Hand Painted
Ships from: USA

 This artwork is
100% hand-painted.

Typical Gallery Price: $200.00

$79.88

SOLD

Category: Chinese Character & Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls

Taekwondo Korean Hanja Symbol Wall Scroll


Taekwondo Korean Hanja Symbol Wall Scroll
169cm
66½"
50.7cm
20"

Approximate Measurements

Painting: 32.2cm x 108.2cm  ≈  12¾" x 42½"

Silk Scroll: 41.7cm x 169cm  ≈  16½" x 66½"

Width at Wooden Knobs: 50.7cm  ≈  20"

Information about caring for your new Wall Scroll
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跆拳道

Taekwondo

Taekwondo Korean Hanja Symbol Wall Scroll close up view

Close up view of the artwork mounted to this silk brocade wall scroll

This is one of the most widespread types of martial arts in the world as well as being an Olympic sport. Taekwondo was born in Korea with influences of Chinese and Japanese styles, combined with traditional Korean combat skills. Some will define it as the "Korean art of empty-handed self-defense".

In the simplest translation, the first character means "kick", the second character can mean either "fist" or "punching" the third means "way" or "method". Altogether, you could say this is "Kick Punch Method". When heard or read in various Asian languages, all will automatically think of this famous Korean martial art.

Taekwondo

It is written the same in Japanese Kanji, Chinese, and Korean Hanja characters - so the appearance of the characters are rather universal. However, you should note that there is another way to write this in modern Korean Hangul characters which looks like the image to the right.

Note: In Japanese, this is pronounced/Romanized as tekondo.
In Mandarin Chinese, it's tái quán dào.
In Korean, it's pronounced 태권도.
This Korean title is most commonly Romanized as Taekwondo, but sometimes it's written Tae-Kwondo, Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-do, Taegwondo, Tai Kwon Do, Taikwondo, Taekwando, Tae Kwan Do.
Chinese alternates include Taiquandao, Tai Quan Dao, Taichuando, or Tai Chuan Tao.


See our Taekwondo custom Korean Hanja wall scrolls page for more custom Korean Hanja calligraphy options.


Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping is a famous calligrapher in Beijing. He's been published and interviewed in magazines numerous times. In Beijing, a city known for its high level of scholarship and calligraphy, Xing An-Ping is rated in the top 200 living masters of calligraphy.

Some random facts about Master Xing:

Master Xing is not only an expert in nine different Chinese scripts, but also can write any of more than 40,000 characters in the Chinese and Japanese lexicons, including alternate forms, without reference to any books. This is very rare, as most calligraphers must consult special reference books to find rare and alternate forms of many characters. Most literate Chinese people of this generation can only read 5000 characters, and perhaps write 3000 of them without reference.

His belief is that art is more important than politics. Therefore, his is more than willing to write Japanese words and phrases. This is rare for a Chinese calligrapher, as most still hold strong distaste for Japan due to the atrocities in Nanking (Nanjing) before and during WWII.

He believes that all religions should be respected. While he sees himself as a Buddhist, and meditates before writing all of this calligraphy, he carefully creates Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and other religious calligraphy artwork upon request of customers in China and around the world.

Unlike many or most Chinese men, Master Xing does not smoke or drink. He eats mostly vegetables and not too much meat (Yes, contrary to popular belief, many Buddhists do eat meat - in moderation). His healthy lifestyle is probably why he is in his mid-50's, but looks like he is 40.

He speaks in sophisticated Chinese - they way you expect a doctor or professor to speak. My Chinese is at about the level of a 3rd-grader, so he has to "dumb down" his Chinese when he and I have a conversation.

Master Calligrapher Xing Anping and I at his studio in Beijing

Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping and I
visit at his studio in the
Haidian District of Beijing.


A summary of when we met and shared philosophies...

When I met Master Xing, in early 2005, I had already looked through the studios of almost 100 top-rated calligraphers, in search of the one I wanted to work with (a process that took two years). I liked the quality and styles I saw in his studio, and we sat down to talk. I told him of my plan to bring very personal and customized Chinese calligraphy to the masses. We talked about catalogs of high-level calligraphy that sells for $2000-$5000 for a single wall scroll. This is fine for a collector of Asian calligraphy, but it puts it out of reach of the common people. I told him that my plan was to offer a beautiful product at an affordable price, while at the same time, educating people about calligraphy and Chinese culture.
He agreed to lower his price in favor of these ideas:
1. His artwork being displayed in over 60 countries around the world.
2. His part in providing education and knowledge about this special art.
3. The fact that I was going to potentially keep him busy with lots of interesting projects.

The final philosophy is, "The legacy of this artwork far outweighs the money received for creating it".

I also found a kindred spirit with Master Xing in the fact that he cares as much about quality as I do. I've always been picky about quality, and thus spent years searching for the best scroll maker in all of China. When I found him, I helped him set up the best mounting workshop ever. We even imported special saws from Sweden, had huge custom glass-top tables made, and recently bought the largest and best artwork press that they make.
Before Master Xing would work with me, he sent me away with a piece of his raw calligraphy to have mounted as a scroll at our workshop. Master Xing had his own favorite mounter, and knowing the quality issues (or lack there of), he wanted to make sure his artwork was going to be mounted using the best materials and craftsmanship. When I brought the scroll back a few days later, he said, "Wow, this is better than mine". He now gets his own artwork for domestic sale at his studio, mounted at our workshop.

Xing Anping writes his craft in his studio

The master calligrapher creates his craft using
traditional and classic materials.

Watching the master do his work

In the past few years, I have become very serious
in my appreciation of Asian calligraphy.
Just watching the way a good calligrapher gracefully
moves and pauses his brush can be mesmerizing.

This item was listed or modified
Jun 30th, 2012

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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The scroll that I am holding in this picture is a "medium size"
4-character wall scroll.
As you can see, it is a great size to hang on your wall.
(We also offer custom wall scrolls in larger sizes)

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Typical Gallery Price: $200.00

$79.88

SOLD

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