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Mandarin Mandarin Chinese information.
Wade Giles Old Wade-Giles romanization used only in Taiwan.
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Buddhist definition. Note: May not apply to all sects.
 Definition may be different outside of Buddhism.

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If shown, 2nd row of characters is Simplified Chinese.

Characters Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition

see styles
Japanese tai / たい
 Vertical Wall Scroll
Japanese (n,n-suf) (1) body; physique; posture; (2) shape; form; style; (3) substance; identity; reality; (4) {math} field; (counter) (5) counter for humanoid forms (e.g. dolls, statues, corpses, etc.); (n,n-suf) (6) typeface; type


see styles
Mandarin shí / shi2
Taiwan shih
Japanese minoru / みのる    makoto / まこと    hiroshi / ひろし    jitsu / じつ    sanesaki / さねさき    sane / さね
Chinese real; true; honest; really; solid; fruit; seed; definitely
Japanese (s,m) Minoru; (personal name) Makoto; (personal name) Hiroshi; (surname) Jitsu; (surname) Sane
Real, true, honest, sincere; solid; fixed; full; to fill; fruit, kernel, effects; verily, in fact; it is used for 眞, as in 一實 the supreme fact, or ultimate reality; also for bhūta.

see styles
Mandarin zhēn / zhen1
Taiwan chen
Japanese ma / ま    shin / しん
 Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese really; truly; indeed; real; true; genuine
Japanese (prefix) (1) (See 真上・まうえ) just; right; due (east); (2) (See 真っ白・まっしろ・1) pure; genuine; true; (3) (See 真に受ける) truth; (adj-na,n,adj-no) (1) truth; reality; genuineness; (2) seriousness; (3) logical TRUE; (4) (See 楷書) printed style writing; (5) (abbreviation) (See 真打ち) star performer; (surname) Mayanagi; (personal name) Mami; (female given name) Mana; (personal name) Masumi; (personal name) Mashio; (personal name) Masatsugu; (personal name) Masashi; (personal name) Masa; (female given name) Makoto; (female given name) Mako; (surname) Magasaki; (female given name) Mao; (given name) Tadashi; (personal name) Shinji; (surname) Shinzaki; (surname) Shinsaki; (surname, female given name) Shin; (surname) Sanesaki; (surname, female given name) Sana

see styles
Mandarin kōng / kong1
Taiwan k`ung / kung
Japanese kuu / ku / くう    kara / から
Chinese to empty; vacant; unoccupied; space; leisure; free time; empty; air; sky; in vain
Japanese (1) empty air; sky; (2) {Buddh} shunyata; emptiness; the lack of an immutable intrinsic nature within any phenomenon; (3) (abbreviation) (See 空軍) air force; (noun or adjectival noun) (4) fruitlessness; meaninglessness; (5) (See 五大・1) void (one of the five elements); (can be adjective with の) (6) {math} empty (e.g. set); (noun - becomes adjective with の) emptiness; vacuum; blank; (female given name) Ron; (personal name) Hiroshi; (female given name) Hikari; (female given name) Haruka; (female given name) Noa; (surname) Sorasaki; (female given name) Sora; (female given name) Sukai; (female given name) Shieru; (personal name) Kuukai; (surname, female given name) Kuu; (female given name) Kanata; (female given name) Kasumi; (female given name) Urue; (surname, female given name) Aki; (female given name) Aoi
śūnya, empty, void, hollow, vacant, nonexistent. śūnyatā, 舜若多, vacuity, voidness, emptiness, non-existence, immateriality, perhaps spirituality, unreality, the false or illusory nature of all existence, the seeming 假 being unreal. The doctrine that all phenomena and the ego have no reality, but are composed of a certain number of skandhas or elements, which disintegrate. The void, the sky, space. The universal, the absolute, complete abstraction without relativity. There are classifications into 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 11, 13, 16, and 18 categories. The doctrine is that all things are compounds, or unstable organisms, possessing no self-essence, i.e. are dependent, or caused, come into existence only to perish. The underlying reality, the principle of eternal relativity, or non-infinity, i.e. śūnya, permeates all phenomena making possible their evolution. From this doctrine the Yogācārya school developed the idea of the permanent reality, which is Essence of Mind, the unknowable noumenon behind all phenomena, the entity void of ideas and phenomena, neither matter nor mind, but the root of both.


see styles
Mandarin chéng / cheng2
Taiwan ch`eng / cheng
Japanese masakatsu / まさかつ    masa / まさ    makoto / まこと    mako / まこ    makato / まかと    nobu / のぶ    tadashi / ただし    takashi / たかし    son / そん    seiji / seji / せいじ    sei / se / せい    sumito / すみと    sumitaka / すみたか    akira / あきら
Chinese honest; sincere; true
Japanese (adv,n) (1) truth; reality; (2) sincerity; honesty; integrity; fidelity; (3) (archaism) that's right (used when recalling forgotten information, suddenly changing the subject, etc.); (personal name) Masakatsu; (personal name) Masa; (surname, female given name) Makoto; (female given name) Mako; (given name) Makato; (given name) Nobu; (given name) Tadashi; (given name) Takashi; (given name) Son; (personal name) Seiji; (given name) Sei; (personal name) Sumito; (personal name) Sumitaka; (given name) Akira
Truthful, true, truth; real; sincere, sincerity.; See under Fourteen Strokes.

三諦


三谛

see styles
Mandarin sān dì / san1 di4
Taiwan san ti
Japanese santai;sandai / さんたい;さんだい
Japanese {Buddh} (in Tendai) threefold truth (all things are void; all things are temporary; all things are in the middle state between these two)
The three dogmas. The "middle" school of Tiantai says 卽空, 卽假. 卽中 i.e. 就是空, 假, 中; (a) by 空śūnya is meant that things causally produced are intheir essential nature unreal (or immaterial) 實空無; (b) 假, though thingsare unreal in their essential nature their derived forms are real; (c) 中;but both are one, being of the one 如 reality. These three dogmas arefounded on a verse of Nāgārjuna's— 因緣所生法, 我說卽是空 亦爲是假名, 亦是中道義 "All causally produced phenomena, I say, areunreal, Are but a passing name, and indicate the 'mean'." There are otherexplanations— the 圓教 interprets the 空 and 假 as 中; the 別教 makes 中 independent. 空 is the all, i.e. the totality of all things, and is spokenof as the 眞 or 實 true, or real; 假 is the differentiation of all thingsand is spoken of as 俗 common, i.e. things as commonly named; 中 is theconnecting idea which makes a unity of both, e.g. "all are but parts of onestupendous whole." The 中 makes all and the all into one whole, unifying thewhole and its parts. 空 may be taken as the immaterial, the undifferentiatedall, the sum of existences, by some as the tathāgatagarbha 如來藏; 假as theunreal, or impermanent, the material or transient form, the temporal thatcan be named, the relative or discrete; 中 as the unifier, which places eachin the other and all in all. The "shallower" 山外 school associated 空 and 中 with the noumenal universe as opposed to the phenomenal and illusoryexistence represented by 假. The "profounder" 山内 school teaches that allthree are aspects of the same; threefold truth

中道

see styles
Mandarin zhōng dào / zhong1 dao4
Taiwan chung tao
Japanese nakamichi / なかみち    chuudou / chudo / ちゅうどう
 Vertical Wall Scroll
Japanese road through the middle; middle road; (noun - becomes adjective with の) (1) middle of the road; moderation; golden mean; (2) the middle (of what one is doing); half-way; (3) {Buddh} middle way; middle path; (place-name, surname) Nakamichi; (place-name, surname) Nakadou; (surname) Chuudou
The 'mean' has various interpretations. In general it denotes the mean between two extremes, and has special reference to the mean between realism and nihilism, or eternal substantial existence and annihilation; this 'mean' is found in a third principle between the two, suggesting the idea of a realm of mind or spirit beyond the terminology of 有 or 無, substance or nothing, or, that which has form, and is therefore measurable and ponderable, and its opposite of total non-existence. See 中論. The following four Schools define the term according to their several scriptures: the 法相 School describes it as the 唯識, v. 唯識中道; the 三論 School as the 八不 eight negations, v. 三論; the Tiantai as 實相 the true reality; and the Huayan as the 法界 dharmadhātu. Four forms of the Mean are given by the 三論玄義.

無我


无我

see styles
Mandarin wú wǒ / wu2 wo3
Taiwan wu wo
Japanese muga / むが
Chinese anatta (Buddhist concept of "non-self")
Japanese (1) selflessness; self-effacement; self-renunciation; (2) {Buddh} anatta; anatman; doctrine that states that humans do not possess souls; (female given name) Muga
anātman; nairātmya; no ego, no soul (of an independent and self-contained character), impersonal, no individual independent existence (of conscious or unconscious beings, anātmaka). The empirical ego is merely an aggregation of various elements, and with their disintegration it ceases to exist; therefore it has nm ultimate reality of its own, but the Nirvāṇa Sūtra asserts the reality of the ego in the transcendental realm. The non-Buddhist definition of ego is that it has permanent individuality 常一之體 and is independent or sovereign 有主宰之用. When applied to men it is 人我, when to things it is 法我. Cf. 常 11; no-self

省悟

see styles
Mandarin xǐng wù / xing3 wu4
Taiwan hsing wu
Japanese seigo / sego / せいご    shougo / shogo / しょうご
 Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese to wake up to reality; to come to oneself; to realize; to see the truth
Japanese (given name) Seigo; (given name) Shougo
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

真実

see styles
Japanese shinjitsu(p);sana;sane / しんじつ(P);さな;さね
 Vertical Wall Scroll
Japanese (adj-na,adv,n,adj-no) truth; reality; (female given name) Mayumi; (female given name) Mami; (female given name) Manami; (surname) Mazane; (female given name) Masami; (given name) Masane; (female given name) Makoto; (surname) Honto; (female given name) Naomi; (given name) Shinjitsu; (female given name) Sanami; (female given name) Kokoro

醒悟

see styles
Mandarin xǐng wù / xing3 wu4
Taiwan hsing wu
 Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese to come to oneself; to come to realize; to come to see the truth; to wake up to reality

不見棺材不落淚


不见棺材不落泪

see styles
Mandarin bù jiàn guān cai bù luò lèi / bu4 jian4 guan1 cai5 bu4 luo4 lei4
Taiwan pu chien kuan ts`ai pu lo lei / pu chien kuan tsai pu lo lei
Chinese lit. not to shed a tear until one sees the coffin (idiom); fig. refuse to be convinced until one is faced with grim reality

see styles
Mandarin shì / shi4
Taiwan shih
Japanese sei / se / せい
Chinese life; age; generation; era; world; lifetime; epoch; descendant; noble; surname Shi
Japanese (counter) (1) counter for generations; (suffix noun) (2) {geol} epoch; (personal name) Toki; (personal name) Seze; (personal name) Seshime; (female given name) Sei; (personal name) Sea
yuga. An age, 1, 000th part of a kalpa.loka, the world. 世 originally meant a human generation, a period of thirty years; it is used in Buddhism both foryuga, a period of time ever flowing, andloka, the world, worldly, earthly. The world is that which is to be destroyed; it is sunk in the round of mortality, or transmigration; and conceals, or is a veil over reality.

see styles
Mandarin/ ru4
Taiwan ju
Japanese shio / しお
Chinese to enter; to go into; to join; to become a member of; to confirm or agree with; abbr. for 入聲|入声[ru4 sheng1]
Japanese (suf,ctr) (archaism) counter for soakings (of fabric in a dye); (surname) Kaeru; (place-name, surname) Iri
To enter, entry, entrance; come, bring or take in; at home; awaken to the truth; begin to understand; to relate the mind to reality and thus evolve knowledge.

see styles
Mandarin jìng / jing4
Taiwan ching
Japanese sakae / さかえ    sakai / さかい    kyou / kyo / きょう
Chinese border; place; condition; boundary; circumstances; territory
Japanese (1) border; boundary; (2) turning point; watershed; (3) area; region; spot; space; environment; (4) psychological state; mental state; (1) border; boundary; (2) area; region; spot; space; environment; (3) psychological state; mental state; (4) (Buddhist term) cognitive object; something perceptible by the sense organs or mind; (surname) Sakae; (surname) Sakai; (surname) Kyou
viṣaya; artha; gocara. A region, territory, environment, surroundings, area, field, sphere, e.g. the sphere of mind, the sphere of form for the eye, of sound for the ear, etc.; any objective mental projection regarded as reality; [cognitive] object

see styles
Mandarin/ ru2
Taiwan ju
Japanese nyo / にょ
Chinese as; as if; such as
Japanese {Buddh} (See 真如) tathata (the ultimate nature of all things); (female given name) Yuki; (male given name) Hitoshi; (female given name) Naho
tathā 多陀; 但他 (or 怛他), so, thus, in such manner, like, as. It is used in the sense of the absolute, the 空 śūnya, which is 諸佛之實相 the reality of all Buddhas; hence 如 ru is 賃相 the undifferentiated whole of things, the ultimate reality; it is 諸法之性 the nature of all things, hence it connotes 法性 faxing which is 眞實之際極 the ultimate of reality, or the absolute, and therefore connotes 實際 ultimate reality. The ultimate nature of all things being 如 ru, the one undivided same, it also connotes 理 li, the principle or theory behind all things, and this 理 li universal law, being the 眞實 truth or ultimate reality; 如 ru is termed 眞如 bhūtatathatā, the real so, or suchness, or reality, the ultimate or the all, i. e. the 一如 yiru. In regard to 如 ju as 理 li the Prajñā-pāramitā puṇḍarīka makes it the 中 zhong, neither matter nor nothingness. It is also used in the ordinary sense of so, like, as (cf yathā).

see styles
Mandarin shí / shi2
Taiwan shih
Japanese jitsu(p);jichi / じつ(P);じち
Chinese Japanese variant of 實|实
Japanese (noun - becomes adjective with の) (1) truth; reality; (2) (じつ only) sincerity; honesty; fidelity; (3) (じつ only) content; substance; (4) (じつ only) (good) result; (m,f) Minoru; (female given name) Minori; (female given name) Makoto; (female given name) Chika; (surname) Jitsusaki; (given name) Jitsu; (surname) Sane

see styles
Mandarin fàn / fan4
Taiwan fan
Japanese bon / ぼん
Chinese abbr. for 梵教[Fan4 jiao4] Brahmanism; abbr. for Sanskrit 梵語|梵语[Fan4 yu3] or 梵文[Fan4 wen2]; abbr. for 梵蒂岡|梵蒂冈[Fan4 di4 gang1], the Vatican
Japanese (1) Brahman; Brahma; ultimate reality of the universe (in Hinduism); (2) Brahma; Hindu creator god; (3) (abbreviation) (See 梵語) Sanskrit; (given name) Bon; (surname) Soyogi
Brahman (from roots bṛh, vṛh, connected with bṛṃh, "religious devotion," "prayer," "a sacred text," or mantra, "the mystic syllable om"; "sacred learning," "the religious life," "the Supreme Being regarded as impersonal," "the Absolute," "the priestly or sacerdotal class," etc. M.W. Translit.


see styles
Mandarin/ di4
Taiwan ti
Japanese tai / たい    akira / あきら
Chinese to examine; truth (Buddhism)
Japanese (given name) Tai; (given name) Akira
To judge, examine into, investigate, used in Buddhism for satya, a truth, a dogma, an axiom; applied to the āryasatyāni, the four dogmas, or noble truths, of 苦, 集, 滅, and 道 suffering, (the cause of its) assembly, the ( possibility of its cure, or) extinction, and the way (to extinction), i.e. the eightfold noble path, v. 四諦 and 八聖道. There are other categories of 諦, e.g. (2) 眞 and 俗 Reality in contrast with ordinary ideas of things; (3) 空, 假 and 中 q.v. (6) by the 勝論宗; and(8) by the 法相宗.; Two forms of statement: (a) 俗諦 saṃvṛti-satya, also called 世諦, 世俗諦, 覆俗諦, 覆諦, meaning common or ordinary statement, as if phenomena were real; (b) 眞諦 paramartha-satya, also called 第一諦, 勝義諦, meaning the correct dogma or averment of the enlightened. Another definition is 王法 and 佛法, royal law and Buddha law.

一如

see styles
Mandarin yī rú / yi1 ru2
Taiwan i ju
Japanese ichinyo / いちにょ
Chinese to be just like
Japanese oneness; (personal name) Kazuyuki
The one ru, i.e. the bhūtatathatā, or absolute, as the norm and essence of life. The 眞如 true suchness, or true character, or reality; the 法性 nature of things or beings. The whole of things as they are, or seem; a cosmos; a species; things of the same order. Name of a celebrated monk, Yiru. V. 一眞; 一實; oneness

一実

see styles
Japanese ichijitsu / いちじつ Japanese {Buddh} the one absolute truth; the one reality; (personal name) Makoto; (female given name) Hitomi; (female given name) Kadzumi; (female given name) Kazumi; (female given name) Kasumi; (female given name) Itsumi; (female given name) Ichimi

一實


一实

see styles
Mandarin yī shí / yi1 shi2
Taiwan i shih
Japanese ichijitsu
The one reality; the bhūtatathatā; idem 一如, 一眞; single reality

一眞

see styles
Mandarin yī zhēn / yi1 zhen1
Taiwan i chen
Japanese kazumasa / かずまさ    kazuma / かずま
Japanese (personal name) Kazuma
The whole of reality, the universe, the all, idem 眞如; cf. 一如, 一實 bhūtatathatā; one reality

三印

see styles
Mandarin sān yìn / san1 yin4
Taiwan san yin
Japanese san'in
The three signs or proofs of a Hīnayāna sutra— non-permanence, non-personality, nirvāṇa; without these the sūtra is spurious and the doctrine is of Māra; the proof of a Mahāyāna sūtra is the doctrine of 一實 ultimate reality, q. v. Also 三法印; three seals of the dharma

三宗

see styles
Mandarin sān zōng / san1 zong1
Taiwan san tsung
Japanese mimune / みむね    mitsumune / みつむね    sansou / sanso / さんそう
Japanese (surname) Mimune; (surname) Mitsumune; (surname) Sansou
The three Schools of 法相宗, 破相宗 , and 法性宗 q.v., representing the ideas of 空, 假, and 不空假, i.e. unreality, temporary reality, and neither; or absolute, relative, and neither.

三德

see styles
Mandarin sān dé / san1 de2
Taiwan san te
Japanese santoku
The three virtues or powers, of which three groups are given below. (1) (a) 法身德 The virtue or potency of the Buddha's eternal, spiritual body, the dharmakāya; (b) 般若德 of his prājñā, or wisdom, knowing all things in their reality; (c) 解脫德 of his freedom from all bonds and his sovereign Iiberty. Each of these has the four qualities of 常, 樂我, 淨eternity, joy, personality, and purity; v. 漫涅槃經 (2) (a) 智德 The potency of his perfect knowledge; (b) 斷德 of his cutting off all illusion and perfecting of supreme nirvāṇa; the above two are 自利 for his own advantage; (c) 恩德 of his universal grace and salvation, which 利他 bestows the benefits he has acquired on others. (3) (a) 因圓德 The perfection of his causative or karmic works during his three great kalpas of preparation; (b) 果圓德 the perfection of the fruit, or results in his own character and wisdom; (c) 恩圓德 the perfection of his grace in the salvation of others.

三忍

see styles
Mandarin sān rěn / san1 ren3
Taiwan san jen
Japanese sannin
The tree forms of kṣānti, i.e. patience (or endurance, tolerance). One of the groups is patience under hatred, under physical hardship, and in pursuit of the faith. Another is patience of the blessed in the Pure Land in understanding the truth they hear, patience in obeying the truth, patience in attaining absolute reality; v. 無量壽經. Another is patience in the joy of remembering Amitābha, patience in meditation on his truth, and patience in constant faith in him. Another is the patience of submission, of faith, and of obedience; three kinds of tolerance

三惑

see styles
Mandarin sān huò / san1 huo4
Taiwan san huo
Japanese sanwaku;sannaku / さんわく;さんなく
Japanese {Buddh} three mental disturbances
A Tiantai classification of the three delusions, also styled 三煩惱; 三漏; 三垢; 三結; trials or temptations, leakages, uncleannesses, and bonds. The first of the following three is common to all disciples, the two last to bodhisattvas. They arise from (a) 見, 思, 惑 things seen and thought, i.e. illusions from imperfect perception, with temptation to love, hate, etc.; to be rid of these false views and temptations is the discipline and nirvāṇa of ascetic or Hīnayāna Buddhists. Mahāyāna proceeds further in and by its bodhisattva aims, which produce their own difficulties, i.e. (b) 塵沙惑 illusion and temptation through the immense variety of duties in saving men; and (c) 無明惑 illusions and temptations that arise from failure philosophically to understand things in their reality; three mental disturbances

三教

see styles
Mandarin sān jiào / san1 jiao4
Taiwan san chiao
Japanese sankyou / sankyo / さんきょう
Chinese the Three Doctrines (Daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism)
Japanese Shinto, Buddhism and Confucianism; (given name) Mitsunori
The three teachings, i.e. 儒, 佛 (or 釋), and 道Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism; or, 孔, 老, 釋 Confucianism, Taoism (aIso known as 神敎), and Buddhism. In Japan they are Shinto, Confucianism, and Buddhism. In Buddhism the term is applied to the three periods of Śākyamuni's own teaching, of which there are several definitions: (1) The Jiangnan 南中 School describe his teaching as (a) 漸progressive or gradual; (b) 頓 immediate, i.e. as one whole, especially in the 華嚴經; and (c) 不定 or indeterminate. (2) 光統 Guangtong, a writer of the Iater Wei dynasty, describes the three as (a) 漸 progressive for beginners, i.e. from impermanence to permanence, from the void to reality, etc.; (b) 頓 immediate for the more advanced; and (c) 圓complete, to the most advanced, i.e. the Huayan as above. (3) The 三時敎q.v. (4) The 南山 Southern school deals with (a) the 性空of Hīnayāna; (b) 相空of Mahāyāna; and (c) 唯識圓 the perfect idealism. v. 行事鈔中 4. Tiantai accepts the division of 漸, 頓, and 不定 for pre-Lotus teaching, but adopts 漸 gradual, 頓 immediate, and 圓 perfect, with the Lotus as the perfect teaching; it also has the division of 三藏敎 , 通敎 , and 別敎 q.v.

三身

see styles
Mandarin sān shēn / san1 shen1
Taiwan san shen
Japanese sanjin;sanshin / さんじん;さんしん
Japanese {Buddh} trikaya (three bodies of the Buddha); (surname) Sanmi
trikāya. 三寶身 The threefold body or nature of a Buddha, i.e. the 法, 報, and 化身, or dharmakāya, sambhogakāya, and nirmāṇakāya. The three are defined as 自性, 受用, and 變化, the Buddha-body per se, or in its essential nature; his body of bliss, which he "receives" for his own "use" and enjoyment; and his body of transformation, by which he can appear in any form; i.e. spiritual, or essential; glorified; revealed. While the doctrine of the trikāya is a Mahāyāna concept, it partly results from the Hīnayāna idealization of the earthly Buddha with his thirty-two signs, eighty physical marks, clairvoyance, clairaudience, holiness, purity, wisdom, pity, etc. Mahāyāna, however, proceeded to conceive of Buddha as the Universal, the All, with infinity of forms, yet above all our concepts of unity or diversity. To every Buddha Mahāyāna attributed a three-fold body: that of essential Buddha; that of joy or enjoyment of the fruits of his past saving labours; that of power to transform himself at will to any shape for omnipresent salvation of those who need him. The trinity finds different methods of expression, e.g. Vairocana is entitled 法身, the embodiment of the Law, shining everywhere, enlightening all; Locana is 報身; c.f. 三賓, the embodiment of purity and bliss; Śākyamuni is 化身 or Buddha revealed. In the esoteric sect they are 法 Vairocana, 報 Amitābha, and 化 Śākyamuni. The 三賓 are also 法 dharma, 報 saṅgha, 化 buddha. Nevertheless, the three are considered as a trinity, the three being essentially one, each in the other. (1) 法身 Dharmakāya in its earliest conception was that of the body of the dharma, or truth, as preached by Śākyamuni; later it became his mind or soul in contrast with his material body. In Mādhyamika, the dharmakāya was the only reality, i.e. the void, or the immateria1, the ground of all phenomena; in other words, the 眞如 the tathāgatagarbha, the bhūtatathatā. According to the Huayan (Kegon) School it is the 理or noumenon, while the other two are氣or phenomenal aspects. "For the Vijñānavāda... the body of the law as highest reality is the void intelligence, whose infection (saṃkleҫa) results in the process of birth and death, whilst its purification brings about Nirvāṇa, or its restoration to its primitive transparence" (Keith). The "body of the law is the true reality of everything". Nevertheless, in Mahāyāna every Buddha has his own 法身; e.g. in the dharmakāya aspect we have the designation Amitābha, who in his saṃbhogakāya aspect is styled Amitāyus. (2) 報身Sambhogakāya, a Buddha's reward body, or body of enjoyment of the merits he attained as a bodhisattva; in other words, a Buddha in glory in his heaven. This is the form of Buddha as an object of worship. It is defined in two aspects, (a) 自受用身 for his own bliss, and (b) 他受用身 for the sake of others, revealing himself in his glory to bodhisattvas, enlightening and inspiring them. By wisdom a Buddha's dharmakāya is attained, by bodhisattva-merits his saṃbhogakāya. Not only has every Buddha all the three bodies or aspects, but as all men are of the same essence, or nature, as Buddhas, they are therefore potential Buddhas and are in and of the trikāya. Moreover, trikāya is not divided, for a Buddha in his 化身 is still one with his 法身 and 報身, all three bodies being co-existent. (3) 化身; 應身; 應化身 nirmāṇakāya, a Buddha's transformation, or miraculous body, in which he appears at will and in any form outside his heaven, e.g. as Śākyamuni among men; three bodies [of the Buddha]

不二

see styles
Mandarin bù èr / bu4 er4
Taiwan pu erh
Japanese funi / ふに    fuji / ふじ
Japanese {Buddh} advaitam (non-duality); (1) being two sides of the same coin; being the same (while appearing different); (2) (See 不一・1) Very sincerely yours; (adj-no,n) (3) (archaism) (orig. meaning) peerless; unparalleled; unparallelled; (surname, female given name) Fuji
advaya. No second, non-duality, the one and undivided, the unity of all things, the one reality、 the universal Buddha-nature. There are numerous combinations, e. g. 善惡不二 good and evil are not a dualism: nor are 有 and 空 the material and immaterial, nor are 迷 and 悟 delusion and awareness— all these are of the one Buddha-nature.

世諦


世谛

see styles
Mandarin shì dì / shi4 di4
Taiwan shih ti
Japanese setai
ordinary or worldly truth, opposite of 眞諦 truth in reality; also 俗諦; 世俗諦; 覆俗諦; conventional truth

事実

see styles
Japanese jijitsu / じじつ Japanese (n-adv,n) fact; truth; reality

二執


二执

see styles
Mandarin èr zhí / er4 zhi2
Taiwan erh chih
Japanese nishū
The two (erroneous) tenets, or attachments: (1) 我執 or 人執 that of the reality of the ego, permanent personality, the ātman, soul or self. (2) 法執 that of the reality of dharma, things or phenomena. Both are illusions. "All illusion arises from holding to the reality of the ego and of things."; two attachments

二空

see styles
Mandarin èr kōng / er4 kong1
Taiwan erh k`ung / erh kung
Japanese nikū
The two voids, unrealities, or immaterialities; v. 空. There are several antitheses: (1) (a) 人空; 我空 The non-reality of the atman, the soul, the person; (6) 法空 the non-reality of things. (2) (a) 性空 The Tiantai division that nothing has a nature of its own; (b) 相空 therefore its form is unreal, i.e. forms are temporary names. (3) (a) 但空 Tiantai says the 藏 and 通 know only the 空; (b) 不但空 the 別 and 圓 have 空, 假, and 中 q.v. (4) (a) 如實空 The division of the 起信論 that the 眞如 is devoid of all impurity; (b) 如實不空 and full of all merit, or achievement; two kinds of emptiness

五觀


五观

see styles
Mandarin wǔ guān / wu3 guan1
Taiwan wu kuan
Japanese gokan
The five meditations referred to in the Lotus Sutra 25: (1) 眞 on the true, idem 空觀, to meditate on the reality of the void or infinite, in order to be rid of illusion in views and thoughts; (2) 淸淨觀 on purity, to be rid of any remains of impurity connected with the temporal, idem 假觀; (3) 廣大智慧觀 on the wider and greater wisdom, idem 中觀, by study of the 'middle' way; (4) 悲觀 on pitifulness, or the pitiable condition of the living, and by the above three to meditate on their salvation; (5) 慈觀 on mercy and the extension of the first three meditations to the carrying of joy to all the living; five contemplations

佛戒

see styles
Mandarin fú jiè / fu2 jie4
Taiwan fu chieh
Japanese bukkai
The moral commandments of the Buddha; also, the laws of reality observed by all Buddhas; Buddhist precepts

俗智

see styles
Mandarin sú zhì / su2 zhi4
Taiwan su chih
Japanese zokuchi
Common or worldly wisdom, which by its illusion blurs or colours the mind, blinding it to reality; mundane cognition

俗有

see styles
Mandarin sú yǒu / su2 you3
Taiwan su yu
Japanese zokuu
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

俗諦


俗谛

see styles
Mandarin sú dì / su2 di4
Taiwan su ti
Japanese zokutai / ぞくたい
Japanese {Buddh} simplified teaching
世諦 Common principles, or axioms; normal unenlightened ideas, in contrast with reality; conventional truth

倒我

see styles
Mandarin dào wǒ / dao4 wo3
Taiwan tao wo
Japanese tōga
The conventional ego, the reverse of reality; mistakenly conceived self

倶空

see styles
Mandarin jù kōng / ju4 kong1
Taiwan chü k`ung / chü kung
Japanese kukū
Both or all empty, or unreal, i.e. both ego and things have no reality; self and phenomena are both empty

假合

see styles
Mandarin jiǎ hé / jia3 he2
Taiwan chia ho
Japanese ke gō
假和合Phenomena, empirical combinations without permanent reality; provisional synthesis

假有

see styles
Mandarin jiǎ yǒu / jia3 you3
Taiwan chia yu
Japanese ke-u
The phenomenal, which in reality no more exists than turtle's hair or rabbit's horns; nominal existence

偏眞

see styles
Mandarin piān zhēn / pian1 zhen1
Taiwan p`ien chen / pien chen
Japanese henshin
偏空, 單空The Hīnayāna doctrine of unreality, a one-sided dogma in contrast with the transcendental reality of Mahāyāna; one sided view of reality

入眞

see styles
Mandarin rù zhēn / ru4 zhen1
Taiwan ju chen
Japanese nyūshin
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

八諦


八谛

see styles
Mandarin bā dì / ba1 di4
Taiwan pa ti
Japanese hachitai
The eight truths, postulates, or judgments of the 法相 Dharmalakṣana school, i.e. four common or mundane, and four of higher meaning. The first four are (1) common postulates on reality, considering the nominal as real, e.g. a pot; (2) common doctrinal postulates, e.g. the five skandhas; (3) abstract postulates, e.g. the four noble truths 四諦; and (4) temporal postulates in regard to the spiritual in the material. The second abstract or philosophical four are (5) postulates on constitution and function, e.g. of the skandhas; (6) on cause and effect, e.g. the 四諦; (7) on the void, the immaterial, or reality; and (8) on the pure inexpressible ultimate or absolute; eight noble truths

六度

see styles
Mandarin liù dù / liu4 du4
Taiwan liu tu
Japanese rokudo / ろくど
Japanese (surname) Rokudo
The six things that ferry one beyond the sea of mortality to nirvana, i. e. the six pāramitās 波羅蜜 (波羅蜜多): (1) 布施 dāna, charity, or giving, including the bestowing of the truth on others; (2) 持戒 śīla, keeping the command rents; (3) 忍辱 kṣānti, patience under insult; (4) 精進 vīrya, zeal and progress; (5) 闡定 dhyāna, meditation or contemplation; (6) 智慧 prajñā; wisdom, the power to discern reality or truth. It is the last that carries across the saṃsāra (sea of incarnate life) to the shores of nirvana. The opposites of these virtues are meanness, wickedness, anger, sloth, a distracted mind, and ignorance. The 唯識論 adds four other pāramitās: (7) 方便 upāya, the use of appropriate means; (8) 願 praṇidhāna, pious vows; (9) 力 bala, power of fulfillment; (10) 智 jñāna knowledge; six perfections

化心

see styles
Mandarin huà xīn / hua4 xin1
Taiwan hua hsin
Japanese keshin
The mind in the transformation body of a Buddha or bodhisattva, which apprehends things in their reality; transformed mind

十力

see styles
Mandarin shí lì / shi2 li4
Taiwan shih li
Japanese jūriki
Daśabala. The ten powers of Buddha, giving complete knowledge of: (1) what is right or wrong in every condition; (2) what is the karma of every being, past, present, and future; (3) all stages of dhyāna liberation, and samādhi; (4) the powers and faculties of all beings; (5) the desires, or moral direction of every being; (6) the actual condition of every individual; (7) the direction and consequence of all laws; (8) all causes of mortality and of good and evil in their reality; (9) the end of all beings and nirvāṇa; (10) the destruction of all illusion of every kind. See the 智度論 25 and the 倶舍論 29.

十宗

see styles
Mandarin shí zōng / shi2 zong1
Taiwan shih tsung
Japanese jūshū
The ten schools of Chinese Buddhism: I. The (1) 律宗 Vinaya-discipline, or 南山|; (2) 倶舍 Kośa, Abhidharma, or Reality (Sarvāstivādin) 有宗; (3) 成實宗 Satyasiddhi sect founded on this śāstra by Harivarman; (4) 三論宗 Mādhyamika or 性空宗; (5) 法華宗 Lotus, "Law-flower" or Tiantai 天台宗; (6) 華嚴Huayan or法性 or賢首宗; ( 7) 法相宗 Dharmalakṣana or 慈恩宗 founded on the唯識論 (8) 心宗 Ch'an or Zen, mind-only or intuitive, v. 禪宗 ; (9) 眞言宗 (Jap. Shingon) or esoteric 密宗 ; (10) 蓮宗 Amitābha-lotus or Pure Land (Jap. Jōdo) 淨士宗. The 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 9th are found in Japan rather than in China, where they have ceased to be of importance. II. The Hua-yen has also ten divisions into ten schools of thought: (1) 我法倶有 the reality of self (or soul) and things, e.g. mind and matter; (2) 法有我無 the reality of things but not of soul; (3) 法無去來 things have neither creation nor destruction; (4) 現通假實 present things are both apparent and real; (5) 俗妄眞實 common or phenomenal ideas are wrong, fundamental reality is the only truth; (6) things are merely names; (7) all things are unreal 空; (8) the bhūtatathatā is not unreal; (9) phenomena and their perception are to be got rid of; (10) the perfect, all-inclusive, and complete teaching of the One Vehicle. III. There are two old Japanese divisions: 大乘律宗, 倶舎宗 , 成實 宗 , 法和宗 , 三論宗 , 天台宗 , 華嚴宗 , 眞言宗 , 小乘律宗 , and 淨土宗 ; the second list adds 禪宗 and omits 大乘律宗. They are the Ritsu, Kusha, Jōjitsu, Hossō, Sanron, Tendai, Kegon, Shingon, (Hīnayāna) Ritsu, and Jōdo; the addition being Zen.

十行

see styles
Mandarin shí xíng / shi2 xing2
Taiwan shih hsing
Japanese jūgyō
The ten necessary activities in the fifty-two stages of a bodhisattva, following on the 十信and 十住; the two latter indicate personal development 自利. These ten lines of action are for the universal welfare of others 利他. They are: joyful service; beneficial service; never resenting; without limit; never out of order; appearing in any form at will; unimpeded; exalting the pāramitās amongst all beings; perfecting the Buddha-law by complete virtue; manifesting in all things the pure, final, true reality; ten practices

十門


十门

see styles
Mandarin shí mén / shi2 men2
Taiwan shih men
Japanese jūmon
The ten "doors" or connections between事 and 理; 事 is defined as 現象 form and 理 as 本體 substance; the common illustration of wave and water indicates the idea thus expressed. The 理事無礎十門 means that in ten ways form and substance are not separate, unconnected entities. (1) li the substance is always present with shih the phenomena; (2) shih is always present with li; (3) shih depends on li for its existence; (4) the shih can reveal the li; (5) the shih (mere form, which is unreal) can disappear in the li;(6) the shih can conceal the li; (7) the true li is the shih; (8) the shih is li; (9) the true li (or reality) is not the shih; (10) the shih is not the (whole) li; v. 華嚴大疏 2. 周遍含容觀十門 The fifth of the five 觀 meditations of the 華嚴宗, i.e. on li and shih, e.g. (1) the li is as the shih; (2) the shih is as the li; 理如事, 事如理 and so on. The 止觀十門 in the 宗鏡録35, also deals with li and shih chiefly for purposes of meditation. Another group, the 華嚴釋經十門, treats of the Canon and the schools.

名実

see styles
Japanese meijitsu / mejitsu / めいじつ Japanese in name and in reality; nominally and virtually; form and contents; (female given name) Nami

名實


名实

see styles
Mandarin míng shí / ming2 shi2
Taiwan ming shih
Chinese name and reality; whether reality lives up to its reputation

唯心

see styles
Mandarin wéi xīn / wei2 xin1
Taiwan wei hsin
Japanese yuishin / ゆいしん
Japanese (1) {Buddh} doctrine that all phenomena are produced from consciousness (a central teaching of the Avatamska sutra); (2) (See 唯物) spiritualism (in philosophy); (personal name) Yuishin
Idealism, mind only, the theory that the only reality is mental, that of the mind. Similar to 唯識q. v. and v. Lankavatara sutra; mind-only

四一

see styles
Mandarin sì yī / si4 yi1
Taiwan ssu i
Japanese yoichi / よいち    shiichi / shichi / しいち
Japanese (given name) Yoichi; (personal name) Shiichi
The four 'ones', or the unity contained (according to Tiantai) in the 方便品 of the Lotus Sutra; i. e. 教一 its teaching of one Vehicle; 行一 its sole bodhisattva procedure; 人一 its men all and only as bodhisattvas; 理一 its one ultimate truth of the reality of all existence; four kinds of unity

四土

see styles
Mandarin sì tǔ / si4 tu3
Taiwan ssu t`u / ssu tu
Japanese shido / しど
Japanese {Buddh} four realms (in Tendai Buddhism or Yogacara)
The four Buddha-kṣetra, or realms, of Tiantai: (1) 凡聖居同土 Realms where all classes dwell— men, devas, Buddhas, disciples, non-disciples; it has two divisions, the impure, e. g. this world, and the pure, e. g. the 'Western' pure-land. (2) 方便有餘土 Temporary realms, where the occupants have got rid of the evils of 見思 unenlightened views and thoughts, but still have to be reborn. (3) 實報無障礙土 Realms of permanent reward and freedom, for those who have attained bodhisattva rank. (4) 常寂光土 Realm of eternal rest and light (i. e. wisdom) and of eternal spirit (dharmakāya), the abode of Buddhas; but in reality all the others are included in this, and are only separated for convenience, sake; four lands

四宗

see styles
Mandarin sì zōng / si4 zong1
Taiwan ssu tsung
Japanese shishū
The four kinds of inference in logic— common, prejudged or opposing, insufficiently founded, arbitrary. Also, the four schools of thought I. According to 淨影 Jingying they are (1) 立性宗 that everything exists, or has its own nature; e. g. Sarvāstivāda, in the 'lower' schools of Hīnayāna; (2) 破性宗 that everything has not a nature of its own; e. g. the 成實宗 a 'higher' Hīnayāna school, the Satyasiddhi; (3) 破相宗 that form has no reality, because of the doctrine of the void, 'lower' Mahāyāna; (4) 願實宗 revelation of reality, that all comes from the bhūtatathatā, 'higher ' Mahāyāna. II. According to 曇隱 Tanyin of the 大衍 monastery they are (1) 因緣宗, i. e. 立性宗 all things are causally produced; (2) 假名宗, i. e. 破性宗 things are but names; (3) 不眞宗, i. e. 破相宗, denying the reality of form, this school fails to define reality; (4) 眞宗, i. e. 顯實宗 the school of the real, in contrast with the seeming; four cardinal principles

四教

see styles
Mandarin sì jiào / si4 jiao4
Taiwan ssu chiao
Japanese shikyō
Four teachings, doctrines, or schools; five groups are given, whose titles are abbreviated to 光天曉苑龍: (1) 光宅四教 The four schools of 法雲 Fayun of the 光宅 Guangzhai monastery are the four vehicles referred to in the burning house parable of the Lotus Sutra, i. e. śrāvaka, pratyekabuddha, bodhisattva, and the final or one vehicle teaching. (2) 天台四教 The Tiantai four are 藏通, 別, and 圓, v. 八教. (3) 曉公四教 The group of 元曉 Wŏnhyo of 海東 Haedong are the 三乘別教 represented by the 四諦緣起經; 三乘通教 represented by the 般若深密教; 一乘分教 represented by the 究網經; and 一乘滿教 represented by the 華嚴經. (4) 苑公四教 The group of 慧苑 Huiyuan: the schools of unbelievers, who are misled and mislead; of śrāvakas and pratyekabuddhas who know only the phenomenal bhūtatathatā; of novitiate bodhisattvas who know only the noumenal bhūtatathatā; and of fully developed bodhisattvas, who know both. (5) 龍樹四教 Nāgārjuna's division of the canon into 有 dealing with existence, or reality, cf. the 四阿含; 空 the Void, cf. 般若經; 亦有亦 空 both, cf. 深密經; and 非有非 空 neither, cf. 中論.

四絶

see styles
Mandarin sì jué / si4 jue2
Taiwan ssu chüeh
The four ideas to be got rid of in order to obtain the 'mean' or ultimate reality, according to the 中論: they are that things exist, do not exist, both, neither.

圓實


圆实

see styles
Mandarin yuán shí / yuan2 shi2
Taiwan yüan shih
Japanese enjitsu / えんじつ
Japanese (surname) Enjitsu
Perfect reality; the Tiantai perfect doctrine which enables one to attain reality or Buddhahood at once; perfect and real

圓教


圆教

see styles
Mandarin yuán jiào / yuan2 jiao4
Taiwan yüan chiao
Japanese engyō
The complete, perfect, or comprehensive doctrine; the school or sect of Mahāyāna which represents it. The term has had three references. The first was by 光統 Guangtong of the Later Wei, sixth century, who defined three schools, 漸 gradual, 頓 immediate, and 圓 inclusive or complete. The Tiantai called its fourth section the inclusive, complete, or perfect teaching 圓, the other three being 三藏 Hīnayāna, 通 Mahāyāna-cum-Hīnayāna, 別 Mahāyāna. The Huayan so called its fifth section, i.e. 小乘; 大乘始; 大乘終; 頓 and 圓. It is the Tiantai version that is in general acceptance, defined as a perfect whole and as complete in its parts; for the whole is the absolute and its parts are therefore the absolute; the two may be called noumenon and phenomenon, or 空 and 假 (or 俗), but in reality they are one, i.e. the 中 medial condition. To conceive these three as a whole is the Tiantai inclusive or 'perfect' doctrine. The Huayan 'perfect' doctrine also taught that unity and differentiation, or absolute and relative, were one, a similar doctrine to that of the identity of contraries. In Tiantai teaching the harmony is due to its underlying unity; its completeness to the permeation of this unity in all phenomena; these two are united in the medial 中 principle; to comprehend these three principles at one and the same time is the complete, all-containing, or 'perfect' doctrine of Tiantai. There are other definitions of the all-inclusive doctrine, e.g. the eight complete things, complete in teaching, principles, knowledge, etc. 圓教四門 v. 四門.

地体

see styles
Japanese jitai / じたい Japanese (1) (archaism) essence; true nature; substance; reality; (adverb) (2) (archaism) originally; naturally; by nature; from the start

執障


执障

see styles
Mandarin zhí zhàng / zhi2 zhang4
Taiwan chih chang
Japanese shūshō
The holding on to the reality of self and things and the consequent hindrance to entrance into nirvana; attachments and (the resultant) hindrances

夢現

see styles
Japanese yumeutsutsu / ゆめうつつ Japanese (1) half asleep and half awake; trance; (2) dream and reality

夢話


梦话

see styles
Mandarin mèng huà / meng4 hua4
Taiwan meng hua
Chinese talking in one's sleep; words spoken during sleep; fig. speech bearing no relation to reality; delusions

天眞

see styles
Mandarin tiān zhēn / tian1 zhen1
Taiwan t`ien chen / tien chen
Japanese tenma / てんま
Japanese (female given name) Tenma
bhūtatathatā, permanent reality underlying all phenomena, pure and unchanging e. g. the sea in contrast with the waves; nature, the natural, 天然之眞理, 非人之造作者 natural reality, not of human creation; as it originally is

如実

see styles
Japanese nyojitsu / にょじつ Japanese (1) (usu. 如実に) reality; actuality; actual conditions; true situation; faithful representation; vivid depiction; (2) {Buddh} ultimate reality; absolute truth; (given name) Nyojitsu; (female given name) Ikumi

如實


如实

see styles
Mandarin rú shí / ru2 shi2
Taiwan ju shih
Japanese nyo jitsu
Chinese as things really are; realistic
Real, reality, according to reality ( yathābhūtam); true; the 眞如 zhenru, or bhūtatathatā, for which it is also used; the universal undifferentiated, i. e. 平等不二, or the primary essence out of which the phenomenal arises; 如實空 is this essence in its purity; 如實不空 is this essence in its differentiation.

如義


如义

see styles
Mandarin rú yì / ru2 yi4
Taiwan ju i
Japanese nyogi
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

妄見


妄见

see styles
Mandarin wàng jiàn / wang4 jian4
Taiwan wang chien
Japanese mōken
False views (of reality), taking the seeming as real.

妙有

see styles
Mandarin miào yǒu / miao4 you3
Taiwan miao yu
Japanese tayu / たゆ
Japanese (female given name) Tayu
The absolute reality, the incomprehensible entity, as contrasted with the superficial reality of phenomena; supernatural existence; marvelous existence

実在

see styles
Japanese jitsuzai / じつざい Japanese (noun/participle) reality; existence

実態

see styles
Japanese jittai / じったい Japanese true state; actual condition; reality

実相

see styles
Japanese jissou / jisso / じっそう Japanese (1) reality; real state of affairs; true state of affairs; (2) {Buddh} true form of all things as they are; ultimate reality; (surname) Jitsusou; (personal name) Jissou

実際

see styles
Japanese jissai / じっさい Japanese (adj-no,adv,n) (1) practicality; practical; (2) reality; actuality; actual conditions; (3) {Buddh} bhutakoti (limit of reality)

寂照

see styles
Mandarin jì zhào / ji4 zhao4
Taiwan chi chao
Japanese jakushou / jakusho / じゃくしょう
Japanese (personal name) Jakushou
nirvāṇa-illumination; ultimate reality shining forth; to silent and luminou

實唱


实唱

see styles
Mandarin shí chàng / shi2 chang4
Taiwan shih ch`ang / shih chang
Japanese jisshō
Reality-proclamation, i.e. to preach the Tathāgata's law of Reality; teach about reality

實在


实在

see styles
Mandarin shí zài / shi2 zai4
Taiwan shih tsai
Japanese jitsuzai
Chinese really; actually; indeed; true; real; honest; dependable; (philosophy) reality
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

實教


实教

see styles
Mandarin shí jiào / shi2 jiao4
Taiwan shih chiao
Japanese jikkyō
The teaching of Reality; also, the real or reliable teaching; real teaching

實智


实智

see styles
Mandarin shí zhì / shi2 zhi4
Taiwan shih chih
Japanese jitchi
The knowledge or wisdom of Reality, in contrast with knowledge of the 權 relative; real wisdom

實本


实本

see styles
Mandarin shí běn / shi2 ben3
Taiwan shih pen
Japanese jitsumoto / じつもと    sanemoto / さねもと
Japanese (personal name) Jitsumoto; (surname) Sanemoto
Fundamental reality, applied to the teaching of the Lotus Sūtra, as opposed to the previous Buddhist teaching; true basis

實物


实物

see styles
Mandarin shí wù / shi2 wu4
Taiwan shih wu
Japanese jitsumotsu
Chinese material object; concrete object; original object; in kind; object for practical use; definite thing; reality; matter (physics)
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

實相


实相

see styles
Mandarin shí xiāng / shi2 xiang1
Taiwan shih hsiang
Japanese jissō
Chinese actual situation; the ultimate essence of things (Buddhism)
Reality, in contrast with 虛妄; absolute fundamental reality, the ultimate, the absolute; the 法身, i.e. dharmakāya, or 眞如 bhūtatathatā. Other terms are 一實; 一如; 一相; 無相; 法證; 法位; 涅槃; 無爲; 眞諦; 眞性; 眞空; 實性; 實諦; 實際, q.v; true form of things as they are

實眼


实眼

see styles
Mandarin shí yǎn / shi2 yan3
Taiwan shih yen
Japanese jitsugen
An eye able to discern reality, i.e. the Buddha-eye; true eye

實行


实行

see styles
Mandarin shí xíng / shi2 xing2
Taiwan shih hsing
Japanese jitsugyō
Chinese to implement; to carry out; to put into practice
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

實語


实语

see styles
Mandarin shí yǔ / shi2 yu3
Taiwan shih yü
Japanese jitsugo
True, or reliable words; words corresponding to reality; discussions of Reality; true words

實際


实际

see styles
Mandarin shí jì / shi2 ji4
Taiwan shih chi
Japanese jissai
Chinese reality; practice; practical; realistic; real; actual
The region of Reality; apex of reality

悟入

see styles
Mandarin ru  / ru4 
Taiwan ru 
Japanese gonyuu / gonyu / ごにゅう
Chinese to understand; to comprehend the ultimate essence of things (Buddhism)
Japanese (noun/participle) {Buddh} entering enlightenment
To apprehend or perceive and enter into (the idea of reality). Name of a Kashmir monk, Sugandhara; to awaken and enter

慧義


慧义

see styles
Mandarin huì yì / hui4 yi4
Taiwan hui i
Japanese egi
The apprehension of the meaning of reality through wisdom.

我想

see styles
Mandarin wǒ xiǎng / wo3 xiang3
Taiwan wo hsiang
Japanese ga zō
The thought that the ego has reality; conception of self

我愚

see styles
Mandarin wǒ yú / wo3 yu2
Taiwan wo yü
Japanese gagu
Ego ignorance, holding to the illusion of the reality of the ego; folly regarding the self

我痴

see styles
Mandarin wǒ chī / wo3 chi1
Taiwan wo ch`ih / wo chih
Ego-infatuation, confused by the belief in the reality of the ego.

我空

see styles
Mandarin wǒ kōng / wo3 kong1
Taiwan wo k`ung / wo kung
Japanese gakū
生空 (衆生空); 人空 Illusion of the concept of the reality of the ego, man being composed of elements and disintegrated when these are dissolved; emptiness of self

我見


我见

see styles
Mandarin wǒ jiàn / wo3 jian4
Taiwan wo chien
Japanese gaken / がけん
Japanese selfish mind
身見 The erroneous doctrine that the ego, or self, composed of the temporary five skandhas, is a reality and permanent; self-view

據實


据实

see styles
Mandarin jù shí / ju4 shi2
Taiwan chü shih
Japanese kojitsu
Chinese according to the facts
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

攀緣


攀缘

see styles
Mandarin pān yuán / pan1 yuan2
Taiwan p`an yüan / pan yüan
Japanese han'en
Something to lay hold of, a reality, cause, basis; used for 緣 q.v; encountering cognized objects

方便

see styles
Mandarin fāng biàn / fang1 bian4
Taiwan fang pien
Japanese houben / hoben / ほうべん
Chinese convenient; suitable; to facilitate; to make things easy; having money to spare; (euphemism) to relieve oneself
Japanese (1) expedient; means; instrument; (2) {Buddh} upaya (skillful means, methods of teaching); (surname) Houben
upāya. Convenient to the place, or situation, suited to the condition, opportune, appropriate; but 方 is interpreted as 方法 method, mode, plan, and 便 as 便用 convenient for use, i. e. a convenient or expedient method; also 方 as 方正 and 便 as 巧妙, which implies strategically correct. It is also intp. as 權道智 partial, temporary, or relative (teaching of) knowledge of reality, in contrast with 般若智 prajñā, and 眞實 absolute truth, or reality instead of the seeming. The term is a translation of 傴和 upāya, a mode of approach, an expedient, stratagem, device. The meaning is— teaching according to the capacity of the hearer, by any suitable method, including that of device or stratagem, but expedience beneficial to the recipient is understood. Mahāyāna claims that the Buddha used this expedient or partial method in his teaching until near the end of his days, when he enlarged it to the revelation of reality, or the preaching of his final and complete truth; Hīnayāna with reason denies this, and it is evident that the Mahāyāna claim has no foundation, for the whole of its 方等 or 方廣 scriptures are of later invention. Tiantai speaks of the 三乘 q. v. or Three Vehicles as 方便 expedient or partial revelations, and of its 一乘 or One Vehicle as the complete revelation of universal Buddhahood. This is the teaching of the Lotus Sutra, which itself contains 方便 teaching to lead up to the full revelation; hence the terms 體内 (or 同體 ) 方便, i. e. expedient or partial truths within the full revelation, meaning the expedient part of the Lotus, and 體外方便 the expedient or partial truths of the teaching which preceded the Lotus; see the 方便品 of that work, also the second chapter of the 維摩經. 方便 is also the seventh of the ten pāramitās.

明理

see styles
Mandarin míng lǐ / ming2 li3
Taiwan ming li
Japanese meiri / meri / めり    myouri / myori / めいり    akari / みょうり
Chinese sensible; reasonable; an obvious reason, truth or fact; to understand the reason or reasoning
Japanese (female given name) Meri; (female given name) Meiri; (surname) Myouri; (female given name) Akari
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

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This page contains 100 results for "reality" in Chinese and/or Japanese.



Information about this dictionary:

Apparently, we were the first ones who were crazy enough to think that western people might want a combined Chinese, Japanese, and Buddhist dictionary.

A lot of westerners can't tell the difference between Chinese and Japanese - and there is a reason for that. Chinese characters and even whole words were borrowed by Japan from the Chinese language in the 5th century. Much of the time, if a word or character is used in both languages, it will have the same or a similar meaning. However, this is not always true. Language evolves, and meanings independently change in each language.

Example: The Chinese character 湯 for soup (hot water) has come to mean bath (hot water) in Japanese. They have the same root meaning of "hot water", but a 湯屋 sign on a bathhouse in Japan would lead a Chinese person to think it was a "soup house" or a place to get a bowl of soup. See this: Soup or Bath

This dictionary uses the EDICT and CC-CEDICT dictionary files.
EDICT data is the property of the Electronic Dictionary Research and Development Group, and is used in conformance with the Group's license.

Chinese Buddhist terms come from Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist Terms by William Edward Soothill and Lewis Hodous. This is commonly referred to as "Soothill's'". It was first published in 1937 (and is now off copyright so we can use it here). Some of these definitions may be misleading, incomplete, or dated, but 95% of it is good information. Every professor who teaches Buddhism or Eastern Religion has a copy of this on their bookshelf. We incorporated these 16,850 entries into our dictionary database ourselves (it was lot of work).



Combined, these cover 355,969 Japanese, Chinese, and Buddhist characters, words, idioms, and short phrases.

Just because a word appears here does not mean it is appropriate for a tattoo, your business name, etc. Please consult a professional before doing anything stupid with this data.

We do offer Chinese and Japanese Tattoo Services. We'll also be happy to help you translate something for other purposes.

No warranty as to the correctness, potential vulgarity, or clarity is expressed or implied. We did not write any of these definitions (though we occasionally act as a contributor/editor to the CC-CEDICT project). You are using this dictionary for free, and you get what you pay for.

The following titles are just to help people who are searching for an Asian dictionary to find this page.

Japanese Kanji Dictionary

Free Asian Dictionary

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