Hand Painted
Ships from: USA

 This artwork is
100% hand-painted.

Typical Gallery Price: $130.00

$58.88

SOLD

Category: Asian Horse Artwork

Chinese Excellent Steed Wall Scroll


Chinese Excellent Steed Wall Scroll
154.4cm
60¾"
46.6cm
18¼"

Approximate Measurements

Painting: 29cm x 98.7cm  ≈  11½" x 38¾"

Silk Scroll: 37.6cm x 154.4cm  ≈  14¾" x 60¾"

Width at Wooden Knobs: 46.6cm  ≈  18¼"

Information about caring for your new Wall Scroll
駿馬圖

Excellent Steed - Chinese Horse Wall Scroll

Chinese Excellent Steed Wall Scroll close up view

Close up view of the artwork mounted to this silk brocade wall scroll

You simply can't appreciate the beauty of this piece in the small picture above. It also looks much better in person - it's tough to show an accurate view of the quality of this artwork in such a small image on the internet.

The title of this painting written in Chinese is "jun ma tu" which can be translated as "Excellent Steed Picture" or "Fine Horse Picture".

The rest of the Chinese characters are the year painted (2006) and the artist's signature.

This painting was created using only black Chinese ink.


The story of this Asian art...

Cheng Zheng-Long and I visit in his Asian art studio near Chengdu.

First meeting at Chen Zheng-Long's
Asian art studio in Chengdu 2003

Ready to leave Chengdu in the Sichuan Province of China. I walk down the hall toward the exit of a building that is home for many antique dealers and artist's studios.

On my way out, I see some nice art in a studio, but keep walking several steps past the door. I feel that I'm finished buying art, and am almost dizzy from the array of art that I'd viewed over the past week in Chengdu City.

But I have to go back and look. I peer in the studio to see an unassuming man holding his paint brush nearly vertical as he slowly works on a landscape painting.

I wait until he is ready to dip his brush into more paint before saying, "hello".

As in most cases, he's a bit startled to see a foreigner, and he mumbles something about how he seldom sees "white people" in the building. Although I doubt the comment is meant for me, I reply, "I look more like a pink person than white don't you think?" He is even more surprised that he can understand me when I speak Chinese to him than the fact that I could reply to his comment.

We both have a good laugh, and exchange pleasantries that are typical in Chinese culture. He hands me his name card (they don't call them business cards in China because the relationship between people is more important - business comes later). I try to read his card back to him, "Chen Zheng-Long", but I am better at oral Chinese than reading, so he corrected me on the pronunciation of his name. (I got the tones wrong - there are 4 possible tones that can go with a sound in Mandarin Chinese - if you use the wrong tone, it completely changes the meaning).

Quick Mandarin Chinese Lesson:

Mandarin Chinese has 370 different sounds and an extended lexicon of over 30,000 characters. That's a lot compared to our 26 Roman letters used in English which have just a little over 26 sounds (in that some English letters can be pronounced with more than one sound - especially vowels).

But wait, there's more. Most of these 370 sounds have up to 4 different tones that can be associated with them, as well as a non-tone or zero-tone. These tones completely change the meaning of the sound just like vowels do in English.

Example...

The consonant sound of "n" and "t" can be:
"not, Nate, note, neat, net, gnat, knit or nut"
...just by changing the vowel sound.

When you change the tone in Chinese, the same thing happens (foreigners, like me, have a lot of trouble with these tones).

Here's an example using the "ma" sound with various tones:

horse eats hemp suffers mother's swearing

Mandarin Chinese Lesson for MA sound

This sentence means
"The horse ate the hemp so it suffers mother's swearing"

...or a more proper translation and better English grammar,
"Mother is swearing at the horse because it ate the hemp".

If you heard this sentence in real life, you probably would not be able to figure out which "ma" is which, unless you'd studied a lot of Chinese. That's what makes this language one of the most difficult to learn on earth.


After he teaches me how to correctly say his name, he shows me several of his latest paintings.

They are all very good, and I know this art is just the kind that a lot of people are looking for from my customers around the world.

He tells me that he really likes to paint black ink horses, and koi fish, but everybody wants his landscape paintings more, so that is what he'd been painting lately.

I tell him that I would like to buy some koi fish and horses too, and he gets very excited, but apologizes that he has very few to show me now. After we talk about the price, I tell him that I'll just pay him in full for several more that he can mail to me in Beijing when he finishes them.

He looks at me with a puzzled face, and I can tell that he is wondering why I want to pay him in full rather than give him deposit. This is when I remind him of an old Chinese Idiom, "If you drain the water from the pond, you will get all the fish in one day, but if you leave the water in the pond, you can catch fish forever". He clearly understood that I was trying to build a long-term relationship with him in a short time that I had left in Chengdu, by extending some trust.

He wraps up the paintings I bought on the spot, and actually paints me a receipt on a piece of rice paper for the money that I hand to him.

Before I leave, he tells me a little about himself in that he was once trained in civil engineering, but wanted to express more of his creative side.  So he left that career behind and became a full time artist after studying at an art academy for a few years. I see some parallels in our lives, as I'd left a similar engineering career behind in the states to come to China originally.

Chinese artist Cheng Zheng-Long and Cat at his studio in Chengdu, China

My wife, Ling Hua (aka Cat) and
Artist Chen Zheng-Long in Chengdu, 2006.

This item was listed or modified
Sep 23rd, 2012

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Gary's random little things about China:

Crossing the Street: Human Frogger in China

If you are from my generation, you may remember the video game called "Frogger". It involved crossing a busy road while narrowly dodging cars and truck, often both in front of and behind you at the same time.

Well you can play real live Frogger every time you cross the street in China. It is perfectly normal to cross a four or six-lane road, one lane at a time. You stand motionless on the white, dashed line between lanes as cars and trucks whiz by you on both sides with only inches to spare. When the next lane is clear, you advance (there is no retreat in this game, that could get you killed, since drivers in China would never expect that).

If you did this in America, drivers would come to a screeching halt and think you were crazy (they might even tell you so, using colorful words and hand gestures). It is simply a different culture, or rather a different way of doing things in modern Chinese culture.

Typical Gallery Price: $130.00

$58.88

SOLD

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