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1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Air in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy an Air calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Air" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Air" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Air / Atmosphere
  2. Sky / Air / Ether / Space
  3. Air Force
  4. Universe / Space
  5. Five Elements
  6. Heaven / Sky
  7. Nothingness
  8. Well-Disciplined / Orderly
  9. Wind
10. Patriot
11. Read 10,000 Books, Travel 10,000 Miles
12. Fast
13. Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis
14. Construction Crane
15. Life in Every Breath
16. Nothingness / Empty / Void


Air / Atmosphere

China kōng qì
Japan kuu ki
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This means air or atmosphere in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. This is an unusual title for an Asian calligraphy wall scroll, but a lot of our western customers have requested it.


Japanese 気While the version shown to the left is commonly used in Chinese and Korean Hanja (and ancient Japanese Kanji), please note that the second character is written with slightly fewer strokes in modern Japanese. If you want the modern Japanese version, please click on the character to the right. Both styles would be understood by native Chinese, Japanese, and many (but not all) Korean people. You should choose character based on the intended audience for your calligraphy artwork.

Sky / Air / Ether / Space

China tiān kōng
Japan ten kuu
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knob

This means sky in most context, but it can also refer to air, space, the heavens, or ether.

Air Force

China kōng
Japan kuugun
knob
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This is "Air Force" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

If you're an airman, this could be the title for you.

Universe / Space

China zhòu
Japan chuu
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This means universe, cosmos or outer space in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. This can also mean air or midair depending on context. In Korean, this can mean eternity in some contexts.

Five Elements

Japanese
Japan chi sui ka fuu kuu
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This is the specifically-Japanese version of the five elements. This is a little different than the ancient or original Chinese version.

The elements are written in this order:
1. Earth / Terra / Ground
2. Water
3. Fire
4. Wind / Air
5. Sky / Emptiness / Void / Ether

Note: This set of Kanji can also be romanized as "ji sui ka fuu kuu", "jisuikafuukuu", or "jisuikafuku".


These can also be written in the order 地火風水空 (chi ka sui fuu kuu). Let me know when you place your order if you want the Kanji to be in this character order.

Heaven / Sky

China tiān
Japan ten
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This is the character which means "heaven" or "sky" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Context of how this character is used determines if you are talking about heaven or the sky above (often they are the same concept anyway).

When combined with other characters, words like "today" and "tomorrow" are created. While sometimes the character for "sun" is used to mean "day", often "sky" represents "day" in Asian languages.
Example: "this sky" = "today", "next sky" = "tomorrow" in modern Chinese and Japanese (they also use "sun" in the same way - but the use of the "sun" character in words like today and tomorrow feels more ancient).

In Chinese culture, regardless of which religion, it's almost always assumed that God (and any other deities) live up above in the sky. This is probably how the idea of heaven being associated with this character began.
The equation goes something like this: God's domain is the sky, thus, the sky is heaven.


Note: As a single character, this is a little ambiguous, so you might want to choose our Kingdom of Heaven selection instead.


See Also...  Heaven | God | Today | Sun

Nothingness

China kōng wú
Japan kuu mu
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This is "nothingness" in Buddhist context.

The first character means empty, but can also mean air or sky (air and sky have no form).

The second character means have not, no, none, not or to lack.

Together these characters reinforce each other into a word that means "absolute nothingness".

I know this is a term used in Buddhism, but I have not yet figured out the context in which it is used. I suppose it can be the fact that Buddhists believe that the world in a non-real illusion, or perhaps it's about visualizing yourself as "nothing" and therefore leaving behind your desire and worldliness.
Buddhist concepts and titles often have this element of ambiguity or rather "mystery". Therefore, such ideas can have different meanings to different people, and that's okay. If you don't get it right in this lifetime, as there will be plenty more lifetimes to master it (whatever "it" is, and if "it" really exists at all).

Soothill defines this as "Unreality, or immateriality, of things, which is defined as nothing existing of independent or self-contained nature".

Well-Disciplined / Orderly

Special Military Term
China yán zhěng
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When reading an account of some battles in China, I came across this Chinese word. As it turns out, it's only used in military circles to describe neat, orderly, and well-disciplined troops. Perhaps this is actually closer to the meaning I was taught while in the U.S. Marines.

The first character literally means stern, serious, strict, or severe (it can also mean "air tight" or "water tight".
The second character means exact, in good order, whole, complete, and orderly.
Together, these two characters multiply each other into a word that expresses the highest military level of discipline.


See Also...  Self-Control | Will-Power

Wind

China fēng
Japan kaze
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This means wind in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. It can also mean air, breeze, or draft. Used as a metaphore, it can mean style or manner.


See Also...  Kamikaze

Patriot

China ài guó zhě
knob
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knob

This is the most common way to write patriot in Traditional Chinese and old Korean Hanja.

In other context, this can refer to the MIM-104 Patriot surface-to-air missile.

This literally translates as "love [of] country person".

Read 10,000 Books, Travel 10,000 Miles

China dú wàn juǎn shū, xíng wàn lǐ lù
knob
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This is a lifelong suggestion for expanding your horizons by gaining knowledge, experience, and seeing the world.

Of course, this was written long ago when it was hard to travel 10,000 miles.
With air travel and the business I'm in, I often achieve that lifetime goal on a monthly basis.
However, I am a little behind in the book count.

Note: An ancient Chinese mile (lǐ) referred to in this proverb is about a third of a British/American mile. However, at that time, this was a great distance to travel (being written at least 1000 years before the invention of the airplane).

Fast

Fast, as in a race car
China kuài
Japan yoshi
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This is the single character for "fast" in Chinese. This applies to race cars, air planes, rockets, etc.

This can also mean rapid, quick, speed, rate, soon, to make haste, clever, or sharp (of knives or wits). In some context it can mean cheerful or happy.

This is not a common choice for a wall scroll, but if you're a speed freak, this may work for you.


Note: In Japanese and Korean, this often just takes the meaning of cheerful or pleasant. It can also be the given name Yoshi in Japanese.

Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

China dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
Japan dou ten chi shou hou
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The first chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War lists five key points to analyzing your situation. It reads like a 5-part military proverb. Sun Tzu says that to sharpen your skills, you must plan. To plan well, you must know your situation. Therefore, you must consider and discuss the following:

1. Philosophy and Politics: Make sure your way or your policy is agreeable among all of your troops (and the citizens of your kingdom as well). For when your soldiers believe in you and your way, they will follow you to their deaths without hesitation, and will not question your orders.

2. Heaven/Sky: Consider climate / weather. This can also mean to consider whether God is smiling on you. In the modern military, this could be waiting for clear skies so that you can have air support for an amphibious landing.

3. Ground/Earth: Consider the terrain in which the battle will take place. This includes analyzing defensible positions, exit routes, and using varying elevation to your advantage. When you plan an ambush, you must know your terrain, and the best location from which to stage that ambush. This knowledge will also help you avoid being ambushed, as you will know where the likely places in which to expect an ambush from your enemy.

4. Leadership: This applies to you as the general, and also to your lieutenants. A leader should be smart and be able to develop good strategies. Leaders should keep their word, and if they break a promise, they should punish themselves as harshly as they would punish subordinates. Leaders should be benevolent to their troops, with almost a fatherly love for them. Leaders must have the ability to make brave and fast decisions. Leaders must have steadfast principles.

5. [Military] Methods: This can also mean laws, rules, principles, model, or system. You must have an efficient organization in place to manage both your troops and supplies. In the modern military, this would be a combination of how your unit is organized, and your SOP (Standard Operating Procedure).


Notes: This is a simplistic translation and explanation. Much more is suggested in the actual text of the Art of War (Bing Fa). It would take a lot of study to master all of these aspects. In fact, these five characters can be compared to the modern military acronyms such as BAMCIS or SMEAC.

CJK notes: I have included the Japanese and Korean pronunciations, but in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, this does not make a typical phrase (with subject, verb and object) it is a list that only someone familiar with Sun Tzu's writings would understand.

Construction Crane

China qǐ zhòng jī
Japan kijuuki
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A customer requested this specifically after a bit of confusion over the bird by the same name. This refers to the huge machine that lifts materials high into the air as crews construct huge buildings.

In an odd twist, where they don't know this name in English sounds like a bird, the building crane is jokingly called "The real national bird of China" because of the current level of construction in Beijing and elsewhere in preparation for the 2008 Olympics.

If you want the type of crane that drives down the road, please note that the word is totally different for the "vehicle crane". post your request on our Asian calligraphy forum if you need that title for some reason.

Life in Every Breath

Japanese only
Japan hakuiki hitotsu nimo seimei ga yadori
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This means, "life in every breath" in Japanese.

This phrase is more like "every single breath as you live and dwell".

The characters breakdown this way:
吐く息 (hakuiki) to breathe; exhaled air; one's breath; breathing.
一つ (hitotsu) one; only; just.
にも (nimo) also; too; as well; even.
生命 (seimei) life; existence; living.
が (ga) particle.
宿り (yadori) to lodge; to dwell; lodging; abode; shelter.

Nothingness / Empty / Void

China xū kōng
Japan kokuu
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This means empty space, empty sky, or void.

In Buddist context, it can mean "emptiness of the material world". This can also be used as an adjective to modify other words with a meaning of unreal or insubstantial.


Check dictionary for air


You should look at these ready-to-ship pieces of artwork:


Compare: $83.00

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Compare: $83.00

Your Price: $45.88

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Compare: $83.00

Your Price: $45.88

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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The scroll that I am holding in this picture is a "medium size"
4-character wall scroll.
As you can see, it is a great size to hang on your wall.
(We also offer custom wall scrolls in larger sizes)

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.




If your search is not successful, just post your request on our forum, and we'll be happy to do research or translation for any reasonable request.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

A Life of Serenity
A New Life
A Vast Sky Full of Stars
Aikido
Autumn
Bamboo
Be Happy
Beautiful
Beautiful Woman
Best Love
Bible
Bird
Black
Black Belt
Blessing
Blooming
Blue
Broken Mirror Rejoined
Brown
Buddha
Buddhist
Bushido
Business
Butterfly
Carl
Cherry Blossom
Child
Children
Christian
Courage
Dance
Double Happiness
Dragon
Drink
Eight
Elegant
Emperor
Eternity
Faith
Family
Fighter
Fish
Flowers
Flying
Forest
Forgiveness
Fortune
Four
Free Will
God Bless
God is Always With You
God is Love
Gold
Golden
Good
Good Fortune
Grace from Heaven
Great
Guan Gong
Guan Yin
Happy
Happy Birthday
Heart Broken
House
I Need You
Indomitable Spirit
Journey
Kelsey
Kevin
Koi Fish
Laugh
Live for Today
Longevity
Lotus
Love With All My Heart
Love You Forever
Luck
Mama
Mountain
One True Love
People
Power
Prosper
Pursuit of Happiness
Ryan
Serenity Prayer
Shinobi
Shugyo
Soldier
Song
Spirit
Spirit of the Tiger
Strong
Strong Hearted
Susan
Sweet
The Saint
Tiger
Tigers
Today
Tranquility
Tree
Trust No Man
Trustworthy
Twin
Virtue
Vitality
Warrior
Warrior Essence
Wedding
White
Wind
Wisdom from Hard Knocks
Woman
Work
World
Year of the Dragon
Yue Fei

With so many searches, we had to upgrade to our own Linux server.
Of course, only one in 500 searches results in a purchase - Hey buy a wall scroll!!!



See: Our list of specifically Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls. And, check out Our list of specifically old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title
Characters 
Simplified
Traditional
Japanese Romaji
(Romanized Japanese)
Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Air / Atmosphere空气 / 空気
空氣
kuu ki
kuuki
ku ki
kōng qì
kong qi
k`ung ch`i
kong1 qi4
kongqi
kungchi
kung chi
Sky / Air / Ether / Space天空
天空
ten kuu
tenkuu
ten ku
tiān kōng
tian kong
t`ien k`ung
tian1 kong1
tiankong
tienkung
tien kung
Air Force空军
空軍
kuugun
kugun
kōng
kong jun
k`ung chün
kong1 jun1
kongjun
kungchün
kung chün
Universe / Space
chuu
chu
zhòu
zhou
chou
zhou4
Five Elements (Japanese)地水火风空
地水火風空
chi sui ka fuu kuu
chisuikafuukuu
chi sui ka fu ku
n/a
Heaven / Sky
tentiān
tian
t`ien
tian1
tien
tien
Nothingness空无
空無
kuu mu
kuumu
ku mu
kōng wú
kong wu
k`ung wu
kong1 wu2
kongwu
kungwu
kung wu
Well-Disciplined / Orderly严整
嚴整
n/ayán zhěng
yan zheng
yen cheng
yan2 zheng3
yanzheng
Wind
kazefēng
feng
feng1
Patriot爱国者
愛國者
n/aài guó zhě
ai guo zhe
ai kuo che
ai4 guo2 zhe3
aiguozhe
Read 10,000 Books, Travel 10,000 Miles读万卷书行万里路
讀萬卷書行萬裡路
n/adú wàn juǎn shū, xíng wàn lǐ lù
du wan juan shu xing wan li lu
tu wan chüan shu hsing wan li lu
du2 wan4 juan3 shu1 xing2 wan4 li3 lu4
duwanjuanshuxingwanlilu
Fast
yoshikuài
kuai
k`uai
kuai4
kuai
kuai
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis道天地将法
道天地將法
dou ten chi shou hou
doutenchishouhou
do ten chi sho ho
dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
dao tian di jiang fa
tao t`ien ti chiang fa
dao4 tian1 di4 jiang4 fa3
daotiandijiangfa
taotientichiangfa
tao tien ti chiang fa
Construction Crane起重机
起重機
kijuuki
kijuki
qǐ zhòng jī
qi zhong ji
ch`i chung chi
qi3 zhong4 ji1
qizhongji
chichungchi
chi chung chi
Life in Every Breath吐く息一つにも生命が宿り
吐く息一つにも生命が宿り
hakuiki hitotsu nimo seimei ga yadorin/a
Nothingness / Empty / Void虚空
虛空
kokuu
koku
xū kōng
xu kong
hsü k`ung
xu1 kong1
xukong
hsükung
hsü kung

If you have not set up your computer to display Chinese, the characters in this table probably look like empty boxes or random text garbage.
This is why I spent hundreds of hours making images so that you could view the characters in the "air" listings above.
If you want your Windows computer to be able to display Chinese characters you can either head to your Regional and Language options in your Win XP control panel, select the [Languages] tab and click on [Install files for East Asian Languages]. This task will ask for your Win XP CD to complete in most cases. If you don't have your Windows XP CD, or are running Windows 98, you can also download/run the simplified Chinese font package installer from Microsoft which works independently with Win 98, ME, 2000, and XP. It's a 2.5MB download, so if you are on dial up, start the download and go make a sandwich.

Some people may refer to this entry as Air Kanji, Air Characters, Air in Mandarin Chinese, Air Characters, Air in Chinese Writing, Air in Japanese Writing, Air in Asian Writing, Air Ideograms, Chinese Air symbols, Air Hieroglyphics, Air Glyphs, Air in Chinese Letters, Air Hanzi, Air in Japanese Kanji, Air Pictograms, Air in the Chinese Written-Language, or Air in the Japanese Written-Language.

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