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Mandarin Mandarin Chinese information.
Wade Giles Old Wade-Giles romanization used only in Taiwan.
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Buddhist definition. Note: May not apply to all sects.
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Characters Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition

see styles
Mandarin ruì / rui4
Taiwan jui
Japanese mizu;zui / みず;ずい
 Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese lucky; auspicious; propitious; rayl (acoustical unit)
Japanese (n,n-pref) (1) (みず only) (archaism) youth; freshness; purity; luster (lustre); beauty; (2) good omen; (n,n-pref,n-suf) (3) (ずい only) (abbreviation) (obscure) Sweden; (4) (ずい only) (abbreviation) (obscure) Switzerland; (personal name) Yutaka; (female given name) Midzuho; (female given name) Mizuho; (female given name) Mizuki; (female given name) Mizue; (surname, female given name) Mizu; (female given name) Mio; (female given name) Tamami; (surname) Zui; (surname) Shirushi
Auspicious: a jade token; good omens

正業


正业

see styles
Mandarin zhèng yè / zheng4 ye4
Taiwan cheng yeh
Japanese seigyou / segyo / せいぎょう    shougou / shogo / しょうごう
Chinese one's regular job
Japanese legitimate occupation; honest business; (1) (abbreviation) {Buddh} (See 八正道) right action; (2) (See 正定業) correct meditative activity (in Jodo, saying the name of Amitabha)
samyakkarmānta, right action, purity of body, avoiding all wrong, the fourth of the 八正道; 'right action, abstaining from taking life, or what is not given, or from carnal indulgence. ' Keith; right behavior

純潔

see styles
Mandarin chún jié / chun2 jie2
Taiwan ch`un chieh / chun chieh
Japanese junketsu / じゅんけつ
Chinese pure; clean and honest; to purify
Japanese (adj-na,n,adj-no) purity; chastity

貞潔

see styles
Mandarin zhēn jié / zhen1 jie2
Taiwan chen chieh
Japanese teiketsu / teketsu / ていけつ
Chinese chastity
Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) chastity; purity

八正道

see styles
Mandarin bā zhèng dào / ba1 zheng4 dao4
Taiwan pa cheng tao
Japanese hasshōdō / はっしょうどう
 Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese the Eight-fold Noble Way (Buddhism)
Japanese (Buddhist term) noble eightfold path
(八正道分) Āryamārga. The eight right or correct ways, the "eightfold noble path" for the arhat to nirvāṇa; also styled 八道船, 八正門, 八由行, 八游行, 八聖道支, 八道行, 八直行, 八直道. The eight are: (1) 正見Samyag-dṛṣṭi, correct views in regard to the Four Axioms, and freedom from the common delusion. (2) 正思 Samyak-saṁkalpa, correct thought and purpose. (3) 正語 Samyag-vāc, correct speech, avoidance of false and idle talk. (4) 正業 Samyak-karmānta, correct deed, or conduct, getting rid of all improper action so as to dwell in purity. (5) 正命 Smnyag-ājīva, correct livelihood or occupation, avoiding the five immoral occupations. (6) 正精進 Samyag-vyāyāma, correct zeal, or energy in uninterrupted progress in the way of nirvāṇa. (7) 正念 Samyak-smṛti, correct remembrance, or memory, which retains the true and excludes the false. (8) 正定 Samyak-samadhi, correct meditation, absorption, or abstraction. The 正 means of course Buddhist orthodoxy, anything contrary to this being 邪 or heterodox, and wrong.

心澄淨

see styles
Mandarin xīn chéng jìng / xin1 cheng2 jing4
Taiwan hsin ch`eng ching / hsin cheng ching
Japanese shin chōjō
 Vertical Wall Scroll
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

和敬清寂

see styles
Japanese wakeiseijaku / wakesejaku / わけいせいじゃく
 Vertical Wall Scroll
Japanese (yoji) harmony, respect, purity and tranquility; the four most important elements of the tea ceremony

釋迦牟尼


释迦牟尼

see styles
Mandarin shì jiā móu ní / shi4 jia1 mou2 ni2
Taiwan shih chia mou ni
Japanese Shakamuni
Chinese Siddhartha Gautama (563-485 BC), the historical Buddha and founder of Buddhism; Sakyamuni Buddha (Sanskrit: sage of the Sakya)
釋迦文 (釋迦文尼); 釋伽文 Śākyamuni, the saint of the Śākya tribe. muni is saint, holy man, sage, ascetic monk; it is: intp. as 仁 benevolent, charitable, kind, also as 寂默 one who dwells in seclusion. After '500 or 550' previous incarnations, Śākyamuni finally attained to the state of Bodhisattva, was born in the Tuṣita heaven, and descended as a white elephant, through her right side, into the womb of the immaculate Māyā, the purest woman on earth; this was on the 8th day of the 4th month; next year on the 8th day of the 2nd month he was born from her right side painlessly as she stood under a tree in the Lumbinī garden. For the subsequent miraculous events v. Eitel. also the 神通遊戲經 (Lalitavistara), the 釋迦如來成道記, etc. Simpler statements say that he was born the son of Śuddhodana, of the kṣatriya caste, ruler of Kapilavastu, and Māyā his wife; that Māyā died seven days later, leaving him to be brought up by her sister Prājapati; that in due course he was married to Yaśodharā who bore him a son, Rāhula; that in search of truth he left home, became an ascetic, severely disciplined himself, and finally at 35 years of age, under a tree, realized that the way of release from the chain of rebirth and death lay not in asceticism but in moral purity; this he explained first in his four dogmas, v. 四諦 and eightfold noble way 八正道, later amplified and developed in many sermons. He founded his community on the basis of poverty, chastity, and insight or meditation, ad it became known as Buddhism, as he became known as Buddha, the enlightened. His death was probably in or near 487 B.C., a few years before that of Confucius in 479. The sacerdotal name of his family is Gautama, said to be the original name of the whole clan, Śākya being that of his branch, v. 瞿, 喬.; his personal name was Siddhārtha, or Sarvārthasiddha, v. 悉.

純度

see styles
Mandarin chún dù / chun2 du4
Taiwan ch`un tu / chun tu
Japanese jundo / じゅんど
Chinese purity
Japanese purity (of a substance)

三德

see styles
Mandarin sān dé / san1 de2
Taiwan san te
Japanese santoku
The three virtues or powers, of which three groups are given below. (1) (a) 法身德 The virtue or potency of the Buddha's eternal, spiritual body, the dharmakāya; (b) 般若德 of his prājñā, or wisdom, knowing all things in their reality; (c) 解脫德 of his freedom from all bonds and his sovereign Iiberty. Each of these has the four qualities of 常, 樂我, 淨eternity, joy, personality, and purity; v. 漫涅槃經 (2) (a) 智德 The potency of his perfect knowledge; (b) 斷德 of his cutting off all illusion and perfecting of supreme nirvāṇa; the above two are 自利 for his own advantage; (c) 恩德 of his universal grace and salvation, which 利他 bestows the benefits he has acquired on others. (3) (a) 因圓德 The perfection of his causative or karmic works during his three great kalpas of preparation; (b) 果圓德 the perfection of the fruit, or results in his own character and wisdom; (c) 恩圓德 the perfection of his grace in the salvation of others.

三身

see styles
Mandarin sān shēn / san1 shen1
Taiwan san shen
Japanese sanjin;sanshin / さんじん;さんしん
Japanese {Buddh} trikaya (three bodies of the Buddha); (surname) Sanmi
trikāya. 三寶身 The threefold body or nature of a Buddha, i.e. the 法, 報, and 化身, or dharmakāya, sambhogakāya, and nirmāṇakāya. The three are defined as 自性, 受用, and 變化, the Buddha-body per se, or in its essential nature; his body of bliss, which he "receives" for his own "use" and enjoyment; and his body of transformation, by which he can appear in any form; i.e. spiritual, or essential; glorified; revealed. While the doctrine of the trikāya is a Mahāyāna concept, it partly results from the Hīnayāna idealization of the earthly Buddha with his thirty-two signs, eighty physical marks, clairvoyance, clairaudience, holiness, purity, wisdom, pity, etc. Mahāyāna, however, proceeded to conceive of Buddha as the Universal, the All, with infinity of forms, yet above all our concepts of unity or diversity. To every Buddha Mahāyāna attributed a three-fold body: that of essential Buddha; that of joy or enjoyment of the fruits of his past saving labours; that of power to transform himself at will to any shape for omnipresent salvation of those who need him. The trinity finds different methods of expression, e.g. Vairocana is entitled 法身, the embodiment of the Law, shining everywhere, enlightening all; Locana is 報身; c.f. 三賓, the embodiment of purity and bliss; Śākyamuni is 化身 or Buddha revealed. In the esoteric sect they are 法 Vairocana, 報 Amitābha, and 化 Śākyamuni. The 三賓 are also 法 dharma, 報 saṅgha, 化 buddha. Nevertheless, the three are considered as a trinity, the three being essentially one, each in the other. (1) 法身 Dharmakāya in its earliest conception was that of the body of the dharma, or truth, as preached by Śākyamuni; later it became his mind or soul in contrast with his material body. In Mādhyamika, the dharmakāya was the only reality, i.e. the void, or the immateria1, the ground of all phenomena; in other words, the 眞如 the tathāgatagarbha, the bhūtatathatā. According to the Huayan (Kegon) School it is the 理or noumenon, while the other two are氣or phenomenal aspects. "For the Vijñānavāda... the body of the law as highest reality is the void intelligence, whose infection (saṃkleҫa) results in the process of birth and death, whilst its purification brings about Nirvāṇa, or its restoration to its primitive transparence" (Keith). The "body of the law is the true reality of everything". Nevertheless, in Mahāyāna every Buddha has his own 法身; e.g. in the dharmakāya aspect we have the designation Amitābha, who in his saṃbhogakāya aspect is styled Amitāyus. (2) 報身Sambhogakāya, a Buddha's reward body, or body of enjoyment of the merits he attained as a bodhisattva; in other words, a Buddha in glory in his heaven. This is the form of Buddha as an object of worship. It is defined in two aspects, (a) 自受用身 for his own bliss, and (b) 他受用身 for the sake of others, revealing himself in his glory to bodhisattvas, enlightening and inspiring them. By wisdom a Buddha's dharmakāya is attained, by bodhisattva-merits his saṃbhogakāya. Not only has every Buddha all the three bodies or aspects, but as all men are of the same essence, or nature, as Buddhas, they are therefore potential Buddhas and are in and of the trikāya. Moreover, trikāya is not divided, for a Buddha in his 化身 is still one with his 法身 and 報身, all three bodies being co-existent. (3) 化身; 應身; 應化身 nirmāṇakāya, a Buddha's transformation, or miraculous body, in which he appears at will and in any form outside his heaven, e.g. as Śākyamuni among men; three bodies [of the Buddha]

三門


三门

see styles
Mandarin sān mén / san1 men2
Taiwan san men
Japanese sanmon / さんもん
Chinese Sanmen county in Taizhou 台州[Tai1 zhou1], Zhejiang
Japanese {Buddh} large triple gate to temple; (surname) Mimon; (surname) Mitsukado; (place-name, surname) Mikado; (given name) Sanmon
trividha-dvāra, the three gates; a monastery; purity of body, speech, and thought; idem 三解脫門 also 三業.

五觀


五观

see styles
Mandarin wǔ guān / wu3 guan1
Taiwan wu kuan
Japanese gokan
The five meditations referred to in the Lotus Sutra 25: (1) 眞 on the true, idem 空觀, to meditate on the reality of the void or infinite, in order to be rid of illusion in views and thoughts; (2) 淸淨觀 on purity, to be rid of any remains of impurity connected with the temporal, idem 假觀; (3) 廣大智慧觀 on the wider and greater wisdom, idem 中觀, by study of the 'middle' way; (4) 悲觀 on pitifulness, or the pitiable condition of the living, and by the above three to meditate on their salvation; (5) 慈觀 on mercy and the extension of the first three meditations to the carrying of joy to all the living; five contemplations

倒見


倒见

see styles
Mandarin dào jiàn / dao4 jian4
Taiwan tao chien
Japanese tōken
Cf. 顚 19. Upside-down or inverted views, seeing things as they seem, not as they are, e.g. the impermanent as permanent, misery as joy, non-ego as ego, and impurity as purity; distorted views

八味

see styles
Mandarin bā wèi / ba1 wei4
Taiwan pa wei
Japanese hachimi
The eight savours (or pleasures) of the Buddha's nirvāṇa: 常住 perpetual abode, 寂滅extinction (of distress, etc.), 不老 eternal youth, 不死 immortality, 淸淨 purity, 虛通 absolute freedom (as space), 不動 imperturbility, and 快樂 joy; eight flavors

六卽

see styles
Mandarin liù jí / liu4 ji2
Taiwan liu chi
Japanese rokusoku
The six stages of Bodhisattva developments as defined in the Tiant 'ai 圓教, i. e. Perfect, or Final Teaching, in contrast with the previous, or ordinary six developments of 十信, 十住, 十行, etc., as found in the 別教 Differentiated or Separate school. The Tiantai six are: (1) 理卽 realization that all beings are of Buddha-nature; (2) 名字卽 the apprehension of terms, that those who only hear and believe are in the Buddha. law and potentially Buddha; (3) 觀行卽 advance beyond terminology to meditation, or study and accordant action; it is known as 五品觀行 or 五品弟子位; (4) 相似卽 semblance stage, or approximation to perfection in purity, the 六根淸淨位, i. e. the 十信位; (5) 分證卽 discrimination of truth and its progressive experiential proof, i. e. the 十住, 十行, 十廻向, 十地, and 等覺位 of the 別教 known also as the 聖因 cause or root of holiness. (6) 究竟卽 perfect enlightenment, i. e. the 妙覺位 or 聖果 fruition of holiness. (1) and (2) are known as 外凡 external for, or common to, all. (1) is theoretical; (2) is the first step in practical advance, followed by (3) and (4) styled 内凡 internal for all, and (3), (4), (5), and (6) are known as the 八位 the eight grades; six identicals

分淨

see styles
Mandarin fēn jìng / fen1 jing4
Taiwan fen ching
Japanese funjō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

十地

see styles
Mandarin shí de / shi2 de
Taiwan shih te
Japanese juuji / juji / じゅうじ
Japanese {Buddh} dasabhumi (forty-first to fiftieth stages in the development of a bodhisattva); (place-name) Juuji
daśabhūmi; v. 十住. The "ten stages" in the fifty-two sections of the development of a bodhisattva into a Buddha. After completing the十四向 he proceeds to the 十地. There are several groups. I. The ten stages common to the Three Vehicles 三乘 are: (1) 乾慧地 dry wisdom stage, i. e. unfertilized by Buddha-truth, worldly wisdom; (2) 性地 the embryo-stage of the nature of Buddha-truth, the 四善根; (3) 八人地 (八忍地), the stage of the eight patient endurances; (4) 見地 of freedom from wrong views; (5) 薄地 of freedom from the first six of the nine delusions in practice; (6) 離欲地 of freedom from the remaining three; (7) 巳辨地 complete discrimination in regard to wrong views and thoughts, the stage of an arhat; (8) 辟支佛地 pratyeka-buddhahood, only the dead ashes of the past left to sift; (9) 菩薩地 bodhisattvahood; (10) 佛地 Buddhahood. v. 智度論 78. II. 大乘菩薩十地 The ten stages of Mahāyāna bodhisattva development are: (1) 歡喜地 Pramuditā, joy at having overcome the former difficulties and now entering on the path to Buddhahood; (2) 離垢地 Vimalā, freedom from all possible defilement, the stage of purity; (3) 發光地 Prabhākarī, stage of further enlightenment; (4) 焰慧地 Arciṣmatī, of glowing wisdom; (5) 極難勝地 Sudurjayā, mastery of utmost or final difficulties; (6) 現前地 Abhimukhī, the open way of wisdom above definitions of impurity and purity; (7) 遠行地 Dūraṁgamā, proceeding afar, getting above ideas of self in order to save others; (8) 不動地 Acalā, attainment of calm unperturbedness; (9) 善慧地 Sādhumatī, of the finest discriminatory wisdom, knowing where and how to save, and possessed of the 十力 ten powers; (10) 法雲地 Dharmamegha, attaining to the fertilizing powers of the law-cloud. Each of the ten stages is connected with each of the ten pāramitās, v. 波. Each of the 四乘 or four vehicles has a division of ten. III. The 聲聞乘十地 ten Śrāvaka stages are: (1) 受三歸地 initiation as a disciple by receiving the three refuges, in the Buddha, Dharma, and Saṅgha; (2) 信地 belief, or the faith-root; (3) 信法地 belief in the four truths; (4) 内凡夫地 ordinary disciples who observe the 五停心觀, etc.; (5) 學信戒 those who pursue the 三學 three studies; (6) 八人忍地 the stage of 見道 seeing the true Way; (7) 須陀洹地 śrota-āpanna, now definitely in the stream and assured of nirvāṇa; (8) 斯陀含地 sakrdāgāmin, only one more rebirth; (9) 阿那含地 anāgāmin, no rebirth; and (10) 阿羅漢地 arhatship. IV. The ten stages of the pratyekabuddha 緣覺乘十地 are (1) perfect asceticism; (2) mastery of the twelve links of causation; (3) of the four noble truths; (4) of the deeper knowledge; (5) of the eightfold noble path; (6) of the three realms 三法界; (7) of the nirvāṇa state; (8) of the six supernatural powers; (9) arrival at the intuitive stage; (10) mastery of the remaining influence of former habits. V. 佛乘十地 The ten stages, or characteristics of a Buddha, are those of the sovereign or perfect attainment of wisdom, exposition, discrimination, māra-subjugation, suppression of evil, the six transcendent faculties, manifestation of all bodhisattva enlightenment, powers of prediction, of adaptability, of powers to reveal the bodhisattva Truth. VI. The Shingon has its own elaborate ten stages, and also a group 十地十心, see 十心; and there are other groups.

十妙

see styles
Mandarin shí miào / shi2 miao4
Taiwan shih miao
Japanese jūmyō
The ten wonders, or incomprehensibles; there are two groups, the 迹v traceable or manifested and 本門妙 the fundamental. The 迹門十妙 are the wonder of: (1) 境妙 the universe, sphere, or whole, embracing mind, Buddha, and all things as a unity; (2) 智妙 a Buddha's all-embracing knowledge arising from such universe; (3) 行妙 his deeds, expressive of his wisdom; (4) 位妙 his attainment of all the various Buddha stages, i.e. 十住 and十地; (5) 三法妙 his three laws of 理, 慧, and truth, wisdom, and vision; (6) 感應妙 his response to appeal, i.e. his (spiritual) response or relation to humanity, for "all beings are my children"; (7) 神通妙 his supernatural powers; (8) 說法妙 his preaching; (9) 眷屬妙 his supernatural retinue; (10) 利益妙 the blessings derived through universal elevation into Buddhahood. The 本門十妙 are the wonder of (1) 本因妙 the initial impulse or causative stage of Buddhahood; (2) 本果妙 its fruit or result in eternity, joy, and purity; (3) 國土妙 his (Buddha) realm; (4) 感應妙 his response (to human needs); (5) 神通妙 his supernatural powers; (6) 說法妙 his preaching; (7) 眷屬妙 his supernatural retinue; (8) 涅槃妙 his nirvāṇa; (9) 壽命妙 his (eternal) life; (10) his blessings as above. Both groups are further defined as progressive stages in a Buddha's career. These "wonders" are derived from the Lotus sūtra.

十德

see styles
Mandarin shí dé / shi2 de2
Taiwan shih te
Japanese jittoku
The ten virtues, powers, or qualities, of which there are several groups, e.g. in the 華嚴經,十地品 there are 法師十德 the ten virtues of a teacher of the Law, i.e. he should be well versed in its meaning; able widely to publish it; not be nervous before an audience; be untiring in argument; adaptable; orderly so that his teaching can be easily followed; serious and dignified; bold and zealous; unwearied; and enduring (able to bear insult, etc.). The 弟子十德 ten virtues or qualities of a disciple according to the 大日經疏 4, are faith; sincerity; devotion to the trikāya; (seeking the) adornment of true wisdom; perseverance; moral purity; patience (or bearing shame); generosity in giving; courage; resoluteness.

命梵

see styles
Mandarin mìng fàn / ming4 fan4
Taiwan ming fan
Japanese myōbon
Life and honour, i. e. perils to life and perils to noble character; life and purity

四倒

see styles
Mandarin sì dào / si4 dao4
Taiwan ssu tao
Japanese shitō
The four viparyaya i. e. inverted or false beliefs in regard to 常, 樂, 我, 淨. There are two groups: (1) the common belief in the four above, denied by the early Buddhist doctrine that all is impermanent, suffering, impersonal, and impure; (2) the false belief of the Hīnayāna school that nirvana is not a state of permanence, joy, personality, and purity. Hīnayāna refutes the common view in regard to the phenomenal life; bodhisattvism refutes both views; four errors

四德

see styles
Mandarin sì dé / si4 de2
Taiwan ssu te
Japanese shitoku
Chinese four Confucian injunctions 孝悌忠信 (for men), namely: piety 孝 to one's parents, respect 悌 to one's older brother, loyalty 忠 to one's monarch, faith 信 to one's male friends; the four Confucian virtues for women of morality 德, physical charm 容, propriety in speech 言 and efficiency in needlework 功
The four nirvana virtues, or values, according to the Mahāyāna Nirvana Sutra: (1) 常德 permanence or eternity; (2) 樂德 joy; (3) 我德 personality or the soul; (4) 淨德 purity. These four important terms, while denied in the lower realms, are affirmed by the sutra in the transcendental, or nirvana-realm; four virtues

四禪


四禅

see styles
Mandarin sì chán / si4 chan2
Taiwan ssu ch`an / ssu chan
Japanese shizen
(四禪天) The four dhyāna heavens, 四靜慮 (四靜慮天), i. e. the division of the eighteen brahmalokas into four dhyānas: the disciple attains to one of these heavens according to the dhyāna he observes: (1) 初禪天 The first region, 'as large as one whole universe' comprises the three heavens, Brahma-pāriṣadya, Brahma-purohita, and Mahābrahma, 梵輔, 梵衆, and 大梵天; the inhabitants are without gustatory or olfactory organs, not needing food, but possess the other four of the six organs. (2) 二禪天 The second region, equal to 'a small chiliocosmos' 小千界, comprises the three heavens, according to Eitel, 'Parīttābha, Apramāṇābha, and Ābhāsvara, ' i. e. 少光 minor light, 無量光 infinite light, and 極光淨 utmost light purity; the inhabitants have ceased to require the five physical organs, possessing only the organ of mind. (3) 三禪天 The third region, equal to 'a middling chiliocosmos '中千界, comprises three heavens; Eitel gives them as Parīttaśubha, Apramāṇaśubha, and Śubhakṛtsna, i. e. 少淨 minor purity, 無量淨 infinite purity, and 徧淨 universal purity; the inhabitants still have the organ of mind and are receptive of great joy. (4) 四禪天 The fourth region, equal to a great chiliocosmos, 大千界, comprises the remaining nine brahmalokas, namely, Puṇyaprasava, Anabhraka, Bṛhatphala, Asañjñisattva, Avṛha, Atapa, Sudṛśa, Sudarśana, and Akaniṣṭha (Eitel). The Chinese titles are 福生 felicitous birth, 無雲 cloudless, 廣果 large fruitage, 無煩 no vexations, atapa is 無熱 no heat, sudṛśa is 善見 beautiful to see, sudarśana is 善現 beautiful appearing, two others are 色究竟 the end of form, and 無想天 the heaven above thought, but it is difficult to trace avṛha and akaniṣṭha; the inhabitants of this fourth region still have mind. The number of the dhyāna heavens differs; the Sarvāstivādins say 16, the 經 or Sutra school 17, and the Sthavirāḥ school 18. Eitel points out that the first dhyāna has one world with one moon, one mem, four continents, and six devalokas; the second dhyāna has 1, 000 times the worlds of the first; the third has 1, 000 times the worlds of the second; the fourth dhyāna has 1, 000 times those of the third. Within a kalpa of destruction 壞劫 the first is destroyed fifty-six times by fire, the second seven by water, the third once by wind, the fourth 'corresponding to a state of absolute indifference' remains 'untouched' by all the other evolutions; when 'fate (天命) comes to an end then the fourth dhyāna may come to an end too, but not sooner'.

堪淨

see styles
Mandarin kān jìng / kan1 jing4
Taiwan k`an ching / kan ching
Japanese kanjō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

外淨

see styles
Mandarin wài jìng / wai4 jing4
Taiwan wai ching
Japanese gejō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

大日

see styles
Mandarin dà rì / da4 ri4
Taiwan ta jih
Japanese dainichi / だいにち
Japanese Mahavairocana (Tathagata); Great Sun; Supreme Buddha of Sino-Japanese esoteric Buddhism; (place-name, surname) Dainichi; (surname) Ookusa
Vairocana, or Mahāvairocana 大日如來; 遍照如來; 摩訶毘盧遮那; 毘盧遮那; 大日覺王 The sun, "shining everywhere" The chief object of worship of the Shingon sect in Japan, "represented by the gigantic image in the temple at Nara." (Eliot.) There he is known as Dai-nichi-nyorai. He is counted as the first, and according to some, the origin of the five celestial Buddhas (dhyāni-buddhas, or jinas). He dwells quiescent in Arūpa-dhātu, the Heaven beyond form, and is the essence of wisdom (bodhi) and of absolute purity. Samantabhadra 普賢 is his dhyāni-bodhisattva. The 大日經 "teaches that Vairocana is the whole world, which is divided into Garbhadhātu (material) and Vajradhātu (indestructible), the two together forming Dharmadhātu. The manifestations of Vairocana's body to himself―that is, Buddhas and Bodhisattvas ―are represented symbolically by diagrams of several circles ". Eliot. In the 金剛界 or vajradhātu maṇḍala he is the center of the five groups. In the 胎藏界 or Garbhadhātu he is the center of the eight-leaf (lotus) court. His appearance, symbols, esoteric word, differ according to the two above distinctions. Generally he is considered as an embodiment of the Truth 法, both in the sense of dharmakāya 法身 and dharmaratna 法寳. Some hold Vairocana to be the dharmakāya of Śākyamuni 大日與釋迦同一佛 but the esoteric school denies this identity. Also known as 最高顯廣眼藏如來, the Tathagata who, in the highest, reveals the far-reaching treasure of his eye, i.e. the sun. 大日大聖不動明王 is described as one of his transformations. Also, a śramaņa of Kashmir (contemporary of Padma-saṃbhava); he is credited with introducing Buddhism into Khotan and being an incarnation of Mañjuśrī; the king Vijaya Saṃbhava built a monastery for him.

如實


如实

see styles
Mandarin rú shí / ru2 shi2
Taiwan ju shih
Japanese nyo jitsu
Chinese as things really are; realistic
Real, reality, according to reality ( yathābhūtam); true; the 眞如 zhenru, or bhūtatathatā, for which it is also used; the universal undifferentiated, i. e. 平等不二, or the primary essence out of which the phenomenal arises; 如實空 is this essence in its purity; 如實不空 is this essence in its differentiation.

始覺


始觉

see styles
Mandarin shǐ jué / shi3 jue2
Taiwan shih chüeh
Japanese shigaku
The initial functioning of mind or intelligence as a process of 'becoming', arising from 本覺 which is Mind or Intelligence, self-contained, unsullied, and considered as universal, the source of all enlightenment. The 'initial intelligence' or enlightenment arises from the inner influence 薰 of the Mind and from external teaching. In the 'original intelligence' are the four values adopted and made transcendent by the Nirvāṇa-sūtra, viz. 常, 樂, 我, 淨 Perpetuity, joy, personality, and purity; these are acquired through the 始覺 process of enlightenment. Cf. 起信論 Awakening of Faith.

少淨

see styles
Mandarin shǎo jìng / shao3 jing4
Taiwan shao ching
Japanese shōjō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

就淨

see styles
Mandarin jiù jìng / jiu4 jing4
Taiwan chiu ching
Japanese shūjō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

尸羅


尸罗

see styles
Mandarin shī luō / shi1 luo1
Taiwan shih lo
Japanese shira
Chinese sila (Buddhism)
Sila, 尸; 尸怛羅 intp. by 淸凉 pure and cool, i.e. chaste; also by 戒 restraint, or keeping the commandments; also by 性善 of good disposition. It is the second pāramitā, moral purity, i. e. of thought, word, and deed. The four conditions of śīla are chaste, calm, quiet, extinguished, i. e. no longer perturbed by the passions. Also, perhaps śīla, a stone, i. e. a precious stone, pearl, or coral. For the ten śīlas or commandments v. 十戒, the first five, or pañca-śīla 五戒, are for all Buddhists; (Skt. śīla)

年三

see styles
Mandarin nián sān / nian2 san1
Taiwan nien san
Japanese nensan
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

徧淨


遍净

see styles
Mandarin biàn jìng / bian4 jing4
Taiwan pien ching
Japanese henjō
Universal purity; perfect purity

心淨

see styles
Mandarin xīn jìng / xin1 jing4
Taiwan hsin ching
Japanese shinjō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

心蓮


心莲

see styles
Mandarin xīn lián / xin1 lian2
Taiwan hsin lien
Japanese Shinren
The lotus of the mind or heart; the exoteric school interprets it by original purity; the esoteric by the physical heart, which resembles a closed lotus with eight petals; Shinren

忠純

see styles
Japanese chuujun / chujun / ちゅうじゅん Japanese faithfulness and purity; unswerving loyalty; (female given name) Tadazumi

成色

see styles
Mandarin chéng sè / cheng2 se4
Taiwan ch`eng se / cheng se
Chinese relative purity of silver or gold; purity in carat weight; quality; fineness

戒淨

see styles
Mandarin jiè jìng / jie4 jing4
Taiwan chieh ching
Japanese kaijō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

持淨

see styles
Mandarin chí jìng / chi2 jing4
Taiwan ch`ih ching / chih ching
Japanese jijō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

末尼

see styles
Mandarin mò ní / mo4 ni2
Taiwan mo ni
Japanese mani
maṇi 摩尼; a jewel, a crystal, a pearl, symbol of purity, therefore of Buddha and of his doctrine. It is used in oṃ-maṇi -padmi-hūṃ.

本淨


本净

see styles
Mandarin běn jìng / ben3 jing4
Taiwan pen ching
Japanese honjou / honjo / ほんじょう
Japanese (surname) Honjou
(本淨無漏) Primal purity.

染淨


染净

see styles
Mandarin rǎn jìng / ran3 jing4
Taiwan jan ching
Japanese zenjō
Impurity and purity; the thoughts and things of desire are impure, the thoughts and methods of salvation are pure; defilement and purity

根淨


根净

see styles
Mandarin gēn jìng / gen1 jing4
Taiwan ken ching
Japanese konjō
The purity of the six organs of sense; purity of the sense organs

梵僧

see styles
Mandarin fàn sēng / fan4 seng1
Taiwan fan seng
Japanese bonsou / bonso / ぼんそう
Japanese {Buddh} monk (esp. one who maintains his purity)
A monk from India. Also a monk who maintains his purity; Indian monk

梵刹

see styles
Mandarin fàn shā / fan4 sha1
Taiwan fan sha
Japanese bonsatsu;bonsetsu / ぼんさつ;ぼんせつ
Japanese temple
brahmakṣetra, Buddha-land; a name for a Buddhist: monastery, i.e. a place of purity; to place of purity

梵志

see styles
Mandarin fàn zhì / fan4 zhi4
Taiwan fan chih
Japanese bonji
brahmacārin. 'studying sacred learning; practising continence or chastity.' M.W. A brahmacārī is a 'young Brahman in the first āśrama or period of his life' (M. W.); there are four such periods. A Buddhist ascetic with his will set on 梵 purity, also intp. as nirvana; brāhmaṇa

梵道

see styles
Mandarin fàn dào / fan4 dao4
Taiwan fan tao
Japanese bondō
The way of purity, or celibacy; the brahmanway; path of purity

梵難


梵难

see styles
Mandarin fàn nán / fan4 nan2
Taiwan fan nan
Japanese bonnan
The difficulty of maintaining celibacy, or purity.

歸淨


归淨

see styles
Mandarin guī jìng / gui1 jing4
Taiwan kuei ching
Japanese kijō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

水絲

see styles
Mandarin shuǐ sī / shui3 si1
Taiwan shui ssu
Chinese (silver) of low purity; low grade

沙門


沙门

see styles
Mandarin shā mén / sha1 men2
Taiwan sha men
Japanese shamon;samon / しゃもん;さもん
Chinese monk (Sanskrit: Sramana, originally refers to north India); Buddhist monk
Japanese {Buddh} shramana (wandering monk); (surname) Shamon
śramaṇa. 桑門; 娑門; 喪門; 沙門那; 舍羅磨拏; 沙迦懣曩; 室摩那拏 (1) Ascetics of all kinds; 'the Sarmanai, or Samanaioi, or Germanai of the Greeks, perhaps identical also with the Tungusian Saman or Shaman.' Eitel. (2) Buddhist monks 'who 'have left their families and quitted the passions', the Semnoi of the Greeks'. Eitel. Explained by 功勞 toilful achievement, 勤息 diligent quieting (of the mind and the passions), 淨志 purity of mind, 貧道 poverty. 'He must keep well the Truth, guard well every uprising (of desire), be uncontaminated by outward attractions, be merciful to all and impure to none, be not elated to joy nor harrowed by distress, and able to bear whatever may come.' The Sanskrit root is śram, to make effort; exert oneself, do austerities.

法性

see styles
Mandarin fǎ xìng / fa3 xing4
Taiwan fa hsing
Japanese hosshou;houshou / hossho;hosho / ほっしょう;ほうしょう
Japanese {Buddh} (See 法相・ほっそう・1) dharmata (dharma nature, the true nature of all manifest phenomena); (personal name) Hosshou; (surname) Houshou
dharmatā. Dharma-nature, the nature underlying all thing, the bhūtatathatā, a Mahāyāna philosophical concept unknown in Hīnayāna, v. 眞如 and its various definitions in the 法相, 三論 (or法性), 華嚴, and 天台 Schools. It is discussed both in its absolute and relative senses, or static and dynamic. In the Mahāparinirvāṇa sūtra and various śāstras the term has numerous alternative forms, which may be taken as definitions, i. e. 法定 inherent dharma, or Buddha-nature; 法住 abiding dharma-nature; 法界 dharmakṣetra, realm of dharma; 法身 dharmakāya, embodiment of dharma; 實際 region of reality; 實相 reality; 空性 nature of the Void, i. e. immaterial nature; 佛性 Buddha-nature; 無相 appearance of nothingness, or immateriality; 眞如 bhūtatathatā; 如來藏 tathāgatagarbha; 平等性 universal nature; 離生性 immortal nature; 無我性 impersonal nature; 虛定界: realm of abstraction; 不虛妄性 nature of no illusion; 不變異性 immutable nature; 不思議界 realm beyond thought; 自性淸淨心 mind of absolute purity, or unsulliedness, etc. Of these the terms 眞如, 法性, and 實際 are most used by the Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

涅槃

see styles
Mandarin niè pán / nie4 pan2
Taiwan nieh p`an / nieh pan
Japanese nehan / ねはん
Chinese nirvana (Buddhism)
Japanese Nirvana; Buddha's death; salvation
nirvāṇa, 'blown out, gone out, put out, extinguished'; 'liberated-from existence'; 'dead, deceased, defunct.' 'Liberation, eternal bliss'; '(with Buddhists and Jainas) absolute extinction or annihilation, complete extinction of individual existence.' M.W. Other forms are 涅槃那; 泥日; 泥洹; 泥畔 Originally translated 滅 to extinguish, extinction, put out (as a lamp or fire), it was also described as 解脫 release, 寂滅 tranquil extinction; 無爲 inaction, without effort, passiveness; 不生 no (re)birth; 安樂 calm joy; 滅度transmigration to 'extinction'. The meaning given to 'extinction' varies, e.g. individual extinction; cessation of rebirth; annihilation of passion; extinction of all misery and entry into bliss. While the meaning of individual extinction is not without advocates, the general acceptation is the extinction or end of all return to reincarnation with its concomitant suffering, and the entry into bliss. Nirvāṇa may be enjoyed in the present life as an attainable state, with entry into parinirvāṇa, or perfect bliss to follow. It may be (a) with a 'remainder', i.e. the cause but not all the effect (karma), of reincarnation having been destroyed; (b) without 'remainder', both cause and effect having been extinguished. The answer of the Buddha as to the continued personal existence of the Tathāgata in nirvāṇa is, in the Hīnayāna canon, relegated 'to the sphere of the indeterminates' (Keith), as one of the questions which are not essential to salvation. One argument is that flame when blown out does not perish but returns to the totality of Fire. The Nirvāṇa Sutra claims for nirvāṇa the ancient ideas of 常樂我淨 permanence, bliss, personality purity in the transcendental realm. Mahāyāna declares that Hīnayāna by denying personality in the transcendental realm denies the existence of the Buddha. In Mahāyāna final nirvāṇa is transcendental, and is also used as a term for the absolute. The place where the Buddha entered his earthly nirvāṇa is given as Kuśinagara, cf. 拘.

淨住


净住

see styles
Mandarin jìng zhù / jing4 zhu4
Taiwan ching chu
Japanese jōjū
A pure rest, or abode of purity, a term for a Buddhist monastery; pure abode

淨勝


淨胜

see styles
Mandarin jìng shèng / jing4 sheng4
Taiwan ching sheng
Japanese jōshō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

淨垢

see styles
Mandarin jìng gòu / jing4 gou4
Taiwan ching kou
Japanese jōku
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

淨屋


净屋

see styles
Mandarin jìng wū / jing4 wu1
Taiwan ching wu
Japanese jō oku
House of chastity, i.e. a monastery or convent; house of purity

淨德

see styles
Mandarin jìng dé / jing4 de2
Taiwan ching te
Japanese jōtoku
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

淨性

see styles
Mandarin jìng xìng / jing4 xing4
Taiwan ching hsing
Japanese jōshō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

淨戒


净戒

see styles
Mandarin jìng jiè / jing4 jie4
Taiwan ching chieh
Japanese jōkai
The pure commandments, or to keep the in purity; pure precepts

淨相

see styles
Mandarin jìng xiàng / jing4 xiang4
Taiwan ching hsiang
Japanese jō sō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

淨行

see styles
Mandarin jìng xíng / jing4 xing2
Taiwan ching hsing
Japanese jōgyō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

淨門


净门

see styles
Mandarin jìng mén / jing4 men2
Taiwan ching men
Japanese jōmon
Gate of purity to nirvana, one of the 六妙; [meditative] approach of purity

淸淨


淸净

see styles
Mandarin qīng jìng / qing1 jing4
Taiwan ch`ing ching / ching ching
Japanese shōjō
pariśuddhi; viśuddhi. Pure and clean, free from evil and defilement, perfectly clean; pure; purified; purity

清廉

see styles
Mandarin qīng lián / qing1 lian2
Taiwan ch`ing lien / ching lien
Japanese seiren / seren / せいれん
Chinese honest; uncorrupted
Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) honesty; integrity; purity and unselfishness; (given name) Kiyoyuki; (given name) Kiyokado

清浄

see styles
Japanese seijou(p);shoujou / sejo(p);shojo / せいじょう(P);しょうじょう Japanese (adj-na,n,adj-no) pure; clean; purity; (surname) Seijou

清濁

see styles
Japanese seidaku / sedaku / せいだく Japanese (1) good and evil; purity and impurity; (2) voiced and unvoiced consonants

清純

see styles
Mandarin qīng chún / qing1 chun2
Taiwan ch`ing ch`un / ching chun
Japanese seijun / sejun / せいじゅん
Chinese fresh and pure
Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) purity; innocence; (given name) Seijun; (male given name) Kiyozumi; (female given name) Kiyosumi

潔白


洁白

see styles
Mandarin jié bái / jie2 bai2
Taiwan chieh pai
Japanese keppaku / けっぱく
Chinese spotlessly white; pure white
Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) innocence (i.e. not guilty); purity; uprightness
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

無垢


无垢

see styles
Mandarin wú gòu / wu2 gou4
Taiwan wu kou
Japanese muku / むく
Japanese (n,adj-na,adj-no) purity
vimala; amala. Undefiled, stainless; similar to 無漏.

無塩

see styles
Japanese muen;buen / むえん;ぶえん Japanese (noun - becomes adjective with の) (1) salt free; no-salt; unsalted; (2) (ぶえん only) raw fish; fresh fish; (3) (ぶえん only) purity; naive person; (4) (ぶえん only) ugly woman

照寂

see styles
Mandarin zhào jì / zhao4 ji4
Taiwan chao chi
Japanese shōjaku
The shining mystic purity of Buddha, or the bhūtatathatā; luminous and quiescent

理智

see styles
Mandarin lǐ zhì / li3 zhi4
Taiwan li chih
Japanese richi / りち    masatomo / まさとも    masatoshi / まさとし    osatoshi / おさとし
Chinese reason; intellect; rationality; rational
Japanese intellect; intelligence; (female given name) Richi; (personal name) Masatomo; (personal name) Masatoshi; (personal name) Osatoshi
Principle and gnosis (or reason); the noumenal in essence and in knowledge; the truth in itself and in knowledge; li is also the fundamental principle of the phenomenon under observation, chih the observing wisdom; one is reality, the other the knower or knowing; one is the known object, the other the knower, the knowing, or what is known; each is dependent on the other, chih depends on lili is revealed by chih. Also knowledge or enlightenment in its essence or purity, free from incarnational influences; cognition of principle

白蓮


白莲

see styles
Mandarin bái lián / bai2 lian2
Taiwan pai lien
Japanese byakuren / びゃくれん
Chinese white lotus (flower); White Lotus society; same as 白蓮教|白莲教
Japanese (1) white lotus; (2) purity; pure heart; (given name) Byakuren; (female given name) Hakuren
(白蓮華); 分陀利 puṇḍarīka, the white lotus.

神淸

see styles
Mandarin shén qīng / shen2 qing1
Taiwan shen ch`ing / shen ching
Japanese jinshō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

精一

see styles
Japanese seiitsu / setsu / せいいつ Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) purity; (given name) Seiitsu; (given name) Seiichi; (given name) Kiyokazu

精粋

see styles
Japanese seisui / sesui / せいすい Japanese purity; unselfishness

純一


纯一

see styles
Mandarin chún yī / chun2 yi1
Taiwan ch`un i / chun i
Japanese junitsu / じゅんいつ
Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) purity; homogeneity; unadorned; (given name) Yoshikazu; (personal name) Sumikazu; (given name) Jun'ichi
Pure, unmixed, solely, simply, entirely; purely

純分

see styles
Japanese junbun / じゅんぶん Japanese fineness or purity (of gold)

純真

see styles
Mandarin chún zhēn / chun2 zhen1
Taiwan ch`un chen / chun chen
Japanese junshin / じゅんしん
Chinese sincere
Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) purity; sincerity; (female given name) Kokoro; (female given name) Ayami

純良

see styles
Japanese junryou / junryo / じゅんりょう Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) purity; pure (and good); genuine; (male given name) Sumiyoshi; (personal name) Junriyou

純質


纯质

see styles
Mandarin chún zhí / chun2 zhi2
Taiwan ch`un chih / chun chih
Japanese junshitsu
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

至純

see styles
Japanese shijun / しじゅん Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) absolute purity

至醇

see styles
Japanese shijun / しじゅん Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) absolute purity

見淨


见淨

see styles
Mandarin jiàn jìng / jian4 jing4
Taiwan chien ching
Japanese kenjō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

足色

see styles
Mandarin zú sè / zu2 se4
Taiwan tsu se
Chinese (gold or silver) of standard purity; (fig.) fine

遍淨

see styles
Mandarin biàn jìng / bian4 jing4
Taiwan pien ching
Japanese henjō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

道禁

see styles
Mandarin dào jìn / dao4 jin4
Taiwan tao chin
Japanese dōgon
Whatever is prohibited by the religion, or the religious life; śīla, the second pāramitā, moral purity; prohibitions of the path

金位

see styles
Japanese kini / きんい Japanese fineness of gold; purity of gold

金性

see styles
Japanese kinshou / kinsho / きんしょう Japanese (1) purity measure for gold; karat; carat; K; kt; (2) (See 金・きん・5) personality of a person born under the element of fire

隨淨


随淨

see styles
Mandarin suí jìng / sui2 jing4
Taiwan sui ching
Japanese zuijō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

高潔

see styles
Mandarin gāo jié / gao1 jie2
Taiwan kao chieh
Japanese kouketsu / koketsu / こうけつ
Chinese noble and clean-living; lofty and unsullied
Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) purity; nobility; (given name) Takakiyo

七最勝


七最胜

see styles
Mandarin qī zuì shèng / qi1 zui4 sheng4
Taiwan ch`i tsui sheng / chi tsui sheng
Japanese shichi saishō
The seven perfections, see唯識論, 9. 安住最勝 Perfect rest in the bodhisattva nature. 依止最勝 perfect reliance on, or holding fast to the great bodhi (awakened mind). 意果最勝 perfect resultant aim in-pity for all 事業最勝 Perfect in constant performance. 巧便最勝 Perfect in able device (for spiritual presentation). 廻向最勝 Perfect direction towards the highest bodhi. 滿淨最勝 Perfect purity and peace.

世間淨


世间淨

see styles
Mandarin shì jiān jìng / shi4 jian1 jing4
Taiwan shih chien ching
Japanese seken jō
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

五部淨


五部净

see styles
Mandarin wǔ bù jìng / wu3 bu4 jing4
Taiwan wu pu ching
Japanese gobu jō
(居 炎 摩 羅) Yama as protector in the retinue of the thousand-hand Guanyin; five part purity (?)

光音天

see styles
Mandarin guāng yīn tiān / guang1 yin1 tian1
Taiwan kuang yin t`ien / kuang yin tien
Japanese kōon ten
Ābhāsvara, light and sound, or light-sound heavens, also styled 極光淨天, the heavens of utmost light and purity, i. e. the third of the second dhyāna heavens, in which the inhabitants converse by light instead of words; they recreate the universe from the hells up to and including the first dhyāna heavens after it has been destroyed by fire during he final series of cataclysms; but they gradually diminish in power and are reborn in lower states. The three heavens of the second dhyāna are 少光, 無量光, and 光音; heaven of radiant sound

八解脫


八解脱

see styles
Mandarin bā jiě tuō / ba1 jie3 tuo1
Taiwan pa chieh t`o / pa chieh to
Japanese hachi gedatsu
aṣṭa-vimokṣa, mokṣa, vimukti, mukti. Liberation, deliverance, freedom, emancipation, escape, release―in eight forms; also 八背捨 and cf. 解脫 and 八勝處. The eight are stages of mental concentration: (1) 内有色想觀外色解脱 Liberation, when subjective desire arises, by examination of the object, or of all things and realization of their filthiness. (2) 内無色想觀外色解脫 Liberation, when no subjective desire arises, by still meditating as above. These two are deliverance by meditation on impurity, the next on purity. (3) 淨身作證具足住解脫 Liberation by concentration on the pure to the realization of a permanent state of freedom from all desire. The above three "correspond to the four Dhyānas". (Eitel.) (4) 空無邊處解脫 Liberation in realization of the infinity of space, or the immaterial. (5) 識無邊處解脫 Liberation in realization of infinite knowledge. (6) 無所有處解脫Liberation in realization of nothingness, or nowhereness. (7) 非想非非想處解脫 Liberation in the state of mind where there is neither thought nor absence of thought. These four arise out of abstract meditation in regard to desire and form, and are associated with the 四空天. (8) 滅受 想定解脫 Liberation by means of a state of mind in which there is final extinction, nirvāṇa, of both sensation, vedanā, and consciousness, saṁjñā; eight kinds of liberation

八顚倒

see styles
Mandarin bā diān dào / ba1 dian1 dao4
Taiwan pa tien tao
Japanese hachi tendō
The eight upside-down views: heretics believe in 常樂我淨 permanence, pleasure, personality, and purity; the two Hīnayāna vehicles deny these both now and in nirvāṇa. Mahāyāna denies them now, but asserts them in nirvāṇa. Also 八倒; eight inverted views

六染心

see styles
Mandarin liù rǎn xīn / liu4 ran3 xin1
Taiwan liu jan hsin
Japanese roku zenshin
The six mental 'taints' of the Awakening of Faith 起心論. Though mind-essence is by nature pure and without stain, the condition of 無明 ignorance, or innocence, permits of taint or defilement corresponding to the following six phases: (1) 執相應染 the taint interrelated to attachment, or holding the seeming for the real; it is the state of 執取相 and 名字相 which is cut off in the final pratyeka and śrāvaka stage and the bodhisattva 十住 of faith; (2) 不斷相應染 the taint interrelated to the persisting attraction of the causes of pain and pleasure; it is the 相續相 finally eradicated in the bodhisattva 初地 stage of purity; (3) 分別智相應染 the taint interrelated to the 'particularizing intelligence' which discerns things within and without this world; it is the first 智相, cut off in the bodhisattva 七地 stage of spirituality; (4) 現色不相應染 the non-interrelated or primary taint, i. e. of the 'ignorant' mind as yet hardly discerning subject from object, of accepting an external world; the third 現相 cut of in the bodhisattva 八地 stage of emancipation from the material; (5) 能見心不相應染 the non-interrelated or primary taint of accepting a perceptive mind, the second 轉相, cut of in the bodhisattva 九地 of intuition, or emancipation from mental effort; (6) 根本業不相應染 the non-interrelated or primary taint of accepting the idea of primal action or activity in the absolute; it is the first 業相, and cut of in the 十地 highest bodhisattva stage, entering on Buddhahood. See Suzuki's translation, 80-1; six kinds of defiled mind

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This page contains 100 results for "purity" in Chinese and/or Japanese.



Information about this dictionary:

Apparently, we were the first ones who were crazy enough to think that western people might want a combined Chinese, Japanese, and Buddhist dictionary.

A lot of westerners can't tell the difference between Chinese and Japanese - and there is a reason for that. Chinese characters and even whole words were borrowed by Japan from the Chinese language in the 5th century. Much of the time, if a word or character is used in both languages, it will have the same or a similar meaning. However, this is not always true. Language evolves, and meanings independently change in each language.

Example: The Chinese character 湯 for soup (hot water) has come to mean bath (hot water) in Japanese. They have the same root meaning of "hot water", but a 湯屋 sign on a bathhouse in Japan would lead a Chinese person to think it was a "soup house" or a place to get a bowl of soup. See this: Soup or Bath

This dictionary uses the EDICT and CC-CEDICT dictionary files.
EDICT data is the property of the Electronic Dictionary Research and Development Group, and is used in conformance with the Group's license.

Chinese Buddhist terms come from Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist Terms by William Edward Soothill and Lewis Hodous. This is commonly referred to as "Soothill's'". It was first published in 1937 (and is now off copyright so we can use it here). Some of these definitions may be misleading, incomplete, or dated, but 95% of it is good information. Every professor who teaches Buddhism or Eastern Religion has a copy of this on their bookshelf. We incorporated these 16,850 entries into our dictionary database ourselves (it was lot of work).



Combined, these cover 355,969 Japanese, Chinese, and Buddhist characters, words, idioms, and short phrases.

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No warranty as to the correctness, potential vulgarity, or clarity is expressed or implied. We did not write any of these definitions (though we occasionally act as a contributor/editor to the CC-CEDICT project). You are using this dictionary for free, and you get what you pay for.

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Japanese Kanji Dictionary

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