Hand Painted
Ships from: USA

 This artwork is
100% hand-painted.

Typical Gallery Price: $220.00

$98.88

SOLD

Category: Landscapes of Asia Paintings

Home Sweet Home - Chinese Landscape Painting


Home Sweet Home - Chinese Landscape Painting
57.6cm
22¾"
61cm
24"
See how "Home Sweet Home - Chinese Landscape Painting" would look after being professionally framed


For the best possible display, this portrait should be professionally framed.

A frame is not included with this artwork!


Zoom InSee Huge Image of this Painting

Approximate Measurements

Painting: 50.7cm x 47.5cm  ≈  20" x 18¾"

Silk Border: 61cm x 57.6cm  ≈  24" x 22¾"

Information about how this Asian painting is mounted

Home Sweet Home - Chinese Landscape Painting

close up

Close-up view

This painting depicts what the artist imagines is the best place to call home. If you look closely, down at the bottom, there is a little house by the edge of the river and some boats.

The Chinese title means "Home Sweet Home".

The characters written on this painting include the title explained above, the year painted (2006), and the artist's signature.


The story of this Asian art...

Cheng Zheng-Long and I visit in his Asian art studio near Chengdu.

First meeting at Chen Zheng-Long's
Asian art studio in Chengdu 2003

Ready to leave Chengdu in the Sichuan Province of China. I walk down the hall toward the exit of a building that is home for many antique dealers and artist's studios.

On my way out, I see some nice art in a studio, but keep walking several steps past the door. I feel that I'm finished buying art, and am almost dizzy from the array of art that I'd viewed over the past week in Chengdu City.

But I have to go back and look. I peer in the studio to see an unassuming man holding his paint brush nearly vertical as he slowly works on a landscape painting.

I wait until he is ready to dip his brush into more paint before saying, "hello".

As in most cases, he's a bit startled to see a foreigner, and he mumbles something about how he seldom sees "white people" in the building. Although I doubt the comment is meant for me, I reply, "I look more like a pink person than white don't you think?" He is even more surprised that he can understand me when I speak Chinese to him than the fact that I could reply to his comment.

We both have a good laugh, and exchange pleasantries that are typical in Chinese culture. He hands me his name card (they don't call them business cards in China because the relationship between people is more important - business comes later). I try to read his card back to him, "Chen Zheng-Long", but I am better at oral Chinese than reading, so he corrected me on the pronunciation of his name. (I got the tones wrong - there are 4 possible tones that can go with a sound in Mandarin Chinese - if you use the wrong tone, it completely changes the meaning).

Quick Mandarin Chinese Lesson:

Mandarin Chinese has 370 different sounds and an extended lexicon of over 30,000 characters. That's a lot compared to our 26 Roman letters used in English which have just a little over 26 sounds (in that some English letters can be pronounced with more than one sound - especially vowels).

But wait, there's more. Most of these 370 sounds have up to 4 different tones that can be associated with them, as well as a non-tone or zero-tone. These tones completely change the meaning of the sound just like vowels do in English.

Example...

The consonant sound of "n" and "t" can be:
"not, Nate, note, neat, net, gnat, knit or nut"
...just by changing the vowel sound.

When you change the tone in Chinese, the same thing happens (foreigners, like me, have a lot of trouble with these tones).

Here's an example using the "ma" sound with various tones:

horse eats hemp suffers mother's swearing

Mandarin Chinese Lesson for MA sound

This sentence means
"The horse ate the hemp so it suffers mother's swearing"

...or a more proper translation and better English grammar,
"Mother is swearing at the horse because it ate the hemp".

If you heard this sentence in real life, you probably would not be able to figure out which "ma" is which, unless you'd studied a lot of Chinese. That's what makes this language one of the most difficult to learn on earth.


After he teaches me how to correctly say his name, he shows me several of his latest paintings.

They are all very good, and I know this art is just the kind that a lot of people are looking for from my customers around the world.

He tells me that he really likes to paint black ink horses, and koi fish, but everybody wants his landscape paintings more, so that is what he'd been painting lately.

I tell him that I would like to buy some koi fish and horses too, and he gets very excited, but apologizes that he has very few to show me now. After we talk about the price, I tell him that I'll just pay him in full for several more that he can mail to me in Beijing when he finishes them.

He looks at me with a puzzled face, and I can tell that he is wondering why I want to pay him in full rather than give him deposit. This is when I remind him of an old Chinese Idiom, "If you drain the water from the pond, you will get all the fish in one day, but if you leave the water in the pond, you can catch fish forever". He clearly understood that I was trying to build a long-term relationship with him in a short time that I had left in Chengdu, by extending some trust.

He wraps up the paintings I bought on the spot, and actually paints me a receipt on a piece of rice paper for the money that I hand to him.

Before I leave, he tells me a little about himself in that he was once trained in civil engineering, but wanted to express more of his creative side.  So he left that career behind and became a full time artist after studying at an art academy for a few years. I see some parallels in our lives, as I'd left a similar engineering career behind in the states to come to China originally.

Chinese artist Cheng Zheng-Long and Cat at his studio in Chengdu, China

My wife, Ling Hua (aka Cat) and
Artist Chen Zheng-Long in Chengdu, 2006.

This item was listed or modified
Feb 14th, 2010

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Gary's random little things about China:

Is "Oriental" politically correct?

Everyone is going to hate me for this, but here is the truth:

Some people who currently prefer to call themselves "Asian-Americans" woke up one morning and decided that "Oriental" is now a word to be used only for Oriental rugs, Oriental art and lamps, or any other inanimate object from Eastern Asia.

When I was teaching English in China, many of my students would refer to themselves as "Oriental", and I would correct them and say, It's better to say that you are Asian or Chinese rather than Oriental, but I was at a loss as to explain why.
My Chinese students were very smart, and came back at me with the fact that being from Asia was too broad a term, and asked if Persians and Saudi Arabians should also refer to themselves as "Asian".

I then had to make excuses for my geographically-challenged fellow Americans* who had long ago replaced the correct term of "Oriental" (meaning the bio-geographic region including southern Asia and the Malay Archipelago as far as the Philippines, Borneo and Java), and replaced it with "Asian" which in truth encompasses half the world's population - many of whom do not consider themselves to be of the same race as those from the Orient.
(For those Americans reading this and who've slept through their high school geography class: It's true, the whole Middle East, and half of Russia are located in the Asian continent)

But I admit I am not helping the problem. You see, almost half the people that find our website did so while searching for "Asian art" and I have done a lot to promote our business as "Purveyors of Asian art". So you can blame me too.
To truly be an Asian art gallery, we would have to offer artwork from beyond the Orient, from places like India, Persia (Iran), most Arab nations, and Russia.

Notes:

There are a lot of things that present problems in the English language.
Usually these problems are thanks to mistakes of the past.
That's why we have to say, "He's an Indian from India" versus "He's a Native-American Indian" (Thanks to Mr. Columbus).

Things to learn:
Do not refer to a Persian (Iranian) as Arab.
If you refer to an Arab-American as being Asian, they will look at you funny and possibly be offended.
If you refer to a person from India as Asian, you will mildly amuse them.
If you refer to a Russian as being Asian, they will pour borsch on you (my ex-wife is Russian, so I know this to be true from experience).
Using "Asian" to refer to a person from Singapore is okay, but they will later, as if by accident, mention that they are in fact from the most civilized country in Asia.

*We citizens of the USA call ourselves "Americans" which seems a bit arrogant to our neighbors who reside on the continents of North and South America. Keep in mind, Canadians and Mexicans are also from North America, but refer to themselves in more correct geographic terms.

Typical Gallery Price: $220.00

$98.88

SOLD

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