silk painting-any comments?

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sosum
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silk painting-any comments?

Post by sosum » Sep 19, 2010 12:32 am

i want to know about the popularity, or lack of, of using silk, i mean painting silk in Chinese paintings. in all the years i exhibited with the Chinese Art Association of Houston and talked with artists they all use rice paper. my own teacher tried to talk me out of painting on silk. he saId that silk was too expensive and tended to deteriorate over the years.. anyone out there want to comment? i also began to realize that western painters do not recognize that the silk i am talking about is a painting silk and not the same silk fabric we use here in the states and in europe for clothing. i am always having to explain my technique for this kind of painting because the public think i m trying to do watercolor on a slick silk fabric.. also i would like comments on artists using SONG-JIN, or gold leaf rice paper. this is also another very interesting medium for Chinese painting...
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Gary
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Post by Gary » Sep 19, 2010 1:34 pm

I've found that the key problem with silk is that when framing, it is very difficult to get it to stay completely flat.

For western customers, there is often a low tolerance for wrinkles in framed artwork. Unfortunately, the Chinese silk materials used for paintings tend to expand and contract at varying rates with humidity and temperature. This causes the wrinkles.

The only solution is to "dry mount" the artwork. However, many framers are afraid to do this process with silk.

In the past, I've tried to sell such paintings on silk with limited success. For me, I found it very hard to photograph it properly and realistically. The sheen from the silk often competes with the colors in the painting. Plus, it's hard to get the silk to lay flat and not look like a wrinkled mess.

In real life, the colors are great, and are deeper than watercolor on xuan paper. The paint certainly penetrates and is held in place by the silk differently than xuan paper.

-Gary.

sosum
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REPLY TO REPLY ON SILK PAINTING

Post by sosum » Sep 19, 2010 2:08 pm

THANKS FOR THE REPLY AND SUGGESTIONS. I DO MOUNT MOST OF MY OWN WORK AND I TRULY BELIEVE THAT MOST WESTERNERS ARE FRIGHTENED OF THE SILK. THEY JUST DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT BEGINS WITH THE ACTUAL HANDLING OF THE PIECE BECAUSE THEY DON'T KNOW IF THE SILK WILL TEAR OR BLEED AND THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA HOW TO FRAME IT.. I WILL CONTINUE TO WORK WITH SILK AND PERHAPS I CAN REACH THE WESTERN PUBLIC AND TEACH THEM ABOUT THE BEAUTY OF THIS ANCIENT ART...IF YOU COULD SEE ME EMBROIDERING ON THIS PAINTING SILK.. NOW, THAT'S A CHALLENGE.....................

sosum
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Posts: 20
Joined: Mar 30, 2010 12:36 am

Post by sosum » May 11, 2011 6:06 am

joseph, hi. i myself have not seen this rise on silk painting although my silk supplier says it true. i must say this. when you speak of painting on silk, i doubt some of this silk is paiinting silk, which is not the same as the fabric silk we wear, like scarves for instance. read the above posts for more information. and yes, a particular type of watercolor is used.

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