoes of the Prince of the Kingdom of Wu. This Prince adored a certain beautiful woman (Xi Shi) so much that he neglected his duties, and soon let the kingdom fall into ruins.

Morality of Mind

China xīn dé
Morality of Mind Vertical Wall Scroll

The idea of "morality of mind" goes along with "wu de" (martial morality or virtues of the warrior).

Here, the first character is a representation of your heart or mind.
The second character refers to morality or virtue.

This can also be translated as "morality of heart," "virtue of heart," or "virtue of the mind."

Note that since ancient times in Asia, the idea of your mind (the place where your soul resides, and your thought originate from) has been associated with the heart. Just as in western culture where we say "it comes from the heart," or "heartfelt emotions," there is a belief that your heart and mind are one and the same (medical science now begs to differ).


See Also:  Morality of Deed | Martial Morality

Five Elements Tai Chi Fist

China wǔ xíng tài jí quán
Japan go gyou tai kyoku ken
Five Elements Tai Chi Fist Vertical Wall Scroll

五行太極拳 is a certain school or style of Tai Chi (Taiji). The characters literally mean "Five Elements Tai Chi Fist."

Notes:
In Taiwan, it would be Romanized as "Wu Hsing Tai Chi Chuan" - see the standard Mandarin method above in the gray box (used in mainland China and the official Romanization used by the Library of Congress).

The last three characters are sometimes translated as "Grand Ultimate Fist," so the whole thing can be "Five Elements Grand Ultimate Fist" if you wish.

I have not confirmed the use of this title in Korean but if it is used, it's probably only by martial arts enthusiasts. The pronunciation is correct as shown above for Korean.

Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

China dà gōng wú sī
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb comes from an old story from some time before 476 BC. About a man named Qi Huangyang, who was commissioned by the king to select the best person for a certain job in the Imperial Court.

Qi Huangyang selected his enemy for the job. The king was very confused by the selection but Qi Huangyang explained that he was asked to find the best person for the job, not necessarily someone that he personally liked or had a friendship with.

Later, Confucius commented on how unselfish and impartial Qi Huangyang was by saying "Da Gong Wu Si" which if you look it up in a Chinese dictionary, is generally translated as "Unselfish" or "Just and Fair."

If you translate each character, you'd have something like,

"Big/Deep Justice Without Self."

Direct translations like this leave out a lot of what the Chinese characters really say. Use your imagination, and suddenly you realize that "without self" means "without thinking about yourself in the decision" - together, these two words mean "unselfish." The first two characters serve to really drive the point home that we are talking about a concept that is similar to "blind justice."

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries translates this simply as "just and fair." So that is the short and simple version.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common Good | Altruism

Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

China quán fǎ
Japan kenpou
Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa Vertical Wall Scroll

This form of martial arts can be translated in several ways. Some will call it "fist principles" or "the way of the fist," or even "law of the fist." The first character literally means fist. The second can mean law, method, way, principle or Buddhist teaching.

Kempo is really a potluck of martial arts. Often a combination of Chinese martial arts such as Shaolin Kung Fu with Japanese martial arts such as Karate, Jujutsu (Jujitsu), Aikido, and others. You may see the term "Kempo Karate" which basically means Karate with other disciplines added. In this way, Kempo becomes an adjective rather than a title or school of martial arts.

These facts will long be argued by various masters and students of Kempo. Even the argument as to whether it should be spelled "kenpo" or "Kempo" ensues at dojos around the world (the correct Romaji should actually be "kenpou" if you precisely follow the rules).

The benefit of Kempo is that the techniques are easier to learn and master compared to pure Kung Fu (wu shu). Students are often taught basic Karate moves, kicks, and punches before augmenting the basic skills with complex Kung Fu techniques. This allows students of Kempo achieve a level where they can defend themselves or fight in a relatively short amount of time (a few years rather than a decade or more).

Because the definition of this word is so fluid, I should make some notes here:

1. Purists in Okinawa will claim that "Okinawa Kenpo" or "Ryukyu Hon Kenpo" is the original and true version of this martial art from the old kingdom. There is actually little or no connection between Okinawa Kenpo and the way the word is used elsewhere.

2. In Chinese, where these characters are pronounced "quan fa" (sometimes Romanized as "chuan fa" because the Chinese-pinyin "q" actually sounds like an English "ch" sound), these characters do not hold the connotation of being a mixed martial art. It is simply defined as "the law of the fist."

3. In my Japanese dictionary, it oddly defines Kenpo as "Chinese art of self-defense." I personally don't feel this is the most common way that people perceive the word but just something you should know.

Search for Bo Wu in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Wu Xing Fist五形拳gokeikenwǔ xíng quán
wu3 xing2 quan2
wu xing quan
wuxingquan
wu hsing ch`üan
wuhsingchüan
wu hsing chüan
Wu Wei
Without Action
無為
无为
muiwú wéi / wu2 wei2 / wu wei / wuwei
Martial Arts
Wu Shu
武術
武术
bujutsuwǔ shù / wu3 shu4 / wu shu / wushu
Jing Mo
Jing Wu
精武jīng wǔ / jing1 wu3 / jing wu / jingwuching wu / chingwu
Xishi
Xi Shi
西施sei shi / seishixī shī / xi1 shi1 / xi shi / xishihsi shih / hsishih
Shaolin Martial Arts少林武功shǎo lín wǔ gōng
shao3 lin2 wu3 gong1
shao lin wu gong
shaolinwugong
shao lin wu kung
shaolinwukung
Wudang Fist武當拳
武当拳
wǔ dāng quán
wu3 dang1 quan2
wu dang quan
wudangquan
wu tang ch`üan
wutangchüan
wu tang chüan
Warrior Essence
Warrior Spirit
Martial
buwǔ / wu3 / wu
Morality of Deed行德xíng dé / xing2 de2 / xing de / xingdehsing te / hsingte
Adoring Love愛慕
爱慕
ai bou / aibou / ai bo / aiboài mù / ai4 mu4 / ai mu / aimu
Morality of Mind心德xīn dé / xin1 de2 / xin de / xindehsin te / hsinte
Five Elements Tai Chi Fist五行太極拳
五行太极拳
go gyou tai kyoku ken
gogyoutaikyokuken
go gyo tai kyoku ken
gogyotaikyokuken
wǔ xíng tài jí quán
wu3 xing2 tai4 ji2 quan2
wu xing tai ji quan
wuxingtaijiquan
wu hsing t`ai chi ch`üan
wuhsingtaichichüan
wu hsing tai chi chüan
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial大公無私
大公无私
dà gōng wú sī
da4 gong1 wu2 si1
da gong wu si
dagongwusi
ta kung wu ssu
takungwussu
Kenpo
Kempo
Quan Fa
Chuan Fa
拳法kenpou / kenpoquán fǎ / quan2 fa3 / quan fa / quanfach`üan fa / chüanfa / chüan fa
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Achieve
Adventure
Aiki Jujutsu
Aikido
Ambitious
Ancestors
Archangel
Bamboo
Beautiful
Benevolence
Bushido
Death Before Dishonor
Destiny
Divine
Double Happiness
Faith
Family
Fire
Fish
Goldfish
Good Health
Hapkido
Health
Heaven
Hentai
Humility
I Love You
Jasmine
Lightning
Lone Wolf
Lotus Flower
Love
Loyalty
Luck
Marine
Mercy
Monkey
Mushin
One True Love
Peace and Good Health
Pisces
Power
Protect
Protector
Rainbow
Resolve
Saint
Satoshi
Scarecrow
Shadow
Soul Mates
Soulmate
Spirit of Taekwondo
Tai Chi Chuan
Thunder
Tiger
Wish

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Bo Wu Kanji, Bo Wu Characters, Bo Wu in Mandarin Chinese, Bo Wu Characters, Bo Wu in Chinese Writing, Bo Wu in Japanese Writing, Bo Wu in Asian Writing, Bo Wu Ideograms, Chinese Bo Wu symbols, Bo Wu Hieroglyphics, Bo Wu Glyphs, Bo Wu in Chinese Letters, Bo Wu Hanzi, Bo Wu in Japanese Kanji, Bo Wu Pictograms, Bo Wu in the Chinese Written-Language, or Bo Wu in the Japanese Written-Language.