Bushido Code of the Samurai - Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scroll

121.5cm
47¾"

49.5cm
19½"

Approximate Measurements

Painting: 31.3cm x 65.5cm  ≈  12¼" x 25¾"

Silk Scroll: 40.5cm x 121.5cm  ≈  16" x 47¾"

Width at Wooden Knobs: 49.5cm  ≈  19½"

Information about caring for your new Wall Scroll
武士道

The Way of the Samurai

Bushido Code of the Samurai - Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scroll close up view

Close up view of the calligraphy artwork mounted to this silk brocade wall scroll

During the 9th and 12th centuries in Japan the warrior class were known as samurai, also called bushi (knights/warriors - bushi hence bushido).
They emerged from the provinces of Japan to become the ruling class until their decline and later total abolition in 1876 during the Meiji Era.

These warriors were men who lived by Bushido; it was their way of life. The samurai's loyalty to the emperor and his overlord or daimyo were unsurpassed. They were trustworthy and honest. They lived frugal lives with no interest in riches and material things, but rather in honor and pride. They were men of true valor. Samurai had no fear of death. They would enter any battle no matter the odds. To die in battle would only bring honor to one's family and one's lord.

The actual code was passed on verbally to each generation of samurai, but over time, seven chief virtues emerged, and became the written form of Bushido.

Of course, credit is generally given that a Chinese man (known in the west as "Confucius") is the father of these values in China. Therefore, you'll find these concepts belong not only to the Japanese samurai, but have spread throughout Asia. Variations of these soldierly and moral values can be seen in China, Korea, Vietnam, and elsewhere.


See our Bushido Way of the Samurai page for more custom Japanese Kanji calligraphy options related to Bushido concepts.


About the artist:

This calligraphy was created by Li Dan-Qing of Beijing. He's an older gentleman who has been involved with the art community of China, all of his life. Now in retirement, he creates calligraphy for us for sort of "hobby income".


About the materials and construction of this wall scroll:

The calligraphy was done using black Chinese ink on xuan paper (known incorrectly in the west as "rice paper"). The raw artwork was then taken to our Wall Scroll Workshop where it was laminated to more sheets of xuan paper, and built into a beautiful silk brocade wall scroll. Except for the use of a lathe to turn the wooden knobs, this wall scroll is virutally 100% handmade from start to finish (even the paper is made by hand).