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Al Give in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy an Al Give calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Al Give" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Al Give" title below...

  1. Never Give In / Never Succumb...

  2. Never Give Up

  3. God Give Me Strength

  4. I give you my hand

  5. God give me strength

  6. God Give Me Strength

  7. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

  8. Always Try to do Better

  9. Tenacious / Tenacity

10. No Fear

11. Teach / Instruct

12. Rose Flowers Given, Frangrance Remains on Hands of Giver

13. Live Free or Die

14. Generosity

15. Professor

16. Dedication

17. Shoganai

18. Horse

19. Mind Your Own Business

20. Courtesy / Politeness

21. Better to sacrifice your life than your principles

22. Blessings and Good Wishes

23. Teach A Man To Fish

24. Outstanding

25. Woman of Strong Character...

26. Ardent / Fierce

27. Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

28. Drink Up! / Cheers!

29. Protection

30. Not Long for this World

31. Perseverance

32. Desire

33. Extreme Faithfulness

34. Forgiveness

35. The More We Sweat in Training,...

36. Broken Hearted

37. Commitment

38. Mercy / Compassion...

39. Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart

40. Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication

41. Birth / Life

42. Inspiration

43. Bravery / Courage

44. Homosexual Male / Gay Male

45. Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

46. Indomitable / Unyielding

47. Tea Fate

48. Work Unselfishly for the Common Good

49. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching Chapter 81

50. Guanxi


Never Give In / Never Succumb
Never Lose

Japan kesshite akirameruna
Never Give In / Never Succumb / Never Lose Vertical Wall Scroll

This is a Japanese term that informally means "never give up." It's also a Japanese way to say "never surrender."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Tenacity | Perseverance | Hope

Never Give Up

China yǒng bù fàng qì
Never Give Up Vertical Wall Scroll

The first character means "eternal" or "forever," the second means "not" (together they mean "never"). The last two characters mean "give up" or "abandon." Altogether, you can translate this proverb as "never give up" or "never abandon."

Depending on how you want to read this, it is also a statement that you will never abandon your hopes, dreams, family or friends.


See Also:  Undaunted | No Fear | Hope

God Give Me Strength

Japan kami ga watashi ni chikara o atae te kudasai
God Give Me Strength Vertical Wall Scroll

This is "God give me strength" in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

I give you my hand

Japan watashi no te o ataeru
I give you my hand Vertical Wall Scroll

This means, "I give you my hand," in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

God give me strength

Japan kami wa watashi ni chikara o ataeru
God give me strength Vertical Wall Scroll

This means, "God give me strength," in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

God Give Me Strength

China yuàn shàng dì gěi wǒ lì liàng
God Give Me Strength Vertical Wall Scroll

This is a wish or a prayer that you might call out at a desperate time.

Translated by us for a military serviceman in Iraq - obviously, he may have a need to use this phrase often, though I am not sure where he's going to find a place to hang a wall scroll.

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
China bǎi zhé bù náo
Japan hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks." More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching." 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks," "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable."

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks," the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times." The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up."
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Always Try to do Better

Japan sara ni ue o me za su
Always Try to do Better Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb literally translates as: [After having achieved a fair degree of success,] one should still try to do better.

Others may translate this as, "Always try to improve," or "Always try to be better."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Never Give Up

Tenacious / Tenacity

China wán qiáng
Japan gan kyou
Tenacious / Tenacity Vertical Wall Scroll

These two characters together mean "Tenacious," "Hard to Defeat," or "Dogged."

Alone, the first character means mischievous, obstinate or stubborn. But it loses some of the mischievous meaning when the second character is added.

The second character means strength, force, powerful or better.


See Also:  Determination | Dedication | Devotion | Never Give Up

No Fear

(2 characters)
China wú wèi
Japan mui
No Fear Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally means "No Fear." But perhaps not the most natural Chinese phrase (see our other "No Fear" phrase for a more complete thought). However, this two-character version of "No Fear" seems to be a very popular way to translate this into Chinese, when we checked Chinese Google.

Note: This also means "No Fear" in Japanese and Korean but this character pair is not often used in Japan or Korea.

This term appears in various Chinese dictionaries with definitions like "without fear," intrepidity, fearless, dauntless, and bold.

In Buddhist context, this is a word derived from abhaya meaning: Fearless, dauntless, secure, nothing and nobody to fear. Also from vīra meaning: courageous, bold.


See Also:  Never Give Up | No Worries | Undaunted | Bravery | Courage | Fear No Man

Teach / Instruct

China jiào dǎo
Japan kyoudou
Teach / Instruct Vertical Wall Scroll

教導 means to instruct, to teach, give guidance, teaching, and/or give instruction.

Rose Flowers Given, Frangrance Remains on Hands of Giver

China zèng rén méi guī shǒu liú yú xiāng
Rose Flowers Given, Frangrance Remains on Hands of Giver Vertical Wall Scroll

This proverb has been translated several ways:

1. Roses given, fragrance in hand.

2. You present others roses, fragrance remains.

3. The fragrance of the rose always remains on the hand of those that bestow them.

4. A little bit of fragrance always clings to the hands which give the flowers

However, this literally translates as, "Give someone rose flowers, [your] hands keep [the] remaining fragrance."

Live Free or Die

Give me liberty or give me death
China bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
Live Free or Die Vertical Wall Scroll

不自由毋寧死 means, "Give me liberty or give me death," in Chinese.

This is also the best way to say, "Live free or die."

The characters break down this way:
不 = Not; none; without.
自由 = Freedom; liberty; freewill; self-determination.
毋寧 = Rather; would rather; rather be.
死 = Dead; death.

This will go nicely next to your, "Don't tread on me," flag. This phrase is known well enough in China that it's listed in a few dictionaries. Though I doubt you will find too many Chinese citizens willing to yell this on the steps of the capital in Beijing.


See Also:  Death Before Dishonor

Generosity

China kuān dà
Japan kandai
Generosity Vertical Wall Scroll

Generosity is giving and sharing. You share freely, not with the idea of receiving something in return. You find ways to give others happiness, and give just for the joy of giving. Generosity is one of the best ways to show love and friendship.

寬大 can also be translated as charitable, magnanimity, liberality or in some context broad-mindedness.

Note: There is a tiny deviation in the first character when written in Japanese. If you choose our Japanese master calligrapher, the little dot on the lower right of the first character will be omitted. With or without the dot, this can be read in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.


See Also:  Benevolence | Altruism | Charity

Professor

China jiào shòu
Japan kyou ju
Professor Vertical Wall Scroll

教授 is the most universal Chinese character and Japanese Kanji title for professor.

This can also be used as a verb meaning to instruct, to lecture on, teaching, or give instruction.

Dedication

Japan sennen
Dedication Vertical Wall Scroll

専唸 is the Japanese word for dedication. It means "give undivided attention" or "devote oneself to (something)."

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Devotion | Passion | Tenacious | Commitment

Shoganai

Accepting Your Fate
Japan shouganai / shiyouganai
Shoganai Vertical Wall Scroll

仕様が無い is a Japanese phrase that means, "it can't be helped," "it is inevitable," "nothing can be done."

Some will see this as a negative (just give up), and others will see it as a suggestion to avoid futile effort.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Horse

Year of the Horse / Zodiac Sign
China
Japan uma
Horse Vertical Wall Scroll

馬 is the character for horse in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the horse, you . . .


Are outgoing and active.
Don't give up easily.
Are known to have a bad temper.


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Mind Your Own Business

Japan yokei na osewa
Mind Your Own Business Vertical Wall Scroll

This suggests that you not give unwanted help or advice to someone.

The Japanese characters break down this way:
余計 (yokei) too much, unnecessary, extraneous, abundance, surplus, excess, superfluity.
な (na) connecting article. お世話 (osewa) help, aid, assistance.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Courtesy / Politeness

China lǐ mào
Courtesy / Politeness Vertical Wall Scroll

Courtesy is being polite and having good manners. When you speak and act courteously, you give others a feeling of being valued and respected. Greet people pleasantly. Bring courtesy home. Your family needs it most of all. Courtesy helps life to go smoothly.


If you put the words "fēi cháng bù" in front of this, it is like adding "very much not." It's a great insult in China, as nobody wants to be called "extremely discourteous" or "very much impolite."


See Also:  Kindness | Respect

Better to sacrifice your life than your principles

China shě shēng qǔ yì
Better to sacrifice your life than your principles Vertical Wall Scroll

捨生取義 is a Chinese proverb that comes from the philosopher Mencius.

It can be translated a few different ways:
To give up life for righteousness.
To choose honor over life
Better to sacrifice one's life than one's principles.

Blessings and Good Wishes

China zhù fú
Japan shukufuku
Blessings and Good Wishes Vertical Wall Scroll

祝福 is a nice way to give good wishes to someone. It can be a general blessing, or used to congratulate someone for a special occasion or graduation.

This has a good meaning in Japanese but more appropriate when expressed orally. 祝福 is not a natural selection for a wall scroll if your audience is Japanese.

Teach A Man To Fish

China shòu rén yǐ yú bù rú shòu rén yǐ yú
Teach A Man To Fish Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the Chinese version of the proverb, "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime."

This implies that knowledge is the best charity.

Outstanding

China chū lèi bá cuì
Outstanding Vertical Wall Scroll

出類拔萃 means "one who stands out from his/her peers," "stand out from the crowd," or "standing out from others." It can also mean, "leaving your peers behind."

A great way to tell yourself that you are outstanding (or give it to a friend that you want to encourage to excel).

Woman of Strong Character
Woman Hero

China nǚ jiá
Japan joketsu
Woman of Strong Character / Woman Hero Vertical Wall Scroll

女傑 can mean brave woman, heroine, lady of character, distinguished woman, outstanding woman, and sometimes prominent woman.

In modern usage, some people might use this to give a title to women like Oprah Winfrey, Hillary Clinton, or Sarah Palin. I would rather use it for a woman like Araceli Segarra (the first woman from Spain to climb Mt. Everest).

Ardent / Fierce

China liè
Japan retsu
Ardent / Fierce Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese word means ardent; intense; fierce; stern; upright; to give one's life for a noble cause.

In another context, this character can refer to one's exploits or achievements.

In Buddhist context, this is burning, fierce, virtuous and/or heroic.

While technically, it had the same meaning in Japanese, it's usually a female given name, Retsu in Japanese these days.

Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

China shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the last line of a famous poem. It is perceived as a tribute or ode to your parent's or mother from a child or children that have left home.

The poem was written by Meng Jiao during the Tang Dynasty (about 1200 years ago). The Chinese title is "You Zi Yin" which means "The Traveler's Recite."

The last line as shown here speaks of the generous and warm spring sun light which gives the grass far beyond what the little grass can could ever give back (except perhaps by showing its lovely green leaves and flourishing). The metaphor is that the sun is your mother or parents, and you are the grass. Your parents raise you and give you all the love and care you need to prepare you for the world. A debt which you can never repay, nor is repayment expected.

The first part of the poem (not written in the characters to the left) suggests that the thread in a loving mother's hands is the shirt of her traveling offspring. Vigorously sewing while wishing them to come back sooner than they left.
...This part is really hard to translate into English that makes any sense but maybe you get the idea. We are talking about a poem that is so old that many Chinese people would have trouble reading it (as if it was the King James Version of Chinese).

Drink Up! / Cheers!

China gān bēi
Japan kan pai
Drink Up! / Cheers! Vertical Wall Scroll

乾杯 is the common way to say "cheers" or give a toast in Chinese, Japanese and old Korean (written the same in all three languages, though pronounced differently).

乾杯 is an appropriate wall scroll for a bar, pub, or another drinking area.

The first character literally means "dry" or "parched."
The second character means "cup" or "glass."

Together the meaning is to drink up (empty your glass).

Protection

China bì hù
Japan hi go
Protection Vertical Wall Scroll

庇護 is not the most common word for a wall scroll but this is the word for protection in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

庇護 is the non-religious, non-superstitious form of protection.

庇護 can be translated as shelter, shield, defend, safeguard, take under one's wing, to put under protection. In certain context, it means to grant asylum or give refuge and sanctuary.


See Also:  Guardian Angel

Not Long for this World

China fēng zhú cán nián
Not Long for this World Vertical Wall Scroll

This phrase means "Old and ailing with little time left" or "Not long for this world."
There is a real suggestion here that someone will die soon.

This was added by special request of a customer, and is perhaps, not the most positive phrase that you could put on a wall scroll.

This would be the most offensive possible gift to give to an older person - please do not do that!

Perseverance

China jiān rèn bù bá
Perseverance Vertical Wall Scroll

Perseverance is being steadfast and persistent. You commit to your goals and overcome obstacles, no matter how long it takes. When you persevere, you don't give up...you keep going. Like a strong ship in a storm, you don't become battered or blown off course. You just ride the waves.

The translation of this proverb literally means, "something so persistent or steadfast, that it is not uprootable / movable / surpassable."


See Also:  Tenacious | Devotion | Persistence | Indomitable

Desire

China kě wàng
Desire Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese word can mean desirous, wishful, or simply desire.

The first character means to thirst for [something], or to be thirsty. The second character means to hope for, to expect, to gaze (into the distance) or to look for something. The combined meaning of these two characters changes a bit but I think it's nice to know the individual meanings to give you a better understanding of where a word comes from.

Korean definitions of this word include craving, longing, and thirst for knowledge.

Extreme Faithfulness

Japan tei retsu
Extreme Faithfulness Vertical Wall Scroll

貞烈 is the Japanese Kanji for, "Extreme Faithfulness."

The first Kanji means "firm adherence to one's principles," chastity (of a woman), chaste, etc.

The second Kanji means ardent, intense, fierce, stern, upright, to give one's life for a noble cause, exploits, achievements, virtuous, and in some contexts, heroic.

Now you get the idea why this refers to someone who is extremely faithful (to a cause, themselves, their religious beliefs, or their philosophy.

Forgiveness (from the top down)

China róng shè
Japan you sha
Forgiveness (from the top down) Vertical Wall Scroll

容赦 is the kind of forgiveness that a king might give to his subjects for crimes or wrong-doings.

容赦 is a rather high-level forgiveness. Meaning that it goes from a higher level to lower (not the reverse).

Alone, the first character can mean "to bear," "to allow" and/or "to tolerate," and the second can mean "to forgive," "to pardon" and/or "to excuse."

When you put both characters together, you get forgiveness, pardon, mercy, leniency, or going easy (on someone).


See Also:  Benevolence

The More We Sweat in Training,
The Less We Bleed in Battle

China píng shí duō liú hàn zhàn shí shǎo liú xuè
The More We Sweat in Training, / The Less We Bleed in Battle Vertical Wall Scroll

There is more than one way to translate this ancient Chinese military proverb. Here are a few interpretations:

A drop of sweat spent in a drill is a drop of blood saved in war.

More practice will give one a better chance of success in real situation.

The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in battle.

I heard this many times when I was a U.S. Marine but I had no idea at the time that it was actually an old Chinese proverb.

Broken Hearted

China shī liàn
Japan shitsuren
Broken Hearted Vertical Wall Scroll

In Chinese, this can mean to lose one's love; to break up (in a romantic relationship); to feel jilted.

In Japanese Kanji, this means disappointed love, broken heart, unrequited love, or being lovelorn.

失戀 is also valid in old Korean Hanja, where is means unrequited love, unreturned love, a disappointment in love, or a broken heart.

Note: In modern Japan, they will tend to write the more simple 失恋 form instead of 失戀. If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect the more simple modern version to be written (unless you give us instructions to use the older or more traditional version).

Commitment

China chéng nuò
Japan shoudaku
Commitment Vertical Wall Scroll

Commitment is caring deeply about something or someone. It is deciding carefully what you want to do, and then giving it 100%, holding nothing back. You give your all to a friendship, a task, or something you believe in. You finish what you start. You keep your promises.

In Chinese, this word directly means to undertake something or to make a promise to do something.

Within the idea of commitment, this word also means to make a big effort, or undertaking a great task. Outside of the commitment idea, this particular word can also mean approval, acceptance, consent, assent, acquiescence, or agreement depending on context (especially in Japanese and Korean). Therefore, this word is probably best if your audience is Chinese.


See Also:  Partnership | Hard Work | Dedication

Mercy / Compassion
Buddhist Loving Kindness

China cí bēi
Japan ji hi
Mercy / Compassion / Buddhist Loving Kindness Vertical Wall Scroll

Besides the title above, 慈悲 can also be defined as clemency or lenience and sometimes the act of giving charity.

In Buddhist context, it can be defined as, "benevolence," "loving kindness and compassion," or "mercy and compassion."

This Buddhist virtue is perhaps the most important to employ in your life. All sentient beings that you encounter should be given your loving kindness. And trust me, however much you can give, it comes back. Make your life and the world a better place!

This Chinese/Japanese Buddhist term is the equivalent of Metta Karuna from Pali or Maitri Karuna from Sanskrit.

慈 can mean loving-kindness by itself.
悲 adds a component of sorrow, empathy, compassion, and sympathy for others.


See Also:  Benevolence

Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart

China suí xīn ér xíng
Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart Vertical Wall Scroll

隨心而行 is the closest way to express this idea in Chinese. Literally translated, this phrase means, "Allow your heart to dictate your behavior" or "Let your heart guide your conduct" in Chinese. You could also translate this as "follow your heart." Or, with a bit of imagination, it could mean: "let your spirit be your guide."

Note that in some cases, "heart" can mean "mind," "soul" or even "spirit" in Chinese. In ancient China, it was thought that the big pumping organ in your chest was where your thoughts came from, or where your soul resides.
Ancient western thought followed a similar belief. Thus phrases like "I love you with all my heart" and "I give you my whole heart."

Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication

(complete bodily devotion)
China xiàn shēn
Japan ken shin
Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication Vertical Wall Scroll

獻身 is used to describe being so devoted to something that you will make sacrifices for that goal/thing/person. You can also translate this word as any of the following:

Give one's life for...
Sacrifice one's life for...
To dedicate oneself to...
Self-devotion
Dedication
Commit ones energy to...
Devote to...
Self-sacrifice
Giving your whole body to...

This can be a dedication to or for someone but more often is used in reference to a dedication or making sacrifices for your country, public service, or a cause. For instance, an Olympic athlete makes great sacrifices to train in his/her sport for their country and compatriots.


献
身
While the form shown to the upper-left is considered an ancient Japanese version, in modern Japan, they use the simplified version of the first Kanji (shown to the right). Click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version.

If you are looking for a more religious meaning of devotion, see Faith.


See Also:  Confidence | Dedication

Birth / Life

China shēng
Japan shou / iku
Birth / Life Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese word means "to be born" and "to give birth."

Also, it's often used to refer to life itself, and sometimes "to grow."

生 is used in a lot of compound words such as "yi sheng," which means "doctor" (literally "healer of life"), "sheng ri" which means "birthday" (literally "birth day") and "xue sheng" which means student (literally "studying life" or "learner [about] life"). Few Chinese people will think of the literal meaning when this use words like doctor and student - but it is interesting to note.

生 has the same root meaning in Korean Hanja and Japanese. However, in Japanese, there are many possible pronunciations, and this can be used to mean "raw" or "unprocessed" (as in draft beer). Therefore, not be the best if your audience is Japanese.


See Also:  Vitality

Inspiration

China líng gǎn
Japan reikan
Inspiration Vertical Wall Scroll

靈感 is the Chinese word that is the closest to hitting the mark for the English word inspiration.

In a more extended context, I have even seen this translated as "brain wave."

The first character means alert, departed soul, efficacious, quick, effective or intelligence.
The second character means to feel, to move, to touch or to affect.
The combined meaning of these two characters changes a bit but I think it's nice to know the individual meanings to give you a better understanding of where a word comes from.

You could describe this word as, "the thought that pops into your head just before you patent the greatest widget ever invented, that everyone in the world will want."
At least, that's the idea.

This term can also mean "intelligent thought" if you were to translate it directly from each of these characters. If you are looking for inspiration or otherwise need to be inspired, this is the word for you.


霊When the first character was absorbed into Japanese from Chinese, an alternate form became the standard in Japan. The Kanji shown to the right is the form currently used in Japan. This is still considered an alternate form in China to this day. It's readable by both Chinese and Japanese people but if your audience is Japanese, I recommend the Kanji shown to the right - just click on that Kanji to order that version.

Bravery / Courage

Courage in the face of Fear
China yǒng gǎn
Japan yuu kan
Bravery / Courage Vertical Wall Scroll

勇敢 is about courage is bravery in the face of fear. You do the right thing even when it is hard or scary. When you are courageous, you don't give up. You try new things. You admit mistakes. This kind of courage is the willingness to take action in the face of danger and peril.

勇敢 can also be translated as: braveness, valor, heroic, fearless, boldness, prowess, gallantry, audacity, daring, dauntless and/or courage in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. This version of bravery/courage can be an adjective or a noun. The first character means bravery and courage by itself. The second character means "daring" by itself. The second character just emphasizes the meaning of the first but adds an idea that you are not afraid of taking a dare, and you are not afraid of danger.

勇敢 is about brave behavior versus the mental state of being brave. You'd more likely use this to say, "He fought courageously in the battle," rather than "He is very courageous."

Homosexual Male / Gay Male

China nán tóng xìng liàn
Homosexual Male / Gay Male Vertical Wall Scroll

You just need the male character in front of the word for homosexual in Chinese to create this word.

It's a much nicer way to say "Gay Male" than English words like Fag, Fairy, Sissy, Puff, Poof, Poofster, Swish or Pansy. Although I suppose it could be used as a substitute for Nancy Boy or Queen (for which last time I checked, my gay friends said were OK in the right context).

For those of you who think China is a restrictive society - there are at least two gay discos in Beijing, the capital of China. It's at least somewhat socially acceptable to be a gay male in China. However, lesbians seem to be shunned a bit.

I think the Chinese government has realized that the 60% male population means not everybody is going to find a wife (every gay male couple that exists means two more women in the population are available for the straight guys), and the fact that it is biologically impossible for men to give birth, may be seen as helping to decrease the over-population in China.

Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history
China jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country Vertical Wall Scroll

This proverb is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as "Serve the country with the utmost loyalty." More literally, it means, "[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country."

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means "serve the country faithfully" or "die for the country." Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean, "Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country."

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei

Indomitable / Unyielding

China bù qū bù náo
Japan fukutsu futou
Indomitable / Unyielding Vertical Wall Scroll

不屈不撓 means "Indomitable" or "Unyielding."

不屈不撓 is a long word by Chinese standards. At least, it is often translated as a single word into English. It's actually a proverb in Chinese.

If you want to break it down, you can see that the first and third characters are the same. Both meaning "not" (they work as a suffix to make a negative or opposite meaning to whatever character follows).

The second character means "bendable."

The last means "scratched" or "bothered."

So this really means "Won't be bent, can't be bothered." I have also seen it written as "Will not crouch, will not submit." This comes from the fact that the second character can mean, "to crouch" and the last can mean "to submit" (as in "to give in" such as "submitting to the rule of someone else"). This may explain better why these four characters mean "indomitable."

Notes:
Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.
The first two characters can be a stand-alone word in Chinese.
In Japanese, this is considered to be two words (with very similar meanings).
The same characters are used in Korean, but the 2nd and 4th characters are swapped to create a word pronounced "불요불굴" in Korean.
Just let me know if you want the Korean version, which will also make sense in Japanese, and though not as natural, will also make sense in Chinese as well.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Tea Fate

China chá yuán
Tea Fate Vertical Wall Scroll

茶緣 is a special title for the tea lover. This kind of means "tea fate" but it's more spiritual and hard to define. Perhaps the tea brought you in to drink it. Perhaps the tea will bring you and another tea-lover together. Perhaps you were already there, and the tea came to you. Perhaps it's the ah-ha moment you will have when drinking the tea.

I've been told not to explain this further, as it will either dilute or confuse the purposefully-ambiguous idea embedded in this enigma.

I happen to be the owner of a piece of calligraphy written by either the son or nephew of the last emperor of China, and this is the title he wrote. It was given to me at a Beijing tea house in 2001. 茶緣 is where I learned to love tea after literally spending weeks tasting and studying everything I could about Chinese tea. I did not understand the significance of the authorship, or meaning of the title at all. Some 10 years later, I realized the gift was so profound and had such providence. Only now I realize the value of a gift that it is too late to give proper thanks for. It was also years later that I ended up in this business, and could have the artwork properly mounted as a wall scroll. It has been borrowed for many exhibitions and shows, and always amazes native Chinese and Taiwanese who read the signature. This piece of calligraphy which I once thought just a bit of ink on a thin and wrinkled piece of paper is now one of my most valued possessions. And by fate, it has taught me to be more thankful of seemingly simple gifts.

Work Unselfishly for the Common Good

China kè jǐ fèng gōng
Work Unselfishly for the Common Good Vertical Wall Scroll

This can also mean: "Place Strict Standards on Oneself in Public Service."
This Chinese proverb is often used to express how one should act as a government official. Most of us wish our public officials would hold themselves to higher standards. I wish I could send this scroll, along with the meaning to every member of Congress, and the President (or if I was from the UK, all the members of Parliament, and the PM)

The story behind this ancient Chinese idiom:
A man named Cai Zun was born in China a little over 2000 years ago. In 24 AD, he joined an uprising led by Liu Xiu who later became the emperor of the Eastern Han Dynasty.

Later, the new emperor put Cai Zun in charge of the military court. Cai Zun exercised his power in strict accordance with military law, regardless of the offender's rank or background. He even ordered the execution of one of the emperor's close servants after the servant committed a serious crime.

Cai Zun led a simple life but put great demands on himself to do all things in an honorable way. The emperor rewarded him for his honest character and honorable nature by promoting him to the rank of General and granting him the title of Marquis.

Whenever Cai Zun would receive an award, he would give credit to his men and share the reward with them.
Cai Zun was always praised by historians who found many examples of his selfless acts that served the public interest.
Sometime, long ago in history, people began to refer to Cai Zun as "ke ji feng gong."


See Also:  Unselfish | Selflessness | Altruism

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching Chapter 81

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching Chapter 81 Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the Mawangdui version of Daodejing chapter 81.

It can be translated this way:
Credible words are not eloquent;
Eloquent words are not credible.

The wise are not erudite;
The erudite are not wise.

The adept are not all-around;
The all-around are not adept.
The sages do not accumulate things.
Yet the more they have done for others,
The more they have gained themselves;
The more they have given to others,
The more they have gotten themselves.

Thus, the way of tian (heaven) is to benefit without harming;
The way of sages is to do without contending.
Another translation:
Sincere words are not showy;
showy words are not sincere.
Those who know are not "widely learned";
those "widely learned" do not know.
The good do not have a lot;
Those with a lot are not good.
The Sage accumulates nothing.
Having used what he had for others,
he has even more.
Having given what he had to others,
what he has is even greater.
Therefore, the Way of Heaven is to benefit and not cause any harm,
The Way of Man is to act on behalf of others and not to compete with them.
And a third translation:
True words aren't charming,
charming words aren't true.
Good people aren't contentious,
contentious people aren't good.
People who know aren't learned,
learned people don't know.
Wise souls don't hoard;
the more they do for others the more they have,
the more they give the richer they are.
The Way of heaven provides without destroying.
Doing without outdoing
is the Way of the wise.

Guanxi

The Chinese Concept of Relationship and Exchange of Favors
China guān xì
Japan kankei
Guanxi Vertical Wall Scroll

The dictionary definition is:
relations / relationship / to concern / to affect / to have to do with / connection.

But there's more to it...

In China, your relationship that you have with certain people can open doors for you. Having guanxi with someone also means they would never defraud you but instead are honor-bound to treat you fairly (of course, this goes both ways). Sometimes it is suggested that guanxi is the exchange of favors. I would say this is more having a relationship that allows you to ask for, and expect favors without shame.

There is no concept in western culture that exactly matches guanxi but perhaps having a social or professional network is similar.

Note that there are some variations common within Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja for this word...

関Japanese tend to use a Chinese alternate form as shown to the right for
the first character.

關There's also another alternate form of that first character (currently used as the official Simplified form in mainland China) which looks like the character shown to the right. It's basically the central radical of the alternate version shown above but without the "door radical" around it. In more free-flowing calligraphy styles, this version would be the likely choice for a calligrapher.

係In Modern Japanese, they use the character shown to the right.
They also tend to use this same form in Korean Hanja (I've only checked this word in my Korean dictionary but it has not been confirmed by a translator's review).

系If that was not confusing enough, there is another alternate form of that second character. See right.

An Asian calligrapher of any nationality may use any of these forms at their discretion. However, They would tend to stick to the most common form used in their respective languages.

If you have any preference on any of these issues, please give us a special note with your order, and we'll make sure it's done the way you want.

Search for Al Give in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Never Give In
Never Succumb
Never Lose
決して諦めるなkesshite akirameruna
kesshiteakirameruna
keshite akirameruna
keshiteakirameruna
Never Give Up永不放棄
永不放弃
yǒng bù fàng qì
yong3 bu4 fang4 qi4
yong bu fang qi
yongbufangqi
yung pu fang ch`i
yungpufangchi
yung pu fang chi
God Give Me Strength神が私に力を與えてください
神が私に力を与えてください
kami ga watashi ni chikara o atae te kudasai
I give you my hand私の手を與える
私の手を与える
watashi no te o ataeru
watashinoteoataeru
God give me strength神は私に力を與える
神は私に力を与える
kami wa watashi ni chikara o ataeru
God Give Me Strength願上帝給我力量
愿上帝给我力量
yuàn shàng dì gěi wǒ lì liàng
yuan4 shang4 di4 gei3 wo3 li4 liang4
yuan shang di gei wo li liang
yuanshangdigeiwoliliang
yüan shang ti kei wo li liang
yüanshangtikeiwoliliang
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks百折不撓
百折不挠
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
hyakusetsusuto
bǎi zhé bù náo
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
bai zhe bu nao
baizhebunao
pai che pu nao
paichepunao
Always Try to do Better更に上を目指すsara ni ue o me za su
saraniueomezasu
Tenacious
Tenacity
頑強
顽强
gan kyou / gankyou / gan kyo / gankyowán qiáng
wan2 qiang2
wan qiang
wanqiang
wan ch`iang
wanchiang
wan chiang
No Fear無畏
无畏
muiwú wèi / wu2 wei4 / wu wei / wuwei
Teach
Instruct
教導
教导
kyoudou / kyodojiào dǎo / jiao4 dao3 / jiao dao / jiaodaochiao tao / chiaotao
Rose Flowers Given, Frangrance Remains on Hands of Giver贈人玫瑰手留余香
赠人玫瑰手留余香
zèng rén méi guī shǒu liú yú xiāng
zeng4 ren2 mei2 gui1 shou3 liu2 yu2 xiang1
zeng ren mei gui shou liu yu xiang
tseng jen mei kuei shou liu yü hsiang
Live Free or Die不自由毋寧死
不自由毋宁死
bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
bu2 zi4 you2 wu2 ning4 si3
bu zi you wu ning si
buziyouwuningsi
pu tzu yu wu ning ssu
putzuyuwuningssu
Generosity寬大
宽大
kandaikuān dà / kuan1 da4 / kuan da / kuandak`uan ta / kuanta / kuan ta
Professor教授kyou ju / kyouju / kyo ju / kyojujiào shòu
jiao4 shou4
jiao shou
jiaoshou
chiao shou
chiaoshou
Dedication専唸
専念
sennen
Shoganai仕様が無いshouganai / shiyouganai
shoganai / shiyoganai
shoganai/shiyoganai
Horse
umamǎ / ma3 / ma
Mind Your Own Business余計なお世話yokei na osewa
yokeinaosewa
Courtesy
Politeness
禮貌
礼貌
lǐ mào / li3 mao4 / li mao / limao
Better to sacrifice your life than your principles捨生取義
舍生取义
shě shēng qǔ yì
she3 sheng1 qu3 yi4
she sheng qu yi
sheshengquyi
she sheng ch`ü i
sheshengchüi
she sheng chü i
Blessings and Good Wishes祝福shukufukuzhù fú / zhu4 fu2 / zhu fu / zhufuchu fu / chufu
Teach A Man To Fish授人以魚不如授人以漁
授人以鱼不如授人以渔
shòu rén yǐ yú bù rú shòu rén yǐ yú
shou4 ren2 yi3 yu2 bu4 ru2 shou4 ren2 yi3 yu2
shou ren yi yu bu ru shou ren yi yu
shou jen i yü pu ju shou jen i yü
Outstanding出類拔萃
出类拔萃
chū lèi bá cuì
chu1 lei4 ba2 cui4
chu lei ba cui
chuleibacui
ch`u lei pa ts`ui
chuleipatsui
chu lei pa tsui
Woman of Strong Character
Woman Hero
女傑
女杰
joketsunǚ jiá / nv3 jia2 / nv jia / nvjianü chia / nüchia
Ardent
Fierce
retsuliè / lie4 / lielieh
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents誰言寸草心報得三春暉
谁言寸草心报得三春晖
shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
shui2 yan2 cun4 cao3 xin1 bao4 de2 san1 chun1 hui1
shui yan cun cao xin bao de san chun hui
shui yen ts`un ts`ao hsin pao te san ch`un hui
shui yen tsun tsao hsin pao te san chun hui
Drink Up!
Cheers!
乾杯kan pai / kanpaigān bēi / gan1 bei1 / gan bei / ganbeikan pei / kanpei
Protection庇護
庇护
hi go / higobì hù / bi4 hu4 / bi hu / bihupi hu / pihu
Not Long for this World風燭殘年
风烛残年
fēng zhú cán nián
feng1 zhu2 can2 nian2
feng zhu can nian
fengzhucannian
feng chu ts`an nien
fengchutsannien
feng chu tsan nien
Perseverance堅韌不拔
坚韧不拔
jiān rèn bù bá
jian1 ren4 bu4 ba2
jian ren bu ba
jianrenbuba
chien jen pu pa
chienjenpupa
Desire渴望kě wàng / ke3 wang4 / ke wang / kewangk`o wang / kowang / ko wang
Extreme Faithfulness貞烈tei retsu / teiretsu
Forgiveness (from the top down)容赦you sha / yousha / yo sha / yosharóng shè / rong2 she4 / rong she / rongshejung she / jungshe
The More We Sweat in Training, The Less We Bleed in Battle平時多流汗戰時少流血
平时多流汗战时少流血
píng shí duō liú hàn zhàn shí shǎo liú xuè
ping2 shi2 duo1 liu2 han4
zhan4 shi2 shao3 liu2 xue4
ping shi duo liu han
zhan shi shao liu xue
p`ing shih to liu shih shao liu hsüeh
ping shih to liu shih shao liu hsüeh
Broken Hearted失戀
失恋
shitsurenshī liàn / shi1 lian4 / shi lian / shilianshih lien / shihlien
Commitment承諾
承诺
shoudaku / shodakuchéng nuò
cheng2 nuo4
cheng nuo
chengnuo
ch`eng no
chengno
cheng no
Mercy
Compassion
Buddhist Loving Kindness
慈悲ji hi / jihicí bēi / ci2 bei1 / ci bei / cibeitz`u pei / tzupei / tzu pei
Listen to Your Heart
Follow Your Heart
隨心而行
随心而行
suí xīn ér xíng
sui2 xin1 er2 xing2
sui xin er xing
suixinerxing
sui hsin erh hsing
suihsinerhhsing
Sacrifice
Devotion
Dedication
獻身
献身
ken shin / kenshinxiàn shēn
xian4 shen1
xian shen
xianshen
hsien shen
hsienshen
Birth
Life
shou / iku / sho / iku / sho/ikushēng / sheng1 / sheng
Inspiration靈感
灵感
reikanlíng gǎn / ling2 gan3 / ling gan / lingganling kan / lingkan
Bravery
Courage
勇敢yuu kan / yuukan / yu kan / yukanyǒng gǎn / yong3 gan3 / yong gan / yongganyung kan / yungkan
Homosexual Male
Gay Male
男同性戀
男同性恋
nán tóng xìng liàn
nan2 tong2 xing4 lian4
nan tong xing lian
nantongxinglian
nan t`ung hsing lien
nantunghsinglien
nan tung hsing lien
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country盡忠報國
尽忠报国
jìn zhōng bào guó
jin4 zhong1 bao4 guo2
jin zhong bao guo
jinzhongbaoguo
chin chung pao kuo
chinchungpaokuo
Indomitable
Unyielding
不屈不撓
不屈不挠
fukutsu futou
fukutsufutou
fukutsu futo
fukutsufuto
bù qū bù náo
bu4 qu1 bu4 nao2
bu qu bu nao
buqubunao
pu ch`ü pu nao
puchüpunao
pu chü pu nao
Tea Fate茶緣
茶缘
chá yuán / cha2 yuan2 / cha yuan / chayuanch`a yüan / chayüan / cha yüan
Work Unselfishly for the Common Good克己奉公kè jǐ fèng gōng
ke4 ji3 feng4 gong1
ke ji feng gong
kejifenggong
k`o chi feng kung
kochifengkung
ko chi feng kung
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching Chapter 81
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善聖人無積既以為人己癒有既以予人矣已癒多故天之道利而不害聖人之道為而不爭
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善圣人无积既以为人己愈有既以予人矣已愈多故天之道利而不害圣人之道为而不争
Guanxi關繫 / 関繫 / 關係
关系 / 関係
kankeiguān xì / guan1 xi4 / guan xi / guanxikuan hsi / kuanhsi
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Adventure
Aiki Jujutsu
Aikido
Ancestors
Archangel
Bamboo
Beautiful
Benevolence
Bushido
Dance
Death Before Dishonor
Destiny
Divine
Double Happiness
Enso
Faith
Fire
Fish
Goldfish
Good Health
Guardian
Hapkido
Health
Hentai
Humility
Jasmine
Lightning
Lone Wolf
Lotus Flower
Love
Loyalty
Marine
Martial Arts
Mercy
Mixed Martial Arts
Mushin
One True Love
Peace and Good Health
Pisces
Power
Protect
Protector
Rainbow
Resolve
Saint
Satoshi
Scarecrow
Shadow
Soulmate
Spirit of Taekwondo
Tai Chi Chuan
Wish

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Al Give Kanji, Al Give Characters, Al Give in Mandarin Chinese, Al Give Characters, Al Give in Chinese Writing, Al Give in Japanese Writing, Al Give in Asian Writing, Al Give Ideograms, Chinese Al Give symbols, Al Give Hieroglyphics, Al Give Glyphs, Al Give in Chinese Letters, Al Give Hanzi, Al Give in Japanese Kanji, Al Give Pictograms, Al Give in the Chinese Written-Language, or Al Give in the Japanese Written-Language.