Buy a Custom Friends Chinese or Japanese Calligraphy Wall Scroll

We have many options to create artwork with the Chinese characters / Asian symbols / Japanese Kanji for Friends on a wall scroll or portrait.
If you want to create a cool Friends Asian character tattoo, you can purchase that on our Chinese and Japanese Tattoo Image Service page and we'll help you select from many forms of ancient Asian symbols that express the idea of Friends.

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Friend / Friendship
  2. Most Sincere Friend / Honest Friend / Real Friend / Best Friend
  3. Sworn Friend / Ally
  4. Best Friends / Closest Friend
  5. Christian Friend
  6. Friend
  7. True Friend
  8. Best Friends
  9. Extremely Good Friends
10. Family and Friends
11. Best Friends / Buddies
12. Eternal Friendship...
13. Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever
14. Soul Mates
15. Friendship
16. Soul Mates
17. Spiritual Soul Mates
18. Soul Mates
19. Five Codes of Tang Soo Do
20. Acceptance
21. Appreciation of Truth by Meditation
22. Be Like Water
23. Best
24. Best Love / Most Sincere Love
25. Cat / Pussycat
26. Choose Life
27. Commitment
28. Compassion
29. Forever In My Heart
30. Friendliness
31. Geisha
32. Generosity
33. Good Intentions
34. Grace
35. Green Plum and Bamboo Horse
36. Islam
37. John 14:18
38. Joshua 24:15
39. Justice / Rectitude / Right Decision
40. Kaili
41. Kindness and Forgiving Nature
42. Kindness / Caring
43. Love
44. Love and Honor
45. Loyalty
46. Loyalty / Devotion
47. Mother and Daughter
48. Never Give Up
49. Better Late Than Never
50. No Fear
51. No Worries
52. An Open Book Benefits Your Mind
53. Osu / Affirmative
54. Outstanding
55. Partnership: Marriage
56. Peace / Harmony
57. Homosexual / Gay
58. Homosexual Male / Gay Male
59. The Red String
60. Tibet
61. Together Forever
62. Together Forever in Love
63. True Victory is Victory Over Oneself
64. Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial
65. Yujin
66. Dog


Friend / Friendship

China yǒu
Japan tomo
Friend / Friendship

友 is the simplest way to express the idea of friends or friendship in Chinese.

It can mean friend, companion, or pal in Japanese. In Korean, it can mean friend, companion, or associate.

This single character is open to interpretation, so it can mean different things to different people (not necessarily a bad thing, as you can decide what it means to you). If you want a more concisely-defined word, you should probably pick one of our multi-character friendship-related words.


See Also:  Best Friends | Friendly | Friendship

Friend / Friendship

China péng
Japan tomo
Friend / Friendship

朋 is a simple way to say friend, companion, comrade, or pal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, or old Korean Hanja.

朋 is a very short form, so a longer two-character word for friendship might be better.

Note: In Japanese, this can also be the female given name, Yukari.

Most Sincere Friend / Honest Friend / Real Friend / Best Friend

China zhì yǒu
Most Sincere Friend / Honest Friend / Real Friend / Best Friend

This one way to say best friend in Chinese.

The first character can mean "honest" or "most sincere." The second character means "friend" or "friends" (plural forms work differently in Chinese).


See Also:  Friendship | Soulmates

Sworn Friend / Ally

China méng yǒu
Japan meiyuu
Sworn Friend / Ally

盟友 means a sworn friend or ally. If you stand on the same side of an issue with someone, and perhaps fight for the same cause together, this is the term you would use to describe such a partner.

There may not be a personal relationship, as this term is also used to describe whole countries that make a coalition, or fight against a common enemy.

This would be most appropriate if you are a high-level military officer, giving this wall scroll to an officer of another country as you join forces together, and go to war.

Best Friends / Closest Friend

China zhì yǒu
Best Friends / Closest Friend

This one way to say best friend in Chinese.

The first character can mean "most," "extreme" or "best."
The second character means "friend" or "friends" (plural forms work differently in China).

Can also be translated as "close friend" or "most intimate friend."


See Also:  Friendship | Soulmates

Christian Friend

China jiào yǒu
Christian Friend

Depending on context, this word can mean Christian or "friend of the same religion." While technically it could be any religion, this is used mostly within the Christian faith. You can also translate this as "Christian friend" and in some cases "Church member."

Friend

Japan tomo dachi
Friend

友達 is the most common way to say "friend" in Japanese.


See Also:  Best Friends | Friendly | Friendship

True Friend

China gòu péng you
True Friend

夠朋友 is a colloquial title in Chinese meaning, "to be a true friend."

True Friend

Japan shinnotomo
True Friend

真の友 is "true friend" in Japanese.

Best Friends

China zhì jiāo
Best Friends

This an alternate way to say best friend in Chinese.

The first character can mean "most," "extreme" or "best." The second character means "making friends" or "building friendship." There's sort of a suggestion with the second character that fate caused you to intersect in life and become friends (that character can mean intersection in some context).

This can also mean "most intimate friend," "very good friend of long standing," or "closest friend."


See Also:  Friendship | Soulmates

Extremely Good Friends

Japan bakugyakunotomo
Extremely Good Friends

莫逆の友 is Japanese expressing meaning, "extremely good friends" or "best friends."

Family and Friends

China qīn péng hǎo yǒu
Family and Friends

This Chinese title simply means "family and friends," or "kith and kin."

If you read each character more literally, it's like, "relatives, friends, [and] good/close friends."

Family and Friends

Japan kazoku ya yuujin
Family and Friends

家族や友人 means, "family and friends," in Japanese.

Best Friends / Buddies

China qīn yǒu
Japan shin yuu
Best Friends / Buddies

親友 is the Japanese way to say "best friend."

The first character can mean "relative" or sometimes "parents." The second character means "friend." Think about the close relationship that Japanese people have with their parents and relatives, and this starts to mean "close friends."

Some Japanese-English dictionaries also translate this as "bosom friend," "old friend," "intimate friend," "buddy," "crony" or "chum."

Note that in Chinese, this has the meaning of "relatives and friends." It's a good meaning in Chinese but it's not quite the same as "best friends."

Eternal Friendship
Friends Forever

Japan ei en no yuu
Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever

The first two characters mean eternal, eternity, perpetuity, forever, immortality, and permanence.

The third character is a possessive article which sort of makes this selection mean "Love, of the eternal kind."

The last character is "friend" or "Friendship."


See Also:  Best Friends

Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever

China yǒng yuǎn de péng yǒu
Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever

永遠的朋友 is exactly what the title suggests. 永遠的朋友 means friends that are eternal or a friendship that will last forever - you will remain the best of friends as long as you live.

The first two characters mean forever, eternal, eternity, perpetuity, immortality, and/or permanence.

The middle character links the words (it's a possessive article).

The last two characters represent friendship, or simply "friends."

Soul Mates

Japan tamashii no tomo
Soul Mates

魂の友 is one of a few ways to write "Soul Mates" in Japanese.

The first Kanji means soul, spirit, ghost, immortal soul, the mind, or conscious mind. From Sanskrit it's Vijñāna.

The middle character is a Japanese Hiragana connecting or possessive article that links the two ideas together.

The last Kanji means friends or friendship.

Friendship

China yǒu yì
Japan yuugi
Friendship

Can also be defined as companionship or fellowship. 友誼 is common in Chinese and Korean Hanja but seldom used in Japanese anymore.


See Also:  Partnership | Friendliness

Friendship

China yǒu qíng
Japan yuujou
Friendship

Can also be translated as "camaraderie" or "fellowship." But this character combination is only used commonly in Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja.

Soul Mates

China tiān shēng yí duì
Soul Mates

It was tough to find the best way to say "soul mates" in Chinese. We settled on this old way to say "A couple selected by heaven."

The first two characters together mean "natural" or "innate." Separated, they mean "heaven" and "born." The last two characters mean "couple." So this can be translated as "A couple that is together by nature," or "A couple brought together by heaven's decree," with a slight stretch, you could say "A couple born together from heaven."

It's a struggle to find the best way to describe this idea in English but trust me, it is pretty cool and it is a great way to say "soulmates."

If you're in a happy relationship or marriage and think you have found your soul mate, this would be a wonderful wall scroll to hang in your home.

Soul Mates

China líng hún bàn lǚ
Japan reikon hanryo
Soul Mates

靈魂伴侶 is the literal translation of "Soul Mates."

This is kind of the western way to express "soul mates" but translated into Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.
The first two characters mean "soul" or "spirit."
The second two characters mean "mate," "companion" or "partner."

Although not the most common title, these characters have good meaning and will be received well in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. It's a universal title!

Spiritual Soul Mates

China jīng shén bàn lǚ
Japan sei shin han ryo
Spiritual Soul Mates

精神伴侶 is title means "Spiritual Soul Mates." The first two characters mean "spiritual" or "soul." The second two characters mean "mates," "companions" or "partners."

精神伴侶 is more about the spiritual connection between partners rather than a "fate-brought-us-together" kind of soul mates.

Both halves of this title have meaning in Japanese but I've not yet confirmed that this is a commonly used title in Japan.

Soul Mates

Japan reikon no nakama tachi
Soul Mates

This is a Japanese-only title for soulmates.

The first half means "of the soul" or "spiritual."

The second half means "eminent mates" or "eminent partners."

Five Codes of Tang Soo Do

China guó jiā zhōng chéng fù mǔ xiào dào péng yǒu yǒu xìn shā shēng yǒu zé lín zhàn wú tuì
Five Codes of Tang Soo Do

These are the five codes of Tang Soo Do.

I suggest you have this arranged in five columns when you get to the options page for your custom calligraphy wall scroll.

Here are my translations of each of the five codes:
國家忠誠 Be loyal to your country.
父母孝道 In regards to parents, behave in a filial way.
朋友有信 Be faithful in friendship.
殺生有擇 When fighting for life and death, make noble choices.
臨戰無退 No retreat in battle.

Note: "Tang Soo Do" is a romanization of 唐手道. It's 당수도 in Korean Hangul. It can also be romanized as "Tangsudo" or "Dangsudo."

Acceptance

Japan judaku
Acceptance

受諾 is a simple Japanese word for acceptance. Because it's a general term, it can mean acceptance in a lot of different contexts (acceptance of your friends, family, differences, faults, etc.).

Appreciation of Truth by Meditation

China xīn yìn
Japan shin nin
Appreciation of Truth by Meditation

心印 is a Buddhist concept that simply stated is "appreciation of truth by meditation."

It's a deep subject, but my understanding is that you can find truth through meditation, and once you've found the truth, you can learn to appreciate it more through further meditation. This title is not commonly used outside of the Buddhist community (your Asian friends may or may not understand it). The literal translation would be something like "the mind seal," I've seen this term translated this way from Japanese Buddhist poetry. But apparently, the seal that is stamped deep in your mind is the truth. You just have to meditate to find it.

Soothill defines it this way: Mental impression, intuitive certainty; the mind is the Buddha-mind in all, which can seal or assure the truth; the term indicates the intuitive method of the Chan (Zen) school, which was independent of the spoken or written word.


Reference: Soothill-Hodous Dictionary of Chinese Buddhism


See Also:  Zen

Be Like Water

China xiàng shuǐ yí yàng
Be Like Water

象水一樣 is a short quote from a much longer statement by Bruce Lee.

He was summarizing how people should be flexible to all circumstances, attacks, or situations. At the end, he exclaims, "Be like water my friend." 象水一樣 is the, "Be like water" part alone, since that seems to be what most people want.

Best

China zhì
Japan shi
Best

It's a little strange but this would be the character which means "best" or "extreme" in Chinese and Korean. The problem is, this is seldom used alone. It's mostly used in combination with other characters to make words like "best friend," "best food," and "best love."

We do not recommend this character for a wall scroll. It's better if you find a more specific term that fits your circumstances.

Note: This can be pronounced in Japanese, and has similar meaning but it is rarely if ever used in modern Japanese.

Best Love / Most Sincere Love

China zhì ài
Best Love / Most Sincere Love

This can mean the best love or most sincere love of your life. This could be a romantic love such as the love you have for your spouse or a boyfriend / girlfriend. It can also apply to the extreme love you have for your children or a parent, and maybe a really good friend.


See Also:  I Love You

Best Love / Most Sincere Love

Japan moai
Best Love / Most Sincere Love

This Japanese word means the best love, beloved, or most sincere love of your life. This could be a romantic love such as the love you have for your spouse or a boyfriend / girlfriend. It can also apply to the extreme love you have for your children or a parent, and maybe a really good friend.

Cat / Pussycat

China māo
Japan neko
Cat / Pussycat

猫 / 貓 means cat or pussy. A common name for feline friends in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.


貓There is a more complex alternate form of this cat character. If you want this form, please click on the character at the right, instead of the button above.

Choose Life

China xuǎn zé shēng huó
Choose Life

This can mean to choose life instead of death (or suicide) or to choose to live life to the fullest.

I think of it as the key phrase used by Renton (Ewan McGregor) in the movie Trainspotting. While Chinese people will not think of Trainspotting when they see this phrase, for me, it will always be what comes near the end of this colorful rant:

Choose life. Choose a job. Choose a career. Choose a family. Choose a fucking big television, Choose washing machines, cars, compact disc players, and electrical tin can openers. Choose good health, low cholesterol, and dental insurance. Choose fixed-interest mortgage repayments. Choose a starter home. Choose your friends. Choose leisure wear and matching luggage. Choose a three piece suite on hire purchase in a range of fucking fabrics. Choose DIY and wondering who the fuck you are on a Sunday morning. Choose sitting on that couch watching mind-numbing spirit-crushing game shows, stuffing fucking junk food into your mouth. Choose rotting away at the end of it all, pissing your last in a miserable home, nothing more than an embarrassment to the selfish, fucked-up brats you have spawned to replace yourself. Choose your future. Choose life.

Commitment

China chéng nuò
Japan shoudaku
Commitment

Commitment is caring deeply about something or someone. It is deciding carefully what you want to do, and then giving it 100%, holding nothing back. You give your all to a friendship, a task, or something you believe in. You finish what you start. You keep your promises.

In Chinese, this word directly means to undertake something or to make a promise to do something.

Within the idea of commitment, this word also means to make a big effort, or undertaking a great task. Outside of the commitment idea, this particular word can also mean approval, acceptance, consent, assent, acquiescence, or agreement depending on context (especially in Japanese and Korean). Therefore, this word is probably best if your audience is Chinese.


See Also:  Partnership | Hard Work | Dedication

Compassion

China tóng qíng
Japan dou jou
Compassion

These two characters mean compassion and sympathy in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean, which makes this word universal.

Compassion is caring and understanding someone is hurt or troubled (even if you don't know them). It is wanting to help, even if all you can do is listen and say kind words. You forgive mistakes. You are a friend when someone needs a friend.


See Also:  Love | Caring | Kindness

Forever In My Heart

China yǒng yuǎn zài wǒ xīn zhōng
Forever In My Heart

This means, "forever in my heart" or "always in my heart" in Chinese.

Forever In My Heart

China yǒng yuǎn zài wǒ xīn
Forever In My Heart

This means, "forever in my heart" or "always in my heart" in Chinese.

This is the shorter, somewhat lyrical version of this phrase.

永遠 forever / eternal
在 at / in / exists
我 me / myself / my
心 heart / mind / soul

Forever In My Heart

Japan i tsu ma de mo watashi no kokoro no naka ni
Forever In My Heart

This means, "forever in my heart" or "always in my heart" in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Forever In My Heart

Japan ei en ni watashi no kokoro no naka ni
Forever In My Heart

This means, "forever in my heart" or "always in my heart" in Japanese.

The character breakdown:
永遠 (eien) eternity; perpetuity; immortality; permanence.
に (ni) indicates the location of a person or thing.
私の (watashi no) my; mine.
心の中 (kokoro no naka) the middle of one's mind; the midst of one's heart.
に (ni) indicates the location of a person or thing (makes this "in" the middle of one's heart).


Note: There's more than one way to say "Forever in My Heart" in Japanese, so you'll find another version in our database. This is the very verbose version.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Friendliness

China yǒu hǎo
Japan yuukou
Friendliness

This Chinese/Japanese word can also be defined as "amity," "friendly," and "outgoing."


See Also:  Friendship

Geisha

China yún zhě
Japan geisha
Geisha

芸者 is the real basis for the way we spell geisha.

However, there are many more ways to refer to a woman that fills the role that westerners think of when they hear the word geisha.

In Japanese, these characters literally mean "artful person." But in English, it might be better translated as "a person (woman) highly trained/accomplished in the arts."

However, my Japanese dictionary says "a singing and dancing girl."

Many will argue as to whether "geisha" = "prostitute" or not. My Japanese friends seem to have the opinion that a geisha is so highly trained in the art playing musical instruments and dancing that the fact she might also be a prostitute is secondary to her performance on stage.

芸者 is a "Japanese only" term, they use a slightly different first character to express "geisha" in Chinese. Since this is a Japanese term, I have not included the Chinese version.

Generosity

China kuān dà
Japan kandai
Generosity

Generosity is giving and sharing. You share freely, not with the idea of receiving something in return. You find ways to give others happiness, and give just for the joy of giving. Generosity is one of the best ways to show love and friendship.

寬大 can also be translated as charitable, magnanimity, liberality or in some context broad-mindedness.

Note: There is a tiny deviation in the first character when written in Japanese. If you choose our Japanese master calligrapher, the little dot on the lower right of the first character will be omitted. With or without the dot, this can be read in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.


See Also:  Benevolence | Altruism | Charity

Good Intentions

China hǎo yì
Japan kou i
Good Intentions

好意 is how to write good intentions in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean Hanja.

This can also be translated as: kindness; good will; favor; favour; courtesy; good wishes; friendliness; amity.

Grace

China ēn
Japan on
Grace

恩 is often translated as "kind act from above," as in "The Grace of God." This doesn't necessarily have to come from God. It could be a favor paid to you, or help that you received (or gave). Of course, you can decide for yourself whether the grace or favor given to you by a friend is actually a gift from God.

Other possible translations of this character:
Favor / favour, acts of kindness, merits, beneficial Influence, kindness, indebtedness, obligation, and benevolent influence.

Green Plum and Bamboo Horse

Innocent Children's Games
China qīng méi zhú mǎ
Green Plum and Bamboo Horse

This literally means, "green plums and hobby-horse." Figuratively, it means, "innocent children's games," "childhood sweethearts," or "a couple who grew up as childhood friends."

This phrase may sound a little strange as it's a kind of Chinese proverb or idiom. It makes much more sense in Chinese than English.

Islam

(phonetic version)
China yī sī lán jiào
Islam

This both means and sounds like "Islam" in Mandarin Chinese.

The first three characters sound like the word "Islam," and the last character means "religion" or "teaching." It's the most general term for "Islam" in China. The highest concentration of Muslims in China is Xinjiang (the vast region in northwest China that was called The East Turkistan Republic until 1949 and is sometimes called Chinese Turkistan, Uyghuristan). Here you will find Uygurs, Kazakhs, and Kyrgyz and others that are descendants of Turkmen (possibly mixed with Persians and Arabs). Many of their ancestors were traders who traveled the silk road to buy and sell spices, silk, and exchange other goods from the Orient and the Middle East.

I spent some time in Xinjiang and got to know this community. They are strong people who can endure much. They are friendly and love to have a good time. I was a stranger but treated by villagers (near China's border with Afghanistan) as if I was a good friend.
However, I have heard that it's best not to cross them, as in this land, the law is the blade, and everything is "eye for an eye." The Chinese government has little control in Xinjiang with almost no police officers except in the capital of Urumqi (so it's a 60-hour roundtrip train ride to seek the aid of law enforcement in most cases).

While few seem to be devout, there are at least small mosques in every village. And you will never see a man or woman outside without a head covering.

It should be noted that these people are all citizens of China, but they are officially of the Caucasian race. A visit to Xinjiang will change your idea what it means to be Chinese.

John 14:18

China wǒ bù piě xià nǐ mén wéi gū ér wǒ bì dào nǐ mén zhè lǐ lái
John 14:18

我不撇下你們為孤兒我必到你們這裡來 is the translation of John 14:18 into Chinese.

This comes from the Chinese Union Bible which comes from a revised version of the King James. This Chinese Bible was originally translated and printed in 1919 (several revisions since then).

Because of the origin being the KJV, I'll say that in English, this would be, "I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.."

In basic English, this would be, "I will not let you be without a friend: I am coming to you."

Joshua 24:15

This House Serves the LORD
China zhì yú wǒ hé wǒ jiā wǒ men bì dìng shì fèng yē hé huá
Joshua 24:15

This is Joshua 24:15 in Chinese.

Joshua 24:15 in Chinese

What your
calligraphy
might look like
from our
Chinese Master
Calligrapher

Joshua 24:15 (KJV) And if it seem evil unto you to serve the LORD, choose you this day whom ye will serve; whether the gods which your fathers served that were on the other side of the flood, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land ye dwell: but as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD.

Joshua 24:15 (NIV) But if serving the LORD seems undesirable to you, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your forefathers served beyond the River, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living. But as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD.

These characters here just dwell on the last line of the verse, "...as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD."

We used the only official Christian Chinese Bible that I know of so that the translation would be as accurate and standard as possible. Any Chinese Christian worth their salt will easily be able to identify this verse from the Chinese words on this scroll.

I think it is a bit like having a secret code on your wall that quietly expresses to whom your are faithful.

A great gift for your devout Christian or Jewish friend if they happen to be fond of Asian art.

Or perhaps a wonderful "conversation starter" for your own home.

Note: If you are curious, the last three characters represent they way "LORD" is used in most English Bibles. In Chinese, this is actually the phonetic name in Mandarin Chinese for "Jehovah."

Justice / Rectitude / Right Decision

Also means: honor loyalty morality righteousness
China
Japan gi
Justice / Rectitude / Right Decision

義 is about doing the right thing or making the right decision, not because it's easy but because it's ethically and morally correct.

No matter the outcome or result, one does not lose face if tempering proper justice.

This character can also be defined as righteousness, justice, morality, honor, or "right conduct." In more a more expanded definition, it can mean loyalty to friends, loyalty to the public good, or patriotism. This idea of loyalty and friendship comes from the fact that you will treat those you are loyal to with morality and justice.

This is also one of the five tenets of Confucius doctrine.

儀 There's also an alternate version of this character sometimes seen in Bushido or Korean Taekwondo tenets. It's just the addition of a radical on the left side of the character. If you want this version, click on the image to the right instead of the button above.


This is also a virtue of the Samurai Warrior
See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Judgment | Impartial | Confucius Tenets

Kaili

China kǎi lǐ
Kaili

凱里 is a common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Kaili.

It's also the name of Kaili city in Guizhou province.

I named my first daughter Kaili after visiting Kaili city and finding very friendly people there. I think this is a great English-Chinese baby name, as it is pronounceable in both languages, and the name works as a given name in both languages as well.

Kindness and Forgiving Nature

China rén shù
Japan jinjo
Kindness and Forgiving Nature

These two characters create a word in Chinese and Japanese that means something like benevolence with magnanimity or kindness with a forgiving nature.

If this describes you, then you are the type of person that I would like to call my friend.

This may not be the most common word in daily use but it's old enough that it transcended cultures from China to Japan in the 5th century when Japan lacked a written language, and absorbed Chinese characters and words into their language.
Note: This is not commonly used in Korean.

Kindness / Caring

China qīn qiè
Japan shin setsu
Kindness / Caring

Kindness is showing you care, doing some good to make life better for others. Be thoughtful about people's needs. Show love and compassion to someone who is sad or needs your help. When you are tempted to be cruel, to criticize or tease, decide to be kind instead.

This Chinese / Japanese / Korean word can also mean affectionate, cordial, warmly, or close (emotionally).


See Also:  Love | Caring | Benevolence

Love

China ài
Japan ai
Love

愛 is a very universal character. It means love in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, old Korean Hanja, and old Vietnamese.

愛 is one of the most recognized Asian symbols in the west, and is often seen on tee-shirts, coffee mugs, tattoos, and more.

愛 can also be defined as affection, to be fond of, to like, or to be keen on. It often refers to romantic love, and is found in phrases like, "I love you." But in Chinese, one can say, "I love that movie" using this character as well.

This can also be a pet-name or part of a pet-name in the way we say "dear" or "honey" in English.


It's very common for couples to say "I love you" in Chinese. However, in Japanese, "love" is not a term used very often. In fact, a person is more likely to say "I like you" rather than "I love you" in Japanese. So this word is well-known but seldom spoken.


More about this character:

This may be hard to imagine as a westerner but the strokes at the top of this love character symbolize family & marriage.

心The symbol in the middle is a little easier to identify. It is the character for "heart" (it can also mean "mind" or "soul"). I guess you can say that no matter if you are from the East or the West, you must put your heart into your love.

友The strokes at the bottom create a modified character that means "friend" or "friendship."

I suppose you could say that the full meaning of this love character is to love your family, spouse, and friends with all of your heart, since all three elements exist in this character.


See Also:  I Love You | Caring | Benevolence | Friendliness | Double Happiness Happy Marriage Wall Scroll

Love and Honor

China qíng yì
Love and Honor

This means to love and honor in Chinese. This is more or less the kind of thing you'd find in marriage vows.

The first character suggests emotions, passion, heart, humanity, sympathy, and feelings.

In this context, the second character means to honor your lover's wishes, and treat them justly and righteously (fairly). That second character can also be translated as "obligation," as in the obligation a husband and wife have to love each other even through difficult times.

In the context outside of a couple's relationship, this word can mean "comradeship."

Japanese may see this more as "humanity and justice" than "love and honor." It's probably best if your target is Chinese.


This is the short and sweet form, there is also a longer poetic form (you can find it here: Love and Honor if it's not on the page you are currently viewing).


See Also:  Love and Honor

Loyalty

China zhōng chéng
Japan chuu sei
Loyalty

Loyalty is staying true to someone. It is standing up for something you believe in without wavering. It is being faithful to your family, country, school, friends or ideals, when the going gets tough as well as when things are good. With loyalty, you build relationships that last forever.

Notes:
1. This written form of loyalty is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

2. There is also a Japanese version that is part of the Bushido Code which may be more desirable depending on whether your intended audience is Japanese or Chinese.

3. This version of loyalty is sometimes translated as devotion, sincerity, fidelity, or allegiance.


See Also:  Honor | Trust | Integrity | Sincerity

Loyalty / Devotion

China zhōng yì
Japan chuu gi
Loyalty / Devotion

忠義 is another form of loyalty or devotion.

In Chinese, this is more specifically about being loyal and devoted to your friends.

In Japanese, this is more often used to mean loyalty to your country or nation.

Except for the slight difference noted above between Japanese and Chinese, this word is understood universally in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. It can also be used to describe devotion or fidelity.

It should be noted that this Kanji combination is being used less and less in modern Japan (this is a better choice if your audience is Chinese, though any Japanese person will clearly understand it).

Mother and Daughter

China mǔ nǚ
Mother and Daughter

This simply means "mother and daughter" kind of as a unit, or as if mother and daughter are a whole together.

This is an unusual selection for a calligraphy wall scroll, and can be read many different ways. Your native Asian friends might wonder what you are trying to say. They might even read it as meaning "a mother and daughter without a dad."

This entry was added to our database for a customer's special request. It has the same meaning in Chinese Characters and Korean Hanja.


See Also:  Mother and Son

Mother and Daughter

Japan haha musume
Mother and Daughter

This simply means "mother and daughter" in Japanese Kanji.

This is an unusual selection for a calligraphy wall scroll, and can be read many different ways. Your native Japanese friends might wonder what you are trying to say.


Note: This will not make sense in Chinese.


See Also:  Mother and Son

Never Give Up

China yǒng bù fàng qì
Never Give Up

The first character means "eternal" or "forever," the second means "not" (together they mean "never"). The last two characters mean "give up" or "abandon." Altogether, you can translate this proverb as "never give up" or "never abandon."

Depending on how you want to read this, it is also a statement that you will never abandon your hopes, dreams, family or friends.


See Also:  Undaunted | No Fear | Hope

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

No Fear

(four-character version)
China yǒng zhě wú wèi
No Fear

勇者無畏 is a complete sentence that means literally "Brave People Have No Fear" or "A Brave Person Has No Fear" (plural or singular is not implied). We translated "No Fear" into the two variations that you will find on our website. Then we checked Chinese Google and found that others had translated "No Fear" in the exact same ways. Pick the one you like best. A great gift for your fearless friend.


See Also:  Fear No Man

No Worries

China fàng xīn
Japan houshin
No Worries

My Australian friends always say "No worries mate." It's caught on with me, though I drop the "mate" part since it confuses my fellow Americans.

If you would like to express the idea of "no worries" this is the best and most natural way to say it in Chinese.

The characters you see to the left can be translated as "put your mind at rest" or "to be at ease." You could literally translate "no worries" but it doesn't "flow" like this simple Chinese version.

For your info, the first character means to release, to free, to let go, to relax, or to rest. The second character means your heart or your mind.

Note that in Japanese and Korean, this holds the similar meaning of "peace of mind" but can also mean absentmindedness or carelessness depending on context.

An Open Book Benefits Your Mind

China kāi juàn yǒu yì
An Open Book Benefits Your Mind

There are several ways to translate this ancient proverb. Translated literally and directly it says, "Open roll has/yields benefit."

To understand that, you must know a few things...

First, Chinese characters and language have deeper meanings that often are not spoken but are understood - especially with ancient text like this. Example: It's understood that the "benefit" referred to in this proverb is to the mind of the reader. Just the last character expresses that whole idea.

Second, Chinese proverbs are supposed to make you think, and leave a bit of mystery to figure out.

Third, for this proverb, it should be noted that roll = book. When this proverb came about (about two thousand years ago) books were really rolls of bamboo slips strung together. The first bound books like the ones we use today did not come about until about a thousand years after this proverb when they invented paper in China.

This is a great gift for a bookworm who loves to read and increase their knowledge. Or for any friend that is or wants to be well-read.

Some other translations of this phrase:
Opening a book is profitable
The benefits of education.

Osu / Affirmative

Japan ossu / osu
Osu / Affirmative

押忍 is a Japanese verbal interjection. In martial arts, it's used like "yes sir!" or "affirmative!."

This can also be a greeting between close male friends. It can be romanized as "ossu" or "osu" (おっすor おす), though many English speakers think it's "oss."

Outstanding

China chū lèi bá cuì
Outstanding

出類拔萃 means "one who stands out from his/her peers," "stand out from the crowd," or "standing out from others." It can also mean, "leaving your peers behind."

A great way to tell yourself that you are outstanding (or give it to a friend that you want to encourage to excel).

Partnership: Marriage

China bàn lǚ
Japan hanryo
Partnership: Marriage

伴侶 is the kind of partnership in which a good marriage is founded. This Chinese word could also be translated as mates or companionship. 伴侶 can also be used as a noun to refer to a partner or companion.

This does not have to include a marriage but at least refers to a partnership with a deep relationship or bond.


Note that this is not the same as a business partner. Different words are used for various types business partnerships (post your request on our Asian calligraphy forum if you need something in that regard).


See Also:  Friendship

Peace / Harmony

China
Japan wa
Peace / Harmony

和 is the simplest form of peace and harmony.

和 can also be translated as the peaceful ideas of gentle, mild, kind, and calm. With the more harmonious context, it can be translated as union, together with, on good terms with, or on friendly terms.

Most people would just translate this character as peace and/or harmony. This is a very popular character in Asian cultures - you can even call it the "peace symbol" of Asia. In fact, this peace and harmony character was seen repeatedly during the opening ceremony of the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing (a major theme of the games).


In old Chinese poems and literature, you might see this used as a kind of "and." As in two things summed together. As much as you could say, "the sun and moon," you could say "the sun in harmony with the moon."


See Also:  Inner Peace | Patience | Simplicity

Homosexual / Gay

China tóng xìng liàn
Homosexual / Gay

A great way to tell your Chinese friends about your lifestyle, while keeping your Anglo friends in the dark.

Kind of a huge bold sign to say "I'm Gay" without anybody knowing.

同性戀 literally mean "same sex feeling" or "same sex affection" in Chinese.

Homosexual / Gay

China tóng xìng ài
Japan douseiai
Homosexual / Gay

A great way to tell your Japanese friends about your lifestyle, while keeping your Anglo friends in the dark.

Kind of a huge bold sign to say "I'm Gay" without anybody knowing.

These Kanji characters literally mean "same sex love." This phrase would also be understood in Chinese but this combination would act to really emphasize the "love" component to a native Chinese person.

Homosexual Male / Gay Male

China nán tóng xìng liàn
Homosexual Male / Gay Male

You just need the male character in front of the word for homosexual in Chinese to create this word.

It's a much nicer way to say "Gay Male" than English words like Fag, Fairy, Sissy, Puff, Poof, Poofster, Swish or Pansy. Although I suppose it could be used as a substitute for Nancy Boy or Queen (for which last time I checked, my gay friends said were OK in the right context).

For those of you who think China is a restrictive society - there are at least two gay discos in Beijing, the capital of China. It's at least somewhat socially acceptable to be a gay male in China. However, lesbians seem to be shunned a bit.

I think the Chinese government has realized that the 60% male population means not everybody is going to find a wife (every gay male couple that exists means two more women in the population are available for the straight guys), and the fact that it is biologically impossible for men to give birth, may be seen as helping to decrease the over-population in China.

The Red String

Thread of Lover's Destiny / Fate
Japan akai ito
The Red String

This literally translates as, "the red string" in Japanese but the real meaning is much deeper...

In Japanese culture, it's believed that fate, destiny, or karma joins lovers by an unseen string, tied around one little finger of each. This is how soul mates fine and are drawn to each other.

Tibet

China xī zàng
Tibet

西藏 is the Chinese name for the Tibet autonomous region. It is a vast area in southwest China for which the Chinese government has little control (except in the capital of Llasa). During your travels in Tibet (outside of Llasa) you will find it's rough country full of ruthless bandits and honorable and upright Living Buddhas. There are about 2000 Living Buddhas in Tibet, and at least 10 times more bandits ready to ambush you on the road or trail.

On the eastern frontier of Tibet, you will find the place designated to be Shangri-la. It's a friendly village of Tibetans and is the gateway to greater Tibet.


See Also:  China | Nepal | Asia

Together Forever

China yǒng yuǎn zài yī qǐ
Together Forever

永遠在一起 is "together forever" in Chinese.

永遠在一起 is a great idea for couples making a commitment of a lifetime.

Together Forever

Japan zutto issho
Together Forever

ずっと一緒 is "together forever" in Japanese.

The first three characters mean "continuously," "throughout," "all along," "the whole time," or "all the way."

The last two Kanji mean "together."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Together Forever in Love

China yǒng yuǎn ài zài yī qǐ
Together Forever in Love

This is "together forever in love" in Chinese.

It's a nice phrase if you're a couple who plans to stay together and make your love last as long as you live.

True Victory is Victory Over Oneself

Japan masa katsu a gatsu
True Victory is Victory Over Oneself

This proverb is often translated as, "True victory is victory over oneself."

However, literally, Kanji by Kanji, it means, "True victory [is] my/self victory."

My Japanese friends rate this very highly for a wall scroll.


See Also:  Know Thy Enemy Know Thyself

Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

China dà gōng wú sī
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

This Chinese proverb comes from an old story from some time before 476 BC. About a man named Qi Huangyang, who was commissioned by the king to select the best person for a certain job in the Imperial Court.

Qi Huangyang selected his enemy for the job. The king was very confused by the selection but Qi Huangyang explained that he was asked to find the best person for the job, not necessarily someone that he personally liked or had a friendship with.

Later, Confucius commented on how unselfish and impartial Qi Huangyang was by saying "Da Gong Wu Si" which if you look it up in a Chinese dictionary, is generally translated as "Unselfish" or "Just and Fair."

If you translate each character, you'd have something like,

"Big/Deep Justice Without Self."

Direct translations like this leave out a lot of what the Chinese characters really say. Use your imagination, and suddenly you realize that "without self" means "without thinking about yourself in the decision" - together, these two words mean "unselfish." The first two characters serve to really drive the point home that we are talking about a concept that is similar to "blind justice."

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries translates this simply as "just and fair." So that is the short and simple version.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common Good | Altruism

Yujin

China yǒu rén
Japan yuuto / yuujin / tomohito
Yujin

友人 is a less-common way to write "friend" in Chinese and Japanese.

友人 is also a given name Yuujin or Yujin, or another romanization for the given name Tomohito.

Dog

Year of the Dog / Zodiac Sign
China gǒu
Japan inu / ku
Dog

狗 is the character for dog, canine or hound in Chinese.

If you were born in the year of the dog, you . . .


Are strong-willed
Loyal to your friends and mate.
Never compromise when you think you are right.

Note: Can be pronounced, and means dog in Japanese but feels like a very old word (see our other dog if you need a Japanese dog).


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Search for in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Friend
Friendship
tomoyǒu / you3 / you yu
Friend
Friendship
tomopéng / peng2 / peng p`eng / peng
Most Sincere Friend
Honest Friend
Real Friend
Best Friend
摯友
挚友
zhì yǒu / zhi4 you3 / zhi you / zhiyou chih yu / chihyu
Sworn Friend
Ally
盟友meiyuu / meiyuméng yǒu / meng2 you3 / meng you / mengyou meng yu / mengyu
Best Friends
Closest Friend
至友zhì yǒu / zhi4 you3 / zhi you / zhiyou chih yu / chihyu
Christian Friend 教友jiào yǒu / jiao4 you3 / jiao you / jiaoyou chiao yu / chiaoyu
Friend 友達
友达
tomo dachi / tomodachi
True Friend 夠朋友
够朋友
gòu péng you
gou4 peng2 you5
gou peng you
goupengyou
kou p`eng yu
koupengyu
kou peng yu
True Friend 真の友shinnotomo
Best Friends 至交zhì jiāo / zhi4 jiao1 / zhi jiao / zhijiao chih chiao / chihchiao
Extremely Good Friends 莫逆の友bakugyakunotomo
Family and Friends 親朋好友
亲朋好友
qīn péng hǎo yǒu
qin1 peng2 hao3 you3
qin peng hao you
qinpenghaoyou
ch`in p`eng hao yu
chinpenghaoyu
chin peng hao yu
Family and Friends 家族や友人kazoku ya yuujin
kazokuyayuujin
kazoku ya yujin
kazokuyayujin
Best Friends
Buddies
親友
亲友
shin yuu / shinyuu / shin yu / shinyuqīn yǒu / qin1 you3 / qin you / qinyou ch`in yu / chinyu / chin yu
Eternal Friendship
Friends Forever
永遠の友ei en no yuu
eiennoyuu
ei en no yu
eiennoyu
Eternal Friendship
Friends Forever
永遠的朋友
永远的朋友
yǒng yuǎn de péng yǒu
yong3 yuan3 de peng2 you3
yong yuan de peng you
yongyuandepengyou
yung yüan te p`eng yu
yungyüantepengyu
yung yüan te peng yu
Soul Mates 魂の友tamashii no tomo
tamashiinotomo
tamashi no tomo
tamashinotomo
Friendship 友誼
友谊
yuugi / yugiyǒu yì / you3 yi4 / you yi / youyi yu i / yui
Friendship 友情yuujou / yujoyǒu qíng / you3 qing2 / you qing / youqing yu ch`ing / yuching / yu ching
Soul Mates 天生一對
天生一对
tiān shēng yí duì
tian1 sheng1 yi2 dui4
tian sheng yi dui
tianshengyidui
t`ien sheng i tui
tienshengitui
tien sheng i tui
Soul Mates 靈魂伴侶
灵魂伴侣
reikon hanryo
reikonhanryo
líng hún bàn lǚ
ling2 hun2 ban4 lv3
ling hun ban lv
linghunbanlv
ling hun pan lü
linghunpanlü
Spiritual Soul Mates 精神伴侶
精神伴侣
sei shin han ryo
seishinhanryo
jīng shén bàn lǚ
jing1 shen2 ban4 lv3
jing shen ban lv
jingshenbanlv
ching shen pan lü
chingshenpanlü
Soul Mates 霊魂の仲間達reikon no nakama tachi
reikonnonakamatachi
Five Codes of Tang Soo Do 國家忠誠父母孝道朋友有信殺生有擇臨戰無退
国家忠诚父母孝道朋友有信杀生有择临战无退
guó jiā zhōng chéng fù mǔ xiào dào péng yǒu yǒu xìn shā shēng yǒu zé lín zhàn wú tuì
guo2 jia1 zhong1 cheng2 fu4 mu3 xiao4 dao4 peng2 you3 you3 xin4 sha1 sheng1 you3 ze2 lin2 zhan4 wu2 tui4
guo jia zhong cheng fu mu xiao dao peng you you xin sha sheng you ze lin zhan wu tui
kuo chia chung ch`eng fu mu hsiao tao p`eng yu yu hsin sha sheng yu tse lin chan wu t`ui
kuo chia chung cheng fu mu hsiao tao peng yu yu hsin sha sheng yu tse lin chan wu tui
Acceptance 受諾judaku
Appreciation of Truth by Meditation 心印shin nin / shinninxīn yìn / xin1 yin4 / xin yin / xinyin hsin yin / hsinyin
Be Like Water 象水一樣
象水一样
xiàng shuǐ yí yàng
xiang4 shui3 yi2 yang4
xiang shui yi yang
xiangshuiyiyang
hsiang shui i yang
hsiangshuiiyang
Best shizhì / zhi4 / zhi chih
Best Love
Most Sincere Love
至愛
至爱
zhì ài / zhi4 ai4 / zhi ai / zhiai chih ai / chihai
Best Love
Most Sincere Love
最愛moai
Cat
Pussycat
猫 / 貓
nekomāo / mao1 / mao
Choose Life 選擇生活
选择生活
xuǎn zé shēng huó
xuan3 ze2 sheng1 huo2
xuan ze sheng huo
xuanzeshenghuo
hsüan tse sheng huo
hsüantseshenghuo
Commitment 承諾
承诺
shoudaku / shodakuchéng nuò
cheng2 nuo4
cheng nuo
chengnuo
ch`eng no
chengno
cheng no
Compassion 同情dou jou / doujou / do jo / dojotóng qíng
tong2 qing2
tong qing
tongqing
t`ung ch`ing
tungching
tung ching
Forever In My Heart 永遠在我心中
永远在我心中
yǒng yuǎn zài wǒ xīn zhōng
yong3 yuan3 zai4 wo3 xin1 zhong1
yong yuan zai wo xin zhong
yongyuanzaiwoxinzhong
yung yüan tsai wo hsin chung
yungyüantsaiwohsinchung
Forever In My Heart 永遠在我心
永远在我心
yǒng yuǎn zài wǒ xīn
yong3 yuan3 zai4 wo3 xin1
yong yuan zai wo xin
yongyuanzaiwoxin
yung yüan tsai wo hsin
yungyüantsaiwohsin
Forever In My Heart いつまでも私の心の中に i tsu ma de mo watashi no kokoro no naka ni
Forever In My Heart 永遠に私の心の中にei en ni watashi no kokoro no naka ni
Friendliness 友好yuukou / yukoyǒu hǎo / you3 hao3 / you hao / youhao yu hao / yuhao
Geisha 芸者geishayún zhě / yun2 zhe3 / yun zhe / yunzhe yün che / yünche
Generosity 寬大
宽大
kandaikuān dà / kuan1 da4 / kuan da / kuanda k`uan ta / kuanta / kuan ta
Good Intentions 好意kou i / koui / ko i / koihǎo yì / hao3 yi4 / hao yi / haoyi hao i / haoi
Grace onēn / en1 / en
Green Plum and Bamboo Horse 青梅竹馬
青梅竹马
qīng méi zhú mǎ
qing1 mei2 zhu2 ma3
qing mei zhu ma
qingmeizhuma
ch`ing mei chu ma
chingmeichuma
ching mei chu ma
Islam 伊斯蘭教
伊斯兰教
yī sī lán jiào
yi1 si1 lan2 jiao4
yi si lan jiao
yisilanjiao
i ssu lan chiao
issulanchiao
John 14:18 我不撇下你們為孤兒我必到你們這里來
我不撇下你们为孤儿我必到你们这里来
wǒ bù piě xià nǐ mén wéi gū ér wǒ bì dào nǐ mén zhè lǐ lái
wo3 bu4 pie3 xia4 ni3 men2 wei2 gu1 er2 wo3 bi4 dao4 ni3 men2 zhe4 li3 lai2
wo bu pie xia ni men wei gu er wo bi dao ni men zhe li lai
wo pu p`ieh hsia ni men wei ku erh wo pi tao ni men che li lai
wo pu pieh hsia ni men wei ku erh wo pi tao ni men che li lai
Joshua 24:15 至於我和我家我們必定事奉耶和華
至于我和我家我们必定事奉耶和华
zhì yú wǒ hé wǒ jiā wǒ men bì dìng shì fèng yē hé huá
zhi4 yu2 wo3 he2 wo3 jia1 wo3 men bi4 ding4 shi4 feng4 ye1 he2 hua2
zhi yu wo he wo jia wo men bi ding shi feng ye he hua
chih yü wo ho wo chia wo men pi ting shih feng yeh ho hua
Justice
Rectitude
Right Decision

giyì / yi4 / yi i
Kaili 凱里
凯里
kǎi lǐ / kai3 li3 / kai li / kaili k`ai li / kaili / kai li
Kindness and Forgiving Nature 仁恕jinjorén shù / ren2 shu4 / ren shu / renshu jen shu / jenshu
Kindness
Caring
親切
亲切
shin setsu / shinsetsuqīn qiè / qin1 qie4 / qin qie / qinqie ch`in ch`ieh / chinchieh / chin chieh
Love
aiài / ai4 / ai
Love and Honor 情義
情义
qíng yì / qing2 yi4 / qing yi / qingyi ch`ing i / chingi / ching i
Loyalty 忠誠
忠诚
chuu sei / chuusei / chu sei / chuseizhōng chéng
zhong1 cheng2
zhong cheng
zhongcheng
chung ch`eng
chungcheng
chung cheng
Loyalty
Devotion
忠義
忠义
chuu gi / chuugi / chu gi / chugizhōng yì / zhong1 yi4 / zhong yi / zhongyi chung i / chungi
Mother and Daughter 母女mǔ nǚ / mu3 nv3 / mu nv / munv mu nü / munü
Mother and Daughter 母娘haha musume
hahamusume
Never Give Up 永不放棄
永不放弃
yǒng bù fàng qì
yong3 bu4 fang4 qi4
yong bu fang qi
yongbufangqi
yung pu fang ch`i
yungpufangchi
yung pu fang chi
Better Late Than Never 亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
No Fear 勇者無畏
勇者无畏
yǒng zhě wú wèi
yong3 zhe3 wu2 wei4
yong zhe wu wei
yongzhewuwei
yung che wu wei
yungchewuwei
No Worries 放心houshin / hoshinfàng xīn / fang4 xin1 / fang xin / fangxin fang hsin / fanghsin
An Open Book Benefits Your Mind 開卷有益
开卷有益
kāi juàn yǒu yì
kai1 juan4 you3 yi4
kai juan you yi
kaijuanyouyi
k`ai chüan yu i
kaichüanyui
kai chüan yu i
Osu
Affirmative
押忍ossu / osu / osu / osu / osu/osu
Outstanding 出類拔萃
出类拔萃
chū lèi bá cuì
chu1 lei4 ba2 cui4
chu lei ba cui
chuleibacui
ch`u lei pa ts`ui
chuleipatsui
chu lei pa tsui
Partnership: Marriage 伴侶
伴侣
hanryobàn lǚ / ban4 lv3 / ban lv / banlv pan lü / panlü
Peace
Harmony
wahé / he2 / he ho
Homosexual
Gay
同性戀
同性恋
tóng xìng liàn
tong2 xing4 lian4
tong xing lian
tongxinglian
t`ung hsing lien
tunghsinglien
tung hsing lien
Homosexual
Gay
同性愛
同性爱
douseiai / doseiaitóng xìng ài
tong2 xing4 ai4
tong xing ai
tongxingai
t`ung hsing ai
tunghsingai
tung hsing ai
Homosexual Male
Gay Male
男同性戀
男同性恋
nán tóng xìng liàn
nan2 tong2 xing4 lian4
nan tong xing lian
nantongxinglian
nan t`ung hsing lien
nantunghsinglien
nan tung hsing lien
The Red String 赤い糸akai ito / akaiito
Tibet 西藏xī zàng / xi1 zang4 / xi zang / xizang hsi tsang / hsitsang
Together Forever 永遠在一起
永远在一起
yǒng yuǎn zài yī qǐ
yong3 yuan3 zai4 yi1 qi3
yong yuan zai yi qi
yongyuanzaiyiqi
yung yüan tsai i ch`i
yungyüantsaiichi
yung yüan tsai i chi
Together Forever ずっと一緒zutto issho
zuttoissho
zutto isho
zuttoisho
Together Forever in Love 永遠愛在一起
永远爱在一起
yǒng yuǎn ài zài yī qǐ
yong3 yuan3 ai4 zai4 yi1 qi3
yong yuan ai zai yi qi
yongyuanaizaiyiqi
yung yüan ai tsai i ch`i
yungyüanaitsaiichi
yung yüan ai tsai i chi
True Victory is Victory Over Oneself 正勝吾勝
正胜吾胜
masa katsu a gatsu
masakatsuagatsu
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial 大公無私
大公无私
dà gōng wú sī
da4 gong1 wu2 si1
da gong wu si
dagongwusi
ta kung wu ssu
takungwussu
Yujin 友人yuuto / yuujin / tomohito
yuto / yujin / tomohito
yuto/yujin/tomohito
yǒu rén / you3 ren2 / you ren / youren yu jen / yujen
Dog inu / kugǒu / gou3 / gou kou
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.