Free Chinese & Japanese Online Dictionary

Include Japanese names (2-3 seconds longer).

If you enter English words, search is Boolean mode:
Enter fall to get just entries with fall in them.
Enter fall* to get results including "falling" and "fallen".
Enter +fall -season -autumn to make sure fall is included, but not entries with autumn or season.

Key:

Mandarin Mandarin Chinese information.
Wade Giles Old Wade-Giles romanization used only in Taiwan.
Japanese Japanese information.
Buddhist definition. Note: May not apply to all sects.
 Definition may be different outside of Buddhism.

There are 726 total results for your bodhisattva search. I have created 8 pages of results for you. Each page contains 100 results...
12345678>

If shown, 2nd row of characters is Simplified Chinese.

Characters Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition

see styles
Mandarin de / de
Taiwan te
Japanese chi / ち    ji / じ
Chinese earth; ground; field; place; land; CL:片[pian4]; -ly; structural particle: used before a verb or adjective, linking it to preceding modifying adverbial adjunct
Japanese (n,n-suf) (1) earth; ground; land; soil; (2) place; (3) territory; (4) (See 天地無用) bottom (of a package, book, etc.); (5) (See 五大・1,土・ど・2) earth (one of the five elements); (1) (abbreviation) ground; land; earth; soil; (2) the region in question; the local area; (3) skin; (4) texture; fabric; material; weave; (5) base; background; (6) one's true nature; (7) narrative (i.e. descriptive part of a story); (8) real life; actuality; (9) (in the game of go) captured territory; (10) (See 地謡) noh chorus; (11) (in Japanese dance) accompaniment music; (12) (in Japanese music) basic phrase (usu. repetitive); (13) base part (of multiple shamisens); (surname) Hamadzi; (surname) Chitoku; (surname) Chizaki; (surname) Chi; (surname) Shouchi; (surname) Koochi
pṛthivī, 鉢里體尾 the earth, ground; bhūmi, 歩弭 the earth, place, situation; talima, 託史麽 (or 託吏麽) ground, site; explained by 土地 earth, ground; 能生 capable of producing; 所依 that on which things rely. It is also the spiritual rank, position, or character attained by a Bodhisattva as a result of 住 remaining and developing in a given state in order to attain this 地 rank; v. 十住; 住位 and 十地.

五行

see styles
Mandarin wǔ xíng / wu3 xing2
Taiwan wu hsing
Japanese gogyou / gogyo / ごぎょう
Chinese five phases of Chinese philosophy: wood 木, fire 火, earth 土, metal 金, water 水
Japanese (1) (See 五大・ごだい・1) the five elements (in Chinese philosophy: wood, fire, earth, metal and water); the five phases; wu xing; (2) {Buddh} five practices of the Bodhisattvas; (3) (See 六信五行) the five pillars of Islam; (surname, given name) Gogyou
The five lines of conduct. I. According to the 起信論 Awakening of Faith they are almsgiving; keeping the commandments; patience under insult; zeal or progress; meditation. II. According to the 涅槃經 Nirvana Sutra they are saintly or bodhisattva deeds; arhat, or noble deeds; deva deeds; children's deeds (i. e. normal good deeds of men, devas, and Hinayanists); sickness conditions, e. g. illness, delusion, etc.; — into all these lines of conduct and conditions a Bodhisattva enters. III. The five elements, or tanmātra— wood, fire, earth, metal, and water; or earth, water, ire, air, and ether (or space) as taught by the later Mahāyāna philosophy; idem 五大; five practices

光明

see styles
Mandarin guāng míng / guang1 ming2
Taiwan kuang ming
Japanese koumyou(p);koumei / komyo(p);kome / こうみょう(P);こうめい
Chinese light; radiance; (fig.) bright (prospects etc); openhearted
Japanese (1) bright light; (2) hope; bright future; (3) {Buddh} light emanating from a buddha or bodhisattva, symbolizing their wisdom and compassion; (personal name) Mitsuharu; (given name) Mitsuaki; (given name) Teruaki; (g,p) Koumei; (p,s,g) Koumyou
v. last entry; radiance

愛語


爱语

see styles
Mandarin ài yǔ / ai4 yu3
Taiwan ai yü
Japanese aigo / あいご
Japanese (female given name) Aigo
Loving speech; the words of a bodhisattva; loving words

日光

see styles
Mandarin rì guāng / ri4 guang1
Taiwan jih kuang
Japanese nikkou / nikko / にっこう
Chinese sunlight
Japanese sunlight; (female given name) Himi; (female given name) Hikari; (place-name) Nitsukou; (p,s,f) Nikkou
(日光菩薩); 蘇利也波羅皮遮那 Sūrya-prabhāsana. Sunlight, and 月光 (月光菩薩) Moonlight, name of two Bodhisattva assistants of 藥師 the Master of Healing; Sunlight is the ninth in the Dizang Court of the Garbhadhātu group.

菩薩


菩萨

see styles
Mandarin pú sà / pu2 sa4
Taiwan p`u sa / pu sa
Japanese bosatsu(p);bosachi(ok) / ぼさつ(P);ぼさち(ok)
Chinese Bodhisattva (Buddhism)
Japanese (n,n-suf) (1) {Buddh} bodhisattva; one who has reached enlightenment but vows to save all beings before becoming a buddha; (2) High Monk (title bestowed by the imperial court); (3) (See 本地垂迹説) title bestowed to Shinto kami in manifestation theory; (surname) Mizoro
bodhisattva, cf. 菩提薩埵. While the idea is not foreign to Hīnayāna, its extension of meaning is one of the chief marks of Mahāyāna. 'The Bodhisattva is indeed the characteristic feature of the Mahāyāna.' Keith. According to Mahāyāna the Hinayanists, i.e. the śrāvaka and pratyekabuddha, seek their own salvation, while the bodhisattva's aim is the salvation of others and of all. The earlier intp. of bodhisattva was 大道心衆生 all beings with mind for the truth; later it became 大覺有情 conscious beings of or for the great intelligence, or enlightenment. It is also intp. in terms of leadership, heroism, etc. In general it is a Mahayanist seeking Buddhahood, but seeking it altruistically; whether monk or layman, he seeks enlightenment to enlighten others, and he will sacrifice himself to save others; he is devoid of egoism and devoted to helping others. All conscious beings having the Buddha-nature are natural bodhisattvas, but require to undergo development. The mahāsattva is sufficiently advanced to become a Buddha and enter nirvāṇa, but according to his vow he remains in the realm of incarnation to save all conscious beings. A monk should enter on the arduous course of discipline which leads to Bodhisattvahood and Buddhahood.

観音

see styles
Japanese mine / みね    mion / みおん    kannon / かんのん    kannou / kanno / かんのう    kanne / かんね    kanna / かんな    kanon / かんおん
Japanese Avalokiteshvara (Bodhisattva); Avalokitesvara; Kannon; Kwannon; Guanyin; Buddhist deity of compassion; (female given name) Mine; (female given name) Mion; (place-name) Kannon; (place-name) Kannou; (female given name) Kanne; (female given name) Kanna; (surname) Kan'on; (female given name) Kanon

關羽

see styles
Mandarin guān yǔ / guan1 yu3
Taiwan kuan yü
Chinese Guan Yu (-219), general of Shu and blood-brother of Liu Bei in Romance of the Three Kingdoms, fearsome fighter famous for virtue and loyalty; posomethingumously worshipped and identified with the guardian Bodhisattva Sangharama

観世音

see styles
Japanese kanzenon / かんぜのん    kanzeon / かんぜおん
Japanese Avalokiteshvara (Bodhisattva); Avalokitesvara; Kannon; Kwannon; Guanyin; Buddhist deity of compassion; (place-name) Kanzenon; (place-name) Kanzeon

觀世音


观世音

see styles
Mandarin guān shì yīn / guan1 shi4 yin1
Taiwan kuan shih yin
Japanese Kanzeon / かんぜおん
Chinese Guanyin, the Bodhisattva of Compassion or Goddess of Mercy (Sanskrit Avalokiteśvara)
Japanese (out-dated kanji) Avalokiteshvara (Bodhisattva); Avalokitesvara; Kannon; Kwannon; Guanyin; Buddhist deity of compassion
Regarder of the world's sounds, or cries, the so-called Goddess of Mercy; also known as 觀音; 觀世音善薩; 觀自在 (觀世自在); 觀尹; 光世音 (the last being the older form). Avalokiteśvara, v. 阿 8. Originally represented as a male, the images are now generally those of a female figure. The meaning of the term is in doubt; it is intp. as above, but the term 觀自在 (觀世自在) accords with the idea of Sovereign Regarder and is not associated with sounds or cries. Guanyin is one of the triad of Amida, is represented on his left, and is also represented as crowned with Amida; but there are as many as thirty-three different forms of Guanyin, sometimes with a bird, a vase, a willow wand, a pearl, a 'thousand' eyes and hands, etc., and, when as bestower of children, carrying a child. The island of Putuo (Potala) is the chief centre of Guanyin worship, where she is the protector of all in distress, especially of those who go to sea. There are many sūtras, etc., devoted to the cult, but its provenance and the date of its introduction to China are still in doubt. Chapter 25 of the Lotus Sūtra is devoted to Guanyin, and is the principal scripture of the cult; its date is uncertain. Guanyin is sometimes confounded with Amitābha and Maitreya. She is said to be the daughter of king Śubhavyūha 妙莊王, who had her killed by 'stifling because the sword of the executioner broke without hurting her. Her spirit went to hell; but hell changed into paradise. Yama sent her back to life to save his hell, when she was miraculously transported on a Lotus flower to the island of Poo-too'. Eitel.

釋迦牟尼


释迦牟尼

see styles
Mandarin shì jiā móu ní / shi4 jia1 mou2 ni2
Taiwan shih chia mou ni
Japanese Shakamuni
Chinese Siddhartha Gautama (563-485 BC), the historical Buddha and founder of Buddhism; Sakyamuni Buddha (Sanskrit: sage of the Sakya)
釋迦文 (釋迦文尼); 釋伽文 Śākyamuni, the saint of the Śākya tribe. muni is saint, holy man, sage, ascetic monk; it is: intp. as 仁 benevolent, charitable, kind, also as 寂默 one who dwells in seclusion. After '500 or 550' previous incarnations, Śākyamuni finally attained to the state of Bodhisattva, was born in the Tuṣita heaven, and descended as a white elephant, through her right side, into the womb of the immaculate Māyā, the purest woman on earth; this was on the 8th day of the 4th month; next year on the 8th day of the 2nd month he was born from her right side painlessly as she stood under a tree in the Lumbinī garden. For the subsequent miraculous events v. Eitel. also the 神通遊戲經 (Lalitavistara), the 釋迦如來成道記, etc. Simpler statements say that he was born the son of Śuddhodana, of the kṣatriya caste, ruler of Kapilavastu, and Māyā his wife; that Māyā died seven days later, leaving him to be brought up by her sister Prājapati; that in due course he was married to Yaśodharā who bore him a son, Rāhula; that in search of truth he left home, became an ascetic, severely disciplined himself, and finally at 35 years of age, under a tree, realized that the way of release from the chain of rebirth and death lay not in asceticism but in moral purity; this he explained first in his four dogmas, v. 四諦 and eightfold noble way 八正道, later amplified and developed in many sermons. He founded his community on the basis of poverty, chastity, and insight or meditation, ad it became known as Buddhism, as he became known as Buddha, the enlightened. His death was probably in or near 487 B.C., a few years before that of Confucius in 479. The sacerdotal name of his family is Gautama, said to be the original name of the whole clan, Śākya being that of his branch, v. 瞿, 喬.; his personal name was Siddhārtha, or Sarvārthasiddha, v. 悉.

文殊

see styles
Mandarin wén shū / wen2 shu1
Taiwan wen shu
Japanese monju / もんじゅ
Chinese Manjushri, the Bodhisattva of keen awareness
Japanese (Buddhist term) Manjushri; Manjusri; Bodhisattva that represents transcendent wisdom; (p,s,f) Monju
(文殊師利) Mañjuśrī 滿殊尸利 -later 曼殊室利. 文殊 is also used for Mañjunātha, Mañjudeva, Mañjughoṣa, Mañjuṣvara, et al. T., hjamdpal; J., Monju. Origin unknown; presumably, like most Buddhas and bodhisattvas, an idealization of a particular quality, in his case of Wisdom. Mañju is beautiful, Śrī; good fortune, virtue, majesty, lord, an epithet of a god. Six definitions are obtained from various scriptures: 妙首 (or 頭 ) wonderful or beautiful) head; 普首 universal head; 濡首 glossy head (probably a transliteration); 敬首 revered head; 妙德 wonderful virtue (or power); 妙吉祥 wonderfully auspicious; the last is a later translation in the 西域記. As guardian of wisdom 智慧 he is often placed on Śākyamuni's left, with 普顯 on the right as guardian of law 理, the latter holding the Law, the former the wisdom or exposition of it; formerly they held the reverse positions. He is often represented with five curls or waves to his hair indicating the 五智 q. v. or the five peaks; his hand holds the sword of wisdom and he sits on a lion emblematic of its stern majesty: but he has other forms. He is represented as a youth, i. e. eternal youth. His present abode is given as east of the universe, known as 淸涼山 clear and cool mountain, or a region 寶住 precious abode, or Abode of Treasures, or 寶氏 from which he derives one of his titles, 寶相如來. One of his dhāraṇīs prophesies China as his post-nirvāṇa realm. In past incarnations he is described as being the parent of many Buddhas and as having assisted the Buddha into existence; his title was 龍種上佛 the supreme Buddha of the nāgas, also 大身佛 or 神仙佛; now his title is 歡喜藏摩尼寶精佛 The spiritual Buddha who joyfully cares for the jewel: and his future title is to be 普現佛 Buddha universally revealed. In the 序品 Introductory Chapter of the Lotus Sutra he is also described as the ninth predecessor or Buddha-ancestor of Śākyamuni. He is looked on as the chief of the Bodhisattvas and represents them, as the chief disciple of the Buddha, or as his son 法王子. Hīnayāna counts Śāriputra as the wisest of the disciples, Mahāyāna gives Mañjuśrī the chief place, hence he is also styled 覺母 mother, or begetter of understanding. He is shown riding on either a lion or a peacock, or sitting on a white lotus; often he holds a book, emblem of wisdom, or a blue lotus; in certain rooms of a monastery he is shown as a monk; and he appears in military array as defender of the faith. His signs, magic words, and so on, are found in various sutras. His most famous centre in China is Wu-tai shan in Shansi. where he is the object of pilgrimages, especially of Mongols. The legends about him are many. He takes the place in Buddhism of Viśvakarman as Vulcan, or architect, of the universe. He is one of the eight Dhyāni-bodhisattvas, and sometimes has the image of Akṣobhya in his crown. He was mentioned in China as early as the fourth century and in the Lotus Sutra he frequently appears, especially as the converter of the daughter of the Dragon-king of the Ocean. He has five messengers 五使者 and eight youths 八童子 attending on him. His hall in the Garbhadhātu maṇḍala is the seventh, in which his group numbers twenty-five. His position is northeast. There are numerous sutras and other works with his name as title, e. g. 文殊師利問菩提經 Gayaśīrṣa sūtra, tr. by Kumārajīva 384-417: and its 論 or .Tīkā of Vasubandhu, tr. by Bodhiruci 535. see list in B. N.

觀音


观音

see styles
Mandarin guān yīn / guan1 yin1
Taiwan kuan yin
Japanese kanon / かんおん
Chinese Guanyin, the Bodhisattva of Compassion or Goddess of Mercy (Sanskrit Avalokiteśvara)
Japanese (out-dated kanji) Avalokiteshvara (Bodhisattva); Avalokitesvara; Kannon; Kwannon; Guanyin; Buddhist deity of compassion; (personal name) Kan'on
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

文殊菩薩


文殊菩萨

see styles
Mandarin wén shū pú sà / wen2 shu1 pu2 sa4
Taiwan wen shu p`u sa / wen shu pu sa
Japanese monjubosatsu / もんじゅぼさつ
Chinese Manjushri, the Bodhisattva of keen awareness
Japanese {Buddh} Manjusri (Bodhisattva); Monju; Monjushuri; Wenshu; (place-name) Monjubosatsu
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

觀音菩薩


观音菩萨

see styles
Mandarin guān yīn pú sà / guan1 yin1 pu2 sa4
Taiwan kuan yin p`u sa / kuan yin pu sa
Japanese Kan'non Bosatsu / かんのんぼさつ
Chinese Guanyin, the Bodhisattva of Compassion or Goddess of Mercy (Sanskrit Avalokiteśvara)
Japanese (out-dated kanji) Kannon (Bodhisattva); Kwannon; Goddess of Mercy; Bodhisattva of Compassion; Guan Yin; Kuan Yin
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

see styles
Mandarin jié / jie2
Taiwan chieh
Japanese kou;gou;kou / ko;go;ko / こう;ごう;コウ
Chinese to rob; to plunder; to seize by force; to coerce; calamity; abbr. for kalpa 劫波[jie2 bo1]
Japanese (1) (こう, ごう only) {Buddh} kalpa (eon, aeon); (2) (kana only) (usu. コウ) ko (in go); position that allows for eternal capture and recapture of the same stones
刧 A kalpa, aeon, age; also translit. ka; 'a fabulous period of time, a day of Brahmā or 1, 000 Yugas, a period of four hundred and thirty-two million years of mortals, measuring the duration of the world; (a month of Brahmā is supposed to contain thirty such kalpas; according to the Mahābhārata twelve months of Brahmā constitute his year, and one hundred such years his lifetime; fifty years of Brahmā are supposed to have elapsed... ).' M. W. An aeon of incalculable time, therefore called a 大時節 great time-node. v. 劫波.; The three asaṃkhyeya kalpas, the three countless aeons, the period of a bodhisattva's development; also the past 莊嚴劫, the present 賢劫, and the future 星宿劫 kalpas. There are other groups. 三劫三千佛 The thousand Buddhas in each of the three kalpas.

see styles
Mandarin/ zi4
Taiwan tzu
Japanese ji;koro(ok) / じ;ころ(ok)
Chinese self; oneself; from; since; naturally; surely
Japanese (prefix) (1) self-; (2) (じ only) (See 至) from ...; (3) (じ only) this ... (in contrast to some other ...); aforementioned; (female given name) Mizu; (surname) Satsuka
sva, svayam; the self, one' s own, personal; of itself, naturally, of course; also, from (i. e. from the self as central). 自 is used as the opposite of 他 another, other's, etc., e. g. 自力 (in) one's own strength as contrasted with 他力 the strength of another, especially in the power to save of a Buddha or Bodhisattva. It is also used in the sense of ātman 阿怛摩 the self, or the soul.

see styles
Mandarin/ pu2
Taiwan p`u / pu
Japanese fukube / ふくべ    satori / さとり
Chinese Bodhisattva
Japanese (personal name) Fukube; (female given name) Satori
A kind of fragrant grass; bo


see styles
Mandarin/ sa4
Taiwan sa
Japanese satsusa / さつさ    satsu / さつ
Chinese Bodhisattva; surname Sa
Japanese (surname) Satsu
A character introduced by the Buddhists, used as a translit. of sa sounds.

see styles
Mandarin cáng / cang2
Taiwan ts`ang / tsang
Japanese kura / くら    osamu / おさむ
Chinese storehouse; depository; Buddhist or Taoist scripture; to conceal; to hide away; to harbor; to store; to collect; Tibet; Xizang 西藏
Japanese (surname) Kura; (personal name) Osamu
Treasury, thesaurus, store, to hide; the Canon. An intp. of piṭaka, a basket, box, granary, collection of writings. The 二藏 twofold canon may be the sutras and the vinaya; or the Hīnayāna and Mahāyāna scriptures. The 三藏 or tripiṭaka consists of the sutras, vinaya, and śāstras (abhidharma). The 四藏 fourfold canon adds a miscellaneous collection. The 五藏 fivefold collection is sutras, vinaya, abhidharma, miscellaneous, and spells, or, instead of the spells, a bodhisattva collection. There is also an esoteric fivefold canon, the first three being the above, the last two being the prājñāpāramitā and the dhāraṇīs.

七星

see styles
Mandarin qī xīng / qi1 xing1
Taiwan ch`i hsing / chi hsing
Japanese shichisei;shichishou / shichise;shichisho / しちせい;しちしょう
Chinese Qixing district of Guilin city 桂林市[Gui4 lin2 shi4], Guangxi
Japanese (archaism) {astron} (See 北斗七星) the Big Dipper; the Plough; the Plow; (personal name) Naboshi; (personal name) Nahoshi; (female given name) Naho; (surname) Nanahoshi; (female given name) Nanaho; (given name) Nanasei; (female given name) Nanase; (female given name) Nanae; (personal name) Natoshi; (given name) Shichisei; (female given name) Kirara
Ursa major; Worshipped in Japan as 妙見菩薩 Wonderful Sight Bodhisattva who protects this world.

三乘

see styles
Mandarin sān chéng / san1 cheng2
Taiwan san ch`eng / san cheng
Japanese minori / みのり
Japanese (surname) Minori
Triyāna, the three vehicles, or conveyances which carry living beings across saṁsāra or mortality (births-and-deaths) to the shores of nirvāṇa. The three are styled 小,中, and 大. Sometimes the three vehicles are defined as 聲聞 Śrāvaka, that of the hearer or obedient disciple; 緣覺Pratyeka-buddha, that of the enlightened for self; these are described as 小乘 because the objective of both is personal salvation; the third is 菩薩Bodhisattva, or 大乘 Mahāyāna, because the objective is the salvation of all the living. The three are also depicted as 三車 three wains, drawn by a goat, a deer, an ox. The Lotus declares that the three are really the One Buddha-vehicle, which has been revealed in three expedient forms suited to his disciples' capacity, the Lotus Sūtra being the unifying, complete, and final exposition. The Three Vehicles are differently explained by different exponents, e.g. (1) Mahāyāna recognizes (a) Śrāvaka, called Hīnayāna, leading in longer or shorter periods to arhatship; (b) Pratyeka-buddha, called Madhyamayāna, leading after still longer or shorter periods to a Buddhahood ascetically attained and for self; (c) Bodhisattva, called Mahayana, leading after countless ages of self-sacrifce in saving others and progressive enlightenment to ultimate Buddhahood. (2) Hīnayāna is also described as possessing three vehicles 聲, 緣, 菩 or 小, 中, 大, the 小 and 中 conveying to personal salvation their devotees in ascetic dust and ashes and mental annihilation, the 大 leading to bodhi, or perfect enlightenment, and the Buddha's way. Further definitions of the Triyāna are: (3) True bodhisattva teaching for the 大; pratyeka-buddha without ignorant asceticism for the 中; and śrāvaka with ignorant asceticism for the 小. (4) (a) 一乘 The One-Vehicle which carries all to Buddhahood: of this the 華嚴 Hua-yen and 法華 Fa-hua are typical exponents; (b) 三乘法 the three-vehicle, containing practitioners of all three systems, as expounded in books of the 深密般若; (c) 小乘 the Hīnayāna pure and simple as seen in the 四阿合經 Four Āgamas. Śrāvakas are also described as hearers of the Four Truths and limited to that degree of development; they hear from the pratyeka-buddhas, who are enlightened in the Twelve Nidānas 因緣; the bodhisattvas make the 六度 or six forms of transmigration their field of sacrificial saving work, and of enlightenment. The Lotus Sūtra really treats the 三乘. Three Vehicles as 方便 or expedient ways, and offers a 佛乘 Buddha Vehicle as the inclusive and final vehicle.

三修

see styles
Mandarin sān xiū / san1 xiu1
Taiwan san hsiu
Japanese san shū
The three ways of discipline, i.e. three śrāvaka and three bodhisattva ways. The three śrāvaka ways are 無常修 no realization of the eternal, seeing everything as transient; 非樂修 joyless, through only contemplating misery and not realizing the ultimate nirvāṇa-joy; 無我修 non-ego discipline, seeing only the perishing self and not realizing the immortal self. The bodhisattva three are the opposite of these; three ways of cultivation

三光

see styles
Mandarin guang  / guang1 
Taiwan guang 
Japanese sankou / sanko / さんこう
Chinese the sun, the moon, and the stars
Japanese (See 花札) (in hanafuda) a collection of three non-rain light cards; (personal name) Miteru; (surname, given name) Mitsuteru; (surname) Mitsukou; (place-name) Sankou; (given name) Kazumitsu
(三光天) Sun, moon, and stars. Also, in the second dhyāna of the form-world there are the two deva regions 少光天, 無量光天, and 光音天q.v. Also 觀音 Avalokiteśvara is styled 日天子sun-prince, or divine son of the sun, 大勢至 Mahāsthāmaprapta is styled 月天子 divine son of the moon, and 虛空藏菩薩 the bodhisattva of the empyrean, is styled 明星天子 divine son of the bright stars.

三惑

see styles
Mandarin sān huò / san1 huo4
Taiwan san huo
Japanese sanwaku;sannaku / さんわく;さんなく
Japanese {Buddh} three mental disturbances
A Tiantai classification of the three delusions, also styled 三煩惱; 三漏; 三垢; 三結; trials or temptations, leakages, uncleannesses, and bonds. The first of the following three is common to all disciples, the two last to bodhisattvas. They arise from (a) 見, 思, 惑 things seen and thought, i.e. illusions from imperfect perception, with temptation to love, hate, etc.; to be rid of these false views and temptations is the discipline and nirvāṇa of ascetic or Hīnayāna Buddhists. Mahāyāna proceeds further in and by its bodhisattva aims, which produce their own difficulties, i.e. (b) 塵沙惑 illusion and temptation through the immense variety of duties in saving men; and (c) 無明惑 illusions and temptations that arise from failure philosophically to understand things in their reality; three mental disturbances

三智

see styles
Mandarin sān zhì / san1 zhi4
Taiwan san chih
Japanese michi / みち    misato / みさと    sanchi / さんち
Japanese (female given name) Michi; (female given name) Misato; (given name) Sanchi
The three kinds of wisdom: (1) (a) 一切智 śrāvaka and pratyeka-buddha knowledge that all the dharma or laws are 空 void and unreal; (b) 道種智 bodhisattva-knowledge. of all things in their proper discrimination; (c) 一切種智 Buddha-knowledge, or perfect knowledge of all things in their every aspect and relationship past, present, and future. Tiantai associates the above with 室, 候, 中. (2) (a) 世間智 earthly or ordinary wisdom; (b) 出世間智 supra-mundane, or spiritual (śrāvaka and pratyeka-buddha) wisdom; (c) 出世間上上智 supreme wisdom of bodhisattvas and Buddhas. v. 智度論 27, 止觀 3, and 概伽經 3. Cf. — 心三智.

三獸


三兽

see styles
Mandarin sān shòu / san1 shou4
Taiwan san shou
Japanese sanshū
The three animals— hare, horse, elephant— crossing a stream. The śrāvaka is like the hare who crosses by swimming on the surface; the pratyeka-buddha is like the horse who crosses deeper than the hare; the bodhisattva is like the elephant who walks across on the bottom. Also likened to the triyāna. 涅槃經 23, 27.

三衍

see styles
Mandarin sān yǎn / san1 yan3
Taiwan san yen
Japanese sanen
The three yāna, or vehicles to nirvāṇa, i.e. śrāvaka, pratyekabuddha, and bodhisattva, v. 三乘; three vehicles

三覺


三觉

see styles
Mandarin sān jué / san1 jue2
Taiwan san chüeh
Japanese sankaku
The three kinds of enlightenment: (1) (a) 自覺 Enlightenment for self; (b) 覺他 for others; (c) 覺行圓 (or 窮) 滿 perfect enlightenment and accomplishment; the first is an arhat's, the first and second a bodhisattva's, all three a Buddha's. (2) From the Awakening of Faith 起信論 (a) 本覺 inherent, potential enlightenment or intelligence of every being; (b) 始覺 , initial, or early stages of such enlightenment, brought about through the external perfuming or influence of teaching, working on the internal perfuming of subconscious intelligence; (c) 究竟覺 completion of enlightenment, the subjective mind in perfect accord with the subconscious (or superconscious) mind, or the inherent intelligence.

三身

see styles
Mandarin sān shēn / san1 shen1
Taiwan san shen
Japanese sanjin;sanshin / さんじん;さんしん
Japanese {Buddh} trikaya (three bodies of the Buddha); (surname) Sanmi
trikāya. 三寶身 The threefold body or nature of a Buddha, i.e. the 法, 報, and 化身, or dharmakāya, sambhogakāya, and nirmāṇakāya. The three are defined as 自性, 受用, and 變化, the Buddha-body per se, or in its essential nature; his body of bliss, which he "receives" for his own "use" and enjoyment; and his body of transformation, by which he can appear in any form; i.e. spiritual, or essential; glorified; revealed. While the doctrine of the trikāya is a Mahāyāna concept, it partly results from the Hīnayāna idealization of the earthly Buddha with his thirty-two signs, eighty physical marks, clairvoyance, clairaudience, holiness, purity, wisdom, pity, etc. Mahāyāna, however, proceeded to conceive of Buddha as the Universal, the All, with infinity of forms, yet above all our concepts of unity or diversity. To every Buddha Mahāyāna attributed a three-fold body: that of essential Buddha; that of joy or enjoyment of the fruits of his past saving labours; that of power to transform himself at will to any shape for omnipresent salvation of those who need him. The trinity finds different methods of expression, e.g. Vairocana is entitled 法身, the embodiment of the Law, shining everywhere, enlightening all; Locana is 報身; c.f. 三賓, the embodiment of purity and bliss; Śākyamuni is 化身 or Buddha revealed. In the esoteric sect they are 法 Vairocana, 報 Amitābha, and 化 Śākyamuni. The 三賓 are also 法 dharma, 報 saṅgha, 化 buddha. Nevertheless, the three are considered as a trinity, the three being essentially one, each in the other. (1) 法身 Dharmakāya in its earliest conception was that of the body of the dharma, or truth, as preached by Śākyamuni; later it became his mind or soul in contrast with his material body. In Mādhyamika, the dharmakāya was the only reality, i.e. the void, or the immateria1, the ground of all phenomena; in other words, the 眞如 the tathāgatagarbha, the bhūtatathatā. According to the Huayan (Kegon) School it is the 理or noumenon, while the other two are氣or phenomenal aspects. "For the Vijñānavāda... the body of the law as highest reality is the void intelligence, whose infection (saṃkleҫa) results in the process of birth and death, whilst its purification brings about Nirvāṇa, or its restoration to its primitive transparence" (Keith). The "body of the law is the true reality of everything". Nevertheless, in Mahāyāna every Buddha has his own 法身; e.g. in the dharmakāya aspect we have the designation Amitābha, who in his saṃbhogakāya aspect is styled Amitāyus. (2) 報身Sambhogakāya, a Buddha's reward body, or body of enjoyment of the merits he attained as a bodhisattva; in other words, a Buddha in glory in his heaven. This is the form of Buddha as an object of worship. It is defined in two aspects, (a) 自受用身 for his own bliss, and (b) 他受用身 for the sake of others, revealing himself in his glory to bodhisattvas, enlightening and inspiring them. By wisdom a Buddha's dharmakāya is attained, by bodhisattva-merits his saṃbhogakāya. Not only has every Buddha all the three bodies or aspects, but as all men are of the same essence, or nature, as Buddhas, they are therefore potential Buddhas and are in and of the trikāya. Moreover, trikāya is not divided, for a Buddha in his 化身 is still one with his 法身 and 報身, all three bodies being co-existent. (3) 化身; 應身; 應化身 nirmāṇakāya, a Buddha's transformation, or miraculous body, in which he appears at will and in any form outside his heaven, e.g. as Śākyamuni among men; three bodies [of the Buddha]

三馬


三马

see styles
Mandarin sān mǎ / san1 ma3
Taiwan san ma
Japanese minma / みんま    mitsuma / みつま    sanma / さんま    sanba / さんば
Japanese (place-name) Minma; (surname) Mitsuma; (given name) Sanma; (personal name) Sanba
The three horses, one young, strong, and tractable; another similar but not tractable; a third old and intractable, i.e. bodhisattvas (or bodhisattva-monks), śrāvakas and icchantis.

下化

see styles
Mandarin xià huà / xia4 hua4
Taiwan hsia hua
Japanese geke
(下化衆生) Below, to transform all beings, one of the great vows of a bodhisattva. 上求菩提 above, to seek bodhi. Also 下濟衆生.

下地

see styles
Mandarin xià de / xia4 de
Taiwan hsia te
Japanese shitaji / したじ
Chinese to go down to the fields; to get up from bed; to leave one's sickbed; to be born
Japanese (1) groundwork; foundation; (2) inclination; aptitude; elementary knowledge of; grounding in; (3) undercoat; first coat; (4) (See お下地) soy sauce; (surname) Shimodzi; (surname) Shimochi; (place-name, surname) Shimoji; (surname) Shitadzi; (surname) Shitachi; (surname) Shitaji; (surname) Kadzi; (surname) Kachi
The lower regions of the 九地 q. v.; also the lower half of the 十地 in the fifty-two grades of bodhisattva development; lower levels

不動


不动

see styles
Mandarin bù dòng / bu4 dong4
Taiwan pu tung
Japanese fudou / fudo / ふどう
Chinese motionless
Japanese (adj-na,n,adj-no) immobility; firmness; fixed; steadfastness; motionless; idle; (place-name, surname) Fudou
acala; niścala; dhruva. The unmoved, immobile, or motionless; also 無動 the term is used for the unvarying or unchanging, for the pole-star, for fearlessness, for indifference to passion or temptation. It is a special term of Shingon 異言 applied to its most important Bodhisattva, the 不動明王 q. v.

九曜

see styles
Mandarin jiǔ yào / jiu3 yao4
Taiwan chiu yao
Japanese kuyou / kuyo / くよう
Japanese (surname) Kuyou
九執 q.v. Navagraha. The nine luminaries: 日 Āditya, the sun; 月 Sōma, the moon; the five planets, i.e. 火星 Aṅgāraka, Mars; 水 Budha, Mercury; 木 Bṛhaspati, Jupiter; 金 Sukra, Venus; and 土 Śanaiścara, Saturn; also 羅睺 Rāhu, the spirit that causes eclipses; and 計都 Ketu, a comet. Each is associated with a region of the sky and also with a bodhisattva, etc., e.g. the sun with Guanyin, Venus with Amitābha, etc.

二修

see styles
Mandarin èr xiū / er4 xiu1
Taiwan erh hsiu
Japanese niś hu
Two kinds of devotion or practice, 專修 and 雜修 sole or single-minded, and miscellaneous or varied, defined as (1) chief or sole duty, and (2) aids thereto or adjunctive observances. Also 緣修 causative devotion of a bodhisattva in former life, and 眞修 its actual manifestation here; two kinds of practice

二利

see styles
Mandarin èr lì / er4 li4
Taiwan erh li
Japanese ji ri
The dual benefits, or profits: benefiting or developing oneself and others; 自利 in seeking enlightenment in bodhisattvahood, 利他 in saving the multitude. Hīnayāna "seeks only one's own benefit"; the bodhisattva rule seeks both one's own benefit and that of others, or personal improvement for the improving of others; two kinds of benefit

二地

see styles
Mandarin èr dì / er4 di4
Taiwan erh ti
Japanese nichi
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

二忍

see styles
Mandarin èr rěn / er4 ren3
Taiwan erh jen
Japanese ninin
The two patiences or endurances: 衆生忍 patience towards all under all circumstances; 無生(法)忍 calm rest, as a bodhisattva、in the assurance of no (re-) birth, i.e. in immortality. Also 安受苦忍 patience under suffering, and 觀察法忍 imperturbable examination of or meditation in the law or of all things. Also, physical and mental patience, or endurance; two endurances

二愛


二爱

see styles
Mandarin èr ài / er4 ai4
Taiwan erh ai
Japanese futae / ふたえ
Japanese (female given name) Futae
The two kinds of love, 欲愛 ordinary human love springing from desire; 法愛 bodhisattva or religious love, i.e. desiring to save all creatures.

二智

see styles
Mandarin èr zhì / er4 zhi4
Taiwan erh chih
Japanese nichi
The two kinds of wisdom; there are various pairs. The Huayan school uses 如理智 and 如量智; the Faxiang (法相) uses 根本智 and 後得智; the Tiantai uses 權智 and 實智. (1) (a) 如理智 or 根本智, 無分別智, 正體智, 眞智, 實智 is Buddha-wisdom, or Bodhisattva real wisdom; (b) 如量智 or 後得智, the same wisdom in its limitation and relation to ordinary human affairs. (2) (a) 實智 Absolute wisdom and (b) 權智 or 方便智 | relative or temporal wisdom. (3) (a) 一切智 wisdom of the all, (b) 一切種智 wisdom of all the particulars; two kinds of cognition

二藏

see styles
Mandarin èr cáng / er4 cang2
Taiwan erh ts`ang / erh tsang
Japanese nizō
The two piṭakas or tripiṭakas, i.e. the Buddhist canon: (a) 聲聞藏 the Śrāvaka, or Hīnayāna canon: (b) 菩薩藏 the Bodhisattva, or Mahāyanā canon; two canons

二覺


二觉

see styles
Mandarin èr jué / er4 jue2
Taiwan erh chüeh
Japanese nikaku
The two enlightenments: (1) The 起信論 has two—(a) 本覺 the immanent mind in all things, e.g. "which lighteth every man that cometh into the world", also defined as the 法身 dharmakāya; (b) 始覺 initial enlightenment or beginning of illumination; this initiation leads on to Buddhahood, or full enlightenment. (2) (a) 等覺 The fifty-first stage of a bodhisattva's 行 位 practice; (b) 妙覺 the fifty-second stage, or enlightenment of Buddhahood.(3) (a)自覺 A Buddha's own or natural enlightenment; (b) 覺他 his enlightening of all others; two kinds of enlightenment

五力

see styles
Mandarin wǔ lì / wu3 li4
Taiwan wu li
Japanese goriki
pañcabalāni, the five powers or faculties — one of the categories of the thirty-seven bodhipakṣika dharma 三十七助道品; they destroy the 五障 five obstacles, each by each, and are: 信力 śraddhābala, faith (destroying doubt); 精進力 vīryabala, zeal (destroying remissness); 念 or 勤念 smṛtibala, memory or thought (destroying falsity); 正定力 samādhibala, concentration of mind, or meditation (destroying confused or wandering thoughts); and 慧力 prajñābala, wisdom (destroying all illusion and delusion). Also the five transcendent powers, i. e. 定力 the power of meditation; 通力 the resulting supernatural powers; 借識力 adaptability, or powers of 'borrowing' or evolving any required organ of sense, or knowledge, i. e. by beings above the second dhyāna heavens; 大願力 the power of accomplishing a vow by a Buddha or bodhisattva; and 法威德力 the august power of Dharma. Also, the five kinds of Mara powers exerted on sight, 五大明王.

五忍

see styles
Mandarin wǔ rěn / wu3 ren3
Taiwan wu jen
Japanese gonin
The five stages of bodhisattva-kṣānti, patience or endurance according to the 別教: (1) 伏忍the causes of passion and illusion controlled but not finally cut off, the condition of 十住, 十行, and 十廻向; (2) 信忍 firm belief, i. e. from the 初地 to the 三地; (3) 順忍 patient progress towards the end of all mortality, i. e. 四地 to 六地; (4) 無生忍 patience for full apprehension, of the truth of no rebirth, 七地 to 九地; and (5) 寂滅忍 the patience that leads to complete nirvana, 十地 to 妙覺; cf. 五位; five kinds of patient endurance

五時


五时

see styles
Mandarin wǔ shí / wu3 shi2
Taiwan wu shih
Japanese goji
(五時教) The five periods or divisions of Śākyamuni's teaching. According to Tiantai they are (1) 華嚴時 the Avataṃsaka or first period in three divisions each of seven days, after his enlightenment, when he preached the content, of this sutra; (2) 鹿苑時 the twelve years of his preaching the Āgamas 阿含 in the Deer Park; (3) 方等時 the eight years of preaching Mahāyāna-cum-Hīnayāna doctrines, the vaipulya period; (4) 般若時 the twenty-two years of his preaching the prajñā or wisdom sutras; (5) 法華涅槃時 the eight years of his preaching the Lotus Sutra and, in a day and a night, the Nirvana Sutra. According to the Nirvana School (now part of the Tiantai) they are (1) 三乘別教 the period when the differentiated teaching began and the distinction of the three vehicles, as represented by the 四諦 Four Noble Truths for śrāvakas, the 十二因緣 Twelve Nidānas for pratyekabuddhas, and the 六度 Six Pāramitās for bodhisattvas; (2) 三乘通教 the teaching common to all three vehicles, as seen in the 般若經; (3) 抑揚教 the teaching of the 維摩經, the 思益梵天所問經, and other sutras olling the bodhisattva teaching at the expense of that for śrāvakas; (4) 同歸教 the common objective teaching calling all three vehicles, through the Lotus, to union in the one vehicle; (5) 常住教 the teaehmg of eternal life i. e. the revelation through the Nirvana sutra of the eternity of Buddhahood; these five are also called 有相; 無相; 抑揚; 曾三歸—; and 圓常. According to 劉虬 Liu Chiu of the 晉 Chin dynasty, the teaching is divided into 頓 immediate and 漸 gradual attainment, the latter having five divisions called 五時教 similar to those of the Tiantai group. According to 法寶 Fabao of the Tang dynasty the five are (1) 小乘; (2) 般着 or 大乘; (3) 深密 or 三乘; (4) 法華 or 一乘; (5) 涅槃 or 佛性教.

五生

see styles
Mandarin wǔ shēng / wu3 sheng1
Taiwan wu sheng
Japanese takai / たかい    itsuo / いつお
Japanese (female given name) Takai; (given name) Itsuo
Five rebirths, i. e. five states, or conditions of a bodhisattva's rebirth: (1) to stay calamities, e. g. by sacrificing himself; (2) in any class that may need him; (3) in superior condition, handsome, wealthy, or noble; (4) in various grades of kingship; (5) final rebirth before Buddhahood; v. 瑜伽論 4.

五眼

see styles
Mandarin wǔ yǎn / wu3 yan3
Taiwan wu yen
Japanese gogen / ごげん
Japanese {Buddh} the five eyes (physical eye, heavenly eye, wisdom eye, dharma eye and Buddha eye)
The five kinds of eyes or vision: human; deva (attainable by men in dhyāna); Hīnayāna wisdom; bodhisattva truth; and Buddha-vision or omniscience. There are five more relate to omniscience making 十眼 ten kinds of eyes or vision; five eyes

五覺


五觉

see styles
Mandarin wǔ jué / wu3 jue2
Taiwan wu chüeh
Japanese gokaku
The five bodhi, or states of enlightenment, as described in the 起信論 Awakening of Faith; see also 五菩提 for a different group. (1) 本覺 Absolute eternal wisdom, or bodhi; (2) 始覺 bodhi in its initial stages, or in action, arising from right observances; (3) 相似覺 bodhisattva. attainment of bodhi in action, in the 十信; (4) 隨分覺 further bodhisattva-enlightenment according to capacity, i. e. the stages 十住, 十行, and 十廻向; (5) 究竟覺 final or complete enlightenment, i. e. the stage of 妙覺, which is one with the first, i. e. 本覺. The 本覺 is bodhi in the potential, 始覺 is bodhi in the active state, hence (2), (3), (4), and (5) are all the latter, but the fifth has reached the perfect quiescent stage of original bodhi; five kinds of enlightenment

五逆

see styles
Mandarin wǔ nì / wu3 ni4
Taiwan wu ni
Japanese gogyaku
pañcānantarya; 五無間業 The five rebellious acts or deadly sins, parricide, matricide, killing an arhat, shedding the blood of a Buddha, destroying the harmony of the sangha, or fraternity. The above definition is common both to Hīnayāna and Mahāyāna. The lightest of these sins is the first; the heaviest the last. II. Another group is: (1) sacrilege, such as destroying temples, burning sutras, stealing a Buddha's or a monk's things, inducing others to do so, or taking pleasure therein; (2) slander, or abuse of the teaching of śrāvaka s, pratyekabuddhas, or bodhisattvas; (3) ill-treatment or killing of a monk; (4) any one of the five deadly sins given above; (5) denial of the karma consequences of ill deeds, acting or teaching others accordingly, and unceasing evil life. III. There are also five deadly sins, each of which is equal to each of the first set of five: (1) violation of a mother, or a fully ordained nun; (2) killing a bodhisattva in a sangha; (5) destroying a Buddha's stūpa. IV. The five unpardonable sin of Devadatta who (1) destroyed the harmony of the community; (2) injured Śākyamuni with a stone, shedding his blood; (3) induced the king to let loose a rutting elephant to trample down Śākyamuni; (4) killed a nun; (5) put poison on his finger-nails and saluted Śākyamuni intending to destroy him thereby; five heinous crimes

他力

see styles
Mandarin tā lì / ta1 li4
Taiwan t`a li / ta li
Japanese tariki / たりき
Japanese outside help; salvation by faith; (surname) Tariki
Another's strength, especially that of a Buddha, or bodhisattva, obtained through faith in Mahāyāna salvation; other-power

住位

see styles
Mandarin zhù wèi / zhu4 wei4
Taiwan chu wei
Japanese jūi
Abiding place, one of the ten stages, resting and developing places or abodes of the bodhisattva, which is entered after the stage of belief has been passed; v. 十住; 十地; 地; stage of abiding

佛像

see styles
Mandarin fó xiàng / fo2 xiang4
Taiwan fo hsiang
Japanese butsuzō / ぶつぞう
Chinese Buddhist image; statue of Buddha or Bodhisattva; CL:尊[zun1], 張|张[zhang1]
Japanese statue of Buddha; image of Buddha; Buddhist statue; Buddhist image
Buddha's image, or pratimā. There is a statement that in the fifth century A.D. the images in China were of Indian features, thick lips, high nose, long eyes, full jaws, etc., but that after the Tang the form became "more effeminate"; an image of the Buddha

佛土

see styles
Mandarin fú tǔ / fu2 tu3
Taiwan fu t`u / fu tu
Japanese butsudo
buddhakṣetra. 佛國; 紇差怛羅; 差多羅; 刹怛利耶; 佛刹 The land or realm of a Buddha. The land of the Buddha's birth, India. A Buddha-realm in process of transformation, or transformed. A spiritual Buddha-realm. The Tiantai Sect evolved the idea of four spheres: (1) 同居之國土 Where common beings and saints dwell together, divided into (a) a realm where all beings are subject to transmigration and (b) the Pure Land. (2) 方便有餘土 or 變易土 The sphere where beings are still subject to higher forms of transmigration, the abode of Hīnayāna saints, i.e. srota-āpanna 須陀洹; sakṛdāgāmin 斯陀含; anāgāmin 阿那含; arhat 阿羅漢. (3) 實報無障礙 Final unlimited reward, the Bodhisattva realm. (4) 常寂光土 Where permanent tranquility and enlightenment reign, Buddha-parinirvāṇa; Buddha land

佛地

see styles
Mandarin fú de / fu2 de
Taiwan fu te
Japanese butsuji
buddha-bhūmi. The Buddha stage, being the tenth stage of the 通 or intermediate school, when the bodhisattva has arrived at the point of highest enlightenment and is just about to become a Buddha; buddha-stage

佛子

see styles
Mandarin fú zi / fu2 zi
Taiwan fu tzu
Japanese busshi / ぶっし
Japanese (surname) Busshi
Son of Buddha; a bodhisattva; a believer in Buddhism, for every believer is becoming Buddha; a term also applied to all beings, because all are of Buddha-nature. There is a division of three kinds: 外子 external sons, who have not yet believed; 度子 secondary sons, Hīnayānists; 眞子 true sons, Mahāyānists; children of the Buddha

佛種


佛种

see styles
Mandarin fú zhǒng / fu2 zhong3
Taiwan fu chung
Japanese busshu / ぶっしゅ
Japanese (1) (Buddhist term) seed of Buddhahood; (2) something that makes it possible to attain Buddhahood; (3) teaching of Buddha which make it possible to be enlightened
The seed of Buddhahood; bodhisattva seeds which, sown in the heart of man, produce the Buddha fruit, enlightenment.

作佛

see styles
Mandarin zuò fú / zuo4 fu2
Taiwan tso fu
Japanese sabutsu
To become or be a Buddha; to cut off illusion, attain complete enlightenment, and end the stage of bodhisattva discipline; to become a buddha

信忍

see styles
Mandarin xìn rěn / xin4 ren3
Taiwan hsin jen
Japanese shinnin
Faith-patience, faith-endurance: (1) To abide patiently in the faith and repeat the name of Amitābha. (2) To believe in the Truth and attain the nature of patient faith. (3) According to Tiantai the 別教 meaning is the unperturbed faith of the Bodhisattva (that all dharma is unreal); cognitive faith

修堅


修坚

see styles
Mandarin xiū jiān / xiu1 jian1
Taiwan hsiu chien
Japanese shuken
Firmness in observing or maintaining; established conviction, e.g. of the 別教 bodhisattva that all phenomena in essence are identical; firmness in cultivation

修道

see styles
Mandarin xiū dào / xiu1 dao4
Taiwan hsiu tao
Japanese shuudou / shudo / しゅうどう
Chinese to practice Daoism
Japanese learning; studying the fine arts; (given name) Nagamichi; (personal name) Naomichi; (surname) Shuudou; (personal name) Osamichi; (given name) Osami
To cultivate the way of religion; be religious; the way of self-cultivation. In the Hīnayāna the stage from anāgāmin to arhat; in Mahāyāna one of the bodhisattva stages; path of [meditative] cultivation

僧那

see styles
Mandarin sēng nà / seng1 na4
Taiwan seng na
Japanese sōna
(僧那僧涅) sannāha (-sannaddha), girding on armour, intp. as a Buddha's or bodhisattva's great Vow.

光宅

see styles
Mandarin guāng zhái / guang1 zhai2
Taiwan kuang chai
Japanese Kōtaku
Kuang-chai, name of the temple where 法雲 Fa-yun early in the sixth century wrote his commentary on the Lotus Sutra, which is known as the 光宅疏; 光宅 became his epithet. He made a division of four yāna from the Burning House parable, the goat cart representing the śrāvaka, the deer cart the pratyekabuddha, the ox-cart the Hīnayāna bodhisattva, and the great white ox-cart the Mahāyāna bodhisattva; a division adopted by T'ien-t'ai.

光降

see styles
Mandarin guāng jiàng / guang1 jiang4
Taiwan kuang chiang
Japanese kōgō
The honoured one descends, i. e. the Buddha or bodhisattva who is worshipped descends; the honored one descends

內祕


内秘

see styles
Mandarin nèi mì / nei4 mi4
Taiwan nei mi
Japanese naihi
The inner mystic mind of the bodhisattva, though externally he may appear to be a śrāvaka; inner and secret

兩權


两权

see styles
Mandarin liǎng quán / liang3 quan2
Taiwan liang ch`üan / liang chüan
Japanese ryōgon
The two temporary vehicles, śrāvaka and pratyekabuddha, as contrasted with the 實 complete Bodhisattva doctrine of Mahāyāna; two provisional approaches

八教

see styles
Mandarin bā jiào / ba1 jiao4
Taiwan pa chiao
Japanese hakkyō
The eight Tiantai classifications of Śākyamuni's teaching, from the Avataṁsaka to the Lotus and Nirvāṇa sūtras, divided into the two sections (1) 化法四教 his four kinds of teaching of the content of the Truth accommodated to the capacity of his disciples; (2) 化儀四教 his four modes of instruction. (1) The four 化法教 are: (a) 三藏教 The Tripiṭaka or Hīnayāna teaching, for śrāvakas and pratyekabuddhas, the bodhisattva doctrine being subordinate; it also included the primitive śūnya doctrine as developed in the Satyasiddhi śāstra. (b) 教通His later "intermediate" teaching which contained Hīnayāna and Mahāyāna doctrine for śrāvaka, pratyekabuddha, and bodhisattva, to which are attributed the doctrines of the Dharmalakṣaṇa or Yogācārya and Mādhyamika schools. (c) 別教 His differentiated , or separated, bodhisattva teaching, definitely Mahāyāna. (d) 圓教 His final, perfect, bodhisattva, universal teaching as preached, e.g. in the Lotus and Nirvāṇa sūtras. (2) The four methods of instruction 化儀 are: (a) 頓教 Direct teaching without reserve of the whole truth, e.g. the 華嚴 sūtra. (b) 漸教 Gradual or graded, e.g. the 阿含, 方等, and 般若 sūtras; all the four 化法 are also included under this heading. (c) 祕密教 Esoteric teaching, only understood by special members of the assembly. (d) 不定教 General or indeterminate teaching, from which each hearer would derive benefit according to his interpretation; eight teaching categories

六位

see styles
Mandarin liù wèi / liu4 wei4
Taiwan liu wei
Japanese rokui
The six stages of Bodhisattva development, i. e. 十信位; 十住位; 十廻向位; 十地位; 等覺位; 佛地位; these are from the order Huayan jing.

六卽

see styles
Mandarin liù jí / liu4 ji2
Taiwan liu chi
Japanese rokusoku
The six stages of Bodhisattva developments as defined in the Tiant 'ai 圓教, i. e. Perfect, or Final Teaching, in contrast with the previous, or ordinary six developments of 十信, 十住, 十行, etc., as found in the 別教 Differentiated or Separate school. The Tiantai six are: (1) 理卽 realization that all beings are of Buddha-nature; (2) 名字卽 the apprehension of terms, that those who only hear and believe are in the Buddha. law and potentially Buddha; (3) 觀行卽 advance beyond terminology to meditation, or study and accordant action; it is known as 五品觀行 or 五品弟子位; (4) 相似卽 semblance stage, or approximation to perfection in purity, the 六根淸淨位, i. e. the 十信位; (5) 分證卽 discrimination of truth and its progressive experiential proof, i. e. the 十住, 十行, 十廻向, 十地, and 等覺位 of the 別教 known also as the 聖因 cause or root of holiness. (6) 究竟卽 perfect enlightenment, i. e. the 妙覺位 or 聖果 fruition of holiness. (1) and (2) are known as 外凡 external for, or common to, all. (1) is theoretical; (2) is the first step in practical advance, followed by (3) and (4) styled 内凡 internal for all, and (3), (4), (5), and (6) are known as the 八位 the eight grades; six identicals

六因

see styles
Mandarin liù yīn / liu4 yin1
Taiwan liu yin
Japanese rokuin
The six causations of the 六位 six stages of Bodhisattva development, q. v. Also, the sixfold division of causes of the Vaibhāṣikas (cf. Keith, 177-8); every phenomenon depends upon the union of 因 primary cause and 緣 conditional or environmental cause; and of the 因 there are six kinds: (1) 能作因 karaṇahetu, effective causes of two kinds: 與力因 empowering cause, as the earth empowers plant growth, and 不障因 non-resistant cause, as space does not resist, i. e. active and passive causes; (2) 倶有因 sahabhūhetu, co-operative causes, as the four elements 四大 in nature, not one of which can be omitted; (3) 同類因 sabhāgahetu, causes of the same kind as the effect, good producing good, etc.; (4) 相應因 saṃprayuktahetu, mutual responsive or associated causes, e. g. mind and mental conditions, subject with object; Keith gives 'faith and intelligence'; similar to (2); (5) 遍行因 sarvatragahetu, universal or omnipresent cause, i. e. of illusion, as of false views affecting every act; it resembles (3) but is confined to delusion; (6) 異熟因 vipākahetu, differental fruition, i. e. the effect different from the cause, as the hells are from evil deeds; six kinds of causes

出現


出现

see styles
Mandarin chū xiàn / chu1 xian4
Taiwan ch`u hsien / chu hsien
Japanese shutsugen / しゅつげん
Chinese to appear; to arise; to emerge; to show up
Japanese (noun/participle) appearance; arrival; make one's appearance
To manifest, reveal, be manifested, appear, e. g. as does a Buddha's temporary body, or nirmāṇakāya. Name of Udāyi 優陀夷 a disciple of Buddha to be reborn as Samantaprabhāsa; also of a son of Ajātaśatru; manifestation of a body in this world by a buddha or high-rank bodhisattva

初住

see styles
Mandarin chū zhù / chu1 zhu4
Taiwan ch`u chu / chu chu
Japanese shojū
The first of the ten stages, or resting-places, of the bodhisattva. 住 is the resting-place or stage for a particular course of development; 地 is the position or rank attained by the spiritual characteristics achieved in this place; first abode

初地

see styles
Mandarin chū de / chu1 de
Taiwan ch`u te / chu te
Japanese shoji
The first of the 十地 ten bodhisattva stages to perfect enlightenment and nirvāṇa; first ground

別惑


别惑

see styles
Mandarin bié huò / bie2 huo4
Taiwan pieh huo
Japanese betsuwaku
別見 Delusions arising from differentiation, mistaking the seeming for the real; these delusions according to the 別教 are gradually eradicated by the Bodhisattva during his first stage; specific mental disturbances

利人

see styles
Mandarin lì rén / li4 ren2
Taiwan li jen
Japanese rihito / りひと    toshihito / としひと    kazuto / かずと
Japanese (given name) Rihito; (given name) Toshihito; (given name) Kazuto
To benefit or profit men, idem利他 parahita; the bodhisattva-mind is 自利利他 to improve oneself for the purpose of improving or benefiting others; the Buddha-mind is 利他一心 with single mind to help others, pure altruism; 利生 is the extension of this idea to 衆生 all the living, which of course is not limited to men or this earthly life; 利物 is also used with the same meaning, 物 being the living; to improve the condition of others

利辯


利辩

see styles
Mandarin lì biàn / li4 bian4
Taiwan li pien
Japanese riben
Sharp and keen discrimination, or ratiocination, one of the seven characteristics 七種辯 of the bodhisattva; sharp discernment

勢至


势至

see styles
Mandarin shì zhì / shi4 zhi4
Taiwan shih chih
Japanese seiji / seji / せいじ    seishi / seshi / せいし
Japanese (personal name) Seiji; (place-name, surname) Seishi
He whose wisdom and power reach everywhere, Mahāsthāmaprāpta, i.e. 大勢至 q.v. Great power arrived (at maturity), the bodhisattva on the right of Amitābha, who is the guardian of Buddha-wisdom.; See 大勢至菩薩.

化尼

see styles
Mandarin huà ní / hua4 ni2
Taiwan hua ni
Japanese keni
The power of a Buddha, or bodhisattva, to be transformed into a nun; transform into a nun

化屬


化属

see styles
Mandarin huà shǔ / hua4 shu3
Taiwan hua shu
Japanese kezoku
The converted followers— of a Buddha, or bodhisattva.

化心

see styles
Mandarin huà xīn / hua4 xin1
Taiwan hua hsin
Japanese keshin
The mind in the transformation body of a Buddha or bodhisattva, which apprehends things in their reality; transformed mind

化現


化现

see styles
Mandarin huà xiàn / hua4 xian4
Taiwan hua hsien
Japanese ke gen
Metamorphosis and manifestation; the appearance or forms of a Buddha or bodhisattva for saving creatures may take any form required for that end; provisional manifestation

化生

see styles
Mandarin huà shēng / hua4 sheng1
Taiwan hua sheng
Japanese keshou / kesho / けしょう    kasei / kase / かせい
Japanese (noun/participle) goblin; (n,vs,adj-no) growth; metamorphosis; (surname, given name) Keshou
q. v. means direct 'birth' by metamorphosis. It also means the incarnate avaatara of a deity.; aupapādaka, or aupapāduka. Direct metamorphosis, or birth by transformation, one of the 四生, by which existence in any required form is attained in an instant in full maturity. By this birth bodhisattvas residing in Tuṣita appear on earth. Dhyāni Buddhas and Avalokiteśvara are likewise called 化生. It also means unconditional creation at the beginning of a kalpa. Bhuta 部多 is also used with similar meaning. There are various kinds of 化生, e. g. 佛菩薩化生 the transformation of a Buddha or bodhisattva, in any form at will, without gestation, or intermediary conditions: 極樂化生, birth in the happy land of Amitābha by transformation through the Lotus; 法身化生 the dharmakāya, or spiritual body, born or formed on a disciple's conversion.

化緣


化缘

see styles
Mandarin huà yuán / hua4 yuan2
Taiwan hua yüan
Japanese keen
Chinese (of a monk) to beg
The cause of a Buddha's or bodhisattva's coming to the world, i. e. the transformation of the living; also, a contribution to the needs of the community; transformation of the environment

化色

see styles
Mandarin huà sè / hua4 se4
Taiwan hua se
Japanese keshiki
A Buddha's or bodhisattva's metamorphoses of body, or incarnations at will.

十住

see styles
Mandarin shí zhù / shi2 zhu4
Taiwan shih chu
Japanese jū jū
The ten stages, or periods, in bodhisattva-wisdom, prajñā 般若, are the 十住; the merits or character attained are the 十地 q.v. Two interpretations may be given. In the first of these, the first four stages are likened to entry into the holy womb, the next four to the period of gestation, the ninth to birth, and the tenth to the washing or baptism with the water of wisdom, e.g. the baptism of a Kṣatriya prince. The ten stages are (1) 發心住 the purposive stage, the mind set upon Buddhahood; (2) 治地住 clear understanding and mental control; (3) 修行住 unhampered liberty in every direction; (4) 生貴住 acquiring the Tathāgata nature or seed; (5) 方便具足住 perfect adaptability and resemblance in self-development and development of others; (6) 正心住 the whole mind becoming Buddha-like; (7) 不退住 no retrogression, perfect unity and constant progress; (8) 童眞住 as a Buddha-son now complete; (9) 法王子住 as prince of the law; (10) 灌頂住 baptism as such, e.g. the consecration of kings. Another interpretation of the above is: (1) spiritual resolve, stage of śrota-āpanna; (2) submission to rule, preparation for Sakṛdāgāmin stage; (3) cultivation of virtue, attainment of Sakṛdāgāmin stage; (4) noble birth, preparation for the anāgāmin stage; (5) perfect means, attainment of anāgāmin stage; (6) right mind, preparation for arhatship; (7) no-retrogradation, the attainment of arhatship; (8) immortal youth, pratyekabuddhahood; (9) son of the law-king, the conception of bodhisattvahood; (10) baptism as the summit of attainment, the conception of Buddhahood.

十信

see styles
Mandarin shí xìn / shi2 xin4
Taiwan shih hsin
Japanese jisshin
The ten grades of bodhisattva faith, i.e. the first ten 位 in the fifty-two bodhisattva positions: (1) 信 faith (which destroys illusion and results in); (2) 念 remembrance, or unforgetfulness; (3) 精進 zealous progress; (4) 慧 wisdom; (5) 定 settled firmness in concentration; (6) 不退 non-retrogression; (7) 護法 protection of the Truth; (8) 廻向 reflexive powers, e.g. for reflecting the Truth; (9) 戒 the nirvāṇa mind in 無為 effortlessness; (10) 願 action at will in anything and everywhere; ten stages of faith

十地

see styles
Mandarin shí de / shi2 de
Taiwan shih te
Japanese juuji / juji / じゅうじ
Japanese {Buddh} dasabhumi (forty-first to fiftieth stages in the development of a bodhisattva); (place-name) Juuji
daśabhūmi; v. 十住. The "ten stages" in the fifty-two sections of the development of a bodhisattva into a Buddha. After completing the十四向 he proceeds to the 十地. There are several groups. I. The ten stages common to the Three Vehicles 三乘 are: (1) 乾慧地 dry wisdom stage, i. e. unfertilized by Buddha-truth, worldly wisdom; (2) 性地 the embryo-stage of the nature of Buddha-truth, the 四善根; (3) 八人地 (八忍地), the stage of the eight patient endurances; (4) 見地 of freedom from wrong views; (5) 薄地 of freedom from the first six of the nine delusions in practice; (6) 離欲地 of freedom from the remaining three; (7) 巳辨地 complete discrimination in regard to wrong views and thoughts, the stage of an arhat; (8) 辟支佛地 pratyeka-buddhahood, only the dead ashes of the past left to sift; (9) 菩薩地 bodhisattvahood; (10) 佛地 Buddhahood. v. 智度論 78. II. 大乘菩薩十地 The ten stages of Mahāyāna bodhisattva development are: (1) 歡喜地 Pramuditā, joy at having overcome the former difficulties and now entering on the path to Buddhahood; (2) 離垢地 Vimalā, freedom from all possible defilement, the stage of purity; (3) 發光地 Prabhākarī, stage of further enlightenment; (4) 焰慧地 Arciṣmatī, of glowing wisdom; (5) 極難勝地 Sudurjayā, mastery of utmost or final difficulties; (6) 現前地 Abhimukhī, the open way of wisdom above definitions of impurity and purity; (7) 遠行地 Dūraṁgamā, proceeding afar, getting above ideas of self in order to save others; (8) 不動地 Acalā, attainment of calm unperturbedness; (9) 善慧地 Sādhumatī, of the finest discriminatory wisdom, knowing where and how to save, and possessed of the 十力 ten powers; (10) 法雲地 Dharmamegha, attaining to the fertilizing powers of the law-cloud. Each of the ten stages is connected with each of the ten pāramitās, v. 波. Each of the 四乘 or four vehicles has a division of ten. III. The 聲聞乘十地 ten Śrāvaka stages are: (1) 受三歸地 initiation as a disciple by receiving the three refuges, in the Buddha, Dharma, and Saṅgha; (2) 信地 belief, or the faith-root; (3) 信法地 belief in the four truths; (4) 内凡夫地 ordinary disciples who observe the 五停心觀, etc.; (5) 學信戒 those who pursue the 三學 three studies; (6) 八人忍地 the stage of 見道 seeing the true Way; (7) 須陀洹地 śrota-āpanna, now definitely in the stream and assured of nirvāṇa; (8) 斯陀含地 sakrdāgāmin, only one more rebirth; (9) 阿那含地 anāgāmin, no rebirth; and (10) 阿羅漢地 arhatship. IV. The ten stages of the pratyekabuddha 緣覺乘十地 are (1) perfect asceticism; (2) mastery of the twelve links of causation; (3) of the four noble truths; (4) of the deeper knowledge; (5) of the eightfold noble path; (6) of the three realms 三法界; (7) of the nirvāṇa state; (8) of the six supernatural powers; (9) arrival at the intuitive stage; (10) mastery of the remaining influence of former habits. V. 佛乘十地 The ten stages, or characteristics of a Buddha, are those of the sovereign or perfect attainment of wisdom, exposition, discrimination, māra-subjugation, suppression of evil, the six transcendent faculties, manifestation of all bodhisattva enlightenment, powers of prediction, of adaptability, of powers to reveal the bodhisattva Truth. VI. The Shingon has its own elaborate ten stages, and also a group 十地十心, see 十心; and there are other groups.

十心

see styles
Mandarin shí xīn / shi2 xin1
Taiwan shih hsin
Japanese jisshin
The ten kinds of heart or mind; there are three groups. One is from the 止觀 4, minds ignorant and dark; affected by evil companions; not following the good; doing evil in thought, word, deed; spreading evil abroad; unceasingly wicked; secret sin; open crime; utterly shameless; denying cause and effect (retribution)―all such must remain in the flow 流 of reincarnation. The second group (from the same book) is the 逆流 the mind striving against the stream of perpetual reincarnation; it shows itself in devout faith, shame (for sin), fear (of wrong-doing), repentance and confession, reform, bodhi (i.e. the bodhisattva mind), doing good, maintaining the right law, thinking on all the Buddhas, meditation on the void (or, the unreality of sin). The third is the 眞言 group from the 大日經疏 3; the "seed" heart (i.e. the original good desire), the sprout (under Buddhist religious influence), the bud, leaf, flower, fruit, its serviceableness; the child-heart, the discriminating heart, the heart of settled judgment (or resolve); ten kinds of mind

十行

see styles
Mandarin shí xíng / shi2 xing2
Taiwan shih hsing
Japanese jūgyō
The ten necessary activities in the fifty-two stages of a bodhisattva, following on the 十信and 十住; the two latter indicate personal development 自利. These ten lines of action are for the universal welfare of others 利他. They are: joyful service; beneficial service; never resenting; without limit; never out of order; appearing in any form at will; unimpeded; exalting the pāramitās amongst all beings; perfecting the Buddha-law by complete virtue; manifesting in all things the pure, final, true reality; ten practices

印光

see styles
Mandarin yìn guāng / yin4 guang1
Taiwan yin kuang
Japanese inkō
Illumination from the symbol on a Buddha's or Bodhisattva's breast; halo

受記


受记

see styles
Mandarin shòu jì / shou4 ji4
Taiwan shou chi
Japanese juki / じゅき
Japanese (Buddhist term) vyakarana (assurance of future enlightenment)
受決; 受別 To receive from a Buddha predestination (to become a Buddha); the prophecy of a bodhisattva's future Buddhahood; to receive assurance

咒願


咒愿

see styles
Mandarin zhòu yuàn / zhou4 yuan4
Taiwan chou yüan
Japanese jugan
Vows, prayers, or formulas uttered in behalf of donors, or of the dead; especially at the All Souls Day's offerings to the seven generations of ancestors. Every word and deed of a bodhisattva should be a dhāraṇī; incantation-vow

善薩


善萨

see styles
Mandarin shàn sà / shan4 sa4
Taiwan shan sa
Japanese zensatsu
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

囘向


回向

see styles
Mandarin huí xiàng / hui2 xiang4
Taiwan hui hsiang
Japanese ekō
迴向 pariṇāmanā. To turn towards; to turn something from one person or thing to another; transference of merit); the term is intp. by 轉趣 turn towards; it is used for works of supererogation, or rather, it means the bestowing on another, or others, of merits acquired by oneself, especially the merits acquired by a bodhisattva or Buddha for the salvation of all, e. g. the bestowing of his merits by Amitābha on all the living. There are other kinds, such as the turning of acquired merit to attain further progress in bodhi, or nirvana. 囘事向理 to turn (from) practice to theory; 囘自向他 to turn from oneself to another; 囘因向果 To turn from cause to effect. 囘世而向出世 to turn from this world to what is beyond this world, from the worldly to the unworldly; dedication of merit

四一

see styles
Mandarin sì yī / si4 yi1
Taiwan ssu i
Japanese yoichi / よいち    shiichi / shichi / しいち
Japanese (given name) Yoichi; (personal name) Shiichi
The four 'ones', or the unity contained (according to Tiantai) in the 方便品 of the Lotus Sutra; i. e. 教一 its teaching of one Vehicle; 行一 its sole bodhisattva procedure; 人一 its men all and only as bodhisattvas; 理一 its one ultimate truth of the reality of all existence; four kinds of unity

四土

see styles
Mandarin sì tǔ / si4 tu3
Taiwan ssu t`u / ssu tu
Japanese shido / しど
Japanese {Buddh} four realms (in Tendai Buddhism or Yogacara)
The four Buddha-kṣetra, or realms, of Tiantai: (1) 凡聖居同土 Realms where all classes dwell— men, devas, Buddhas, disciples, non-disciples; it has two divisions, the impure, e. g. this world, and the pure, e. g. the 'Western' pure-land. (2) 方便有餘土 Temporary realms, where the occupants have got rid of the evils of 見思 unenlightened views and thoughts, but still have to be reborn. (3) 實報無障礙土 Realms of permanent reward and freedom, for those who have attained bodhisattva rank. (4) 常寂光土 Realm of eternal rest and light (i. e. wisdom) and of eternal spirit (dharmakāya), the abode of Buddhas; but in reality all the others are included in this, and are only separated for convenience, sake; four lands

四教

see styles
Mandarin sì jiào / si4 jiao4
Taiwan ssu chiao
Japanese shikyō
Four teachings, doctrines, or schools; five groups are given, whose titles are abbreviated to 光天曉苑龍: (1) 光宅四教 The four schools of 法雲 Fayun of the 光宅 Guangzhai monastery are the four vehicles referred to in the burning house parable of the Lotus Sutra, i. e. śrāvaka, pratyekabuddha, bodhisattva, and the final or one vehicle teaching. (2) 天台四教 The Tiantai four are 藏通, 別, and 圓, v. 八教. (3) 曉公四教 The group of 元曉 Wŏnhyo of 海東 Haedong are the 三乘別教 represented by the 四諦緣起經; 三乘通教 represented by the 般若深密教; 一乘分教 represented by the 究網經; and 一乘滿教 represented by the 華嚴經. (4) 苑公四教 The group of 慧苑 Huiyuan: the schools of unbelievers, who are misled and mislead; of śrāvakas and pratyekabuddhas who know only the phenomenal bhūtatathatā; of novitiate bodhisattvas who know only the noumenal bhūtatathatā; and of fully developed bodhisattvas, who know both. (5) 龍樹四教 Nāgārjuna's division of the canon into 有 dealing with existence, or reality, cf. the 四阿含; 空 the Void, cf. 般若經; 亦有亦 空 both, cf. 深密經; and 非有非 空 neither, cf. 中論.

四明

see styles
Mandarin sì míng / si4 ming2
Taiwan ssu ming
Japanese shimei / shime / しめい    shimyou / shimyo / しみょう
Japanese (given name) Shimei; (personal name) Shimyou
Four Shingon emblems, aids to Yoga-possession by a Buddha or bodhisattva; they are 鉤, 索, 鏁, 鈴, a hook, a cord, a lock, and a bell; the hook for summoning, the cord for leading, the lock for firmly holding, and the bell for the resultant joy. Also, the four Veda śāstras; four emblems

地上

see styles
Mandarin dì shàng / di4 shang4
Taiwan ti shang
Japanese chijou / chijo / ちじょう
Chinese on the ground; on the floor
Japanese (noun - becomes adjective with の) (1) above ground; surface; (2) earth; world; (surname) Chiue
on the ground; above the ground; used for 初地以上 the stages above the initial stage of a Bodhisattva's development; the rank of the bodhisattva grounds and above

地分

see styles
Mandarin dì fēn / di4 fen1
Taiwan ti fen
Japanese chiwake / ちわけ
Japanese (surname) Chiwake
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

12345678>

This page contains 100 results for "bodhisattva" in Chinese and/or Japanese.



Information about this dictionary:

Apparently, we were the first ones who were crazy enough to think that western people might want a combined Chinese, Japanese, and Buddhist dictionary.

A lot of westerners can't tell the difference between Chinese and Japanese - and there is a reason for that. Chinese characters and even whole words were borrowed by Japan from the Chinese language in the 5th century. Much of the time, if a word or character is used in both languages, it will have the same or a similar meaning. However, this is not always true. Language evolves, and meanings independently change in each language.

Example: The Chinese character 湯 for soup (hot water) has come to mean bath (hot water) in Japanese. They have the same root meaning of "hot water", but a 湯屋 sign on a bathhouse in Japan would lead a Chinese person to think it was a "soup house" or a place to get a bowl of soup. See this: Soup or Bath

This dictionary uses the EDICT and CC-CEDICT dictionary files.
EDICT data is the property of the Electronic Dictionary Research and Development Group, and is used in conformance with the Group's license.

Chinese Buddhist terms come from Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist Terms by William Edward Soothill and Lewis Hodous. This is commonly referred to as "Soothill's'". It was first published in 1937 (and is now off copyright so we can use it here). Some of these definitions may be misleading, incomplete, or dated, but 95% of it is good information. Every professor who teaches Buddhism or Eastern Religion has a copy of this on their bookshelf. We incorporated these 16,850 entries into our dictionary database ourselves (it was lot of work).



Combined, these cover 355,969 Japanese, Chinese, and Buddhist characters, words, idioms, and short phrases.

Just because a word appears here does not mean it is appropriate for a tattoo, your business name, etc. Please consult a professional before doing anything stupid with this data.

We do offer Chinese and Japanese Tattoo Services. We'll also be happy to help you translate something for other purposes.

No warranty as to the correctness, potential vulgarity, or clarity is expressed or implied. We did not write any of these definitions (though we occasionally act as a contributor/editor to the CC-CEDICT project). You are using this dictionary for free, and you get what you pay for.

The following titles are just to help people who are searching for an Asian dictionary to find this page.

Japanese Kanji Dictionary

Free Asian Dictionary

Chinese Kanji Dictionary

Chinese Words Dictionary

Chinese Language Dictionary

Japanese Chinese Dictionary