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Be Water in Chinese / Japanese...

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  1. Water
  2. Ultimate Goodness of Water
  3. Be Like Water
  4. Water Polo
  5. Be Like Water
  6. Mind Like Water
  7. Water Tiger
  8. Fire and Water Have No Mercy
  9. Put out a burning wood cart...
10. Not Only Can Water Float A Boat, It Can Sink It Also
11. Feng Shui
12. River
13. Five Elements
14. Large River
15. Five Elements
16. Drinking the water of a well,...
17. Water Dragon / Rain Dragon
18. Water Dragon / Coiled Dragon
19. Five Elements
20. Rain
21. Ice / Frost
22. Forgive and Forget
23. Great Sea
24. Soldiers Adapt Actions to the Situation
25. Shidai / Sida / Mahabhuta
26. Oasis
27. Aquarius
28. Clarity
29. Mercury
30. Enlisted Sailor
31. No Limitations
32. Four Elements
33. Lake
34. Red Dragon / Vermillion Dragon
35. Warriors Adapt and Overcome
36. Dragon
37. Well-Disciplined / Orderly
38. Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things
39. Frightful Demon / Asura
40. No Mind / Mushin

Water

(One of the five elements)
China shuǐ
Japan mizu / sui
Water

水 is the symbol for water in Japanese and Chinese.


Water is one of the five elements that ancient Chinese believed all things were composed of. These elements are also part of the cycle of Chinese astrology. Every person has both an animal sign, and one of the five elements according to the date of their birth. See also Five Elements and Chinese 12 Animals / Zodiac.

Ultimate Goodness of Water

Quote from Lao Tzu
China shàng shàn ruò shuǐ
Ultimate Goodness of Water

This quote is sometimes presented as, "Be like water." However, this is an ancient quote from the great philosopher Lao Tzu. It basically suggests that the ultimate goodness and purity (in the world) is water. Many take this as a suggestion to be like pure/good water.

Be Like Water

Quote from Lao Tzu
China ruò shuǐ
Be Like Water

若水 is part of a very old saying from Lao Tzu. It these two characters, there is a suggestion to be like water. The full phrase is about the goodness and purity of water. So, when this suggests being like water, it is actually a suggestion to be a good person (one who does not dishonor himself/herself etc).

Water Polo

China shuǐ qiú
Japan sui kyuu
Water Polo

水球 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja title for water polo.

The literal meaning of the characters is "water ball".

Be Like Water

China xiàng shuǐ yí yàng
Be Like Water

象水一樣 is a short quote from a much longer statement by Bruce Lee.

He was summarizing how people should be flexible to all circumstances, attacks, or situations. At the end, he exclaims, "Be like water my friend." 象水一樣 is the, "Be like water" part alone, since that seems to be what most people want.

Mind Like Water

Mizu No Kokoro
Japan mizu no kokoro
Mind Like Water

水の心 is the Japanese Buddhist and martial arts phrase, "mizu no kokoro," which means, "mind like water" or "heart of water."

The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects it's surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

Water Tiger

China shuǐ hǔ
Japan sui ko
Water Tiger

水虎 means "water tiger" in Chinese and Japanese.

Fire and Water Have No Mercy

China shuǐ huǒ wú qíng
Fire and Water Have No Mercy

This Chinese proverb means, "fire [and] water have-not mercy." This serves to remind us that the forces of nature are beyond human control.

Some may also translation this as, "implacable fate."

Put out a burning wood cart
with a cup of water

An utterly inadequate measure
China bēi shuǐ chē xīn
Put out a burning wood cart / with a cup of water

杯水車薪 is a warning against a futile effort. This proverb literally refers to one who is "trying to put out a burning cart of wood with a cup of water," or "throw a cup of water on a cartload of wood." The lesson to be learned is about using the right measure or tool for the job, and not to waste your effort if you are inadequately equipped for the task at hand - in other words the postscript should be "go get a bucket or a fire hose."

Not Only Can Water Float A Boat, It Can Sink It Also

China shuǐ néng zài zhōu yì néng fù zhōu
Not Only Can Water Float A Boat, It Can Sink It Also

Many things have opposite properties. The water you drink can also drown you. Pork may nourish you and keep you alive but under-cook it and it could kill you. Potassium nitrate is often used as a fertilizer to grow the food that sustains us but it's also been used as an explosive to topple buildings and destroy us.

This concept is easily associated with "yin yang" where an element has two opposite properties that are as different as night and day.

This proverb's meaning can be summed up this way: "Anything that can lead you to success may also contain great risks."

This phrase is known in literary circles by Korean people (scholars or literature). It is therefore also a valid proverb in Korean Hanja, though most Koreans would not be able to make sense of it.

Please note that there is an unwritten rule when the same character appears twice in the same phrase, the calligrapher will alter the appearance so that no two characters are exactly alike in the same piece. This calligraphy has two repeating characters that will be written differently than they appear here.

Feng Shui

China fēng shuǐ
Japan fuu sui
Feng Shui

風水 is the famous technique and approach to arranging your home externally around natural features, and internally to create balance and peace.

These two characters literally mean "wind water." Obviously, the title is far more simple than the concept behind this subject.

It may enlighten you slightly to know that the character for "wind" can also mean "style," "custom" or "manner" in some context. This may apply somewhat to this title.

In a very technical sense, this title is translated as "Chinese geomancy."

River

China chuān
Japan kawa
River

川 means river or stream in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

In Japanese, this can be a surname when pronounced as Sakigawa.

Five Elements

China jīn mù shuǐ huǒ tǔ
Five Elements

金木水火土 is a list of the Chinese characters for the five elements in a comfortable order (meaning that they simply "feel right" to a Chinese person who views this arrangement).

The order is metal, wood, water, fire, earth.

Note that sometimes the metal element is translated as gold. And earth refers to soil versus the whole planet earth.

Large River

China jiāng
Japan kou
Large River

江 means large river in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. This generally refers to a river big enough that it's navigable by cargo boats, passenger boats, or small ships.

In Japanese, this can be a surname when pronounced as Minkou or just Kou.

Five Elements

Japan chi sui ka fuu kuu
Five Elements

地水火風空 is the specifically-Japanese version of the five elements. 地水火風空 is a little different than the ancient or original Chinese version.

The elements are written in this order:
1. Earth / Terra / Ground
2. Water
3. Fire
4. Wind / Air
5. Sky / Emptiness / Void / Ether

Note: This set of Kanji can also be romanized as "ji sui ka fuu kuu," "jisuikafuukuu," or "jisuikafuku."


These can also be written in the order 地火風水空 (chi ka sui fuu kuu). Let me know when you place your order if you want the Kanji to be in this character order.

Drinking the water of a well,
one should never forget who dug it

China chī shuǐ bú wàng jué jǐng rén
Drinking the water of a well, / one should never forget who dug it

This proverb suggests that one should always be grateful to those who helped you succeed.

And remember your ancestors and those that came before you whose sacrifices made your present life better.

Some Chinese will separate the intended meaning from this proverb and translate this as "Don't forget the people who once helped you." In Modern China, this idiom is virtually never used to refer to an actual well.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used phrase.

Water Dragon / Rain Dragon

China jiāo
Japan kou ryuu
Water Dragon / Rain Dragon

This title for water dragon is the hornless or scaled dragon. 蛟龍 is the king of all aquatic animals with the ability to control rain and floods.

In Japanese, the rain dragon can represent hidden genius. This dragon's domain is the deep murky water, thus with hidden potential. This can also be the Japanese given name Kouryuu.

Water Dragon / Coiled Dragon

China pān lóng
Japan han ryuu
Water Dragon / Coiled Dragon

蟠龍 is sometimes seen as a lower level of dragon, or a dragon that has not-yet-reached its potential.

蟠龍 is often defined as a "lake dragon" that has not ascended to heaven.
Another way to put that is a dragon coiled on the earth, which has not yet ascended to the sky.

Five Elements

China wǔ xíng
Japan gogyou
Five Elements

五行 is the title of the five elements which are: wood, fire, water, earth, and metal.

The first character means "5" and the second character is simply "elements."

According to ancient Chinese science, all matter in the world is made up of these elements. One idea presented with the five elements is that when energy is added, matter is believed to expand. When energy is removed, matter contracts. Oddly, this concept is not far from Einstein's theories, and modern science. Just a few thousand years before Einstein.


More info: Wikipedia - Five Elements (Wu Xing).


See Also:  Wood | Fire | Water | Earth | Metal | Five Elements

Rain

China
Japan ame
Rain

雨 is how to write "rain" in Chinese. If rain is your name or has some significance to you in your life, this is the character you want.

If your name is Varṣā or Varsha, this is how you name translates into Chinese.


See Also:  Storm | Water | Wave

Ice / Frost

China bīng
Ice / Frost

冰 is the Chinese character used to express "ice" or "frost."

The main part of the character on the right holds the meaning of "water" and on the left, is a radical (the two dots) that also means water. Together, they create the character that means "ice" (solid water).


This is similar to the character for frost in Japanese. However, Japanese drop the radical from the left side.

Forgive and Forget

Water Under the Bridge
Japan mizu ni naga su
Forgive and Forget

水に流す is a Japanese proverb which suggests that "water continues to flow." It's similar to our English phrase, "Water under the bridge." The perceived meaning is, "Forgive and forget."

I have also seen this translated as, "Don't cry over spilled milk."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Great Sea

China dà yáng
Japan tai you
Great Sea

大洋 is a rarely-used word for ocean in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. 大洋 is here mostly for reference - please order a different ocean for your custom calligraphy wall scroll.

The first character means "big" or "great."
The second means "ocean" or "body of water" (it can sometimes mean "foreign" but not in this case).
The first character designates that you are talking about a great or huge body of water (certainly a major ocean and not a smaller sea).

Soldiers Adapt Actions to the Situation

China bīng lái jiàng dǎng shuǐ lái tǔ yǎn
Soldiers Adapt Actions to the Situation

This Chinese military proverb means, counter soldiers with arms, and counter water with an earthen dam.

This is about how different situations call for different action. You must adopt measures appropriate to the actual situation.

To explain the actual proverb, one would not attack a flood of water with gunfire, nor would you counter-attack soldiers by building an earth weir. You must be adaptable and counter whatever threatens with relevant action.

Shidai / Sida / Mahabhuta

China sì dà
Japan shi dai
Shidai / Sida / Mahabhuta

In Buddhism, this is mahābhūta, the four elements of which all things are made: earth, water, fire, and wind.

This can also represent the four freedoms: speaking out freely, airing views fully, holding great debates, and writing big-character posters.

In some context, this can be a university or college offering four-year programs.

To others, this can represent the Tao, Heaven, Earth and King.

Going back to the Buddhist context, these four elements "earth, water, fire, and wind" represent 堅, 濕, 煖, 動, which is: solid, liquid, heat, and motion.

Oasis

China lǜ zhōu
Oasis

綠洲 is the Chinese word for oasis, as in refuge with water in the midst of a vast desert.

Aquarius Zodiac Symbol / Sign

China shuǐ píng zuò
Japan mizugame-za
Aquarius Zodiac Symbol / Sign

水瓶座 is the Chinese and Japanese way to write Aquarius (water bearer) of western astrology.


See Also:  Chinese Zodiac

Clarity

China qīng
Japan sei
Clarity

清 means clarity or clear in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. Looking at the parts of this character, you have three splashes of water on the left, "life" on the top right, and the moon on the lower right.

Because of something Confucius said about 2500 years ago, you can imagine that this character means "live life with clarity like bright moonlight piercing pure water." The Confucian idea is something like "Keep clear what is pure in yourself, and let your pure nature show through." Kind of like saying, "Don't pollute your mind or body, so that they remain clear."

This might be stretching the definition of this single Chinese character but the elements are there, and "clarity" is a powerful idea.


Korean note: Korean pronunciation is given above but this character is written with a slight difference in the "moon radical" in Korean. However, anyone who can read Korean Hanja, will understand this character with no problem (this is considered an alternate form in Korean). If you want the more standard Korean Hanja form (which is an alternate form in Chinese), just let me know.

Japanese note: When reading in Japanese, this Kanji has additional meanings of pure, purify, or cleanse (sometimes to remove demons or "exorcise"). Used more in compound words in Japanese than as a stand-alone Kanji.

Mercury

China shuǐ xīng
Japan sui shou
Mercury

水星 is title for the planet Mercury in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The literal meaning is "water star." This title has been used to refer to Mercury in much of Asia for the past 2200 years or longer.

Enlisted Sailor

China shuǐ bīng
Japan suihei
Enlisted Sailor

These are the Chinese and Japanese characters for "Sailor."

Specifically, this refers to an enlisted sailor.

These two characters literally mean "water soldier."


See Also:  Military

No Limitations

China màn lán
Japan man ran
No Limitations

漫瀾 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for, "Having no boundaries or limitations."

This literally talks of the vastness of an ocean or river.

Character breakdown:
漫 = free; unrestrained; to inundate; overflowing; boundless.
澜 = swelling water; large wave.

Four Elements

Buddhist Term
China dì shuǐ huǒ fēng
Japan chisuikafuu
Four Elements

地水火風 is a Buddhist term that means "earth, water, fire, wind." 地水火風 is often just referred to as "the four elements." There is a more common title (the five elements) which adds wood to the mix. These four elements are used in some sects of Japanese Buddhism (not so much in Chinese).

Lake

China
Japan mizumi
Lake

湖 is lake in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

湖 is used in place names (like Lake Huron) and as a descriptive term for any large body of fresh water.

In Japanese, this can also be the female given name Reiku.

If your surname is Lake, this could be a good character for you.

Red Dragon / Vermillion Dragon

China zhū lóng
Red Dragon / Vermillion Dragon

朱龍 is a sophisticated or scholarly way to say, "Red Dragon." 朱龍 is the title you'd expect in ancient Chinese literature.

The first character means red, cinnabar, or vermillion.

The second character means dragon.

It is said that the Vermillion Dragon represents kings that bestow blessings on lakes or bodies of water. This makes more sense in an ancient Chinese context.

Warriors Adapt and Overcome

Soldiers need a fluid plan
China bīng wú cháng shì shuǐ wú cháng xíng
Warriors Adapt and Overcome

This literally translates as: Troops/soldiers/warriors have no fixed [battlefield] strategy [just as] water has no constant shape [but adapts itself to whatever container it is in].

Figuratively, this means: One should seek to find whatever strategy or method is best suited to resolving each individual problem.

This proverb is about as close as you can get to the military idea of "adapt improvise overcome." This is best way to express that idea in both an ancient way, and a very natural way in Chinese.

Dragon

Year of the Dragon / Zodiac Sign
China lóng
Japan ryuu / tatsu
Dragon

龍 is the character for dragon in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

The dragon is the creature of myth and legend that dominates Chinese, Japanese, and even European folklore. In China, the dragon is the symbol of the Emperor, strength and power, and the Chinese dragon is known as the god of water.

From the Chinese Zodiac, if you were born in the year of the Dragon, you . . .

Have a strong body and spirit.
Are full of energy.
Have vast goals.
Have a deep level of self-awareness.
Will do whatever you can to "save face."


See also our Chinese Zodiac or Dragon Calligraphy pages.

Well-Disciplined / Orderly

Special Military Term
China yán zhěng
Well-Disciplined / Orderly

When reading an account of some battles in China, I came across this Chinese word. As it turns out, it's only used in military circles to describe neat, orderly, and well-disciplined troops. Perhaps this is actually closer to the meaning I was taught while in the U.S. Marines.

The first character literally means stern, serious, strict, or severe (it can also mean "air tight" or "water tight."
The second character means exact, in good order, whole, complete, and orderly.
Together, these two characters multiply each other into a word that expresses the highest military level of discipline.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

China zhēn rú
Japan shinnyo
Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

This comes from the Sanskrit and Pali word often romanized as "tathata" or "tathatā." Originally written, "तथता."

It's a Buddhist term that is often translated as "thusness" or "suchness" but this does not explain it.
A better explanation may be, "the ultimate nature of all things." However, this gives it too strong of a feeling. This concept is sometimes described as being in awe of the simple nature of something - like a blade of grass blowing in the wind, or ripples on water. It is what it is supposed to be, these things are following their nature. Amazing in their mundane simplicity.

Every sect of Buddhism will have a slightly different flavor, or explanation, so don't get fixated on one definition.


Notes: Sometimes Buddhists use the word dharmatā, a synonym to tathatā.

In Japan, this can also be the female given name Mayuki, or the surname Majo.

Frightful Demon / Asura

China ē xiū luó
Japan ashura
Frightful Demon / Asura

This demon title comes from the ancient Sanskrit word Asura.

阿修羅 is often used in Buddhism when describing various demons. Sometimes defined as "Fighting and battling giant demon."

In the context of Buddhism: This title originally meant a spirit, spirits, or even the gods (perhaps before 1700 years ago). It now generally indicates titanic demons, enemies of the gods, with whom, especially Indra, they wage constant war. They are defined as "not devas," and "ugly," and "without wine." There are four classes of asuras, separated according to their manner of rebirth. They can be egg-born, womb-born, transformation-born, and spawn- or water-born. Their abode is in the ocean, north of Sumeru but certain of the weaker dwell in a western mountain cave. They have realms, rulers, and palaces, as have the devas.

In terms of power, Asuras rank above humans but below most of the other deities. They live in the area near the coastal foot of Mount Sumeru (on the northern side). Their domain is partially or wholly in the ocean.

No Mind / Mushin

China wú xīn
Japan mu shin
No Mind / Mushin

In Japanese, this word means innocent, or one with no knowledge of good and evil. It literally means "without mind."

無心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: "No mind, a mind without ego. A mind like a mirror which reflects and dos not judge." The original term was "mushin no shin," meaning, "mind of no mind." It is a state of mind without fear, anger, or anxiety. Mushin is often described by the phrase, "mizu no kokoro," which means, "mind like water." The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects it's surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

This has a good meaning in conjunction with Chan / Zen Buddhism in Japan. However, out of that context, it means mindlessness or absent-minded. To non-Buddhists in China, this is associated with doing something without thinking.
In Korean, this usually means indifference.

Use caution and know your audience before ordering this selection.


More info: Wikipedia: Mushin

Search for Be Water in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Watermizu / suishuǐ / shui3 / shui
Ultimate Goodness of Water上善若水shàng shàn ruò shuǐ
shang4 shan4 ruo4 shui3
shang shan ruo shui
shangshanruoshui
shang shan jo shui
shangshanjoshui
Be Like Water若水ruò shuǐ / ruo4 shui3 / ruo shui / ruoshuijo shui / joshui
Water Polo水球sui kyuu / suikyuu / sui kyu / suikyushuǐ qiú / shui3 qiu2 / shui qiu / shuiqiushui ch`iu / shuichiu / shui chiu
Be Like Water象水一樣
象水一样
xiàng shuǐ yí yàng
xiang4 shui3 yi2 yang4
xiang shui yi yang
xiangshuiyiyang
hsiang shui i yang
hsiangshuiiyang
Mind Like Water水の心mizu no kokoro
mizunokokoro
Water Tiger水虎sui ko / suikoshuǐ hǔ / shui3 hu3 / shui hu / shuihu
Fire and Water Have No Mercy水火無情
水火无情
shuǐ huǒ wú qíng
shui3 huo3 wu2 qing2
shui huo wu qing
shuihuowuqing
shui huo wu ch`ing
shuihuowuching
shui huo wu ching
Put out a burning wood cart
with a cup of water
杯水車薪
杯水车薪
bēi shuǐ chē xīn
bei1 shui3 che1 xin1
bei shui che xin
beishuichexin
pei shui ch`e hsin
peishuichehsin
pei shui che hsin
Not Only Can Water Float A Boat, It Can Sink It Also水能載舟亦能覆舟
水能载舟亦能覆舟
shuǐ néng zài zhōu yì néng fù zhōu
shui3 neng2 zai4 zhou1 yi4 neng2 fu4 zhou1
shui neng zai zhou yi neng fu zhou
shui neng tsai chou i neng fu chou
Feng Shui風水
风水
fuu sui / fuusui / fu sui / fusuifēng shuǐ
feng1 shui3
feng shui
fengshui
Riverkawachuān / chuan1 / chuanch`uan / chuan
Five Elements金木水火土jīn mù shuǐ huǒ tǔ
jin1 mu4 shui3 huo3 tu3
jin mu shui huo tu
jinmushuihuotu
chin mu shui huo t`u
chinmushuihuotu
chin mu shui huo tu
Large Riverkou / kojiāng / jiang1 / jiangchiang
Five Elements地水火風空
地水火风空
chi sui ka fuu kuu
chisuikafuukuu
chi sui ka fu ku
chisuikafuku
Drinking the water of a well, one should never forget who dug it吃水不忘掘井人chī shuǐ bú wàng jué jǐng rén
chi1 shui3 bu2 wang4 jue2 jing3 ren2
chi shui bu wang jue jing ren
chishuibuwangjuejingren
ch`ih shui pu wang chüeh ching jen
chih shui pu wang chüeh ching jen
Water Dragon
Rain Dragon
蛟龍
蛟龙
kou ryuu / kouryuu / ko ryu / koryujiāo
jiao1 long2
jiao long
jiaolong
chiao lung
chiaolung
Water Dragon
Coiled Dragon
蟠龍
蟠龙
han ryuu / hanryuu / han ryu / hanryupān lóng / pan1 long2 / pan long / panlongp`an lung / panlung / pan lung
Five Elements五行gogyou / gogyowǔ xíng / wu3 xing2 / wu xing / wuxingwu hsing / wuhsing
Rainameyǔ / yu3 / yu
Ice
Frost
bīng / bing1 / bingping
Forgive and Forget水に流すmizu ni naga su
mizuninagasu
Great Sea大洋tai you / taiyou / tai yo / taiyodà yáng / da4 yang2 / da yang / dayangta yang / tayang
Soldiers Adapt Actions to the Situation兵來將擋水來土掩
兵来将挡水来土掩
bīng lái jiàng dǎng shuǐ lái tǔ yǎn
bing1 lai2 jiang4 dang3 shui3 lai2 tu3 yan3
bing lai jiang dang shui lai tu yan
ping lai chiang tang shui lai t`u yen
ping lai chiang tang shui lai tu yen
Shidai
Sida
Mahabhuta
四大shi dai / shidaisì dà / si4 da4 / si da / sidassu ta / ssuta
Oasis綠洲
绿洲
lǜ zhōu / lv4 zhou1 / lv zhou / lvzhoulü chou / lüchou
Aquarius Zodiac Symbol
Sign
水瓶座mizugame-zashuǐ píng zuò
shui3 ping2 zuo4
shui ping zuo
shuipingzuo
shui p`ing tso
shuipingtso
shui ping tso
Clarityseiqīng / qing1 / qingch`ing / ching
Mercury水星sui shou / suishou / sui sho / suishoshuǐ xīng
shui3 xing1
shui xing
shuixing
shui hsing
shuihsing
Enlisted Sailor水兵suiheishuǐ bīng
shui3 bing1
shui bing
shuibing
shui ping
shuiping
No Limitations漫瀾
漫澜
man ran / manranmàn lán / man4 lan2 / man lan / manlan
Four Elements地水火風
地水火风
chisuikafuu
chisuikafu
dì shuǐ huǒ fēng
di4 shui3 huo3 feng1
di shui huo feng
dishuihuofeng
ti shui huo feng
tishuihuofeng
Lakemizumihú / hu2 / hu
Red Dragon
Vermillion Dragon
朱龍
朱龙
zhū lóng / zhu1 long2 / zhu long / zhulongchu lung / chulung
Warriors Adapt and Overcome兵無常勢水無常形
兵无常势水无常形
bīng wú cháng shì shuǐ wú cháng xíng
bing1 wu2 chang2 shi4 shui3 wu2 chang2 xing2
bing wu chang shi shui wu chang xing
ping wu ch`ang shih shui wu ch`ang hsing
ping wu chang shih shui wu chang hsing
Dragon
ryuu / tatsu
ryu / tatsu
ryu/tatsu
lóng / long2 / longlung
Well-Disciplined
Orderly
嚴整
严整
yán zhěng
yan2 zheng3
yan zheng
yanzheng
yen cheng
yencheng
Tathata
Ultimate Nature of All Things
真如shinnyozhēn rú / zhen1 ru2 / zhen ru / zhenruchen ju / chenju
Frightful Demon
Asura
阿修羅
阿修罗
ashuraē xiū luó
e1 xiu1 luo2
e xiu luo
exiuluo
o hsiu lo
ohsiulo
No Mind
Mushin
無心
无心
mu shin / mushinwú xīn / wu2 xin1 / wu xin / wuxinwu hsin / wuhsin
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Achieve Inner Peace
Aikido
Angel
Balance
Black
Blessing
Brave Heart
Brotherly and Sisterly Love
Chaos
Christian
Confidence
Destiny
Devil
Divine
Dream
Endurance
Energy
Enso
Family
Family Over Everything
Father
Feng Shui
Fire
Fire Dragon
Follow Your Dreams
Follow Your Heart
Forever
Forever Family
Forgive and Forget
God Bless You
God is Always With You
Good Fortune
Gratitude
Hanawa
Happy Birthday
Happy Life
Harmony
Heart Sutra
Heaven
Holy Spirit
Home is Where the Heart Is
Honor
Independence
Inner Peace and Serenity
Jeet Kune Do
Justice
Kingdom of Heaven
Kung Fu
Lightning
Live Laugh Love
Love
Loyalty
Mixed Martial Arts
Muhammad
Music
Nature
Never Give Up
New Beginning New Life
Noble
Once in a Lifetime
Peace and Good Health
Peace and Happiness
Phoenix
Phoenix Rise from the Ashes
Power
Protect
Pure
River
Sacrifice
Samurai
Saudi
Self-Discipline
Shogun
Silence
Sing
Spiritual Strength
Strength
Tai Chi
Tao Te Ching
The Dao of Filial Piety
Tiger Spirit
Together
Trust
Truth
Vitality
Water
Wing Chun

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Be Water Kanji, Be Water Characters, Be Water in Mandarin Chinese, Be Water Characters, Be Water in Chinese Writing, Be Water in Japanese Writing, Be Water in Asian Writing, Be Water Ideograms, Chinese Be Water symbols, Be Water Hieroglyphics, Be Water Glyphs, Be Water in Chinese Letters, Be Water Hanzi, Be Water in Japanese Kanji, Be Water Pictograms, Be Water in the Chinese Written-Language, or Be Water in the Japanese Written-Language.