Buy a Mind Chinese/Japanese Calligraphy Wall Scroll

We have many options to create artwork with the Chinese characters / Asian symbols / Japanese Kanji for Mind on a wall scroll or portrait.

See also: Heart, Spirit and/or Soul.

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Mind
  2. Beautiful Mind
  3. Mind of the Beginner
  4. Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind
  5. Heart / Mind / Spirit
  6. Heijoshin / Presence of Mind
  7. Immovable Mind
  8. Lingering Mind
  9. Listen with Open Mind
10. Be Master of Mind, Not Mastered by Mind
11. Mind, Body and Spirit
12. Mind Over Matter
13. Mind Your Own Business
14. Mind Like Water
15. Morality of Mind
16. No Mind / Mushin
17. One Heart / One Mind / Heart and Soul
18. One Mind / Unity
19. Open and Calm Mind
20. Open Mind
21. An Open Book Benefits Your Mind
22. Patience Brings Peace of Mind
23. Patience Yields Peace of Mind
24. Peace of Mind
25. Peaceful Heart / Peace of Mind / Calm Mind
26. Presence of Mind
27. Prideful Mind...
28. Purity of Mind
29. Strong Mind Strong Body
30. Strong Body, Strong Mind
31. Truth Flashed Through The Mind
32. A Wise Man Changes His Mind
33. Work Together with One Mind
34. Body and Mind
35. Open and Calm Mind
36. Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Spirit
37. Good Heart
38. To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible
39. Determination
40. Learning is Eternal
41. Exercise
42. Inner Peace
43. Martial Morality...
44. Energy Sword Body in Concert
45. Morality of Deed
46. One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door
47. Spirit
48. You are only as old as you feel


Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Mind

Japan utsukushii kokoro
Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Mind Wall Scroll

美しい心 means, "beautiful heart" or "beautiful mind," in Japanese.

The word for "heart" also means "mind" and sometimes "soul" in ancient Asia.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Beautiful Mind

China měi lì xīn líng
Beautiful Mind Wall Scroll

This means, "Beautiful Mind" in Chinese.

This is also the Chinese title of the 2001 movie of the same name.

Mind of the Beginner

Shoshin
China chū xīn
Japan sho shin
Mind of the Beginner Wall Scroll

初心 is often translated in Japanese as "beginner's mind" or "beginner's spirit."

In Chinese, the dictionary definition is "one's original intention."

The first character means first, initial, primary, junior, beginning, or basic.

The second character means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

初心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: The state of shoshin is that of a beginners mind. It is a state of awareness the remains always fully conscious, aware, and prepared to see things for the first time. The attitude of shoshin is essential to continued learning.

Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind

China mào dì zhì duō
Japan boujiishitta
Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind Wall Scroll

冒地質多 is a Chinese and Japanese way to write Bodhicitta.

冒地質多 is often translated as "the enlightened mind" or "enlightened heart."

This title is strictly Buddhist, and won't make sense to Chinese or Japanese people who do not have an expansive background in Buddhist terms, concepts, and scripture.

Heart / Mind / Spirit

China xīn
Japan kokoro
Heart / Mind / Spirit Wall Scroll

心 would often be translated as "heart".

However, because it was believed in Chinese culture thousands of years that your consciousness and thoughts came from the big red organ in the middle of your chest, it also means "mind" or "spirit" and sometimes even "soul."

In Korean, beyond heart, mind, and spirit, this character can mean moral, nature, mind, affections, intentions, core, and center. In fact, it is used in Chinese to mean "center" as well but only with another character in front of it. For instance, "medical center" or even "shopping center." Separately and alone, it will not be read with that "center" meaning unless thought of as "the center of your soul."

Heijoshin / Presence of Mind

China píng cháng xīn
Japan hei jou shin
Heijoshin / Presence of Mind Wall Scroll

平常心 is the title Heijoshin, as associated with Kendo and Aikido schools of Japanese martial arts.

平常心 is also a word in Japanese which can be translated as "one's self-possession" or "presence of mind."

In Chinese and Korean, this means "simplicity heart," "composure," "calmness," or a "sense of orderliness." In Chinese and Korean, this implies that you enjoy what you have, keep your heart in balance, and have no over-blown ambitions.

Immovable Mind

fudoshin
Japan fu dou shin
Immovable Mind Wall Scroll

不動心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet.

Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: An unshakable mind and an immovable spirit is the state of fudoshin. It is courage and stability displayed both mentally and physically. Rather than indicating rigidity and inflexibility, fudoshin describes a condition that is not easily upset by internal thoughts or external forces. It is capable of receiving a strong attack while retaining composure and balance. It receives and yields lightly, grounds to the earth, and reflects aggression back to the source.

Other translations of this title include imperturbability, steadfastness, keeping a cool head in an emergency, or keeping one's calm (during a fight).

The first two Kanji alone mean immobility, firmness, fixed, steadfastness, motionless, idle.

The last Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these three Kanji create a title that is defined as "immovable mind" within the context of Japanese martial arts. However, in Chinese it would mean "motionless heart" and in Korean Hanja, "wafting heart" or "floating heart."

Lingering Mind

Zanshin
China cán xīn
Japan zan shin
Lingering Mind Wall Scroll

First off, this should only be used in context of Japanese martial arts. In Chinese, it's a rather sad title (like a broken heart). In Chinese, the first character alone means destroyed, spoiled, ruined, injured, cruel, oppressive, savage, incomplete, disabled. However, in Japanese, it's remainder, leftover, balance, or lingering.
The second character means heart, mind, soul, or essence in both languages.

This is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: The spirit of zanshin is the state of the remaining or lingering spirit. It is often described as a sustained and heightened state of awareness and mental follow-through. However, true zanshin is a state of focus or concentration before, during, and after the execution of a technique, where a link or connection between uke and nage is preserved. Zanshin is the state of mind that allows us to stay spiritually connected, not only to a single attacker but to multiple attackers and even an entire context; a space, a time, an event.


残In modern Japan (and Simplified Chinese), they use a different version of the first character, as seen to the right. Click on this character to the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version of lingering mind / zanshin.

Listen with Open Mind

China xū jǐ yǐ tīng
Listen with Open Mind Wall Scroll

虛己以聽 is a Chinese proverb that means to listen to the ideas of others with an open mind.

Be Master of Mind, Not Mastered by Mind

China yuàn zuò xīn shī bù shī yú xīn
Be Master of Mind, Not Mastered by Mind Wall Scroll

This is, "Be master of mind, rather than mastered by mind," in Chinese.

This is not an ancient Chinese phrase but rather something we added at the request of a customer.

Mind, Body and Spirit

China shēn xīn líng
Japan mi shin rei
Mind, Body and Spirit Wall Scroll

This is probably the best way to express the idea of "Body, Mind and Spirit" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. We are actually using the word for "heart" here because for thousands of years, the heart was thought to be the place where your thoughts, feelings and emotions came from. We do something similar in the west when we say "warm-hearted" or "I love you with all of my heart." In this context, heart = mind in Asian language and culture.

The very literal translation of these three characters is "body, heart & spirit" which could also be interpreted as "body mind & soul."

We have arranged these characters in this order because it simply "feels" like the proper order in the Chinese language. Word lists like this are not so common for calligraphy artwork, so we have to be careful to put them in the most natural order. It should be noted that this is not a common title in Asia, nor is it considered an actual phrase (as it lacks a clear subject, verb, and object).


霊In Japanese Kanji, they use an alternate form of the character for soul or spirit. If you want this using the Japanese alternate, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above.

Japanese disclaimer: This is not a natural phrase/list in Japanese. While not totally-natural in Chinese, this word list is best if your audience is Chinese.

Mind Over Matter

China xīn shèng yú wù
Mind Over Matter Wall Scroll

心勝於物 is how to write, "mind over matter" in Chinese.

Mind Over Matter

Japan busshitsu-sei o chouetsu suru seishin-ryoku
Mind Over Matter Wall Scroll

This means, "mind over matter," in Japanese.

If you get really technical, you get a translation like, "mental strength transcends materiality."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Mind Your Own Business

China bù gān jǐ shì bù zhāng kǒu yī wèn yáo tóu sān bù zhī
Japan yokeina osewa
Mind Your Own Business Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: [About] matters [that] don't concern [you], do not open [your] mouth, [and] when questioned, always shake [your] head "No."

Figuratively, this means: It is best to remain reticent about other people's affairs and to refuse to make any comment on matters that don't concern you.

Mind Your Own Business

Japan yokei na osewa
Mind Your Own Business Wall Scroll

This suggests that you not give unwanted help or advice to someone.

The Japanese characters break down this way:
余計 (yokei) too much, unnecessary, extraneous, abundance, surplus, excess, superfluity.
な (na) connecting article. お世話 (osewa) help, aid, assistance.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Mind Like Water

Mizu No Kokoro
Japan mizu no kokoro
Mind Like Water Wall Scroll

水の心 is the Japanese Buddhist and martial arts phrase, "mizu no kokoro," which means, "mind like water" or "heart of water."

The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects it's surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

Morality of Mind

China xīn dé
Morality of Mind Wall Scroll

The idea of "morality of mind" goes along with "wu de" (martial morality or virtues of the warrior).

Here, the first character is a representation of your heart or mind.
The second character refers to morality or virtue.

This can also be translated as "morality of heart," "virtue of heart," or "virtue of the mind."

Note that since ancient times in Asia, the idea of your mind (the place where your soul resides, and your thought originate from) has been associated with the heart. Just as in western culture where we say "it comes from the heart," or "heartfelt emotions," there is a belief that your heart and mind are one and the same (medical science now begs to differ).


See Also:  Morality of Deed | Martial Morality

No Mind / Mushin

China wú xīn
Japan mu shin
No Mind / Mushin Wall Scroll

In Japanese, this word means innocent, or one with no knowledge of good and evil. It literally means "without mind."

This is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: "No mind, a mind without ego. A mind like a mirror which reflects and dos not judge." The original term was "mushin no shin," meaning, "mind of no mind." It is a state of mind without fear, anger, or anxiety. Mushin is often described by the phrase, "mizu no kokoro," which means, "mind like water." The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects it's surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

This has a good meaning in conjunction with Chan / Zen Buddhism in Japan. However, out of that context, it means mindlessness or absent-minded. To non-Buddhists in China, this is associated with doing something without thinking.
In Korean, this usually means indifference.

Use caution and know your audience before ordering this selection.


More info: Wikipedia: Mushin

One Heart / One Mind / Heart and Soul

China yī shì dài
Japan isshin
One Heart / One Mind / Heart and Soul Wall Scroll

This literally reads as "one heart" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Colloquially or figuratively, it means: wholeheartedly; heart and soul; of one mind; wholeheartedness; one's whole heart; with the whole mind or heart; one mind of heart.
I'm not kidding, all of those came right from the dictionary for this one title. In Buddhism, this can refer to the bhūtatathatā, or the whole of things; the universe as one mind, or a spiritual unity.

In Japanese this can be the female given name, Hitomi.

One Mind / Unity

China hé hé
Japan wagou / wago
One Mind / Unity Wall Scroll

This means to blend, unite, or be of one mind.

This is usually used as a Buddhist term. It can also be defined as: harmony; concord; agreement; unity; union; harmonize.

Open and Calm Mind

Japan kyoshintankai
Open and Calm Mind Wall Scroll

虛心坦懐 is a Japanese proverb that means, "with an open and calm mind," "with no preconceived notions," or "without reservations." In some context it can mean frank or candid.

Open Mind

China kāi jué
Japan kaikaku
Open Mind Wall Scroll

開覺 is a Buddhist term meaning "open mind."

The more full definition as used in Buddhism is, "To arouse, awaken; to allow the original Buddha-nature to open and enlighten the mind."

An Open Book Benefits Your Mind

China kāi juàn yǒu yì
An Open Book Benefits Your Mind Wall Scroll

There are several ways to translate this ancient proverb. Translated literally and directly it says, "Open roll has/yields benefit."

To understand that, you must know a few things...

First, Chinese characters and language have deeper meanings that often are not spoken but are understood - especially with ancient text like this. Example: It's understood that the "benefit" referred to in this proverb is to the mind of the reader. Just the last character expresses that whole idea.

Second, Chinese proverbs are supposed to make you think, and leave a bit of mystery to figure out.

Third, for this proverb, it should be noted that roll = book. When this proverb came about (about two thousand years ago) books were really rolls of bamboo slips strung together. The first bound books like the ones we use today did not come about until about a thousand years after this proverb when they invented paper in China.

This is a great gift for a bookworm who loves to read and increase their knowledge. Or for any friend that is or wants to be well-read.

Some other translations of this phrase:
Opening a book is profitable
The benefits of education.

Patience Brings Peace of Mind

Japan nintai wa kokoro no heiwa o motarasu
Patience Brings Peace of Mind Wall Scroll

This means, "patience brings peace of mind," in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Patience Yields Peace of Mind

China néng rěn zì ān
Patience Yields Peace of Mind Wall Scroll

This ancient Chinese proverb can be translated as, "Patience brings peace of mind," "One who has patience, finds peace," and a few other ways.

Peace of Mind

(five character version)
China nèi xīn de níng jìng
Peace of Mind Wall Scroll

內心的寧靜 is the longer way to express the idea of "peace of mind" in Chinese.

The first two characters mean heart or "innermost being."
The middle character is a connecting modifier.
The last two characters mean peace, tranquility, or serenity.

Some may also translate this as "inner peace" but I like our other inner-peace options for that idea.

This kind of makes sense in Korean but will have an archaic read - even by those who can understand Korean Hanja.

Peace of Mind

China hé píng
Japan wa hei
Peace of Mind Wall Scroll

和平 is the Chinese order for these two characters which means peace but can also be translated as amicability, pacifically or mildness. 和平 is often translated as a simple way to say "peace of mind." This combination is used in Korean Hanja to mean "peace and harmony."

Alone, the first character means peace and harmony.
The second character means balance, when read by itself.

Note: 和平 are often seen in the opposite order in Japanese with the same meaning (You'll sometimes find them in this order in Japan, so either way is OK).

Peaceful Heart / Peace of Mind / Calm Mind

China ān xīn
Japan an shin
Peaceful Heart / Peace of Mind / Calm Mind Wall Scroll

安心 is a nice word that encompasses great meanings within just two characters. This can be defined as relief, peace of mind, feeling at ease, to be relieved, set one's mind at rest. easiness. To put it another way, it's the idea of feeling a sense of security, safety, and confidence in your state of well-being.

Presence of Mind

China tài rán zì ruò
Japan taizenjijaku
Presence of Mind Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese proverb/word means, "cool and collected," "showing no sign of nerves," "perfectly composed," "having presence of mind," "self-possessed," "imperturbable," and/or "calm and self-possessed."

Presence of Mind

Japan ochitsuki
Presence of Mind Wall Scroll

This Japanese word means: calmness; composure; presence of mind; stability; steadiness.

Prideful Mind
Self-Respecting Heart

China zì zūn xīn
Japan ji son shin
Prideful Mind / Self-Respecting Heart Wall Scroll

This Japanese and Korean word means "pride" or "self-respect."

The first Kanji/Hanja means oneself. The second can mean revered, valuable, precious, noble or exalted. And the last Kanji/Hanja means heart, mind and/or spirit.


While these characters make sense and hold the same general meaning in Chinese, this is not a normal Chinese word. This selection should only be used if your audience is Japanese or Korean.


See Also:  Respect | Pride | Self-Reliance | Self-Control | Self-Discipline

Purity of Mind

China xīn chéng jìng
Japan shin chou jou
Purity of Mind Wall Scroll

心澄淨 is the Buddhist concept of the pure and calm mind. It is believed that once you achieve a meditative state of pure focused thought, the mind becomes clear and calm. Although, others will say this means that achieving a calm mind will allow you to reach pure thought.

From Sanskrit, this is known as citta-prasāda. The concept of citta-prasāda is sometimes defined as, "clear heart-mind," or "the single and definitive aspiration."

Strong Mind Strong Body

China qiáng zhuàng de shēn tǐ jiān qiáng de xīn tài
Strong Mind Strong Body Wall Scroll

This is the Chinese phrase for "Strong Mind, Strong Body," however, the character order is actually "Strong Body, Strong Mind," as that's the more natural word order in Chinese.

Strong Body, Strong Mind

Japan tsuyo i karada tsuyo i kokoro
Strong Body, Strong Mind Wall Scroll

強い体強い心 is a way to write "strong mind, strong body" in Japanese.

Each of the two lines starts with 強い (tsuyoi) which means: strong; powerful; mighty; potent; resistant; resilient; durable; tough; stiff; hard; inflexible.

Body is represented with 体 (ancient version is 體, romanized as karada) which means: body; build; physique; posture; torso; trunk; health.

Mind is represented with 心 (kokoro) which can mean heart, mind, or soul depending on context.

This is not a common phrase in Japanese, so it's not the most natural title for calligraphy. In English, you might want to write it, "strong mind, strong body" but, "strong mind, strong body," is more natural in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Truth Flashed Through The Mind

China cān wù
Truth Flashed Through The Mind Wall Scroll

參悟 is a Chan / Zen Buddhism concept that means "to understand (mystery) from meditation," or "to see truth flash through the mind."

參悟 is a pretty deep idea, therefore, your own study and contemplation may be required before you can fully appreciate it.

A Wise Man Changes His Mind (but a fool never will)

Japan kun shi hyou hen su
A Wise Man Changes His Mind (but a fool never will) Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb suggests that a wise man is willing to change his mind but a fool will stubbornly never change his.

The first word is 君子 (kunshi) man of virtue, person of high rank, wise man.

The second word is 豹変 (hyouhen) sudden change, complete change.

The last part す (su) just modifies the verb to a more humble form.

The "fool" part is merely implied or understood. So if wise and noble people are willing to change their minds, it automatically says that foolish people are the ones unwilling to change.

Work Together with One Mind

Japan ichi mi dou shin
Work Together with One Mind Wall Scroll

一味同心 is a Japanese phrase that refers to people working together with one mind.

Body and Mind

China shēn xīn
Japan shin shin
Body and Mind Wall Scroll

身心 means, "body and mind" or "mental and physical" in Chinese and Japanese.

In the Buddhist context, body and mind encompass the five elements (skandha) of a sentient being.
The body is the physical material (rūpa) of life. Mind embraces the other four skandhas which are consciousness, perception, action, and knowledge.

Open and Calm Mind

Japan kyo shin tan kai
Open and Calm Mind Wall Scroll

虚心坦懐 is a Japanese word that means with an open and calm mind.

If you want to remind yourself to approach each situation with no preconceptions, this is a good title for you. This can also refer to the ideas of being candid, frank, and straightforward.

Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Spirit

China měi lì de xīn líng
Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Spirit Wall Scroll

美麗的心靈 means beautiful heart, beautiful mind, or beautiful spirit in Chinese.

Good Heart

A heart of kindness, benevolence, and virtuous intentions
China shàn xīn
Japan yoshinaka
Good Heart Wall Scroll

This literally reads, "Good Heart" but is used to refer to the ideas of kindness, benevolence, philanthropy, virtuous intentions, moral sense, and conscience.

Some will also translate this as morality of mind (as the character for heart is often used to mean mind).

In Japanese, this can be the given name Yoshinaka.

To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

Where there is a will, there is a way
China yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible Wall Scroll

This old Chinese proverb has been translated many different ways into English. As you read the translations below, keep in mind that in Chinese, heart=mind.

Nothing is impossible to a willing heart.
Nothing is impossible to a willing mind.
Nothing is difficult to a willing heart.
Where there is a will, there is a way.
Nothing in the world is impossible if you set your mind to do it.
A willful man will have his way.
If you wish it, you will do it.
A determined heart can accomplish anything.
All things are possible to a strong mind.


Determination

China jué xīn
Japan kesshin
Determination Wall Scroll

This Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word holds the dictionary definition of "determination" but literally means, "determined heart."

The first character means "to determine" or "determined."

The second character means "heart," "mind" or "soul," so you can imagine that this form of "determination" partially means to put your heart into something. It can also be translated as resolve, resolution, or decision (as in a decision made and followed).


See Also:  Devotion | Tenacious | Passion | Dedication | Will-Power

Learning is Eternal

China xué wú zhǐ jìng
Learning is Eternal Wall Scroll

This Chinese philosophy tells of how we continue to learn throughout our lives. This proverb can be translated in a few ways such as "Study has no end," "Knowledge is infinite," "No end to learning," "There's always something new to study," or "You live and learn."

The deeper meaning: Even when we finish school we are still students of the world gaining more knowledge from our surroundings with each passing day.


See Also:  An Open Book Benefits Your Mind | Wisdom | Learn From Wisdom

Exercise

(for body or mind)
China duàn liàn
Exercise Wall Scroll

鍛煉 / 鍛鍊 means exercise in much the same way we use the word exercise in English. This can be exercising your body at the gym, or exercising your mind in studies. Most of the time, this refers to physical exercise.

This can also be translated as to temper, to toughen, to train, to drill, to forge, or simply discipline.

Inner Peace

China nèi xīn píng jìng
Japan naishin heizyou
Inner Peace Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese phrase is a direct translation for the western idea of inner peace.

The first two characters contain the idea of "heart," "innermost being," or "deep in the/your inner mind."

The last two characters mean "tranquil" and "serene."

I have seen this phrase used as "inner peace" for art prints and even on the side of coffee cups. But I think the translation is too literal. It feels like a direct translation from English rather than a nicely composed Chinese or Japanese phrase. See my other entries for "inner peace."


See Also:  Serenity | Simplicity | Peace

Martial Morality
Martial Arts Ethics / Virtue

China wǔ dé
Japan butoku
Martial Morality / Martial Arts Ethics / Virtue Wall Scroll

This refers to the virtue, morality, and ethics that any practitioner of martial arts should posses. This can be used in both Chinese and Japanese in lieu of English terms such as "soldierly virtue," "good conduct" (military), "warrior ethics," and being honorable in regards to any fight or competition.


See Also:  Morality of Mind | Morality of Deed

Energy Sword Body in Concert

Spirit, Sword & Body as One
Japan ki ken tai icchi
Energy Sword Body in Concert Wall Scroll

This often gets translated as "Mind Sword Body," or "Spirit, Sword and Body as One." But I think these translations don't tell you enough about what this is really saying.

In this context, 気, which is the modern Japanese version of 氣, means spiritual and unseen energy or "life energy." In some cases, 気 can be translated as spirit, feeling, or nature. If defined as mind, it's more about invisible or intangible part of one's mind (or soul).

剣 is the Japanese version of 劍 meaning sword.

体 is the modern Japanese version of 體 meaning body.

The Kanji 一 means one, and in this case suggests "all in one." The Kanji 到 means to send, deliver, or convey. But together, 一到 suggests all these things in agreement, union cooperation, or in concert.

Morality of Deed

China xíng dé
Morality of Deed Wall Scroll

The idea of "morality of deed" goes along with "wu de" (martial morality or virtues of the warrior).

Here, the first character is a representation of the actions or deeds that you engage in.
The second character refers to morality or virtue.

This translates better in English in the opposite order, as the Chinese order is literally "deed morality."


See Also:  Morality of Mind | Martial Morality

One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door

China bái tiān bù zuò kuī xīn shì yè bàn qiāo mén bù chī jīng
One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: [If one does] not do bad things in the daytime, one need not be alarmed at knocks on the door in the middle of the night.

The meaning is something like, "A quiet conscience sleeps in thunder." Basically, the message is, "don't commit crimes and you won't be jumpy every time the doorbell rings (so don't do anything wrong and your life will have fewer worries and you can sleep at night)".

Spirit

China jīng shén
Japan sei shin
Spirit Wall Scroll

精神 is the kind of spirit that you have if you perform well in sports or competition. It is the idea of having a good attitude, and putting your all into something - so much so that others can see or feel your spirit. It is the essence of your being that can only be subjectively described because there are no words that can fully explain what "spirit" really is.

For your information:
My Japanese dictionary further tries to explain this word by comparing it to mind, soul, heart or intention.
My Chinese dictionary compares these characters to meanings like vigor, vitality, drive and mentality.
My Korean dictionary defines this as mind, spirit and soul.


See Also:  Vitality | Heart | Soul

You are only as old as you feel

You're only old if you think you're old
China bú pà rén lǎo zhǐ pà xīn lǎo
You are only as old as you feel Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Do not be concerned about being old; be concerned about a mind which is old.

Figuratively, this means: Your are not as old as you look, you are only as old as you think you are.

Search for in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Beautiful Heart
Beautiful Mind
美しい心utsukushii kokoro
utsukushiikokoro
utsukushi kokoro
utsukushikokoro
Beautiful Mind 美麗心靈
美丽心灵
měi lì xīn líng
mei3 li4 xin1 ling2
mei li xin ling
meilixinling
mei li hsin ling
meilihsinling
Mind of the Beginner 初心sho shin / shoshinchū xīn / chu1 xin1 / chu xin / chuxin ch`u hsin / chuhsin / chu hsin
Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind 冒地質多
冒地质多
boujiishitta
bojishitta
mào dì zhì duō
mao4 di4 zhi4 duo1
mao di zhi duo
maodizhiduo
mao ti chih to
maotichihto
Heart
Mind
Spirit
kokoroxīn / xin1 / xin hsin
Heijoshin
Presence of Mind
平常心hei jou shin
heijoushin
hei jo shin
heijoshin
píng cháng xīn
ping2 chang2 xin1
ping chang xin
pingchangxin
p`ing ch`ang hsin
pingchanghsin
ping chang hsin
Immovable Mind 不動心fu dou shin
fudoushin
fu do shin
fudoshin
Lingering Mind 殘心
残心
zan shin / zanshincán xīn / can2 xin1 / can xin / canxin ts`an hsin / tsanhsin / tsan hsin
Listen with Open Mind 虛己以聽
虚己以听
xū jǐ yǐ tīng
xu1 ji3 yi3 ting1
xu ji yi ting
xujiyiting
hsü chi i t`ing
hsüchiiting
hsü chi i ting
Be Master of Mind, Not Mastered by Mind 願作心師不師於心
愿作心师不师于心
yuàn zuò xīn shī bù shī yú xīn
yuan4 zuo4 xin1 shi1 bu4 shi1 yu2 xin1
yuan zuo xin shi bu shi yu xin
yuanzuoxinshibushiyuxin
yüan tso hsin shih pu shih yü hsin
Mind, Body and Spirit 身心靈 / 身心霊
身心灵
mi shin rei
mishinrei
shēn xīn líng
shen1 xin1 ling2
shen xin ling
shenxinling
shen hsin ling
shenhsinling
Mind Over Matter 心勝於物
心胜于物
xīn shèng yú wù
xin1 sheng4 yu2 wu4
xin sheng yu wu
xinshengyuwu
hsin sheng yü wu
hsinshengyüwu
Mind Over Matter 物質性を超越する精神力busshitsu-sei o chouetsu suru seishin-ryoku
bushitsu-sei o choetsu suru seishin-ryoku
bushitsu-seiochoetsusuruseishin-ryoku
Mind Your Own Business 不干己事不張口一問搖頭三不知
不干己事不张口一问摇头三不知
yokeina osewa
yokeinaosewa
bù gān jǐ shì bù zhāng kǒu yī wèn yáo tóu sān bù zhī
bu4 gan1 ji3 shi4 bu4 zhang1 kou3 yi1 wen4 yao2 tou2 san1 bu4 zhi1
bu gan ji shi bu zhang kou yi wen yao tou san bu zhi
pu kan chi shih pu chang k`ou i wen yao t`ou san pu chih
pu kan chi shih pu chang kou i wen yao tou san pu chih
Mind Your Own Business 余計なお世話yokei na osewa
yokeinaosewa
Mind Like Water 水の心mizu no kokoro
mizunokokoro
Morality of Mind 心德xīn dé / xin1 de2 / xin de / xinde hsin te / hsinte
No Mind
Mushin
無心
无心
mu shin / mushinwú xīn / wu2 xin1 / wu xin / wuxin wu hsin / wuhsin
One Heart
One Mind
Heart and Soul
一心isshin / ishinyī shì dài
yi1 shi4 dai4
yi shi dai
yishidai
i shih tai
ishihtai
One Mind
Unity
和合wagou / wago
wago / wago
wago/wago
hé hé / he2 he2 / he he / hehe ho ho / hoho
Open and Calm Mind 虛心坦懐
虚心坦懐
kyoshintankai
Open Mind 開覺
开觉
kaikaku / kaikakukāi jué / kai1 jue2 / kai jue / kaijue k`ai chüeh / kaichüeh / kai chüeh
An Open Book Benefits Your Mind 開卷有益
开卷有益
kāi juàn yǒu yì
kai1 juan4 you3 yi4
kai juan you yi
kaijuanyouyi
k`ai chüan yu i
kaichüanyui
kai chüan yu i
Patience Brings Peace of Mind 忍耐は心の平和をもたらすnintai wa kokoro no heiwa o motarasu
Patience Yields Peace of Mind 能忍自安néng rěn zì ān
neng2 ren3 zi4 an1
neng ren zi an
nengrenzian
neng jen tzu an
nengjentzuan
Peace of Mind 內心的寧靜
内心的宁静
nèi xīn de níng jìng
nei4 xin1 de ning2 jing4
nei xin de ning jing
neixindeningjing
nei hsin te ning ching
neihsinteningching
Peace of Mind 和平wa hei / waheihé píng / he2 ping2 / he ping / heping ho p`ing / hoping / ho ping
Peaceful Heart
Peace of Mind
Calm Mind
安心an shin / anshinān xīn / an1 xin1 / an xin / anxin an hsin / anhsin
Presence of Mind 泰然自若taizenjijakutài rán zì ruò
tai4 ran2 zi4 ruo4
tai ran zi ruo
tairanziruo
t`ai jan tzu jo
taijantzujo
tai jan tzu jo
Presence of Mind 落着きochitsuki
Prideful Mind
Self-Respecting Heart
自尊心ji son shin
jisonshin
zì zūn xīn
zi4 zun1 xin1
zi zun xin
zizunxin
tzu tsun hsin
tzutsunhsin
Purity of Mind 心澄淨shin chou jou
shinchoujou
shin cho jo
shinchojo
xīn chéng jìng
xin1 cheng2 jing4
xin cheng jing
xinchengjing
hsin ch`eng ching
hsinchengching
hsin cheng ching
Strong Mind Strong Body 強壯的身體堅強的心態
强壮的身体坚强的心态
qiáng zhuàng de shēn tǐ jiān qiáng de xīn tài
qiang2 zhuang4 de shen1 ti3 jian1 qiang2 de xin1 tai4
qiang zhuang de shen ti jian qiang de xin tai
ch`iang chuang te shen t`i chien ch`iang te hsin t`ai
chiang chuang te shen ti chien chiang te hsin tai
Strong Body, Strong Mind 強い體強い心
強い体強い心
tsuyo i karada tsuyo i kokoro
tsuyoikaradatsuyoikokoro
Truth Flashed Through The Mind 參悟
参悟
cān wù / can1 wu4 / can wu / canwu ts`an wu / tsanwu / tsan wu
A Wise Man Changes His Mind (but a fool never will) 君子豹変すkun shi hyou hen su
kunshihyouhensu
kun shi hyo hen su
kunshihyohensu
Work Together with One Mind 一味同心ichi mi dou shin
ichimidoushin
ichi mi do shin
ichimidoshin
Body and Mind 身心shin shin / shinshinshēn xīn / shen1 xin1 / shen xin / shenxin shen hsin / shenhsin
Open and Calm Mind 虚心坦懐kyo shin tan kai
kyoshintankai
Beautiful Heart
Beautiful Spirit
美麗的心靈
美丽的心灵
měi lì de xīn líng
mei3 li4 de xin1 ling2
mei li de xin ling
meilidexinling
mei li te hsin ling
meilitehsinling
Good Heart 善心yoshinakashàn xīn / shan4 xin1 / shan xin / shanxin shan hsin / shanhsin
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible 有志者事竟成 / 有誌者事竟成
有志者事竟成
yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
you3 zhi4 zhe3 shi4 jing4 cheng2
you zhi zhe shi jing cheng
youzhizheshijingcheng
yu chih che shih ching ch`eng
yuchihcheshihchingcheng
yu chih che shih ching cheng
Determination 決心
决心
kesshin / keshinjué xīn / jue2 xin1 / jue xin / juexin chüeh hsin / chüehhsin
Learning is Eternal 學無止境
学无止境
xué wú zhǐ jìng
xue2 wu2 zhi3 jing4
xue wu zhi jing
xuewuzhijing
hsüeh wu chih ching
hsüehwuchihching
Exercise 鍛煉 / 鍛鍊
锻炼
duàn liàn
duan4 lian4
duan lian
duanlian
tuan lien
tuanlien
Inner Peace 內心平靜
内心平静
naishin heizyou
naishinheizyou
naishin heizyo
naishinheizyo
nèi xīn píng jìng
nei4 xin1 ping2 jing4
nei xin ping jing
neixinpingjing
nei hsin p`ing ching
neihsinpingching
nei hsin ping ching
Martial Morality
Martial Arts Ethics
Virtue
武德butokuwǔ dé / wu3 de2 / wu de / wude wu te / wute
Energy Sword Body in Concert 気剣体一致 / 氣劍體一致
气剑体一致
ki ken tai icchi
kikentaiicchi
ki ken tai ichi
kikentaiichi
Morality of Deed 行德xíng dé / xing2 de2 / xing de / xingde hsing te / hsingte
One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door 白天不做虧心事夜半敲門不吃驚
白天不做亏心事夜半敲门不吃惊
bái tiān bù zuò kuī xīn shì yè bàn qiāo mén bù chī jīng
bai2 tian1 bu4 zuo4 kui1 xin1 shi4 ye4 ban4 qiao1 men2 bu4 chi1 jing1
bai tian bu zuo kui xin shi ye ban qiao men bu chi jing
pai t`ien pu tso k`uei hsin shih yeh pan ch`iao men pu ch`ih ching
pai tien pu tso kuei hsin shih yeh pan chiao men pu chih ching
Spirit 精神sei shin / seishinjīng shén
jing1 shen2
jing shen
jingshen
ching shen
chingshen
You are only as old as you feel 不怕人老隻怕心老
不怕人老只怕心老
bú pà rén lǎo zhǐ pà xīn lǎo
bu2 pa4 ren2 lao3 zhi3 pa4 xin1 lao3
bu pa ren lao zhi pa xin lao
buparenlaozhipaxinlao
pu p`a jen lao chih p`a hsin lao
pupajenlaochihpahsinlao
pu pa jen lao chih pa hsin lao
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.